Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife Review

A huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

Due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery expert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree brand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife.

Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife
Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife

Boker Plus:

When Boker explains this line of knives, they say, “In close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security we develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA and Asia.”

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Kansei Matsuno. His bio says, “Kansei was born in 1951 in Japan. He loves fishing and tourism, that’s why, he always needed good hunting knifes. He found very few knifes, which meet his requirements, he decided to make knifes himself. He used difficult technology: using a file to shape the steel billet. He made knives in this way for two years and then bought a simple belt-sander, and in 1992 – the machine BurrKing. Needless to say that productivity and work quality has improved markedly. Kansei enjoyed using instrument, which he made himself, and which was even better, than knifes from stores. Soon, his friends began to ask him to design and built knives for them. Then, in 1998, Kansei started manufacturing knifes only.

In 2001 Kansei visited American knife exhibition for the first time, and in 2002, the quality of his knifes improved and he was admitted for a probationary period in the American Guild of manufacturers of knives. Today, Kansei prefer to create frameworks folding knives made of titanium, stainless steel blades are VG-10b, OU-31, CV-134. Lining the handle makes it out of steel G-10, deer antler, pearl and coral. He changes the design of knife depending on customer requirements. Now, Kansei is manufacturing a series of first-class folding knives with different original designs and high quality.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. This is a tough steel that is relatively corrosion resistant. It is also a martensitic steel that maintains a good edge. For a long while, this was the steel that was most wanted. However, now that super steels and higher end steels are coming out, not as many people are after 440C steel. It does still give people almost everything they want out of a steel. This steel is often compared to 154CM, although it is the inferior steel. The microstructure of 440C is not as fine and uniform as 154CM, which means that the edge is not going to maintain itself as well, you are not going to get as fine of an edge, and it may result in some chipping. That being said, it is easier to work with than 154CM, so it is favored in that manner.

The blade has been finished satin, which is a very common blade finish in today’s knife age. The finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive. The finish showcases the bevels of the blade as well as the fine lines of the steel. The finish gives the blade a very traditional look as well as cuts down on glares, reflections, and even increases the corrosion resistance of the knife.

The blade has been carved into a drop point style blade. This is one of the two most popular blade shapes that you can find. The shape is created with a spine that curves slowly from the handle to the tip of the blade. This creates a dropped point, which is where the knife got its name from. The dropped point allows you to have more control over the knife, which makes fine detail work easier to manage. The point is also broad, which is where the knife gets so much of its strength from. The drop point shape also has a large belly, which makes slicing a breeze—perfect for this traditional EDC knife. The only major drawback that the drop point shape has is because its tip is so broad, you do lose out on most of your piercing or stabbing capabilities. You need to remember that you exchanged these for the strength that you get in return. If you are looking for a knife that is going to pierce well, you should be looking for a clip point blade.

The blade on this knife is a plain edge, which is better suited for taking on a wider variety of tasks. It will give you cleaner cuts. The knife is going to be easier to sharpen as well. Plus, the plain edge is going to excel at push cuts, skinning, and slicing.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of G-10. This is a material that has been made out of fiberglass. It is very similar in properties to carbon fiber, except that it is slightly inferior. Because it is inferior, you can get this material for almost a fraction of the cost, which does keep the overall cost of the knife down. To create this material, the manufacturer is going to take layers of fiberglass cloth, soak them in resin, then compress them and bake them under pressure. This process creates a material that is tough, hard, strong, and even lightweight—perfect for this large knife. Tactical folders and even fixed blades benefit from this material because it is durable, lightweight, and non-porous. The overall pros to a G-10 handle is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons to a G-10 handle is that it is going to be brittle because all of the strands are arranged in a single direction. The other con is that some people feel like it is not as aesthetically pleasing and feel like it lacks elegance.

The G-10 on this handle is black. The handle is completely straight, on both the spine and the belly. The ergonomics are not going to be the most comfortable, but it will serve its purpose. The butt of the handle is slightly rounded and does have a lanyard hole carved into it. If you put a lanyard in it, you can easily wrap the lanyard around the handle if you are ever in dire need of a little extra grip, since this does not offer high amounts of grip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is an advantage for the look of the knife because it does not have holes carved into each end and side of the handle. It is also an advantage because tip down carry is the safer way to carry a knife, because you don’t risk getting your fingers cut if it accidentally opens in your pocket. This is especially important for this knife that is non-locking. However, it is a disadvantage because it is not going to be comfortable for everyone to carry in their own way.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fully manual knife that has been equipped with a flipper. It is a non-locking knife which means that there is no locking mechanism to keep it super secure when you are using it or securely closed when you are not. This just means that you are not going to want to use this knife for heavier duty tasks because it will probably close in on itself. Because it is a fully manual knife, it is going to be legal in more areas than an automatic knife would. This is because it does not fall under the strict set of laws that an automatic knife does. However, it is not going to be as efficient to use. This knife is going to be easier to maintain than a fully automatic knife, because there is not a spring that you need to worry about keeping in pristine condition. That being said, there are still small pieces inside the handle that you need to keep up on. And, you will need to keep up on the hinge maintenance as well.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4 inches long. The overall length of the knife measures in at 7 inches long. This knife is a lightweight knife, measuring in at only 1.7 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Designer Kansei Matsuno blends classic Japanese style elements with modern gentlemen’s aesthetics in the new Wasabi flipper. Built in 3 different configurations, the Wasabi comes complete with a non-locking slip joint mechanism that houses a decent ball for the blade to remain open but not locked and the ball bearings translates into ultra-fluid action. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features black G-10 handle scales, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade Knife Review

A huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

Due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery expert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the treebrand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of Bohler N690 Stainless Steel. This steel is similar to 440C steel and has a carbon content that is around 1.07%. This steel is a high end stainless steel with an alloy that is common in many good knives. This is a durable knife steel that is wear resistant while also being a hard steel. The most common steel that N690 steel is compared to is 440C, because it is also a high-chromium stainless steel. The steel is going to be easy to re-sharpen and it offers a good value.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is the most common blade finish that you are going to find on the market today. It is also the most traditional blade finish that you are going to find on the market today. The finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive, which is normally a sandpaper. As a key, the finer the sandpaper or other abrasive, and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish is going to look. Because it is a Boker knife, the finish is going to look incredibly clean. The satin finish does a few other things as well: it decreases the amount of glares and reflections that the knife is going to give off and it increases the corrosion resistance of this steel slightly.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point style blade. The drop point style blade is one of the two most common blade shapes on the market. This is because it is both versatile as well as tough. The shape is created with a spine that extends from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curve. This creates a lowered point, which is going to give you the ability to perform fine detail work with. The point is the key characteristic of the drop point knife, but not just because it is dropped. It is also because it is broad, which is where the drop point knife gets the strength that it is known for. The drop point blade shape is able to withstand more than the clip point because of how tough the point is. This blade shape also has a very large belly that is going to make slicing a breeze. The drop point blade shape does have one major disadvantage: because the point is so broad, you do lose out on much of your piercing and stabbing capabilities. This is the opposite of the clip point, which is ideal for piercing, but not ideal for strength.


The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Canvas Micarta. Micarta is a popular type of a phenolic, which is a substance made with the organic compound Phenol, a type of resin. This material is created with tin layers of canvas that are soaked in a phenolic resin. This creates a product that is lightweight, strong, and looks a little nicer than G-10. This material was actually originally introduced as an electrical insulator but was found to be a great option for knife handles.

That being said, Micarta does not have any surface texture. It requires a lot of hand labor to produce and then carve some sort of texture into the knife. The more manual labor a material requires, the more expensive it is going to be. This means that Micarta is definitely going to raise the cost of the knife. Some people worry that because the manufacturer carves the texture into the knife that the material is going to be easily scratched. That is not an issue. Micarta is incredibly hard and not easy to scratch, which is why it does cost so much to put the texture in it. The overall pros of this knife material are that it is tough, light, and durable. The overall cons to this knife material is that it is expensive and it is brittle, just like G-10.

The handle is very simple for a fixed blade. There are finger guards on each side of the handle. They are not the largest finger guards that you are going to find, but they will do the trick. The spine is pretty straight, but does bulge out slightly. Towards the end of the handle, it curves towards the butt, which is pretty pointed. The belly of the hadnle has a bulge in the middle, which is going to the user a more comfortable grip on the knife. On the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole, which allows you to have this knife with you throughout more situations. You can wear it around your neck or even tie it onto a pack of some sort.


The Mechanism:

This is a full tang fixed blade.

