Round 2 BladeOps Writing Contest

You Can Win Great Prizes!

BladeOps has an ongoing non-fiction writing contest. The writer of the top three contributed article in the next 45 days will receive prize packages valued at more than $500.00.

First Prize:

1. Hogue Knives EX01 Auto Knife, Model 34128

Second Prize:

1. H&K Plan D Fixed Blade Knife

Third Prize:


1.
Schrade 4BGS Assist Knife

Contest Rules:

To be eligible, your submission must be an original piece of work. Detail is encouraged. You can write on any knife topic or subject that would be of interest to readers of the BladeOps blog. Please proofread your entry. Every entry must be completely original and upon submission the copyright becomes the property of BladeOps, LLC.

Once you have submitted your article on the BladeOps Blog, you may not submit it anywhere else. Along those same lines, do not submit articles that you have submitted to other places already. Every entry must be completely original. Upon submission, the copyright belongs to BladeOps, LLC. We reserve the right to edit articles for spelling, punctuation, grammar, and length as well as for any other reason we deem necessary.

Plagarism is completely unacceptable. This must be your own original work. It may include brief quotes that are properly enclosed in quotation marks and where full attribution is given to the original author of the quote material. Any instance of plagiarism will result in immediate disqualification from this contest.

Winners must have a legal US address. Contest not valid where prohibited by law. You must be at least 18 years old to enter and you must be eligible to legally own the prizes.

Submit as many articles as you would like. Pictures are encouraged, please include them if possible.

Contest ends December 27th, 2014. Winners will be announced by December 31st, 2014.

Thanks and good luck.

Trevor Darby

Post your contest entry below.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Congratulations to Our September 2014 Blog Contest Winners

WINNERS ANNOUNCEMENT

The following entries have won.

First Place: That Old KaBar

Second Place: Picking the Perfect Knife

Third Place: The Pennsylvania Knife

Congratulations to our winners. I will contact you via email on Monday to arrange shipment of your prize.

Also, since this contest was so hotly contested, we have decided to start the November contest right away. The same rules apply, with a final entry date of November 30th, 2014.  Contest prizes for the November contest will be announced next week–and watch closely because they are going to be even better than ever. Get writing and feel free to submit as soon as you like.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

A Swiss Army Knife In Your Life Prevents A Lot Of Strife, by M.T.

Swiss Army Knife
Swiss Army Knife

So, it was the 1970’s. I was living in Denver, Colorodo at the time, so it was only a 13-15 hr. drive (nothing for me…LOVE DRIVING) to…would you believe it, Las Vegas. I went out right after I got off from work that Sunday morning. This trip out is what ended up giving me the brilliant idea (which wasn’t typical for me) to hit up Vegas and spend my entire weeks vacation there. You see, the week before I had made a nice amount of money by putting in a lot of overtime, and I guess I was in a hurry to lose all that money huh.

I was just browsing around a few stores…looking to burn just a LITTLE BIT of my hard earned money. That’s where I saw it, in some display case…the Victorinox Classic (would you believe it) this was going to be the first ever folding knife I would ever buy. Good thing too, cause this knife would later on SAVE MY LIFE!!! After pondering the decision for a sec I said “what the heck.” While the sweet little girl behind the register was boxing and bagging this knife up I saw (sitting on the counter) this little pamplet for some Vegas attraction. That’s when the decision was pretty much made for me…”Vegas,” I said, “here I come.”

So there I was, leaving Denver heading for Vegas (with Victorinox in pocket…my new pocket rocket). The drive to Vegas went great, scenery was beautiful, temp was great, and my nerves were shot by the time I reached Vegas. Why, because, well, lets just say that back then (my 20’s) I was a MUCH bigger risk taker…more so than I care to remember. I want go into too much detail about that (my risks), but lets just say I never went anywhere without my herbs…nuff said?

