Boker Plus Tactical Kwaiken Knife Review

Kwaiken History

Anciently, Japanese women and men of the samurai class once carried the kwaiken blade. Primarily used for self-defense in indoor spaces, the kwaiken had an advantage over the long blade katana and intermediate sword wakizashi in smaller spaces. Women carried them in their kimono, either in a pocket-like space (futokoro) or in the sleeve pouch (tamoto), for self-defense purposes.

Today, the modern kwaiken also serves as a great self-defense tool for men and women everywhere. Its slim profile, and durable design are perfect in this realm.

 

Boker Plus Tactical Kwaiken
Boker Plus Tactical Kwaiken

Specs

As a smaller version of the katana or even the wakizashi, the Boker Kwaiken is still an impressive knife. Below is a list of all the specifications you need to know before getting a modern twist on an ancient classic.

  • Product Type: Flipper
  • Locking Mechanism: Liner Lock
  • Overall Length: 8.38″
  • Weight: 4.45 oz.
  • Handle Length: 4.88”
  • Blade Length: 3.50″
  • Blade Thickness: 0.130″
  • Blade Steel: VG-10
  • Blade Edge: Plain
  • Blade Style: Straight Back
  • Blade Finish: Black
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Handle Color: Black
  • Sheath Included: No
  • Pocket Clip: Tip-Up

 

Even though this blade has been around for many generations, it is best to cover the basics of the knife and the new modernized additions to the Kwaiken.

 

Burnley Design

Burnley Knives was founded in 2003 by Lucas Burnley in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Their mission is to “create custom knives with a superlative level of design and function utilizing ever evolving techniques and materials.” Much of Burnley’s inspiration comes from spending time with his father, time out among Mother Nature, and action packed survival stories and films. Over the years, he has experimented with a range of styles to combine classical knife designs with modern materials and techniques.

 

Flipper

The Boker Kwaiken opens with a “flipper.” The flipper is that part of the blade that protrudes near the knife spine when the blade is closed. One advantage to having a flipper is when the blade is opened, it acts as an additional finger support when gripping the handle. It also, depending on the size, can serve as an extra way to protect your fingers when cutting. When proficiently skilled, a user can open a flipper knife in the blink of an eye. As the user pulls back on the flipper blade protrusion, the ball bearings rotate so that the blade glides out of the handle then locks into place, ready for use. Without the use of a spring or torsion bar to assist the blade out of the handle, the IKBS opening system is a manual opening system that provides a smooth, easy blade opening.

 

IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System

One of the new twists to the Boker Kwaiken is the IKBS System. The Ikoma Korth Bearing System (IKBS) is a ball bearing pivot system for folding knives. The IKBS gives an exceptionally fast and smooth opening and closing action without much friction. The pivot requires very little maintenance and has a long service life. It works is by using uncaged ball bearings at the pivot which are held in grooves machined into the folder frame and blade. The IKBS was originally designed to fit in balisong knives, but because of its versatility it can be used in most kinds of folding knives (mainly liner locks and frame locks).
The IKBS system is highly favorable because of its simplicity.
An ordinary bearing is designed to rotate at high-speed for a long period of time and usually with some load applied on it. This required additional hardware such as bearing races and cages. With a simple flipper knife, such as the Boker Kwaiken, it was possible to eliminate those bulky and complex pieces, leaving just the steel balls to rotate the blade. Instead of external races, there are recesses made in the liners to hold the steel balls. And the pivot pin is used as the internal race. The steel balls that make up the IKBS are inexpensive and can be easily replaced without the need of any adjustment, making maintenance quite simple. The IKBS system is slightly adjustable. If any blade play occurs after time, tightening the pivot screw can easily eliminate it.
Blade Style

If you want a knife with a relatively narrow point and yet a curved belly, a straight back blade is the one for you. It is well suited for both thrusting and cutting. There isn’t too much of difference between a straight back and a dropped point. However, a straight back blade is the simplest of blade shapes. The sharp edge starts near the handle and curves towards the tip of the blade. The unsharpened edge continues straight from the handle to the tip. Simple, no? Having a straight back on your knife blade helps improve the strength of the blade. It also makes it ideal for adding thumb pressure when slicing and chopping. The straight dull back won’t hurt your thumb when adding a lot of pressure.