A full tang knife is a type of knife that has the metal from the handle extend clear through the handle to the butt. This is definitely the tougher of the fixed blades, because there are no weak spots where the handle and the blade have been welded together. Not only that, but if the handle scales happen to break, you still have the entire blade shape to use. This is an ideal option for a tactical knife, where you are going to need the strength. It is also an ideal option for a survival or outdoors knife where you are heavily relying on your knife. You will be able to take on harder tasks with this than you would be able to if it were not a full tang knife.

A fixed blade knife is a type of knife that lacks a mechanism. You do not fold the blade into the handle. It is one continuous knife. Fixed blades have a few advantages. For starters, they are the superior tactical and survival tool. They are superior in tactical situations because you can bring it into play much quicker than you would be able to bring a folding knife into play. All you have to do is pull the knife out of the sheath and then it is ready to go. With a folding knife, you would have to remove it from your pocket, open it, and then you would be ready to go. It is a superior survival tool because you can do more with it than just slice. Because it is a full tang, you can dig, split wood, use it for food preparation, use it for first aid, or almost anything you want. The fixed blade is also going to be easier to maintain and clean.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that this knife comes with is made out of leather. Leather is the most traditional material that you are going to find for a knife sheath. This material is very rugged, tough, and strong. This knife is not going to break like the modern material such as plastic would. If the stitches happen to come undone, they can easily be re-sewn. A leather sheath not only feels good, it looks good. Plus, if you take care of this knife sheath, it is only going to look better as it ages. There’s even more though, the leather sheath is very versatile and will actually provide your knife with a custom fit once it is broken in. The leather is also going to be silent, which means that you can easily pull the knife out and put it back in without making a single sound.

Of course, it is going to have its disadvantages. Leather is not waterproof. If you happen to get it wet a lot, it will dry out the oils and the leather will crack. On the flip end of the spectrum, if you expose this sheath to high heat, the oils will dry out and the sheath will crack. That being said, both of those cracking issues can be prevented if you oil it occasionally.

 

Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade
Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.8 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.6 inches long. The overall length of the knife measures in at 8.4 inches long. The knife itself weighs in at 4.6 ounces. The sheath that it comes with weighs in at 2 ounces. This knife was made in Germany.

 

Conclusion:

             The Cub is another Lucas Burnley designed fixed blade that has quickly gained praise from consumers on a global scale thanks to its clean versatile design and ergonomic profile. With a sturdy full tang design, each product is also complimented with Micarta handles that allow them to get wet without losing traction. The Boker Classic line of knives are manufactured in the City of Blades Solingen, Germany and have been since 1869–ranking as a global innovation leader for more than 145 years. This model features green canvas Micarta handle scales, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the brown leather sheath supports a belt carry option. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife Review

Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife
Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife

A huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

Due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery expert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

Heinrich considered the chestnut tree as an ideal, memorable logo which belonged to the Remscheid company with an arrow as well. One of the rare and precious documents which survived the total destruction of WW II is an ad of Böker Remscheid from 1874, showing both logos.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the treebrand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today, we will be discussing the Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife.

 

Boker Plus:

When Boker explains this line of their knives they say, “In close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security we develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA and Asia.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. This is a tough and relatively corrosion resistant martensitic stainless steel that maintains a good edge. For many years, this was the peak of cutlery steel, but now there are super steels on the block. However, even today, it does make a great option for a blade steel that fits for most people’s requirements. This steel is similar to 154CM, although it is slightly inferior in corrosion resistance, wear resistance, hardness, and even edge holding. Also the microstructure of 440C is not as fine and uniform as 154 CM, which results in the steel not taking as fine of an edge and it can lead to some chipping on the blade as well. 440C belongs to the family of stainless steels that include 440A and 440B, the major differences being the variance in carbon content between the three.

The blade on this knife has been polished into a mirror finish. A mirror polish is done by hand, polishing the metal into a highly reflective surface. It gives the knife a fantastic look and does offer better corrosion resistance because of how smooth the blade is. However, this finish does require a lot of maintenance to keep its look, which makes it not a great option for tactical, survival, or any other heavy duty type of chores. Also, the amount of work that needs to be put into this blade to get it to a mirror polish does result in an expensive blade. This finish is mainly used for a presentation finish. It can be quickly scratched if you are choosing to use this blade.

The blade has been carved into a spear point blade shape. This is a symmetrically pointed blade that has a point that is in line with the center of the blade’s long axis. To create this uniform shape, both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the center of the blade. This knife has been known to be similar to the needle point blade because it is good for piercing. However, unlike the needle point blade, the spear point has a point that is strong and sharp enough for piercing. While the needle point has a very sharp but weak point that is known for snapping when used against harder targets. The spear point blade also features a lowered point, which is easily controllable and great for fine tip work. One of the other great features about the spear point blade is that they do contain a small belly that can be used for some cutting and slicing. If you were to compare the spear point belly with that of a drop point or a clip point though, it would look incredibly small. The spear point blade is known to be a hybrid design, great for somebody who wants a good balance between all of the traits.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of titanium liners with G-10 handle scales.

Titanium is a lightweight metal that is going to give the knife high corrosion resistance. Because it is a little tougher than your typical metal, it is going to be more expensive to machine, which does raise the cost of this knife. Titanium is a very sturdy metal while also having a springiness to it, which is why it makes a great liner material.

G-10 is made out of fiberglass that has been soaked in resin and then compressed together. It has also been baked under pressure, which creates a very tough, hard, strong material that is still incredibly lightweight. Although it is such a tough material, it does tend to be brittle. This is because all of the fiberglass strands are arranged in a single direction. This creates a material that is incredibly strong in that particular direction but will begin to break apart or crack if it is stressed in any of the other directions. Because the two handle materials are so lightweight, the overall weight of the knife is definitely going to be low. Texture can be easily added to the handle, which does create a very solid and comfortable grip. The overall pros to the G-10 is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons are that it is brittle and some people feel like it lacks elegance.

The titanium liners on this knife have been anodized blue, which show through the G-10 handle scales that are black. This creates a magical looking handle because the blue does shine through. The G-10 has been skeletonized with four holes of varying sizes carved out of the middle of the handle scale. The spine and the belly of the knife have the same symmetry that the blade does. Each side does have a finger guard that is a piece of the blade metal. Then each side curves in as a finger groove. This groove is both comfortable and will give you a solid grip on the knife. The middle of the handle does bulge out. Near the butt of the hadnle (which is pointed) there is a row of thick jimping that will give you even more control when you are using this knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a disadvantage because tip up carry is the more dangerous way to carry a knife. And because the hadnle has only been drilled for the traditional side of the handle, it is not going to be as ambidextrous.

 

The Mechanism:

             This knife has been equipped with a flipper as well as a liner lock.

The flipper is a small triangular piece of metal that is part of the blade. When the knife is closed, it extends out of the spine of the handle. The user can use this to pull back on, which will flip the knife out of the handle and lock it into place. The liner lock is a little more complicated to get the hang of than the thumb stud, but it is safer to use and does not protrude off the blade and get in the way.

Liner locks are one of the more common mechanism seen on folding knives. The mechanism’s key characteristic is a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the sharp edge of the blade, which lines the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, that tension will slip the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, allowing it to rest firmly in place. This tension will also prevent it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to use your thumb or other finger to push the spring bar down so that it clears contact. Then, you can push the blade into the hadnle and lock it into place. The liner lock allows a knife to have two true sides, which is perfect for this symmetrical blade. You can also close the knife with one hand without switching grip, which is perfect for those two-handed jobs. However, this is not the sturdiest locking system, which means you shouldn’t be doing your toughest jobs with this knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.4 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.4 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.8 inches long. This knife is a very lightweight knife, weighing in at only 2.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Picador is a liner lock designed flipper that combines tactical elements of the flipper with the refined elements of a 3-D machined pocket clip and blued titanium liners. Every Picador boasts a bearing-mounted blade that is deployed with the triangular spine flipper and the nature of the handle scales really help reduce the overall weight. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features skeletonized black G-10 handle, blue anodized titanium liners, a spear point blade in a mirror polished finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife.

Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife
Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife

Boker Magnum:

When Boker explains Magnum by Boker, they say, “The attractive brand from Boker with a great price-performance ratio. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives from all categories, from traditional pocket knives, to hunting knives and modern knives. Latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Doorkicker is made out of 440A stainless steel. This steel is in the 440 family which includes A, B, and C. Compared to B and C, A does have a lower carbon content, which is going to make the steel a little bit softer. This is not always a disadvantage because the softer the steel, the easier it is going to be to sharpen or work with the blade. 440A is extremely stain resistant, which will help cut down on maintenance time. The biggest advantage about this steel is that it is a budget steel and keeps the overall cost of the Doorkicker down considerably. That being said, 440A stainless steel does not have high wear resistance. It will probably have enough wear resistance for an EDC or ever some camping and outdoor tasks. However, this knife is not going to make a good survival knife because of the steel chosen.

The blade has been coated black. The coating is going to increase the wear resistance, which is a very important quality on this steel that is lacking the wear resistance already. It is also going to increase the corrosion resistance because it does create a barrier between the steel and the elements. Overall, the coating is going to prolong the life of the blade. However, all coatings do scratch off after time or heavy use. Once the coating has been scratched off, it does not provide the same benefits and can actually be worse for the blade than a non-coated blade. This is because the areas that are scratched off can create drag and unwanted friction.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. This is one of the two most popular blade shapes on the market today. It is a good all-purpose blade that is going to excel at piercing. The blade shape is similar to the drop point, but does differ slightly. The spine of the knife extends from the handle to about halfway up the knife. At this point, the spine turns own and continues to the point of the knife. This area looks as if it has been clipped off the knife and is referred to as the clip, which is where the knife shape got its name from. Because of the clip, the point is lowered, which is why this knife is so easily controllable. Also because of the clip, the blade is sharper and thinner at the spine, which is why this knife is going to excel at stabbing. However, this tip shape is also one of the shape’s biggest disadvantages. Because it is so narrow, it does have a tendency to break or chip when being used on harder targets. The clip point blade shape is so versatile because it does feature a very large belly area that will make slicing a piece of cake.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Doorkicker is made out of polymer. A polymer is a synthetic material that is either a plastic or a resin. Either way, this is a modern material that is going to be durable, but still lightweight. The handle is not completely prone to breaking and can suffer from being brittle, but it will get the job done while also keeping the cost of the Doorkicker down. The handle has been finished black, which creates an all-black knife.

The handle has a unique shape. In the middle of the handle, there are three rounded indents that run down the length of the handle. This will give you more texture and grip when you are using the knife. The spine of the knife is pretty straight, but does have a few rows of jimping-like grooves that are going to give you more texture when you use the knife. The belly of the handle has a finger guard that is enhanced by the flipper when the knife is opened. It then has a rectangular finger groove. This groove has jimping inside of it. The handle then bulges out before curving in toward the butt that does flare out slightly. This handle is going to be comfortable to use for long periods of item and give you the necessary grip for your EDC tasks.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife has been statically designed for tip down carry and only on the traditional side of the handle. The fact that it can only be attached for tip down carry is both an advantage and a disadvantage. This is an advantage because tip down carry is the safer way to carry a knife. This is because if the blade accidentally gets deployed while it is in your pocket, you can still safely reach into your pocket and remove the knife without a blade point waiting to greet you. It is a disadvantage because it will not allow each individual to carry this knife in the way that is most comfortable for them. This pocket clip can also only be attached on the traditional side of the handle. This is a disadvantage because of the same reason: every user is not going to be able to carry this knife in the direction that is most comfortable for them. However, from an aesthetics side, it does look nicer to not have drilled holes all over your knife.

The pocket clip is a deep gray that matches the blade and the handle. The pocket clip is attached by three metallic grey screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The clip is slightly skeletonized to cut down on weight, which is needed on this knife. The pocket clip also tapers triangularly towards the end of the clip.

This is a deep carry pocket clip which means that this knife is going to rest lower in your pocket than an average pocket clip. This accomplishes two things. First, it makes it easier to conceal your knife in your pocket. And second, it keeps the knife more secure inside your pocket so that you can move around more freely without worrying about your knife falling out.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a flipper knife that has been equipped with both a spine flipper as well as a dual thumb stud. The Doorkicker is also equipped with a liner locking mechanism.

The flipper is an opening mechanism that is easy to use once you get the hang of it. At first though, it is going to be the harder of the two opening mechanisms to use. It is a small triangular protrusion that extends off the blade. When the knife is closed, it extends out of the spine of the handle. The user can hold the knife with their hand while using their finger to pull back on the flipper and flip the knife open where it will lock into place. Once the knife is opened, the flipper does act as an enhancement to the finger guard. The flipper is the safer of the two mechanisms to use because when you are opening the knife, it does not put your fingers in the path of the blade like the thumb stud would. The flipper is ambidextrous by design, which is a major advantage.

A dual thumb stud is a thumb stud that extends out on both sides of the blade. This makes it ambidextrous. The thumb stud is probably the most common of opening features on folding knives. It is easy to get the hang of and easy to use. It is a small barrel that sits near the end of the blade where the handle begins. The user holds the knife with one hand and uses their thumb to push on the thumb stud which will flip the knife open. The thumb stud is easy to use, even with just one hand. However, when you are opening the knife, the thumb stud is going to put your hand in the pathway of the blade. There have been plenty of accounts of someone trying to open their knife with a thumb stud and cutting themselves instead. No matter which opening mechanism you choose to use, the knife is going to open smoothly and efficiently.

The Doorkicker has a liner locking mechanism. The liner lock is one of the more common opening mechanisms that you are going to find on folding knives in today’s cutlery industry. The key characteristic of a liner lock is that it has a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the sharpened edge of the blade, which will line the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, that spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, that same spring bar tension slips the bar inward, which puts it in the path of the butt of the blade, which will keep it locked in place. Liner locks are great because they do allow the knife to have two true sides, which does help this knife become more ambidextrous (too bad the pocket clip is not ambidextrous friendly.) While the liner lock is a great mechanism, it is not going to be a great mechanism if you want to do heavier duty tasks. This is because the liner lock is not as durable as other locking mechanisms.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.8 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 8.3 inches long. This knife weighs in at 6.6 ounces, which is definitely a heavier knife. This is partly due to how long the knife is; there is just going to be extra weight with the extra length. But it is also partly due to the fact that it has a stainless steel blade, which is going to add considerable weight to the knife.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Doorkicker breaks down the notion that all tactically inspired knives need to cost a fortune. Each liner locked designed models sports an all-black tactical profile complete with plenty of ergonomic contouring and each stainless steel blade can be deployed with the use of the spine flipper function or the dual thumb stud design. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features a black soft polymer handle, stainless steel liners, a clip point style blade in a black finish and the extra-long pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

Gerber Empower Auto Knife Review

Gerber Empower Auto Knife
Gerber Empower Auto Knife

When Joseph R. Gerber described his young knife company, Gerber Legendary Blades, as the, “birth of an enterprise that grew into big business,” it was true, but it was an understatement for sure. What had started out in 1939 as a small batch of handmade cutlery sets given as holiday gifts had turned into thousands of retail accounts around the country. By 1960, Gerber had quickly become one of the most trusted, appreciated and collected names in knives.

Over 70 years since its founding and Gerber continues to grow. Still grounded in the same principles that first guided Joseph R. Gerber’s “enterprise,” Gerber is a company dedicated to making knives and tools that combine high quality materials and innovative designs that will stand up to a lifetime of use. The sleek, stainless steel sheath knives of the ’50s and ’60s (the Magnum Hunter) have given birth to today’s lightweight, open-frame clip folders (the Remix). Gerber is, however, no longer just a knife company. Multi-tools, axes, handsaws, machetes, headlamps, flashlights, survival kits, digging implements – these are the newest directions that Gerber explores with the same standards of quality and design that inform their revered knife making

Gerber says, “Like the men and women who carry our gear, Gerber is Unstoppable. Decades of innovation and dedication have put us here. Renowned as a master of knives and tools, Gerber’s problem-solving, life-saving products are designed with the unique needs of specific activities in mind. Today that includes much more than a blade.

All Gerber products are designed and engineered in Portland, OR where many are produced. We also tap our global supply chain to create a wide range of activity specific gear for wide variety of consumers. And no matter what, every product that bears the Gerber name is backed by our famous lifetime warranty.

Quality, reliability, innovation. For over 70 years this is what our customers have expected from us. And whether our products are used to save time, save the day, or save a life, Gerber always delivers.”