Had a blast in Vegas though. And this is where my story really starts to pick up. I was up about $1,400.00, yeah, the craps table was definitely on my side (along with fate) the first night I was in Vegas. I had just got done with my turn on the craps table and the man next to me had just picked up the dice…with a smug look on his face too. This guy was on fire, even more so than I was, which was amazing because winning $1,400.00 at the craps table back then was no easy task. The cheering for this man (who seemed to be a dice magnet) was relentless. That’s when I noticed it, a hangnail on my thumb (something I could not stand…still can’t). So I whipped out my new Victorinox, popped out the file, and thanks to my gracefulness, dropped it on the floor. “Oh well” I said, bent down to grab my knife, glanced up, and to my utter amazement noticed that this supposed ‘dice machine’ was nothing more than a cheat. The guy had a second pair of weighted dice in his hand. Even though I just barely caught a glimpse of these dice it was enough for me to go to the pit boss, report this cheating douche-bag and get him arrested.

The casino owner was so grateful for my help that he comped my entire weeks stay there…can you say “SWEET!” That’s when I turned to the owner and explained how it was all thanks to this little Swiss Army Knife (and my clumsiness) that his casino was prevented from being robbed…he couldn’t believe it.

Well, at this point I bet you can believe that I was on cloud 9. I was up $1,400.00, saved a casino from being stolen from, was kind of a hero (at least in my own mind) and apparently had a new good luck charm in pocket (my Victorinox Classic). The rest of my weeks stay in Vegas went great. Except for that last night, I guess my new knife’s luck (or mine) had finally run out. That’s right, lost about $600.00 on the craps table that night, right before leaving Vegas to head back to Denver too. Can you believe that (like an hour before leaving…my timing SUCKED). Oh well, at least I was still up $800.00 and had my whole hotel bill comped (could’ve been worse).

Anyway, so on the way back to Denver…that’s when things got hairy. About 5 hours into the drive back (it was around 3:00 a.m.) my 1972 Ford Pinto started fading out one me. With my head lights getting dimmer, engine clanking out one me and car slowing down I thought to myself…”you’ve got to be kidding me.” Pulling off to the side of the road I said “what a way to end this fabulous week huh, with getting stuck out here in the middle of nowhere!” Nowhere was right too, I had broken down right between Green River, UT & Grand Junction, CO…there’s nothing for over 110 miles.

Getting out of the car heading for the hood I was like “great.” I mean, I’m by far from a mechanic, but what did I have to lose right. Opening the hood with a little extra force (from my great mood) I noticed that there was a wire or two that looked like they had come loose from somewhere. It didn’t take me long to realize where these wires went…you’d be amazed at how far common sense will get you. Whipping out my new Victorinox Classic I thought to myself “man, who would’ve thought that this baby would’ve come in handy so much on this trip.”

Unfortunately, I shouldn’t of counted my blessings quite yet. While I was attempting to reattach all the wires I happen to glance up…and what did I see, that’s right, here came Mr. Police Officer. Of course the officer had to pull over (thinking back now, I guess it was nice of him), but when this all was going down I was sweating bullets. Think about it, I had a car with stashes of my (lets just say) “herbs” all over it, and a nice amount right in my shirts front pocket too. Can you all say “jail time.” “This is it” I thought as the officer pulled off the road, got out of his patrol car and was approaching.

Luckily I had almost reattached all the wires by this point (correctly I hoped). As the officer reached my side he could probably see the sweat pouring down my face. “Can I help you” the officer said. “NOPE” I yelled back, a little too loudly now that I think about it. I wanted to get back on the road (and away from this officer) as soon as possible…so that’s when I thought of a plan to do just that. “Excuse me officer” I said, continuing on with “can you please stay right here next to the hood while I try starting the car up, just in case I need something adjusted?” “Sure” he said. As I got back into the car all I could think about was getting the stuff that was in my pocket front out, and stashing it away somewhere.

The only problem was that I wasn’t in reach of any of my stash spots. With only seconds to decide I slid out (discreetly) my Victorinox Classic and slit a small hole into the drivers seat right between my legs. Luckily my front pocket stash fit perfectly into this hole I made. It even matched a few other holes around the inner upholstery…so it didn’t stand out. I then proceeded to take a deep breath, slid the key into the ignition and to my great delight…the car (lights and all) started right up. “Phew” I thought, bullet dodged…literally.