 

Blade Steel

VG-10 Steel isn’t a common steel you hear about. Though it is not used much, the blade steel is still excellent in quality. Sticking with the Japanese theme on the Boker Kwaiken, VG-10 is a cutlery grade stainless steel was originally designed and produced by Takefu Special Steel Co. Ltd., in Japan. It is a high carbon stainless steel containing 1% Carbon, 15% Chromium, 1% Molybdenum, 0.2% Vanadium, 1.5% Cobalt, and 0.5% Manganese. Even though carbon only makes up a relatively small amount of the total material of the blade, it is still a significant amount for stainless steel. The G in the name stands for “gold,” referring to the “gold standard” that this stainless steel is considered to have met. One of the original uses of this steel was in the horticultural industry. This is because of its ability to make clean, grafting cuts. Thus it would not fray or destroy the vessels of the plant. VG-10 was originally aimed at Japanese chefs, but also found its way into sports cutlery. VG-10 is quite capable of retaining an edge, while still being rust resistant. It is preferred by many professional chefs. With VG-10, you also get the hardness of a carbon steel. It is more expensive when compared to other steels such as 440 steels, but is well worth it. All of these qualities of this steel make this knife great for everyday use, plus its ability to take abuse.

 

Liner Lock

The liner lock is one of the most prevalent locking systems used in the knife industry and is the locking mechanism on the Boker Kwaiken. It was invented and patented in 1980 by Michael Walker. A liner lock works by having a section of the liner spring inwards and wedge itself beneath the tang of the blade when it is opened all the way. This locks the blade open between the stop pin and the liner locking mechanism. The liner lock is easy to manufacture and reliable to use. The biggest advantage of the liner lock is the easy one-handed opening and closing. Most other locking methods are not as easy to close one-handed. This type of locking mechanism, in conjunction with the flipper, makes this knife perfect for one-handed use. Not only for right handed people, but for left handed people as well.

 

Handle

The handle on the Boker Kwaiken is full of mysteries, like its origin, that are waiting to be unlocked. Do not let its appearance deceive you. There is a lot more than meets the eye. The handle is quite slim. In fact, it is three quarters of an inch thick in its thinnest spot and grows to just under an inch thick near the pivot area. Though it is slender, its weight is very dense. In total, the knife weighs around four and a half pounds. For such a small knife, the Kwaiken has quite the hefty feel to it.

In addition to the slimness and weight of the Kwaiken, the handle also includes the specially fabricated handle scales. Made from a single G-10 piece, the lower part has a milled, wood-like texture for a neat design and a secure grip. The portion near the pivot is made without this texture to provide a contrasting look from the scales. This special look gives the knife a unique appeal while retaining a natural look.

G-10 or G10 is similar to Micarta and Carbon Fiber and is often used in handles because of its moisture imperviousness. G-10 is a fiberglass based laminate made by layers of fiberglass cloth that are soaked in an epoxy resin, are compressed, and then baked. The result is a material that is hard, lightweight, and strong. The surface of the G-10 is a checkering texture that is added for additional grip support. A unique property of the material is that the grip improves when wet. This material is difficult to break. It is also an ideal handle material because it does not shrink or swell in extreme hot or cold temperatures. Many knife companies prefer to use G-10 because of these properties, but also prefer to use it because it is easy to shape into different designs and has a possibility for an unlimited number of colors. This handle is recommended for knives that are to be used in survival situations. G-10 is considered the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger (though more brittle) than Micarta. Its main advantages include its toughness, its light weight, it is strong and durable, impervious to water, low maintenance, and relatively inexpensive. Though it can be brittle, and occasionally have a cheap plastic feel, G-10 is a fantastic handle material.

 

Everyday Carry

As an everyday carry knife, it is important to know how the Boker Kwaiken feels when being carried around all the time. Those criteria include its carry depth, its weight, its thickness and width, and its appearance.

Carry Depth

The Boker Kwaiken is comfortable to carry in your pocket. The slim design takes up minimal pocket real-estate. Because of its smaller size, it sacrifices the potential for a really secure and comfortable grip.  When closed, the knife is 4.88 inches long. You’ll find that most comfortable carry knives are anywhere between 3.5 to 5 inches long when closed. The knife rests just near the edge that range. Frequently, before any knife purchase, I ask myself, “Will the knife fit in my pant pocket?” But I also ask “Will the knife fall out of my pocket?” The knife is a deep carry knife. The pocket clip allows the majority of the knife to fit within my pocket.