Today we will be discussing the Gerber Empower automatic knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V stainless steel. This stainless steel is a premium steel that is designed and manufactured by Crucible Industries, which is based in the United States of America. This steel is known for having high edge retention as well as being able to resist rust with ease. This steel was actually specifically designed for premium pocket knives as well as kitchen cutlery, which means that you are going to get all of the best qualities for a knife that you could ask for. To design it for these purposes, Crucible added in vanadium carbides to the steel alloy, which is what brings out the extreme hardness without letting it get too brittle. In fact, this steel is known for having one of the best balances between hardness, edge retention, and toughness. This is a complicated balance to achieve because the harder the steel, the less tough that it is. Crucible really hit it right on the head with this one. Really S30V steel only has one drawback—bookcase of its harness, it is tricky to work with or sharpen. You won’t need a master sharpener to do it by any means, but a beginner sharpener probably isn’t the best option for getting the best edge.

This Gerber blade has been finished with a Stonewashed finish. This finish is rugged and gives a well-worn look to the blade. The biggest advantage to a stonewashed blade is actually how well it preserves the original look of the blade over time. To create this finish, the blade steel is tumbled with small abrasive material, which are most commonly ceramic pebbles. When the blade is done being tumbled, it is removed and smoothed out, then polished. The look is textured and works to hide scratches and smudges exceptionally well.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a spear point blade shape. The spear point blade shape is considered a hybrid shape because it combines many of the best attributes from different blade shapes. However, it is most similar to the dagger style blade because it is great for piercing. The spear point is created symmetrically, because both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that is exactly in the middle of the knife. Although it is very similar to the dagger style blade, it does have its differences. For example, the dagger style blade has a sharper point, but because it is finer, it is also weaker. The spear point has a less fine point, but because of that, it is stronger and won’t be as prone to breaking when used on harder targets. The spear point blade shape also has a lowered tip, which is going to help you have better control over the knife as well as being able to perform fine tip work. Spear points also differ from the dagger style blade because it does have a small belly that can be used for some cutting or slicing. If you were to compare the belly with that on a drop point or even that on a clip point, it would look incredibly small. But, it will get the job done. Like I said, this blade shape is often considered a hybrid blade shape. This is because it gives both piercing and slicing capabilities, it has the sharpness of a dagger style blade, but more of the strength that you would find on a drop point blade. This blade shape is really going to get the job done, almost no matter what the job actually is.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 aluminum that has been anodized black. It also has a two-toned black and white textured inlay for a little added grip.

Aluminum is a great material for a knife handle because it is a low-density metal. This means that while you will feel like you have the heft that you need to take on most tasks (and you do) you will not feel weighed down by the knife. This is ideal for the Empower knife because it is a larger knife, but won’t feel as if it is a larger knife. The most common aluminum alloy is the 6061-T6 alloy, which just means that the type of aluminum is 6061 and it has been T6 tempered. This aluminum alloy does have one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys. While aluminum does have an older brother, Titanium, which is known to be the superior metal, aluminum is lighter and easer to work with. This means that when the manufacturer is making a complex automatic knife such as this one, using aluminum instead of titanium is going to keep the cost of the knife down considerably.

The handle has been anodized, which is an electrolytic process that increases the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of the aluminum. Anodizing is not only going to add the sleek black color, but will also increase the resistance to corrosions and wear. Because it is anodized, the knife handle does have a longer life expectancy.

The handle really does have a simple shape. The neck of the handle does go inward and then the spine bulges out to fit comfortably in your hand. The butt is a rounded square with nothing too fancy, but it does have a lanyard hole carved into it. The belly of the handle has a slight finger guard and a deep, but elongated finger groove. This Gerber knife is going to fit comfortably in your hand, even if you need to use it for long periods of time. Since aluminum is not known for its high texture, Gerber has added an inlay that will give you plenty of texture for a solid grip when you are using this knife. The inlay is made out of Gerber’s Armored Grip, which is “electroformed handle scales that provide a quick, confident grip and a striking aesthetic designed to empower those who carry it.” Overall, the blade and the handle create a rugged, yet elegant look.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife can only be attached on the traditional side of the handle. This means that the knife is not going to be fully ambidextrous. However, the pocket clip is reversible for either tip up or tip down carry. This helps the Empower knife be more comfortable for a wider variety of people. The clip is not a deep carry clip, which is also a drawback as it will not be as concealed or as secure inside of your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife that has been equipped with a safety slide as well as a plunge lock. Because this is an automatic knife, you should be aware that automatic knives do fall under a set of strict laws in the United States of America. This style of knife is not legal in every city or state. You need to know your local knife laws before purchasing this knife because BladeOps is not the responsible party. Automatic knives are often known as switchblades. This is a type of knife that has a folding blade that is contained in the handle. The knife is opened automatically when a button on the handle is pushed. A fun fact is that switchblade knives have actually dated back to the mid-18th century. The first examples that are known right now were constructed in Europe. However, they have had a tumultuous history which is why they do have such a strict set of laws surrounding them.

The plunge lock is also known as a button lock, which is often found on automatic knives. The plunge lock is going to use a spring-loaded plunger to hold the knife open. When you press the button, it will line up a notch in the plunger and allow the blade to pivot open. Some of the pros to the plunge lock is that it is very strong and durable, it is also going to be easy to use, it is fast and effective, and it does not put your fingers in the blade’s path, which makes it a safer option. Some of the overall cons to the plunge lock is that it is a difficult and expensive mechanism to manufacture which is going to increase the overall cost of the knife and it is not an ambidextrous mechanism.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long with a handle that measures in at 5.16 inches long. When the knife is opened, the overall length of it measures in at 8.41 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.6 ounces. As a key, anything under 5 ounces is going to make for a pretty good everyday carry knife, which means this just makes it. This knife was made in the United States of America, so you can feel patriotic when you use it.

 

Conclusion:

             The Empower side-open automatic series joins the ranks with Gerber’s other American-made autos–showcasing a fresh new look that blends a tactical feel and user-friendly styling. Based upon the Gerber Propel, the Empower will be offered in 4 different variations while still offering an integrated slide safety as well as an over-sized firing button. Along with the new name premiers the new Armor Grip™ handle scales, in 2 unique patterns with some even being photo-chemically etched, which provide an ideal balance of control and grip security. This model sports a black anodized aircraft-grade aluminum handle complete with a two-toned black and white textured inlay, a spear point style blade in a stonewash finish and the reversible pocket clip is designed for the traditional side of the handle only but is eligible for a tip up or tip down carry. You can pick up the Gerber Empower today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

Boker Plus Kihon Tanto Stainless Steel Flipper Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

A fun fact about Boker is that they were one of the first companies that offered ceramic knives as a featured product line.

 

Boker Plus:

             When Boker is describing their Boker Plus line, they say, “In close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security we develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA and Asia.”

 

The Designer:

             This knife is designed by Lucas Burnley. Lucas’ formative years were spent traveling North America with his family where he was raised on a steady diet of adventure in the campgrounds of National Parks and under the tutelage of some of the best action movies of our time. Lucas views knives as a personal expression of independence, self-reliance, and fun—ideas and philosophies he began formulating as a, bowie-toting 7-year-old. He designs in a style that he considers to be Post-Tactical™, blending clean modern lines with tactical origins. Above all, he believes that utility shouldn’t come at the cost of beauty. Along with his custom line and BNRLY Brand (limited production), Lucas works closely with companies Böker and CRKT to continue making his designs available to a wider audience.

 

The Blade:

             The blade on this knife is made out of D2 Tool Steel. This is a high end tool steel that is often referred to as a semi-stainless steel. This is because it falls just short of the required amount of chromium, which is 13%, to qualify as a full stainless knife. However, it does still provide a good amount of resistance to corrosion. However, in the semi-stainless steel category, D2 is one of the hardest ones, especially when compared to the popular 154CM or ATS-34 steels. This means that it is going to hold its edge a little better than the other semi-stainless steels. However, it is not as tough as many other steels and it is also extremely hard to sharpen. You will need to be a master-sharpener, or will need to find a master-sharpener to get a fine enough edge on this steel, and thus, this blade.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is one of the most popular blade finishes in the cutlery industry to date. The finish creates a classic look, which Boker is known to love. Not only that, but the finish also showcases the fine lines in the steels as well as showcasing the bevels of the blade. The satin finish can also increase the blade’s corrosion resistance slightly, although not enough to really account for much. The finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive. The fine abrasive that is most commonly used is a fine sandpaper. The finer the sandpaper and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish is going to look. Because it is a Boker knife, and Boker is known for tradition, the finish is going to be very clean.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a tanto style blade. The tanto blade shape is not designed as an all-purpose blade, but rather a blade that is going to do one thing and do that one thing incredibly well. This blade shape was originally known and designed to pierce through armor, but was redesigned and popularized by Cold Steel in the 80s. This shape is still similar in style to the Japanese long and short swords that it was based off of. The tanto knife has a high point with a flat grind, which leads to an extremely strong point. This point is going to excel at stabbing into hard materials. This is because the point does contain a lot of excess metal near the tip, so it is able to absorb the impact form repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to break. Something else that is unique about this blade shape is that the front edge of the knife meets the spine at an angle, rather than your typical curve. This means that the blade is not going to have a belly, because it has been sacrificed for a stronger tip. That being said, because it does not have a belly for slicing, you aren’t going to want to use this knife as an EDC or a general utility knife. But, if you are ever in a situation where you need to pierce through hard materials, this knife is going to be your guy.