After closing the hood, stepping to the side and saying “goodbye” the police officer proceeded to get back into his patrol car. And as we both pulled away (driving off in opposite directions) I thought to myself, “what a week this was.”

Well that was it. the rest of the drive back to Denver (on the I-70, and even over the Continental Divide) went off without a hitch. As I pulled up to my apartment around 8:00 a.m., walked up to the door, slid my key in the lock I said to myself “who would’ve thought that this whole weeks adventure started with the purchase a single SWISS ARMY KNIFE.”

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

My Holy Grail, by C.O.

Microtech Ultratech
Microtech Ultratech

When my friend introduced me to BladeOps.com, I never imagined that one of the first knives I saw would become my grail knife. My friend told me about the cheap out-the-front knife that was used in the Dark Knight movie and encouraged me to get one for myself. After making the purchase, I started browsing through the other various wares of BladeOps.com and that is when I discovered the Microtech Ultratech. I didn’t really know what it was, but the tanto edge was so slick and clean. I fell in love with the design immediately and thought, “I have to have this!” That was when I discovered the price. While some might consider the lower $200 range to be cheap for a knife, I had never spent over $50 at this time. I knew I would need to save up for a while. What I didn’t realize is that the knives sell out relatively quickly and there are long waits between productions. After nearly 3 years of saving, waiting, and watching, I finally managed to score my grail knife. It is more amazing than I even imagined and I am extremely satisfied. The engineering is perfect and I am very pleased with the fit and finish. I know this blade will satisfy me for quite some time. I wonder what my new grail will become.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Tenacious Like a Ninja, by A.M.

Spyderco Tenacious
Spyderco Tenacious

My first partner ever was tenacious. Black on black like a ninja. He was born in Asia but he was trained in America. No job was to small or big for him. He always got his mark. He did jobs that even the best can’t handle. From gutting a bass to chopping birch. Now he is recruiting members into his team. He heard of a special someone who has a lot of talent. His name is Tumult.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

The EDC Emergency Survival Blade, by N.W.

EDC Emergency Knife
EDC Emergency Knife

In an actual survival situation, what blade would you prefer to have on your person in order to help you survive? Think about that perfect blade, now forget about it. Survival situations do not happen on your schedule, and unless you EDC that perfect survival blade on you every day of your life, it is not going to help when the situation calls for it. Natural disasters or the inopportune flat tire in the middle of no where arejust a couple examples of when an emergency survival blade could be employed.

An emergency survival blade is any blade you happen to have on you when chaos strikes, for most individuals this would usually be a folding knife of some sort. There are pocket survival kits that are available which are normally housed in an Altoids tin and have just enough room for a small knife or razor blade, along with a way to start a fire, etc. However, considering one of your most important tools in a survival situation is a cutting device, a tiny knife or a razor blade can only be used to a certain point. A much more beneficial option is the folding knife you carry every day.

On a regular basis, your EDC may only be used for light tasks such as opening letters, cutting boxes, etc. Although this may be the image you think of, your EDC is capable of so much more. Nearly any folding knife can be put into the role of an emergency survival knife, because honestly, at the time you have no choice. You would have to use what you have available.

The edge itself is the most important aspect of the knife, which is why we use knives in the first place. But once the user knows the physical limitations of the knife, the strengths of the model’s design, and efficient techniques in using the knife for which ever type of task, the capability of the knife is increased one hundred fold. The basis for this knowledge and ability comes down to personal experience with the particular knife, skills, and knowledge of edged weapons.

Manual folders, spring assisted, old design styles, automatics, and well made OTF knives are all capable of filling the role as an emergency survival blade. This is not to say that the user should simply buy which ever knife is the cheapest, though it can be compared to the old firearm saying, “a .22 in the hand is better than a .45 at home.”

Which ever knife you choose to carry will fill multiple roles in its lifetime, from every day utility tasks to self defense. Look at your EDC and ask yourself, “If I had to, could I use this in an survival situation?” Do you have the experience to use the blade to it’s full potential? If not, what do you have to learn to make it so? A knife is limited only by the skill of the user.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Baghdad and My Microtech SCARAB Knife, by W.M.