Weight

One of the more important aspects to consider when choosing an everyday carry is its weight. One of the worst feelings that can happen on a day to day basis is carrying something heavy in your pocket. A good knife weight ranges anywhere from as little as 3.0 ounces to 5.0 ounces. The Kwaiken barely fits right into this range. It weighs 4.45 ounces. For the size of the knife, I would be careful about getting it if you are sensitive to your pocket weight. But again, it is within this range of comfortable weight. The knife is just dense.

Thickness and Width

Like we mentioned before, the knife is very slim. At most, the knife is just under an inch thick. And the knife is just under half an inch wide from handle scale to handle scale. There is hardly anything to the Kwaiken.

Appearance

When the knife is closed, it looks pretty conservative, especially with its “wood grain” finish. But when the knife is unleashed, it does have that ancient samurai intimidation to it. It’s as if it says “Be careful, this knife will come after you.”

 

Conclusion

Boker is constantly coming up with knifes that work well for a decent price. At $135, you will be happy with this purchase. There are many creative minds going into this blade. From the creators of the IKBS System to Lucas Burnley, and from the people over at Boker to the ancient Japanese creators of the kwaiken, the Boker Plus Tactical Kwaiken is a huge hit. You will want this in your armory.

 

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Boker Magnum 018 Auto Knife Review

One of Boker’s fantastic automatic knives is their Magnum 018. Boker has a great history of making durable knives that are affordable, effective, and good looking. The Magnum is nothing short of the Boker Standard.

Boker 018 Magnum Auto
Boker 018 Magnum Auto

Specs

Below is the specs list for the Magnum 018. This is somewhat similar to another popular Boker auto knife. The Boker Kalashnikov 74 is just slightly smaller than the Magnum 018. Here is the list:

  • Product Type: Automatic Knife
  • Overall Length: 8.0″
  • Weight: 4.50 oz.
  • Handle Length: 4.75”
  • Blade Length: 3.25″
  • Blade Thickness: 0.120″
  • Blade Material: AUS-8 Stainless
  • Blade Edge: Combo
  • Blade Style: Tanto
  • Blade Finish: Black
  • Handle Material: Aluminum
  • Handle Color: Black
  • Sheath Included: No
  • Pocket Clip: Tip-Down
  • Made in Taiwan

 

Handle Material

The handle on the Magnum 018 is Aluminum is usually treated by anodizing the metal to obtain its color, hardness, and protection. It is a durable metal for knife handles. Its low density provides for a nice, light feel to the knife without weighing the knife down. The most common type of aluminum used today a T6-6061 alloy. When aluminum is properly texturized, the handle can provide a considerably secure grip that is both comfortable and easy to hold. Despite its smooth appearance, it also provides excellent grip and is especially suitable for knives that will be used in harsh weather conditions or even in just very wet conditions. Another property that aluminum possesses is a high corrosion resistance. One possible negative effect that an aluminum handle can have is its conductive property. When it is cold out, the knife’s metal will cool down too. This can be potentially uncomfortable for some people, but others may take favor to this property.

 

Blade Steel

The steel that is used on the Magnum 018 is the Japanese manufactured AUS-8 Stainless Steel. AUS-8 is said to be compared to steels such as 440C, CM-154, and even D2. This steel is exceptionally hard, and is quite capable of achieving and retaining a sharp edge. This well-rounded knife has high quality in its hardness, toughness, edge retention, and corrosion resistance. While this metal is still far from being perfect, it is a quality steel for what it costs to produce.

 

Blade Style

The blade on the Magnum 018 is a tanto part serrated blade. The tanto blade has a somewhat chisel-like point that is thick towards the point (being close to the spine) and is thus quite strong. The tanto knife was inspired by ancient Japanese swords. The Westernized tanto is often straight but may also be gently curved. This style of blade became popular during the ‘80s shortly after the blade was created and introduced. The tanto does not have a typical belly (such as that on a drop point), which is sacrificed in exchange for a stronger tip. Its design makes it great for push cuts, rather than slicing, and piercing tougher materials because of its tip’s strength.