 

The Handle:

             The handle on this knife is made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel is going to provide high durability for a knife while also being incredibly resistant to corrosion. The biggest disadvantage of a stainless steel knife is that it is not very lightweight and will significantly increase the weight of this knife. Plus, stainless steel handles are sleek. While this sleekness does look good, it also causes the knife to be pretty slippery, so manufacturers have to incorporate etchings to give the user the needed friction. This extra work is also going to increase the cost of the knife. Because it is such a heavy material, stainless steel liners should be avoided in an EDC knife or even a heavy duty knife, because of the added weight. The overall pros to a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. The overall cons to a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be heavy and it can be slippery.

The knife handle is unique, which the spine of the knife being almost completely straight. This is similar to the belly, which is also incredibly straight. Both the spine and the belly do taper out towards the butt of the handle. Because it gets wider at the bottom, you are going to have a solid grip on the knife. While the other ergonomics are not the highest quality for a secure grip, the tapering of the hadnle really does do wonders. There is a finger indent that will also help with comfort as well as adding a little more grip. Underneath the finger indent is a thick row of jimping, that will give you even more control over the knife when you are using it to slice. The butt of the handle is angled with a point. The butt of the hadnle also has an oblong lanyard hole carved into it. This lanyard hole is ideal for when you want your knife close by but want it out of the way. The lanyard will also give you a little extra grip if you need it. All you have to do is wrap the lanyard around the handle before you grip it. It creates a thick ridge as well as giving you some texture so that you feel like you cannot slip. The manufacturer has carved some ray shapes into the handle, which will provide you with some grip, although not as much as you would find on many other knives.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is an advantage and a drawback. It is an advantage because it does look classy to not have the hadnle full of drilled holes. However, it is a disadvantage because tip up carry is definitely the more dangerous way to carry a knife. If it happens to come open in your pocket and you reach into your pocket, you can slice your hand. There have been plenty cases of people doing this, which is why many people prefer to carry it tip down. Also, because it can only be attached on the traditional side of the handle, it is not as ambidextrous or comfortable for a wide audience.

Boker Plus Kihon Tanto Stainless Steel Flipper Knife
Boker Plus Kihon Tanto Stainless Steel Flipper Knife


The Mechanism:

This is a flipper knife that has been equipped with both a dual thumb stud as well as a flipper. It has been finished off with a Japanese-inspired frame lock.

The dual thumb stud is the same as a regular thumb stud in all ways, except that it extends out of both sides. This means that it is going to be ambidextrous and give the blade to sides, instead of one front. The dual thumb stud is also going to be easy to use, easy to get the hang of, and can be used with only one hand comfortably.

The flipper is a piece of metal that extends off of the blade in a rectangular shape. The user pulls back on this to flip the knife open and lock it into place. It is a little harder to get the hang of than a thumb stud but is ambidextrous by design. When the knife is opened, the flipper does act as a finger guard.

The frame lock is really just the beefed up version of the liner lock. This is very similar to the liner lock, except that instead of an internal spring bar moving into place, it’s part of the hadnle itself. Frame locks are going to be stronger than liner locks, because the piece of metal that slips into place is usually thicker and more durable than that in a liner lock. But, because of their similarity, closing a frame lock is going to be the same as a closing a liner lock—you push down on the spring bar so that it no longer blocks the butt of the blade, remove your fingers from the path, then fold the knife closed. The frame lock is known for being ideal for heavy-duty tasks. This style of locking mechanism is seen more in mid to upper range knives.


The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.8 inches long. This is a heftier knife, partly because it is larger, and partly because of the heavy materials used. It weighs in at 5.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Plus Kihon is a Lucas Burnley designed flipper that is one of many new knives released by Boker this year. Burnley, who is the godfather behind the popular Kwaiken series, created another Japanese-inspired frame lock design that also features a Rick Hinderer designed lock stop that assists in limiting the travel of the frame lock actuator. Furthermore, the stainless steel blade is rapidly deployed with either the dual thumb studs or the spine flipper function thanks to the ball bearing pivot. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features stainless steel handles, a tanto style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

Gerber Harsey Air Ranger Knife Review

Gerber says, “Like the men and women who carry our gear, Gerber is Unstoppable. Decades of innovation and dedication have put us here. Renowned as a master of knives and tools, Gerber’s problem-solving, life-saving products are designed with the unique needs of specific activities in mind. Today that includes much more than a blade.

Founded in 1939 and based in Portland, Oregon, USA, Gerber is an American brand whose products have global reach and relevance. Carried extensively by hunters, soldiers and tradesmen, Gerber’s heritage runs deep. And we are now looking toward the future, where tomorrow’s problems will be solved by the next generation of innovations.

All Gerber products are designed and engineered in Portland, OR where many are produced. We also tap our global supply chain to create a wide range of activity specific gear for wide variety of consumers. And no matter what, every product that bears the Gerber name is backed by our famous lifetime warranty.

Quality, reliability, innovation. For over 70 years this is what our customers have expected from us. And whether our products are used to save time, save the day, or save a life, Gerber always delivers.”

When Joseph R. Gerber described his young knife company, Gerber Legendary Blades, as the, “birth of an enterprise that grew into big business,” it was true, but it was an understatement for sure. What had started out in 1939 as a small batch of handmade cutlery sets given as holiday gifts had turned into thousands of retail accounts around the country. By 1960, Gerber had quickly become one of the most trusted, appreciated and collected names in knives.

Over 70 years since its founding and Gerber continues to grow. Still grounded in the same principles that first guided Joseph R. Gerber’s “enterprise,” Gerber is a company dedicated to making knives and tools that combine high quality materials and innovative designs that will stand up to a lifetime of use. The sleek, stainless steel sheath knives of the ’50s and ’60s (the Magnum Hunter) have given birth to today’s lightweight, open-frame clip folders (the Remix). Gerber is, however, no longer just a knife company. Multi-tools, axes, handsaws, machetes, headlamps, flashlights, survival kits, digging implements – these are the newest directions that Gerber explores with the same standards of quality and design that inform their revered knife making.
Today we will be discussing the Gerber Harsey Air Ranger knife.

 

The Designer:

             The man behind this knife is Bill Harsey, who is an American knife maker and designer who works with several knife companies, including Gerber Legendary Blades, Lone Wolf Knives, Spartan Blades, Ruger/CRKT, Fantoni, and Chris Reeve Knives. Harsey is a custom knife maker, designing and crafting one-of-a-kind folding and fixed blade knives, often to order. In Battle Blades, author Greg Walker identifies Harsey as producing superb edges and blade finishes on his knives, as well as making knives specifically for Al Mar and Colonel Rex Applegate. Even so, he is best known for his collaboration projects.

 

Gerber Harsey Air Ranger Knife
Gerber Harsey Air Ranger Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife has been finished with a black coating. The coating is going to work to prolong the life of the blade because it does increase the wear resistance as well as the corrosion resistance of this knife. This is because it creates a barrier between the blade steel and the environment and everything has to go through the coating before it can reach the steel. When the black oxide coat is applied evenly, it helps you have smoother cuts because it cuts down on any drag or friction that the steel may have had in the first place. However, the black oxide coating is not the highest quality coating and will scratch off after either heavy use or over time. Once the coating has scratched off, you no longer have any of the life-prolonging benefits. But you also are going to have much more drag because the scratches will create texture on the blade.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. The clip point blade shape is one of the two most popular blade shapes on the market. This is because it is versatile and it is going to excel at piercing. The blade shape is made up of a spine that runs straight from the handle to about halfway up the knife. At this point, it is going to turn and continue to the point in a straight angle, which does create a dropped point. This section makes the knife look as if it has had a portion of the blade clipped off of it and is referred to as the clip, which is where this blade shape got its name. Because it does have a lowered point, you are going to be able to perform fine tip work with this knife. And because the tip is controllable and both sharper and thinner at the spine, this blade shape is going to excel at stabbing. This is because these characteristics help create less drag which leads to faster insertion as well as faster withdrawal. Not only is the Air Ranger going to excel at piercing, it is very versatile because of the large belly. The larger the belly, the easier it is to slice. Clip points are prone to having their tips snap because they are thinner. To prevent this, try to avoid stabbing your blade into a harder target.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of black G10. Gerber says, “Establishing the Air Ranger as distinct from similar folders is its innovative handle. The ultra-tactile G-10 offers you steady purchase while deploying the blade. Its one-hand opening releases with a thumb using the dual thumb studs positioned near the hilt, and the liner lock keeps the blade open safely during use. Make dexterous use of this sturdy knife in all conditions.”