Location: Camp Victory – Baghdad, Iraq
Year : AUG 2005

Microtech SCARAB OTF Knife
Microtech SCARAB OTF Knife

I remember it as being hot and dusty, but that’s pretty much the definition of an understatement for Baghdad in the summer. Using an old school, wet bulb thermometer, we had recently registered a stunning 132 degrees so it was more than just hot. You know when you’re baking something in the oven and you open the door to check on it. Like a dummy you bend over to get a peek and that first wave of heated air makes you squint your eyes and pinch your face? Yeah, it was that kind of hot, only all day long.
We were assigned as firefighter/paramedics to protect the US military personnel assigned to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Looking back on it now, I think it was the most significant thing that I’ve done in my life. We had a motto that summed it up. Protecting Those Who Protect Peace. It was truly an honor to be the First Responder for those brave men and women as they rested on base in between combat missions.
But with that being said, it was also boring as hell. There’s an old saying in our industry that our days are made up of 99% boredom and 1% pure terror/adrenaline. That pretty much sums up the Iraq experience. From a firefighter’s perspective, our customer (the military) made for pretty good residents so we really didn’t have a lot of structure fires or cats in trees. In 2005 we had a lot of indirect fire coming at us from over the wire, but for the most part, we spent our days trying to keep busy and maintaining our training levels.
The one escape from the boredom, outside of calls to home, was mail-call.
A package or a letter from home was not only a break in the monotony, it was a reminder of why we were doing what we were doing, and why protecting our way of life is so important.

So there I was on that hot and dusty day in August of 2005, sitting in our Heavy Rescue unit outside of the US Army postal center at Camp Victory (adjacent to the Baghdad International Airport / BIAP).
I had small cardboard box in my lap and I was contemplating the irony of the fact that I needed a knife to open my box that contained a knife. I’d searched around on-line and found a really bad-ass OTF knife made by Microtech. I’d been eagerly awaiting its arrival for nearly three weeks and the time had finally come. Using the edge of a fireman’s axe, I sliced the tape from the box and unwrapped my new toy. The knife was everything I’d hoped it to be. Sleek, well made and with a hefty OTF spring that made a satisfying; “CLICK” when it sprang into action. For the next several days I abused that spring religiously. In and Out, In and Out. “Hey wanna see my new knife?” In and Out, In and Out.
As obnoxious as it was, it’s hard to resist the fun of playing around with good OTF knife. Even if it involves multiple band-aids from the self -inflicted “training” along the way.
When I think of good knives that I’ve had in my life, I think of that one and I see it in my head, with the sandy, dust filled light of a Baghdad sunrise in the background.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Airsoft and My Cold Steel Leatherneck, by M.A.

A LITTLE WORD ABOUT AIRSOFT IN THE WORLD

Airsoft is some kind of joke for any serious military or firearms enthusiast, and for many good reasons. Airsoft ‘guns’ – even the most expensive ones – are nothing more than toys for kids, or movie props at best: unreliable, lightweight replicas, very cool to grab and shoot, but without any value for any serious shooting-range enthusiast. Airsoft ammunitions also lacks any marking system, so airsoft skirmishing should never be considered a real sport, but a game for ‘old aged kids’ trying to feel ‘inside movies’ or – in the worst ‘human cases’ – inside computer games.

THE ITALIAN AIRSOFT CHAMPIONSHIP

Despite that sad basic truths, Italy got crazy for airsoft and in a few years we found ‘our’ way to transform it in something REALLY serious. The most doesn’t know but here in Italy there is a well established (around 20 years) italian airsoft championship that solved the problem of the marking system using only one very smart rule.  Teams DON’T play against each other (as in football, soccer, Formula One, etc) but fight against arbitrators. In simple words, arbitrators act as the ‘bad guys’ and set up the very same mission for every playing team, and the one that accomplish this very same mission better than any other, is the final winner of that event.