 

Serrations

In comparison with a sharp plain edge, the serrated edge on the Magnum 018 tends to do better in cutting hard material. Whether it be thick rope, hard plastics, bones, or any other fibrous material, a serrated blade is capable of cutting through it. A serrated cut works because of several key reasons. When beginning to cut, the tiny points on the serrations touch the object being cut. This allows for a centralized pressure on the cut. After applying this pressure, the dozens of little serrations act like hooks. Each tug and pull at the material until it is cut deep. The penetrating points and scallops greatly assist in cutting with their low-edge, sharp angle. Many question the usage of a serrated blade. They ask if it is even worth it to have as a tool when they have a sharp plain edge. However, it is difficult to ever really know when you will be needing a serrated blade. It is essential though to be prepared for whenever that situation arises. This is more truth in this statement because of the line of work that tactical knives find themselves in. For some people, having a combination of a plain edge and a serrated edge is important. You never know when it can come in handy. The nice thing about serrated edges is that they can still cut when dull, while a dull plain edge has a difficult time cutting.

 

Handle Design

Because of the way the Magnum handle is finished, with its discrete looking finger holds and its parallel grooves on the handle’s surface, it provides a solid grip to hold while using the knife. Most of the time, an aluminum handle is smooth and lacks any kind of texture. The Magnum 018 has a slight texturing to the handle that helps improve the grip slightly. The handle, along with the rest of the blade, have a curving arch that runs the full length of the knife.

 

Similar to 007

The Magnum 018 is related to its similarly built Magnum 007. It is as if the 018 is the darker side of the Magnum, while the 007 is lighter. The fierce looking 018 has a more tactical look to it while the 007 is more gentlemanly. For more info on the 007, check out its review.

 

Automatic Knife

Automatic knives are a popular choice of knife to own. They offer many advantages that typical folders, fixed blades, or even a spring assisted knives do not offer. One benefit to owning an auto is its deployment speed. Some may argue that a spring assisted knife is just as fast as an automatic knife. This is true in many cases. However, what makes an automatic knife a better option is the ease in opening the knife. With the press of a button, or a flick of a switch, the blade will flash open in a blink of an eye. Not only is it quick, but it can be fired off with one hand. Plus, firing off an auto is fun to do. The firing and locking mechanism on the Magnum 018 is a plunge lock that utilizes a button. Until this little button is pressed on the handle, this blade is not going anywhere.

Having these features come in handy during many instances. For example, if one of your hands in a bind or holding an object in need of cutting, an auto can be opened right away with one hand and do its job. Emergency response teams, law enforcement, and military personnel are all constantly faced with tribulation that requires the use of a decent knife. In many high stress situations, having a knife ready in a blink of an eye using only one hand can help someone else live for one more day. They are different than a traditional knife and bring a new element to the knife industry.

 

Test

To give you a better idea on how this knife works in the “real world”, below are the results of several tests. These will inform you of what you can expect with the Magnum 018. The normal tests include cutting paper, cardboard, plastic, and rope. This testing also includes a fruit and vegetable test.

Paper- The paper was easy to cut, but it took some effort to get it started. Because of the blade style with a combo edge, there isn’t a lot of cutting edge to use. The serrated part of the blade got in the way of slicing through the paper. The tanto, with its two different edges, made it difficult to have a nice sweeping motion to cut the paper.

Cardboard- Cutting the cardboard was relatively simple, only because of the combination of the serrated edge and a sawing motion. Pushing through was slightly more difficult than pulling back when sawing through.

Plastic- All types of synthetic material were able to be cut; from tape to shopping bags, and from thicker bottles to heavy packaging plastics. The thicker stuff was easily cut with the help of the serrations. The tanto’s tip was perfect at penetrating the plastic packaging that we see around all the time.

Rope/Paracord- Here, cutting rope, is where the Magnum 018 performs well. The serrations on the tanto blade are designed to cut rope and other fibrous materials with ease. The serrated design did what it is intended to do. The rope snapped in half in a split second after taking the serrated blade to it. Of course I had to try using the non-serrated portion of the blade on the rope. The plain edge near the tip of the tanto blade cut the rope with ease.