G10 is known for being hard, tough, strong, but still lightweight. This material is created when the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth, soaks them in resin, then compresses them. Lastly, the material is baked under pressure. Unfortunately, because all of the fibers are arranged in a single direction, it creates a material that is very strong in that direction but not super strong in any other direction. This is why the material does suffer from being brittle. G10 helps the Air Ranger go from a good tactical knife to a great tactical knife because G10 is durable, lightweight, and non-porous, which means that it won’t absorb any fluids it happens to come in contact with. This creates a low-maintenance knife handle.

The handle is simply shaped with ergonomics that will give you a solid, yet comfortable hold. There are some areas of jimping to give more texture. This knife does have a lanyard hole.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a tip down clip. This is the safer way to carry a knife, so it is not too big of a drawback that you cannot carry the knife tip-up as well. The pocket clip is wide, which helps to make it very sturdy. It is black, which matches the blade and the handle and creates an all-black knife. The clip is kept in place by three small black screws which match the rest of the hardware on the knife. The clip is wide at the top but quickly tapers, where it remains the same width for 2/3rds of the clip. In the middle, Gerber has stamped their name in silver, which pops.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that has been equipped with both a thumb stud as well as a liner locking mechanism. The thumb stud is probably the most common one handed opening feature for folding knives in today’s world. The stud sits on the butt of the blade near where the handle begins. When the knife is closed, the stud extends out of the spine of the handle, where your thumb can get a solid grip on it and swing the knife opened. This is a dual thumb stud, which means that it extends out of both sides of the blade. This creates an ambidextrous knife opening mechanism, which is always preferred. The thumb stud is easy to get the hang of and you can open the knife with only one hand, which is perfect for when you need both hands on the job. However, there are some complaints when it comes to a thumb stud. For starters, some people don’t like how the stud extends out of the blade. This is because when the knife is opened, it does not get out of the way, like a flipper does. It still sits on top of the blade, extending outward. Some people feel as if the thumb stud gets in the way when they are trying to use the knife. The other major drawback to a thumb stud is that it does put your fingers in the path of the blade when you are trying to open the knife. This means that it is not the safest opening mechanism that you will be able to find on the market.

The liner locking mechanism is one of the most common locking mechanism that you are going to find on a folding knife. The main characteristic of the liner lock is a spring bar that is on the same side as the sharpened edge of the blade. This spring bar lines the inside of the handle. When you close the knife, the spring bar is actually held under tension, but when the knife is fully opened, the tension will slip the bar inward, putting it in contact with the butt of the blade. This keeps it securely in place and will prevent the knife from closing on you when you are in the middle of using it. If you want to close your knife, you use your thumb to push down the spring bar so that it is no longer touching the butt of the blade. Then, you can push the blade back into the handle. Liner locks are popular because they create a knife that has two true handle sides, helping make it even more ambidextrous. You can also close the knife with just one hand. However, liner locks are not the most durable or the sturdiest knife locking mechanisms, so if you are wanting to perform some heavy duty tasks, you might not want to use the Harsey Air Ranger.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.30 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.20 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.3 ounces. The Air Ranger weighs in at 2.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Gerber classic Air Ranger, designed by Bill Harsey, comes roaring back with an ultra-tactical G10 handle that delivers a superior grip on this iconic knife. With an elegant fine edge clip point blade, the black oxide coat gives you a low profile and highly corrosion resistant tool. Easy to open with dual thumb studs. Sturdy tip down pocket clip for easy carry.

When Gerber describes this knife, they say, “Gerber’s classic Air Ranger, designed by acclaimed knife maker Bill Harsey, gets an assist with a new G-10 handle to deliver the superior grip expected of this iconic knife. Possessing an elegant fine edge drop point blade, the folder packs a serious punch. The Air Ranger Black G-10 folding knife is a great, logical daily carry for addressing trouble efficiently. Deploy the Air Ranger G-10 to open tape on the latest Internet delivery, cut cardboard to help with a child’s school project, or cut the tow rope when boating. Resilient black oxide coating on the blade and all hardware gives you a low-profile, highly corrosion-resistant knife when you need it. The well-attached pocket clip reliably keeps it tethered to a pocket or belt loop. The lanyard hole provides optional tie-down and additional security for the sturdy knife.”

You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

Boker Magnum Green Hope Folder Knife Review

The sign of Boker is a huge chestnut tree. This is the chestnut tree that towered above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century. It is also the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently, Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

The next step in their history was when Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree brand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Magnum Green Hope folding knife.

Boker Magnum Green Hope Folder Knife
Boker Magnum Green Hope Folder Knife

The Blade:

             The blade on this knife is made out of 440A stainless steel. This steel is considered to be one of the workhorses of the Sports and Tactical Knife industry. Also, the majority of entry level knives use this steel or other steels such as 420HC and AUS-6 steel. 440 steel is a medium carbon, martensitic stainless steel that is actually very corrosion resistant as well as being extremely tough. This steel is not considered to be a premium knife steel, but it is still going to demonstrate some good properties for cutting. This steel is going to take a razor fine edge. This steel is in the 440 series of steel, but it is more corrosion resistant and tougher than both 440B and 440C steel. 440A steel is not usually going to be used for custom knives, because there are better steels on the market.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is the most common blade finish in the cutlery industry to date. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with a fine sandpaper. The finish creates a very traditional look, which was why it was chosen for this gentleman’s folder. The satin finish is also used to showcase the bevels of the blade while also showing off the fine lines of the steel. This finish can cut down on some glares and reflections. The satin finish is going to increase the corrosion resistance levels of the blade somewhat, although not significant enough to not have to worry about maintenance.

The blade has been carved into a drop point style blade, which is also the most popular blade shape that you are going to find on the market. This shape is both extremely versatile as well as being extremely tough, which is why it is perfect for an EDC knife. The blade has a spine that slowly curves from the handle to the point, which creates a dropped point. This is where the blade shape gets its name from. Not only is the tip the defining feature of this knife’s shape, it also is what makes the knife so tough. The tip is broad, which means that it is going to be able to withstand tougher tasks without breaking. The excess metal near the tip is going to allow the knife to take what you give it. Because the tip is dropped, you are going to have more control over it, allowing you to perform fine detail work with this knife. The knife also has a large belly that is ideal for slicing. As a key, the larger the belly, the easier it is to slice. The large belly is going to excel at push cuts, skinning, and slicing. The drop point blade does have one major drawback though—because the tip is so broad, you do lose out on many of your stabbing capabilities. You should remember that by sacrificing those capabilities, you keep the extreme strength that the knife is known for.

 

The Handle:

             The handle is made out of stainless steel liners and G-10 handles. The stainless steel is going to provide the knife with high durability while remaining very resistant to corrosion. Unfortunately, the stainless steel is not a lightweight material and is where this knife is going to get most of its high weight from. The stainless steel is very strong though and will allow you to take on some of those heavier tasks.

G-10 is a type of laminate composite that has been made out of fiberglass. This material is very similar to carbon fiber, except that it can be made at a fraction of a cost. Because it is so much less expensive; you can expect to sacrifice a little bit of the quality. To create this material, the manufacturer is going to take layers of fiberglass cloth, soak them in resin, then compress them and bake them under pressure. The resulting material is going to be tough, hard, lightweight, and strong. One of the reasons that this material is loved is because the manufacturer can create colors other than your typical neutrals, which gives the knife a look that you wouldn’t normally find. Tactical folder and fixed blades also benefit from G-10 because it is durable, lightweight, and does not absorb liquids. The overall pros of this knife hadnle material is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons to this knife hadnle is that it is going to be brittle and some people do feel like it lacks class or elegance.