Each championship run is made by five events in two years and I personally play my region’s championship from more years than I want to admit to myself (fifteen…. Yep).
In the nineties – when the championship was still ‘young’ – the events were short and simple, they weren’t physical demanding and didn’t required any land navigation skill.
But year after year, the championship always got harder and harder, to the point that nowadays the average difficulty sounds crazy to the most.
The hardest events usually require players to march up to 60 kilometers in 30 hours, without any real pause to sleep and under ANY weather (rain, snow, etc).
No matter how tired, cold, wet, sleepy you are… You have to never give up with both mind and body, because when you are too tired/wet/cold/sleep, fighting well is much more difficult.
My team’s best result ever, was 28th on 260 teams from all Italy in 2009.

THE BLADEOPS STORY

Cold Steel Tanto Leatherneck
Cold Steel Tanto Leatherneck

What I am going to tell you didn’t happen during one of those hardcore championship events, but during a ‘movie inspired’ non-sporting event, mostly made to entertain people and without any final classification at all. Anyway, most players were coming from the local championship, and I finally had the pleasure to have the italian champions right on my side during a couple of missions (the ‘Blackhawks’ of Pastrengo, really funny guys I am a friend of from a long time).

Most of the fun of the event came from the fact that every player had his own fictional character and had to act accordingly, so to create a fictional, movie-like world.. So, here’s what happened.

My four men patrol was radio-ordered from headquarter to go on certain coordinates on the field, to check some ‘unknown movements’.

It was night, and when we reached the place, we found two relaxed, armed guardsmen talking aloud, as if they had nothing to do. Thinking they weren’t enemies and dangerous neither, we didn’t opened up fire and approached them peacefully, saying we were army regulars. They told us that they were guards of a nearby bank and that we kindly had to ‘back off’, which we did. We then hide back in the woods and radioed our headquarter who the guys were, and what they were doing.

“Stay in place, team 7” was the reply.
“We are going to give you a mission”

After a couple of minutes the orders arrived: we had to conquer the bank with ‘extreme prejudice’, but first we had to try to convince the two guards to simply go away.
Then I had an idea, so I offered myself to my team to talk again with the guards.

I pulled out my Cold Steel ‘leatherneck’ training (hard rubber) knife from its sheath, then I reverse gripped it, covering it with my wrist and forearm.  Since the pockets of my woodland-BDU pants are very large, I also put half of it inside my pocket.
From the front point of view, it was invisible. My plan was to put my rifle on the ground and go to talk with the guards, but with the hidden knife at the ready. Then, I realized I was making a bad mistake.

My rifle has a three points sling and I was wearing it around my neck, so there was no way I could put my rifle down on the ground using one hand only. And using two, I would have surely exposed the knife in the pocket. So I took the sling out from my neck and hold the rifle with one hand only. When I was ready, my team mates hide themselves in the woods while I stayed in plain sight, waiting for the guards to return.

A couple of minutes later, they were back in place. This time they were silent and their rifle were at the ready. Anyway, seeing me on the open and right in front of them with the rifle pointed muzzle down, they thought I had no bad intentions.

“Can I talk with you again?” I said but they didn’t reply.
So I added: “I put my rifle down on the ground. You see? I leave it here and come to you”
“Okay then. Come here”

Seeing I left the rifle far away, the two guards relaxed a lot, and lowered their weapons from at-the-ready to down on their slings. I walked to them than I started to talk:

“The army told me to stay on guard in this sector but they didn’t talk me about any bank”
“Anyway, here there’s a bank for sure, and it’s our duty to watch it. Regular army or not, you can’t stay here”
“It probably is just a map misunderstanding, but we have a job to do. Can you please simply get away?”
“Of course we can’t. That’s a problem of yours, not ours”
“I don’t know how to say that to you guys. So I will put it plain and simple: you should really get the XXX away from here”
“We are not going anyway you stupid –

With a single movement, I slid my rubber knife under both the necks in front of me.
Cold Steel’s training rubber is quite hard, so for safety reasons I slid it a little lower than the real throats were and before the talking guard could end his phrase, everything was already over. A little while of silence followed up.

“I just slit both of your throats” I said.
“You did it for sure” said one guard.
“I don’t know if rubber knives are covered in our rules” said the other.
“As you wish – I said – but my team is hidden right behind you. You see? And they are ready to fire”

The guards turned themselves and saw the rest of my team coming out from the darkness of the nearby trees.