Fruit/Vegetable- Only to be fair when talking about the tanto serrated blade, there had to be a test to see where the blade’s potential could truly shine forth. Where I imagined this type of blade to excel at is in culinary uses. The perfect foods to test the cutting ability of the Magnum 018 are apples and carrots. Most people, at one time or another, imagines slicing of a piece of apple and eating it directly from the blade (just like in the movies). The plain edge portion of the blade performed just as you would see in the movies. The apple is small enough that the small plain blade could cut right through the fruit. Carrots, denser than an apple, require a different cutting technique. Cutting carrots, especially raw carrots, takes great effort and force to cut. Luckily, there is the serrated blade that saws right through. It is similar to cutting a thin tree branch.

 

Carrying the Knife

It is very important to know how the knife feels when being carried around all the time. There are a few things to consider when looking to get a new knife. Those items include the following: its carry depth, its weight, its thickness and width, and its appearance.

Carry Depth

The Magnum 018 is comfortable to carry. Not only in your hand, but it is decently comfortable in your pocket. When closed, the knife is 4.75 inches long. A typically comfortable carry knife is anywhere between three and a half to 5 inches long when closed. The knife rests on the edge that range. A question I ask myself before getting a knife is “Will the knife fit in my pant pocket?” But I also ask “Will the knife fall out of my pocket?” Ever since I lost my own knife, I check to see if the knife has the potential to fall out.

Weight

One of the more important aspects to consider when choosing an everyday carry is its weight. It is the worst feeling to have to carry heavy objects in your pocket, no matter what it is. A good knife weight ranges anywhere from as little as 3.0 ounces to 5.0 ounces. The Magnum 018 fits right into this range. It weighs 4.50 ounces. It is about average in size. However, when holding the knife, it feels lighter than what you think.

Thickness and Width

When carrying a knife around all the time in your pocket, there is a limited amount of space available in your pocket. A good everyday carry knife should be comfortable to carry and easy to handle. The Magnum 018 is about an inch and a half wide at its thickest point from the top of the blade to the back of the handle. Its thickness from the left of the handle to the opposite side is between a half an inch and three quarters of an inch. The Magnum 018 is going to take up some room in your pocket, but not a ton of space.

Appearance

The Magnum’s appearance is significantly different than its counterpart the Magnum 007. The 018 has a dark look that comes off intimidating at a first glance. The serrations add to the intimidation factor. But all of this intimidation is contained inside the conservative looking handle. Once unleashed, the Magnum is unstoppable.

 

Conclusion

The Boker Magnum 018 Auto Knife is a good, inexpensive, automatic knife that will satisfy your basic needs. There is no need to worry about beating up this knife. Pick your Magnum up today.

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Boker Knives and Two Boker Plus Knives

Böker Knives began in Germany during the 17th century. The company originally focused on swords and didn’t move on to design blades until the 1800’s. If you go back and look at the company’s books, they will tell you that by 1839 Böker was producing around 2000 Sabres a week for various wars. In the 1960’s, the company had migrated into North America; however, they were just sub brands at the time. During World War II, the main Germany factory was destroyed, so Boker USA took control. Since then, the company has traded hands several times, but in 1986 Boker USA was started for good for US production. The symbol of this company is a giant chestnut tree, which is the perfect symbol because over the 150 years that it has existed, the company has reached out, or “branched out”, and become planted across the world.

Boker USA is the in charge of the production of Boker knives, but they carry five brand names underneath them which are Boker, Boker Arbolito, Boker Plus, Magnum by Boker, and Cinch by Boker.

 

Boker is sometimes known as the Tree Brand, so any knives that are labeled with this are usually purely Boker.

 

Boker Arbolito means little tree in Spanish. If you see a knife labeled with this name, it means that it was manufactured in Argentina and typically are only household or work knives.

 

Boker Plus knives are manufactured in Taiwan and China. These knives are typically not as high quality as Boker, but they are more quality than Magnum by Boker. In this line, you will find tactical and outdoor knives.

 

Magnum by Boker knives are also manufactured in Taiwan and China. This line of knives focus on value, so out of the five sub brands, these are going to be the least expensive of them. Don’t worry about sacrificing quality though, because these knives are still made from quality materials.

 

Cinch by Boker are knives designed to fit the Western lifestyle. They are targeted towards ranchers and outdoor enthusiasts. This is actually a collaboration between Boker and Cinch Jeans. This is a classy line that have an authentic feel to them.