The G10 that is on this knife is green. The shape of this knife is made up of a straight spine and a mostly straight belly. There is a very small finger groove, just enough to give you a little bit of grip or texture. Near the butt of the handle on the belly is a row of jimping, which will give you a little more control, wince the ergonomics on this traditional knife aren’t all there. The butt of the handle does have a lanyard hole carved into a small corner of the liner where the G-10 handle scales don’t reach.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip that is on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a drawback because it is not going to be comfortable for each person to use how they want to. However, it does keep the traditional look of the knife alive, which was Boker’s purpose with it. This clip is also not a deep carry clip, which is a drawback because it is not going to stay as secure or as concealed in your pocket as a deep carry clip would.

 

The Mechanism:

             This is a fully manual knife that has been equipped with a thumb stud and a liner lock.

Because it is a fully manual knife, you can expect it to be legal in more areas than a spring assisted knife would be and many more areas than an automatic knife would be. It does not fall under the strict laws of the automatic knife. However, it also does not open as smoothly or as efficiently as an automatic knife or a spring assisted knife would. You win some, you lose some.

The thumb stud is one of the most common opening mechanism that you are going to come across in today’s knife world. It is a small barrel that rests near the back of the blade. The thumb stud gives you a place to set your thumb on while you push on it, which will swing the knife open and lock it into place. The thumb stud allows people to easily open the knife, even with only one hand. It is also easy to get the hang of, which is one of the reasons that it is so popular. The biggest complaint is that the stud can get in the way once the knife is opened.

The liner lock is one of the most common locks that you are going to find on modern folding knives. It is such a popular option because it is easy to sue, easy to assemble or fix, while also staying low on cost. This is definitely not the fanciest lock that you are going to come across, but it is going to get the job done for sure. The lock is made out of the liners, hence the knife. One of the liners is going to be cut out and bent which creates a spring effect, which will engage the back of the blade tang when the blade is opened. Liner locks have been around for a while, but Michael Walker, a custom knife maker made two upgrades that have made them incredibly popular. The first upgrade was a stop pin that anchors to the scales to precisely align the blade when open. The second upgrade was to add a detent ball on the liner lock to hold the blade closed, which also gives you a more aggressive opening action.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.7 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.9 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 8.6 inches long. This knife is a heftier knife, weighing in at 5.7 ounces. Usually, the heaviest knife that you would want with you at all times would weigh in at a maximum of 5 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

             The Hope is an over-built manual folder that should absolutely be taken seriously. Complete with thick liners and circular stand-offs, each frame liner lock designed manual folder sports dual thumb studs for effortless blade deployment and the thumb ramp helps you excel at the finer tasks. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features green G-10 handles atop stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

Kershaw 3-Piece Set Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some products coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they back each of their knives for the life of tis original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Kershaw was founded din 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw says, “if this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw 3-Piece Set, which includes a spring assisted knife, a multi-function tool, and a K-Tool.

Kershaw 3-Piece Set
Kershaw 3-Piece Set

The Spring Assisted Knife:

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 4Cr13MoV steel. This is a budget line of Japanese steel. The biggest advantage that this steel can boast is that it is inexpensive. On the other hand, you do get what you pay for, so while this knife will get the job done, it won’t do much else. It is not going to maintain an edge for very long, but it will be very easy to sharpen. This steel is also going to be more prone to rusting and corrosion, so Kershaw has coated the blade to combat that. This steel is going to be just enough of everything, tough enough, durable enough, corrosion resistant enough, but you will have to put in a good amount of maintenance time.

The blade has been coated with a black-oxide coating. To put this coating on, a chemical bath converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. Some of the biggest benefits of a coating is that it does add a layer in between the blade steel and the environment, which helps with the corrosion resistance. With this blade, the coating will add enough corrosion resistance to the steel to boost it to regular levels, although you will still want to be careful with any moisture around the steel. The coating is also a sleek, matte black, which cuts down on all glares and reflections, whilst adding an elegant look to the blade.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape, which is the most popular blade shape in the cutlery industry today. This is an all-purpose blade shape that can really stand up to almost anything. This blade shape is most commonly found on hunting knives, although it is commonly found on many other styles of knives, such as regular folding knives, and even Swiss army knives. To form the blade’s shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point is what adds more control and strength to the tip. Because of the tip strength, drop point blades are a popular option on tactical and survival knives. The broad tip that adds all the strength to the blade is also the drop point blades only disadvantage. Because of how broad it is, you do lose out on most of the blade’s piercing capabilities. This blade shape is often compared to a clip point blade that also has a lowered tip, but has a finer tip designed for piercing. Because the tip on the drop point blade is lowered, it is much more easily controlled. This means that you are able to perform fine detail work with this blade. One of the other reasons that this is such an all-purpose knife is because of the large belly that it sports. The belly is the slicing edge, and the bigger the belly, the more capable you are with slicing tasks, which will probably be the main style of task that you will be performing.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this spring assisted knife is made out of stainless steel and also features a black-oxide coating. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but it is pretty heavy. Stainless steel handles are also known for being slippery, which means that the manufacturer will need to incorporate some form of ridges or etching. To help with the texture on this particular knife, Kershaw has added diagonal ridges across the face of the handle.

The advantages of having a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. But, it is a heavier material and it can be slippery.

Just like with the blade, the black oxide coating does increase the stainless steels corrosion resistance abilities. This makes the knife an all-black sleek look. Plus, because of the extra corrosion resistance, the maintenance for this handle is reduced.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is black, as is all the hardware on this knife. The clip can only be attached for tip up carry on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is held in place by two screws and has “Kershaw” stamped across the middle.

 

The Mechanisms:

This is a spring assisted knife that utilizes a flipper mechanism and locks with a frame lock.

An assisted opening knife, which is often referred to as a spring-assisted knife, is a knife that spring open only after the blade is slightly pushed open with force. This is not like a switchblade, because nothing holds down the assisted opening knife when it’s in the closed position. As the user begins opening up the blade with the flipper, which does have some resistance, the spring or torsion bar attaches the knife and propels it open where it locks into place.

A flipper is a shark’s fin shaped protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper is there to enable fast and easy one-handed opening as well as being fully ambidextrous. One of the other major advantages to a flipper is that it keeps your fingers out of the way during the entire opening process, which a thumb stud does not. This protects your fingers from accidentally getting sliced during the opening process.

To open this knife, hold the knife handle vertically in one hand and place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper, which will open the knife quickly and easily and lock the blade into place. Keep your fingers away from the blade edge when you are closing the knife.

This knife features a frame lock, which is when the knife handle, or its “frame”, consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.75 inches long.

 

The Multi-Tool:

The multi tool measures in at an overall length of 4.0 inches long. This knife is made out of 3Cr13MoV steel, also with a black oxide coating. Just like the knife in this set, the steel is more of a bargain steel than anything else. The steel is going to be soft which isn’t as big of a deal with a multi-tool, like it is a big deal with a knife.

The black-oxide coating is ideal for this tool because it prolongs the life of it. This tool shouldn’t be encountering too many humid environments, so you shouldn’t have to worry about corrosion like you would the knife. However, if it does encounter a wet environment, make sure that you dry it off completely and oil it every once in a while, to avoid the rusting that would be bound to happen.

This multi-tool encompasses four different tools in one. The first is that it is a screwdriver, then a bottle opener, then a hex wrench, then a cord or seat belt cutter. The seat belt cutter is at the tip of the knife. This is a sharp piece of metal that will come in handy in any emergency situation. You will be able to slice a seat belt in a car wreck, or cut twine in an emergency situation. The screwdriver will be able to help you from day-to-day. The hex wrench has a couple of sizes that you can choose from, and again, this will be a good tool to have on you at all times, because it is small enough not to get in the way, but tough enough to work as a great tool. The bottle opener is on the bottom of this multi-tool, where a circular hole has been cut out of the tool.

This is the perfect tool to have with you at all times. While it only has four purposes, the four purposes that it does have are exceptional.

 

The K-Tool:

The K-tool is a tool that is completely unique to Kershaw. This tool is made out of 3Cr13 steel, which is a value priced high chromium stainless steel. Like the rest of the set, this stool has been coated in a black-oxide coating, which is perfect for prolonging the life of this tool. The tool has been carved into the Kershaw “K” shape.

This tool measures in at 2 inches long and functions as a bottle opener. This is the better tool to have on hand if you know that you won’t be needing a screwdriver, hex wrench, or cord cutter, but will be opening a lot of bottles.

 

Conclusion:

This limited edition Kershaw 3-Piece Set boasts a black oxide finished Spring assist knife as well as a multi-function tool and a K-tool. With this set, you can be prepared for almost any situation. Pick up this bargain set today at BladeOps.