“It doesn’t matter – said one guard to the other -, I liked the way he did it and his acting too. Go on with your mission right now, guys. Time is clicking”

IN THE PHOTO:
Me just a few minutes before the events told here.
I wear a woodland BDU with an english ARKTIS ‘long range’ chest.
My airsoft weapons weapons were:
+ a PANTHER ARMS short barrel version of the M4
+ a WILSON COMBAT CQB (1911 clone in the inner holster of the ARKTIS, not visible)
+ a Cold Steel Leatherneck training knife (near the neck, barely visible)
+ an ATN NVM-14 night vision monocular

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Picking the Perfect Knife for You, by B.A.

Picking the perfect knife for you

contest-pickingA lot of times, when I’m deciding on my next knife, I spend as much time researching and comparing as I did helping plan my own wedding. (I’m talking about napkins and crap, not my wife.) There are a lot of things to consider and narrowing it down can be a grueling job if you over-think it like I do. Here are some things that have helped me figure out exactly what I want in a knife:
1. USE: The most important thing you will want to consider is what you will be using it for. Is it a tool, for self defense, survival, hunting, or a time consumer like a butterfly knife? When you know exactly what it is you intend to use it for, it makes it much easier to select the category to start and this will get you pointed in the right direction. (No pun intended.) It is vital however, that no matter what you plan to do with it, you know how. Study up on how to properly handle it. This could be knowing how to efficiently gut an animal or resorting to it as a line of defense. Taking it out and not being trained in how to employ it could result in more trouble than it was worth in the beginning. Knives are to be respected as the weapon they are. Many knives can be multipurpose and cover a couple of these categories. My suggestion is that you utilize it for the purpose it was created but know its limits. A folder knife doesn’t really make a great hunting knife because they aren’t fun to clean and aren’t as reliable as a full tang (blade goes the entire length of the handle) which can also be used in a survival situation to chop wood or throw with less chance of breaking. However, walking around with a machete hanging off your waste tends to give people a bad impression of you. And I’m sure you’re a real decent person.
2. BLADE: As I said before, a full tang blade is much more reliable and will hold up through whatever you throw at it. On the other hand, a good folder can tuck comfortably in your pocket and give you a subtle extra hand in almost any situation. Be sure to check local laws if you plan to carry a knife concealed on your person. In most cases, the blade must be shorter than 4 inches and have a pocket clip to remain visible. I know this is especially true in California where all their laws are whack but in Utah, where I live, I have talked to several authorities and the general consensus here is that as long as you can justify it as a useful tool and that you aren’t just carrying it with intent to do harm then it is alright. The guy who did my concealed carry class told me that the permit does not cover knives and that I would have to research that separate. I still haven’t found anything saying otherwise so don’t quote me on it, but that’s all I know.
A few things to consider are the type of steel, the type of blade, number of blades, and length. Most common knives you find have a standard stainless steel or 440. There are 3 types of 440 steel. 440A, 440B and, you guessed it, 440C. C is the best and also the most expensive. If it isn’t specified which, you can assume that it is A. Any of these metals will work for day to day functions but can be considered essentially base grade. If you really want to invest, you can look into more upscale metals like s30v or v10. Those are just some more common types. There is also Damascus (real Damascus hasn’t been made for centuries since the recipe was lost) which is very strong, and titanium which is weaker but won’t rust making it great for diving knives. You may want to go with a multi-tool if you’re looking for practicality. I’ll swear up and down on the Leatherman Wave but the Surge is a close second. A Swiss army knife is also a good alternative. This gives you multiple blade options for more specific jobs. Remember that every blade eventually goes dull. Invest in a honer and sharpener and then learn how to properly use it. Benchmade makes a great honer and Spyderco a great V design sharpener, both available at Bladeops.com. A good point here is to think about the fact that it is much harder to sharpen a serrated blade. They are practical in that they can cut tougher materials but lack the surgical precision of a straight blade. And finally, you need to think about what style you are looking for. I have a trailing point blade that I use for gutting ducks, my deer knife has a gut hook, my butterfly knife has a tanto which is more handy for day to day jobs, and my all purpose daily carry is a drop point which I find better for self defense and it better fits my personal needs. A few other types include: the clip point, pen style, needle point, spear point, and hawkbill. Each was created for its own purpose but have fairly specific jobs.
3. MECHANISM: This is where personal taste and style really come into play. If you want your knife to have panache, an assisted knife allows quick access and cool presentation. Out the Front or OTF knives are a great example. However, pig stickers like the balisong butterfly knives serve little purpose other than to impress or intimidate, if that’s your game, showoff. They require a process to access and freak most people out but are a fun talent to master and teach you a sick sort of serenity. It’s kind of like how martial arts are supposed to bring you a kind of enlightenment. I do suggest that if you go this route to pick one held together with pins rather than screws. I’ve had many a butterfly explode on me after playing with it too long. People like screws because you can adjust it to your preferred tightness tolerances but if you do go that way, use lock-tite to keep the screws in place.
A full tang knife can hang from your belt or you can carry a lock blade in your pocket. It’s all personal preference. Lock knives have a wide variety of options. Cold Steel have a very reliable lock back that they advertise with military personnel swinging from knife to knife like monkey bars. Very common is the liner locker style which can be a trick at times but I find more reliable. And then there’s the lever lock or button lock which has a switch on the side of the handle to release it. It’s all about finding your price range and knowing what you like. If you can only afford $65 then don’t play with a $300 knife. After that, everything in your range will feel like garbage. More popular brands will usually offer better quality. That’s what got their name to where it is. A few noteworthy brands are: Gerber (Don’t buy it just because Bear Grylls posted his face all over it), Benchmade, Buck, Kershaw, Shrade, Boker, Spyderco, SOG, Cold Steel, K-Bar and CRKT. Go with what looks good to you. Find what fits your hand and something that you can see owning for a long time. Who said you had to have just one? I own over 70. Granted, for some that may be excessive, but each has a function, a specific purpose, and better yet –a story.