Boker produces great knives and because of the five different sub brands, you will find a large variety of different styles, values, and designs of knives. Today I am going over two great and popular Boker Knives.

 

 

The Boker Plus Subcom:

 

Just like the name implies, this is part of the Boker Plus brand. The drop point blade on this knife is 1.875 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 4.625 inches long and has been known as the “money clip knife”. This knife has been used for a defensive tool and a backup knife. The blade has a big belly that makes it perfect for utility purposes and the tip is chubby so it isn’t meant for stabbing. Even though it is so small, because of the blade shape and the tip shape it can cut just as well as a larger knife.

The knife weighs 2.5 ounces, which seems small at first, but when you realize that the blade is smaller than 2 inches long, it starts to seem like a hefty knife. It weighs what it does because the knife has a stainless steel frame lock and a full steel liner.

The ergonomics on this knife is as good as you are going to get on such a small knife, because really, there is no way that you can fit your whole hand on this. A bonus about the handle on this knife is all the jimping, which provides grip and traction just where you need it. Unfortunately, because of all this jimping, it can be an uncomfortable knife to use for long periods of time.

This knife was such a hit that Boker made a few different versions to satisfy everyone, these versions are:

 

The Subcom F: This version has AUS-8 steel with a black or silver blade. It is partially serrated and has an FRN handle that comes in either black or gray. The locking system is a frame lock. This was the original Subcom knife and the other versions are just copycats. Along with the silver, black, and gray versions, there is a special camo version.

 

The Subcom Titan: When Boker designed this version, they designed it to be an elite version of the F. This version sports a satin 440-C stainless steel, which is a higher quality steel than the other versions. The edge is plain. The handle is made out of titanium and because of that it only weighs 1.9 ounces. Because of the titanium handle and silver blade, it looks more elegant than the other versions. It has either a frame lock or a slip joint locking mechanism.

 

The Subcom 42: This blade is made out of AUS-8 steel that is finished with a bead blast. The blade has a plain edge. The handle is made out of pink FRN material and it sports a frame lock mechanism.

 

The Subcom Dusk: This version also has AUS-8 steel, but this one has a black finish. It is partially serrated. The Zytel handle is orange and this version boasts a framelock mechanism.

 

The Subcom Dawn: This also has a satin AUS-8 blade that has a plain edge. The Orange Zytel handle has either a frame lock or a slip joint locking mechanism.

 

The Subcom Z: Just like most of the versions, the Z has AUS-8 steel, but with a black finish. It is partially serrated. The green Zytel handle sports a frame lock system.

 

The Subclaw: This version is very similar to the Subcom F but the main difference is the blade shape. This version has a Hawkbill blade. This blade shape is great for slicing, but not for a lot of other things. Many people only see this as a defensive or collectors blade.

 

The WharCom: This is also similar to the Subcom F, but again, it has a different blade shape. This style of blade has a Wharncliffe blade that is perfectly straight from the handle to the tip. The shape is very similar to a razor blade. This is a great blade shape for slicing, but it is a perfect blade shape for scraping.

 

The ResCom: This is the most unique out of all the Subcom versions that were previously mentioned. This one is designed for safety and rescue situations. It is also similar to the Subcom F. The ResCom has an almost hook shaped blade, but the outside of the hook is not sharp in any places. There is another portion of the blade that is a saw. This is so that you can cut materials that are too large to get through the hook. This is not going to be an everyday knife, but it is a great candidate for your emergency, safety, or rescue knife. It does dull relatively quickly, so using it for everyday tasks would not be ideal. You can get the ResCom in two different versions: all black—black blade, black handle, and black thumb studs, or a red version—silver blade, red frame and red thumb studs.

 

Pros of the Plus Subcom:

  • This is a very small knife, so it won’t weigh you down and is easy to have with you at all times.
  • The knife sports a large belly, so it is easy to cut with and can actually cut as well as larger knives.
  • The knife comes in a large variety of handle colors and materials.
  • The knife also comes in a large variety of steel and steel colors.
  • The extra jimping allows for great grip.

 

Cons of the Plus Subcom:

  • This is a tiny knife, so it can’t stand up to large, heavy duty tasks.
  • The extra jimping can get uncomfortable quickly.
  • There is no way that you are going to be able to use your hold hand to hold this knife.

 

 

The Boker Plus Kwaiken Flipper:

 

This knife is also manufactured from Boker in their Boker Plus line. This knife was originally called the Boker Kwaiken, and it was a flop. People were disappointed in how hard the knife was to open and they were disappointed because the tip of the blade peeked out of the handle when it was supposed to be closed. But Boker redesigned this knife in a flipper version. When the flipper version was first released, many collectors were after it to see if Boker had actually fixed the problems.

The blade on this knife is 3.5 inches long and made out of either AUS-8 steel or VG-10. The shape of the knife is a modified drop point silhouette that looks sleek and tucks into the handle perfectly. The tip on this knife is very fine, which makes it perfect for stabbing things. The AUS-8 steel is easy to sharpen. However, there were still many complaints about the steel because it isn’t the highest quality steel. That was when Boker released the upgraded version with the VG-10 steel. However, VG-10 steel is a little bit weaker than the AUS-8. Neither of the options hold their edge super well, but they both are durable enough.

The handle on this knife is unique. It sports full steel liners and has 3D machined pieces of titanium. Both of these materials are supports by a solid titanium back spacer. The handle was designed to have a minimalist look to it and is monochromatic. Some pros about the simple design is that it will work for almost any hand size. Some of the cons to the simple design is that there is really no texture to it, meaning the grip is lacking a little bit. The titanium keeps the knife sturdy and durable. However, because of all the titanium, this is a heavy knife. The handle features a pocket clip; it is a right side tip-up pocket clip. The flipper knife works because of the IKBS bearing pivot system, which helps flip well and open with a snap.

The overall length of the knife is 8 3/8 inches long and weighs 5.4 ounces. The blade thickness is 0.1 inches.

 

Pros of the Kwaiken Flipper:

 

  • The fine tip is ideal for piercing cuts
  • You can get the blade in either AUS-8 or VG-10 steel.
  • The steel is easy to sharpen.
  • The simple design helps to fit in any size hand.
  • Very sturdy knife.
  • Opens and flips well.

 

 

Conclusion:

 

Boker has a rich history that slowly got them to where they needed to be. Today, there are five different Sub Brands that Boker USA owns, each of which specialize in their own categories. Boker Plus produces good quality knives, that aren’t quite as high quality as Boker, but they still are made with high quality materials so you know that you are getting a reliable knife. Boker Plus focuses on making tactical and outdoors knives. Today I chose two different Boker Plus knives to really focus on: The Plus Subcom and the Kwaiken Flipper.

The Subcom is a small knife that isn’t meant to do big tasks, but is great for having with you as a backup knife, a defensive knife, or for doing the smaller everyday tasks. The Subcom is great because there are so many different variations of it, so you really will get exactly what you are looking for. It’s a small knife, but it’s a good knife. The Subcom will be an old friend, not something you see every day, but will stand up for you when you need it to.

The Kwaiken Flipper has a history. The original Kwaiken was not an instant hit, in fact it was a disappointment. But Boker heard the complaints and re-designed it. It’s a sturdy, reliable knife, but it is a heavy knife. It will be able to stand up to the tasks that you throw at it.

These two knives are popular knives for a reason and it’s not a bad idea to try them out.

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Boker Plus Decade Edition Knives

Boker is celebrating 10 years with their Boker Plus line of knives.  The newest arrivals are the Nano and the Subcom.  An interesting fact is the Subcom knife, designed by Chad Los Banos, is the very knife that launched the entire Boker Plus line.

These special Decade Edition knives are being produced with carbon fiber handle scales and two tone VG-10 blades.  Each model will only have 600 units and each one will bear the serial number.  Get your Decade Edition knives quick–they won’t last long.

Boker Plus Subcom, Decade
Boker Plus Subcom, Decade Edition with Carbon Fiber and VG-10
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Presenting the Boker Damascus Kwaiken Flipper Knife

The Boker Kwaiken has been one of the most popular knife models in the past couple years.  This extremely well designed flipper boasts a sleek look that is comfortable in the hand.  It has excellent action.  Now, for the first time, you can get the Kwaiken with a Damascus blade on our website.  This is an exclusive first run available only at BladeOps.

Here is the Boker Damascus Kwaiken:

Boker Damascus Kwaiken
Boker Damascus Kwaiken
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