 

 

Benchmade Mini-Reflex II Automatic Knife Family Review

The Benchmade Knife Company is a knife manufacturer run by Roberta and Les de Asis in Oregon City, Oregon. Its products are geared toward many niche markets, such as outdoor sporting cutlery, rescue, law enforcement, martial arts, and military. The company has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers since its inception.

Benchmade started in California in 1979 as Bali-Song, changing its name in 1988 to the Pacific Cutlery Corporation. In 1990 the company moved to Clackamas, Oregon. In 1996, the company moved to a 144,000 square foot facility in Oregon City, Oregon. Benchmade became known primarily as a manufacturer of butterfly, or balisong-style knives, which it continues to manufacture. These knives have been so identified with the company that Benchmade has registered “Bali-Song” as a trademark and logo. Benchmade’s original Bali-Song design by Jody Samson was awarded Blade Magazine’s Knife of the Year Award in 1979.

In 1996, Benchmade moved to Oregon City. Apart from some Red Class products, which were produced in their “off shore facilities,” Benchmade has produced more than 90% of its knives in Oregon City, and has succeeded in bringing others back to home production. Since 2010, all red Class production knives have been discontinued, and as such, every Benchmade labeled knife is made in the United States.

Benchmade receives a significant amount of revenue from selling restricted-sales knives to the military and law enforcement. Benchmade produces a diverse selection of “auto” or switchblade knives, along with a range of hunting, fishing, utility, and miscellaneous knives, however balisong’s remain a core product.

Benchmade has three different classes when it comes to their knives. The first class is the Blue Class, also known as the Recreation class. This type of Benchmade knife is made for typical use by the everyday person. The next class is the Black Class, also known as the Professional class. This type of Benchmade knife is made for military, law enforcement, and public safety workers. They are knives made for more challenging work. The last class is the Gold class, also known as the Collector class. This class of Benchmade knife is made for collectors and are limited edition.

Benchmade has a patent on the locking mechanism used in most of the switchblades they produce. Benchmade additionally holds an exclusive license on use of the McHenry/Williams “AXIS Lock,” which is a strong, spring operated locking mechanism that is used in both automatic and manual action models.

Today we will be talking about the Benchmade Mini Reflex II Automatic knife family. This family features many different options that you can choose from, so you can get the blade that is most comfortable for you and what you are going to be using your new Benchmade knife for.

 

The Blade:

The blades on any of these knives are made out of 154CM steel. This is a high end steel that is relatively hard. This stele is considered an upgraded version of 440C through the addition of Molybdenum, which helps achieve superior edge holding compared to 440C while retaining similar excellent levels of corrosion resistance despite having less Chromium. It has decent toughness good enough for most uses and holds an edge well. This steel is not too difficult to sharpen when you have the right equipment.

There are a couple of finishes that you can choose from with this family of knives. The first option is a satin finished blade. To create this finish, the blade is sanded in one direction with increasing degrees of a fine abrasive, which is usually sandpaper. A satin finish shows the bevels of the blade, showcases the lines of the knife, while also reducing its reflective glare. The finer the abrasive and the more even the lines, the cleaner the satin finish blade looks.

The second option for blade finish that you have is a black coated finish. A coating finish reduces the reflection and glare while also reducing wear and corrosion. However, ALL coatings can and will be scratched off after continuous heavy use, and at that point the blade would have to be recoated. Coatings do work to prolong the life of a blade by preventing corrosion or rust.

All of the versions of this knife also feature a drop point blade shape. This is an all-purpose knife that can really stand up to almost anything. This is also one of the two most popular blade shapes that is in use today. It will be easiest to find this blade shape on a hunting knife, although it is used on many other types of knives as well, from your small EDC knives to larger Swiss army knives. To form this blade shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use that drop point blades are also popular on tactical and survival knives. One of the main reasons that the drop point blade is so popular on hunting knives is because the blade is easily controllable. This lowered, controllable point makes it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. Drop point knives also feature a large belly area that is perfect for slicing. There is one main disadvantage to the drop point blade and that is its relatively broad tip, which makes it less suitable for piercing than the clip point. However, the broad tip provides point strength that is not found on clip point knives.

With this family of knives, you can also choose between a plain edge and a combo edge blade. The plain edge is going to give you cleaner cuts than the combo edge.  The plain edge is also more suited to take on a wider variety of tasks, especially those tasks involving push cuts. However, the serrated edge is designed to give you the best of both worlds. The combo edge has the upper 2/3 plain edge and the lower 1/3 serrated. With this, you are able to do fine detail work with the upper portion, as well as getting the cleaner slices. And with the serrated portion, you are able to saw through thicker materials. Some people feel like the combo edge really does give them the best of both worlds, while another group feels like both portions are too small to really work with. It’s all personal preference, just be aware of the pros and cons of each before making your decision.

 

Benchmade Mini-Reflex II Automatic Knife Family
Benchmade Mini-Reflex II Automatic Knife Family

The Handle:

The handle on this family of knives is made out of 6061-T6 aluminum. Aluminum is a very low-density metal that is often used in knife making. This metal is very corrosion resistant. Since it is such a soft metal, it is primarily used in knife handles and sometimes hard anodized for aesthetics and wear resistance. A fun fact is that aluminum is also the most abundant metal in the earth’s crust. This knife is made out of the aluminum alloy 6061-T6, which means the type of aluminum is 6061 and it is T6 tempered. 6061-T6 aluminum has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys. This aluminum is also used extensively in aircraft, and is often referred to as aircraft aluminum, although that is nothing more than a selling ploy. Aluminum alloy is cheaper to machine and produce than titanium, and is lighter, weaker, and less resistant to wear. For the most part, Aluminum is an inferior metal to Titanium aside from its lightness. However, when producing complex knives that require a large amount of CNC machining, such as the case with automatic knives, aluminum is much cheaper to produce and the material costs less.

The handle has been anodized black. Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of aluminum. The process is called anodizing because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit. Anodizing increase resistance to corrosion and wear, and provides better adhesion for paint than bare metal does. Anodic films can also be sued for a number of cosmetic effects. Aluminum alloys are anodized to increase corrosion resistance and to alloy coloring. Although anodizing increases the durability and corrosion resistance of the aluminum, it does not increase the strength. The anodized aluminum layer is grown by passing a direct current through an electrolytic solution, with the aluminum object serving as the anode. The current releases hydrogen at the cathode and oxygen at the surface of the aluminum anode, creating a building up of aluminum oxide. This process is usually performed in an acid solution.

The handle on the Mini Reflex II has a deep finger groove, which also creates a thick finger guard to keep your fingers safe. After the deep finger groove, the handle has a slight belly that will make your grip on it slightly more comfortable. The butt of the handle is angled and it does sport a lanyard hole, which is the perfect addition that allows you to keep your knife close by without it being in the way.

Across the face of the handle, there are a couple of grooves carved in. These are to provide you with a more secure grip, because aluminum can be slippery.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is made out of the same aluminum that the handle is and is designed for tip up carry only. On all versions of the knife, the clip is black, matching the handle and is held in place by three small black screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

The Benchmade Mini-Reflex II is an automatic knife, or switchblade. Automatic knives have strict laws surrounding them and are not legal in all states, cities, or areas. Make sure that you know your local knife laws before purchasing and carrying this Benchmade knife. You are responsible for any consequences, not BladeOps.

An automatic knife is a style of knife that has a folding blade contained in the handle which is opened automatically by a spring when a button on the handle is activated. This Benchmade family of knives features an enlarged firing button. This knife also features an integrated safety on the spine near the location of the firing button.

Because it is an automatic knife, it is going to open more smoothly and quicker than if it were a regular manual folding knife.

 

The Specs:

The blades on all versions in this family of knives measure in at 3.17 inches long. The handle on these knives measures in at 4.18 inches long. When the Mini-Reflex II is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.35 inches long. These knives weigh in at 2.6 ounces. These knives are made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

The best-selling original Benchmade 2550 Mini-Reflex automatic knife was slightly modified in 2016–producing the new and improved Benchmade Mini-Reflex II auto knife. With increased reliability and improved access to the enlarged firing button, this true utilitarian tool certainly doesn’t sacrifice function for form. This Benchmade black class model features a drop point blade style in either a satin or black coated finish or black anodized 6061-T6 handle scales with an integrated safety on the spine near the location of the firing button. This classic automatic knife aims to please with its American-made 154CM stainless steel and the handle offers a slim profile and ergonomic grip. The pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only. Come pick your perfect combination of finishes and edges to get the perfect EDC knife. Pick up one of five options today at BladeOps.