After a long excessive trial and error period of many years, I have decided that the CRKT M21 -14SFG “Big Dog” is the pocket knife that works best for me. CRKT is a fairly new company but has already made itself an outstanding reputation with 15 patents under its belt. I was looking for a heavy duty blade that could take a beating to perform any mechanic work I may use it for and double as a personal defense. The reasons this one won out over so many others was primarily the hilt. The number one injury in a knife fight is actually your fingers slipping up onto the blade and cutting you all up. Having the hilt prevents this but it also allows me to quickdraw the knife from my pocket. When I pull it out, it catches in the corner and pulls the blade open. The only other knife I’ve seen with this option is the Emerson series by Kershaw. I had to change the position of the pocket clip to permit this but the nice thing is that it has 4 possible clip locations for left or right handed handlers. Use lock-tite on the screws when switching it. Another plus is that it is not an assisted knife, but by applying a lot of pressure with my forefinger to the hilt on the back of the closed knife and then releasing the blade with the other fingers, I am able to make it spring open as if it were. It is perfectly balanced which also gives it the potential to make a good throwing knife if it came to that, and I throw it often to get the feel down. It is a steel frame and has a 8Cr14MoV blade with nitrade coating. In English that means that it holds up better than an aluminium construction and is resistant to corrosion. From tip to bottom it is about 9.25 inches. It’s a standard crocodile Dundee. It was designed based on the requests of military procurement specialists. This is just the one that works best for me and I wanted to explain why. I hope this has all helped save some money and time in figuring out what you’re looking for. All I can say is find what satisfies your taste and needs. It’s ok to have more than one.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Microtech QD Scarab OTF Knife, by P.L.

Microtech QD Scarab
Microtech QD Scarab

I chose to review the Microtech QD Scarab OTF Knife because it is one of my favorite knives that I own. It is a very high-end knife that is worth ever dollar. It is a definite must have for the serious collector. But even better, it is good for an every day carry. It is well built and extremely reliable. This OTF is great, the speed and power behind this blade is second to none. This drop point blade is my first choice for any situation whether be law enforcement, military, or zombie apocalypse.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram