CRKT Amicus Compact Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company, or CRKT, was founded in Oregon in 1994. This is an American company that is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over twenty years now, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. CRKT believes that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To do this, they collaborate with the best designers in the world, some of which are Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. They also own fifteen patents and patents pending, which include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. In the past two decades, they have gained a serious reputation of long lasting, ground breaking knives. But, it wasn’t that way all the time. It wasn’t until 1997 at the Shot Show when they introduced the K.I.S.S, Keep It Super Simple, knife. This knife was designed by Ed Halligan and is a small folder. CRKT sold out of the entire years’ worth of product in the opening days.

CRKT has recently released a new knife to the Amicus series. This is the Amicus Compact.

 

CRKT 5441 Compact Amicus
CRKT 5441 Compact Amicus

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Jesper Voxnaes. He is from Loegstrup, Denmark and when he needs to test a design, he only has to step into his own backyard. The harsh elements and conditions of the fjords and forests in his native Denmark do the rest. When he was starting out, no one was making the knife of knives he wanted to design so he learned by trial and error. Apparently his efforts paid off given his IF Award in 2013 for one of the Top European Designs. Now he creates and uses knives like the Amicus as he sails, camps, and drives off road.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8CR13MoV steel. This formula of steel is form a Chinese steel that has many different versions of the steel. The highest or best formula of the steel is the 9Cr formula, but 8Cr falls quickly behind. The best steel to compare this steel with is AUS 8 steel, however 8Cr is the inferior steel out of the two. 8Cr is a stainless steel, so it does resist rust fairly well, but you do have to make sure that you are keeping up on maintenance. This is a softer steel, so it is extremely easy to sharpen—many beginners can pull it off. And, you can get an extremely fine edge on 8Cr steel that does last quite a while. The biggest feature that this steel boasts is its low price. You get a steel that can stand up to most tasks for a very inexpensive cost. However, you do have to keep in mind that you do get what you pay for when it comes to steel, so while it will stand up to most tasks, this blade steel is not going to excel at anything.

The blade has been finished satin. This is one of the more traditional finishes. It is created by continuously sanding the steel in one direction with an increasing level of abrasive material—usually a sandpaper. The satin finish’s main purpose is to showcase the lines in the steel. In terms of how shiny this steel is, this is a fairly medium finish. It is not as shiny as a mirror finish, but it is more reflective than a matte finish. If you are looking for a very classic look, this finish is going to be your best bet.

The steel on the Amicus Compact has been carved into a tanto blade shape. This style of blade was originally designed for armor piercing because it was designed after the Japanese long and short swords. In the early 80s Cold Steel Americanized and popularized the tanto blade shape and now you can easily find a knife with this style of blade. This blade is for when you don’t want an all-purpose knife, but instead you want a knife that does one thing and does that one thing extremely well. This one thing is piercing through tough materials. The tanto style is formed with a high point and a flat grind, which leads to a crazy strong point that is perfect for stabbing into those hard materials. The tanto style also has a thick point which contains a lot of metal near the tip. Because of the extra metal, it can absorb the impact from repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to crack under the pressure. The front edge of the tanto knife meets the back edge of it at an angle, instead of the traditional curve. Because of this, the tanto has no belly, which is why you can’t use this for slicing or general utility purpose. But, by sacrificing the belly, your receive the extremely strong point. This style of knife is perfect for those unexpected moments while adventuring or even just going through your daily life.

The edge of this knife is a plain edge. This is the more traditional edge that you are going to find on knives and is tailored for excelling at push cuts. This means that the plain edge is going to be perfect for slicing, peeling, and skinning. As more benefits, the plain edge is the easier edge to sharpen because you don’t have to worry about all of the small teeth while sharpening. And, you can get your plain edge sharper than you could get a serrated or combo edge. Some people are worried that without the teeth of a serrated edge, they aren’t going to be able to saw through the harder and tougher materials. For the most part, you are going to want a serrated edge for those tougher materials, but if you get your edge sharp enough and with the benefits of the strong tanto shape, you will be able to get through those materials.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Amicus Compact is made out of stainless steel with G 10 scales covering one side of it. Stainless steel provides the user with durability that is out of the park as well as crazy resistance to corrosion. However, it is not lightweight and is going to weigh the knife down. It is also quite slippery. To combat both of these problems, CRKT used less stainless steel and added G 10 scales.

G 10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, but with the slight lag of qualities, you can get it for a much cheaper price. To create this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin. The manufacturer then compresses the layers of cloth and bakes them under pressure. The material that comes out is extremely tough, very hard, quite lightweight, and very strong. G 10 is even considered to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta. However, this is a brittle material because the fibers are all arranged in one direction, so when it is stressed in opposing directions, it will break down. One of the drawbacks that many knife users express is that the G 10 does not have much character and lacks elegance.

To provide you with exceptional grip, CRKT has added intense checkering as texture on the G 10 scale. There is also a row of shallow but thick jimping near the butt of the handle. The finger groove on this knife is shallow and elongated to provide you with a comfortable grip. There is also a finger guard to protect your fingers from getting sliced in the event of slipping.

As a cherry on top of the design of the handle, there is a lanyard hole on the butt, carved out of the stainless steel. One of the best reasons to keep a lanyard on your knife is that it makes it easier to attach to your belt or backpack strap, while keeping it out of the way when you aren’t using this knife, but giving you easy access when you do need your knife. The lanyard will also protect your knife from loss while you are out and about. I’ve come to realize that the preference for a lanyard is really a love-hate type of thing with people either loving it or see no point in it. Either way, it is always great to have the option.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a low carry clip that is made out of stainless steel. It is held in place by two small silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The pocket clip is attached on the back of the knife, or the stainless steel side of the two toned handle. In the middle of this pocket clip, CRKT has stamped their logo.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that uses a thumb slot blade deployment. This type of mechanism has been around since the 1980s and is exactly what it sounds like—a slot cut into the knife that gives you a spot to gain purchase on and flip the knife open. One of the first companies to use this style of mechanism was Spyderco, but most other knife companies have jumped on the train, and for good reason—it works excellently. Using it is basically like using a thumb stud and by its design, it is extremely ambidextrous. One of the advantages that the thumb stud does not offer is that the slot does not protrude from the blade and get in the way like the thumb stud sometimes does.

The Amicus Compact sports a frame lock locking mechanism. The frame lock is very similar to the liner lock is except that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. The handle on knives with a frame lock is often cut forma steel that is much thicker than the liner of most locks. Just like the liner lock, the frame lock is situated with the liner set inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, which engages it at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Amicus Compact is 3.004 inches long with a thickness of 0.124 inches. The overall length of this knife is 7.313 inches long and it sports a closed length of 4.249 inches. This knife weighs in at 3.8 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Designer Jesper Voxnaes has done it again with a redesign of the popular CRKT Amicus folder knife–the Amicus Compact. The word “amicus” actually translates to “friend” or “comrade” which is fitting considering how this knife will deliver whenever you call upon it. From basic chores to demanding tasks, the 3″ tanto style blade is ideal for cutting and piercing and the G-10 front scale and stainless steel back scale provide a secure grip and quick and easy access. Just like its larger counterpart, the protruding back spacer provides jimping for multiple carry options and the lanyard hole make carry options almost limitless. The pock clip is designed for tip up or tip down carry. The Amicus Compact is the perfect size for when you want a knife with you that is going to be able to take on the majority of your daily task, but still preparing you for taking on those unexpected situations that tend to pop up in your everyday life. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

 

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT AUX Knife Series Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company was founded in Oregon in 1994. This is an American company that is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over 2 decades now CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. CRKT operates on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. They also collaborate with the best designers in the world, some of which are Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Laker, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. CRKT also owns fifteen patents and patents pending which include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated Edges.

This company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

They recently released a brand new series of knives which includes two folding knives and one fixed blade. They called it the AUX series.

 

The Designer:

The designer of this series of knives is Lucas Burnley. He is from Albuquerque, New Mexico. When you ask him was drew him to the knife world as a teenager, he will tell you it was stories of survival, off path adventures with his father, and a healthy dose of action movies. Over the years, he has experimented with a broad range of styles to artfully combine classical examples with modern materials and techniques, such as with his Obake knife, Lucas believes knives are a personal expression of independence.

 

The Blades:

The blades on all of the knives are made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese steel that comes from a series of steels that has many different formulas in it. The best formula of steel in this Chinese series is 9Cr steel, but 8Cr steel does fall closely behind. When comparing this type of steel to other steels, it is most commonly compared to AUS 8 steel. 8Cr is the inferior between the two though. 8Cr steel is a soft steel, but surprisingly enough, it does maintain a very fine edge for long periods of time. As a bonus, it is extremely easy to sharpen, because of the softness behind it. It is a stainless steel, so it does resist rusting and corroding well, but you will still need to be keeping up on your maintenance, such as cleaning and oiling your blade. The biggest advantage that this blade steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. With steel, you do get what you pay for though, so while this steel is going to stand up to most challenges, it is not going to excel at anything.

There are two different finishes that this series offers. The fixed blade and one of the folding knives has a satin finish. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the steel in one direction with an increasing level of abrasive. The abrasive that is most commonly used is sandpaper. This is one of the most traditional and classic finishes that you can find on a knife today. In terms of reflectiveness, it is a medium finish. It does cut down on glares and reflections, but it is in no means matte. One of the biggest characteristics of this finish is that it shows of the lines in the steel.

The second finish option is on the second folding knife. It sports a black oxide finish. This is a blackening finish that is a conversion coating for ferrous materials. It is use to add mid corrosion resistance, for appearance, and to minimize light reflection. While this is a quality finish, it is a coating finish, so it will scratch or peel off after periods of long or heavy use.

There are also two different edge styles that you can choose from with this series of knives. Both knife versions that feature the satin finish have a plain edge. This is the more traditional style of edge that is ideal for push cuts including skinning, peeling, and slicing. You can get a sharper edge on this style and it is easier to sharpen.

The version of the knife that features the Black Oxide coating has a combination edge. This is when the half of the blade closer to the handle is serrated and the other half is plain. This type of edge gives the user the best of both worlds, because they have the teeth to saw through some of the thicker materials, but they also have a plain portion that is perfect for small slices or even detail work.

All three of the knives in the AUX series feature spear point blades. This style of blade is very similar to the needle point blade because they are both great for piercing. However, it also differs from the needle point blade because it has a stronger point and it contains a small belly that can be used for slicing. When you compare the belly to a style of knife that has been created for its belly such as a drop point or clip point, the belly on the spear point tends to seem very small. To shape of the spear point is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center line of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. One of the most common places that you are going to find a spear point is on a throwing knife. The spear point does have a lowered edge, which gives you more control over your cuts and slices. This makes the AUX a great option for fine tip work. The spear point knife style is considered a hybrid style because it does contain a belly for some cutting and slicing applications, but it also has the point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade. This style of blade is a great choice for the knife lover who is looking for the perfect balance between piercing and slicing abilities.

 

The Handle:

CRKT 1200 AUX Fixed Blade
CRKT 1200 AUX Fixed Blade

The handles on all of these knives are made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN. This is a thermoplastic material that is super strong, very resistant to bending, abrasion, and is practically indestructible. Even better, it’s a very cheap material. It is such an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. All of this lends well to high volume manufacturing and thus the low cost. What makes this material so strong is that the fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout, which makes it strong in all directions. Similar materials such as G 10, Carbon Fiber, an Micarta have the fibers arranged in only one direction which makes it brittle when it is stressed in the other directions. Many people did not warm up to this material because they thought it felt cheap and somewhat hollow. Another drawback is that it tends to provide the user with less grip. The GRN on all of the versions is black, with a texture of deep dimples. These dimples will provide you with a secure grip in almost any situation.

The handle on the different versions vary: the fixed blade version does not have a finger groove, but it does sport a finger guard to protect your hand from getting cut. There is also a row of thick jimping on the fixed blade version where the blade meets the handle, so as to provide you with better control over your cuts. The last thing that the fixed blade version has that is different from the other two is that it sports a lanyard hole at the butt end of it. The lanyard is great to fold over your handle to provide you with extra grip or for attaching your knife to your belt or pack strap so that it is out of the way, but you still have easy access to it. The hardware on this version of the knife is silver.

The handles on both of the folding versions do sport a finger groove, but this groove is more rectangular than you would normally find, but it will provide you with a comfortable grip even for long periods of use. The hardware on these handles are also silver.

 

The AUX:

The Mechanism:

This knife in the series is a fixed blade. There are so many advantages to owning a fixed blade. For starters, they are bigger and stronger because they don’t have to be small enough to fold into itself. They also don’t break, because there are no moving, small, inward parts that have the tendency to rust or break. To go along with that advantage, a fixed blade is so much easier to maintain. This is because you do not have to worry about the moving, small, inward parts to clean. Basically all you have to do is wipe down the blade and handle and oil the blade. It is a very simple process. Fixed blades are also superior for tactical use because they can be brought into play faster than a folding knife. They are also a superior survival too because they are so strong, you can use them for a variety of reasons such as cutting, digging, splitting wood, food preparation, hunting, hammering, and even prying. If you are looking for a knife that is going to do it all, look no further than the AUX.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.451 inches long, with a thickness of 0.122 inches. The overall length of the knife is 7.563 inches long and it weighs in at 3.9 ounces.

 

The AUX Folder and the AUX Folder Black:

CRKT 1221K AUX Folder
CRKT 1221K AUX Folder

The Mechanism:

These knives are folding knives with a thumb disk blade deployment. They also sport a locking liner. The thumb disk is similar to the flipper, because it is a small protrusion on the spine of the blade that you can use to assist you while you deploy the blade.

The locking liner is one of the more common mechanism that you are going to find on folding knives. The main component of this mechanism is a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the sharp edge of the blade, essentially “lining” the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed the spring bar is held under tension. And when the knife is fully opened, that same tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, which keeps it firmly in place and prevents it from closing. To disengage this type of lock, you use your thumb to push the spring bar down towards the pocket clip so that it clears contact form the butt of the blade. This then lets you use your index finger to push the blade just enough so that it keeps the bar pushed down so you can remove your thumb from the blade path and then continue to safely close the knife. Some of the benefits to this type of mechanism tis that they allow the knife to have two true handle sides. You can also close the knife with one hand without switching grip, which is perfect for when you need both hands on the job. However, you should know that this type of locking mechanism is not as strong or durable as other locking systems, so keep that in mind for when you are doing heavy duty tasks.

 

CRKT 1220 AUX Folder
CRKT 1220 AUX Folder

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.211 inches long with a thickness of 0.144 inches. The overall length of the knife is 7.688 inches long with a closed length of 4.424 inches. These versions of the knife weigh in at 4.2 ounces.  

 

Conclusion:

The AUX is one of many new models released by CRKT this year and is offered in 2 different functionalities as well as 2 distinct blade configurations. They were designed with the vision of being an AUXiliary to the users primary EDC of choice. This is a high quality knife that is going to change the way you think about everyday carry knives. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT Pineapple Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT was founded in 1994. This is an American company that is known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over 20 years now, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. Some of these designers are Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. CRKT also owns fifteen patents and patents pending, some of which are the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer, both of whom were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. Even though it seems like they’ve always been a strong company, there was a time where it was struggling. The company did not truly take off for about three years after it had been founded. It was in 1977 at the Shot Show when they introduced the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife. This was a small folder that was designed by Ed Halligan and it was a huge success. Within the opening days of the show, the years’ worth of the product had sold out. Since then, they have produced a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

They have recently released a brand new folding knife called the Pineapple.

CRKT Pineapple Knife
CRKT Pineapple Knife

The Designer:

The Pineapple was designed by Matthew Lerch. He was initially trained as a jewelry and watchmaker, but then progressed into manufacturing and tool making. He now has a few patents under his belt for innovations like the Fire Safe, and has been honored with some prestigious award including the Buster Warenski award. Matt views knives as functional art, as evidenced in his Moxie and the Blade Show award winning Endorser design.

 

The Blade:

The steel on this blade is 1.4116 stainless steel. This is the steel that is used in Swiss Army Knives and it is an excellent steel for beginner sharpeners. One of the drawbacks to this steel is that it does not hold an edge super well, but because it is so easy to sharpen, it ends up being less of a drawback. You can get this steel razor sharp in only a few minutes. This steel is crazy corrosion and rust resistant. This is a German steel that is most popular on kitchen knife sets in German knives. This steel has an HRC level of 56-58.

The finish on the blade is a stonewash finish. This finish is created by tumbling the steel around with an abrasive material, which is usually small pebbles. This creates a rugged, texture to the steel. After it has been tumbled around, the steel is smoothed out and polished. The resulting look is an even, matte gray. This steel finish works to cut down on glares and reflections. The biggest thing that this finish does is preserve the look of the blade overtime, because it works to hide the scratches and fingerprints that the steel would accumulate over time.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape. This is one of the most popular and versatile blade shapes that you are going to find on a knife. One of the most common places that you are going to find a drop point blade shape is on a hunting knife, but it is also used on many other styles of knives because of how versatile it is. To form this shape, the back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curving manner. This slow curve creates a lowered point, and the lowered point provides more control to your cuts and slices. The reason that this blade shape is found on so many hunting knives is because it is so easily controllable; the hunter does not have to worry about slipping or accidently nicking the internal organs or ruining the meat. The lowered tip also adds a lot more strength to the tip of this knife. Because of the tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy sue, drop point blades are popular on tactical and survival knives. A drop point knife shape and a clip point knife shape is often confused. Both of these knife shapes are very popular as well as being extremely versatile. The biggest difference between the two are the tip shape. Each of the tips have a handful of benefits, but also a drawback or two. The clip point has a lowered tip, so it is also controllable, but it does not have a broad tip. The lack of the broad tip means that it is weaker and more prone to breaking, but it also means that you have stabbing capabilities. The drop point has a lowered tip, like I mentioned, but it does have a very broad tip. SO while you do have so much more strength behind the tip, you also lose out on most of your stabbing capabilities. That is really the only drawback to the drop point blade shape. One of the other reasons that this is such a versatile knife shape is that it sports a large belly area that provides plenty of length to make slicing a breeze. The drop point blade shape provides you with the abilities to take on all of your everyday tasks, but it also prepares you for the unexpected circumstances that seem to surround your everyday life.

The edge on blade is a plain edge, which makes this an ideal knife for your everyday carry blade. The plain edge is more traditional and is easier to sharpen as well as having the capacity to get a finer edge on the blade. The plain edge is the perfect edge for push cuts, which include skinning, peeling, and slicing.

To add to the control that you have over your knife, there is a row of thick, deep jimping on the spine of the knife near the handle. On the sharpened edge, near the handle, there is a deep cut out.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the pineapple is made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN. This is thermoplastic material that is super strong and crazy resistant to bending, abrasion, and practically indestructible. As an added bonus, it’s cheap. This is an inexpensive option because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. All this lends well to high volume manufacturing and low cost. With this material, all of the fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which is why it is so strong and practically indestructible. With similar materials such as G 10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, the fibers are all arranged in a single direction, so when the fibers are stressed in other directions, it tends to be brittle or fall apart. But, because the GRN is arranged haphazardly, when it is stressed in any direction, it can stand up to it and not fall apart.  Many knife lovers took a while to warm up to this material, as well as FRN and Zytel (because they are all extremely similar), because they thought it felt cheap and somewhat hollow. Another drawback to this material is that it tends to offer less of grip than G 10 does.

The GRN on this handle is black and intensely textured. Not only does it have intense textured, but it also has cross hatches across the butt half of the handle to look as if it is a pineapple. On the bottom and top of the handle, there is a row of thick, deep jimping to improve your grip on it. Because of its multiple jimping platforms, you have a virtually 360-degree secure hold. When describing the handle, CRKT said, “The handle pattern, made with glass-reinforced nylon with G10 texture, was modeled after a pineapple frag grenade. Even in gritty conditions, it offers an extremely secure grip whether you’re performing fine detail work or long, slashing cuts.”

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a silver pocket clip that matches the blade of the Pineapple. On the middle of this clip, CRKT’s logo is stamped on in dark grey. This is a long clip that is angled to curve around the side of the knife. This clip is kept in place by two small, dark grey screws that match the rest of the hardware on the knife. This clip is designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that features a flipper opening mechanism as well as a locking liner. The flipper on the Pineapple is not the typical flipper shape. Instead, it is rectangular and very skinny. The flipper is a small piece of the blade that protrudes out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. To deploy the knife, you pull back on the flipper protrusion which puts enough pressure on the blade to flip the blade out and lock it into place.

The locking mechanism on this knife is a liner lock. The liner lock is one of the more common mechanisms seen on folding knives. This mechanism’s characteristic component is a side spring bar located on the same side as the sharp edge of the blade, essentially lining the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, the tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, keeping it firmly in place and preventing it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to use your thumb to push the spring bar down so that it clears contact from the butt of the blade. This lets you use your index finger to push the blade just enough so that it keeps the bar pushed down so you can remove your thumb from the blade path, then continue to safely close the knife. One of the benefits of a liner lock is that they allow a knife to have two true handle sides. You can also close the knife with one hand without switching grip, which is perfect for when you need both hands on the job. You will find liner locks in both entry level and high end knives. However, the liner lock is not as strong as other locking systems. They are still very strong and can hold their own, but they are made out of a thinner piece of metal, so they are more prone to wearing out.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Pineapple is 2.625 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.125 inches. The overall length of this knife is 6.188 inches long and has a closed length of 3.541 inches. The weight of this knife is 3.3 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Pineapple is one of the new models that CRKT has released in 2017. It was designed by the American knife maker Matthew Lerch. This knife is ready in an instant and its rugged construction is built to handle even the toughest of jobs. Each model features a pineapple frag grenade design that is coarsely textured which is complimented by its multiple jimping platforms. The knife that features a liner lock is pocket friendly but can still blow its competition to bits.   You can pick your Pineapple knife up here.  CRKT has a reputation of designing and building high quality knives that are extremely durable. This model, the Pineapple 4120, features a black Glass Reinforced Nylon handle, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade with a stonewash finish on the 1.4116 stainless steel and the an angled pocket clip that is designed for tip up carry on the traditional side of the handle.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT Bombastic Flipper Knife Review

CRKT was born in Oregon in 1994. Columbia River Knife and Tool is an American company that is known for their distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over 20 years now, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. CRKT collaborates with the best designers in the world and operates on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand.

This company was founded by Paul Gillespie and Rod Bremer. Both of these men were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. However, this company did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show. This is when they introduced the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife. This was a small folder that had been designed by Ed Halligan. Within the opening days of the show, the entire years’ worth of product was sold out. That was when this company truly became a successful company and hit the radar of many members in the knife community.

CRKT produces a wide range of field blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. They have collaborated with many of the best knife makers and designers in the world, including Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and The Graham Brothers. CRKT also owns fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of these are the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff Serrated edges.

 

The Designer:

The CRKT Bombastic was designed by Ken Onion. Ken is considered the Real Deal. He was the youngest ever inductee into the Blade Magazine Hall of Fame in 2008. He is also recognized as one of the most innovative and successful knife designers of all time. In 1996, he created the first commercially successful assisted opening mechanism, and 20 years later he unveiled his award winning Field Strip Technology. He is also the designer of the successful Eros folder series, as well as the award wining Hi Jinx. It seems as if Ken Onion is never at a loss for ideas.

This means that you can be confident that the Bombastic will also include innovative and ground breaking technology, as well as looking aesthetically pleasing.

CRKT Bombastic Flipper
CRKT Bombastic Flipper

The Blade:

The blade on the Bombastic is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel belongs in a series of Chinese steels. In the series, there are a variety of different formulas of steels, with 9Cr steel being the top dog. However, 8Cr steel falls closely behind in terms of quality and durability. I wouldn’t recommend going anywhere near any of the steels lower than a 6Cr when you are choosing a knife blade, because after that, they are much too soft. 8Cr steel is most commonly compared to AUS 8 in terms of similar qualities, hardness, and durability. Between the two steels, the AUS 8 is the superior steel though. 8Cr steel is super easy to sharpen because of the softness that the steel has. And, you can get a very fine edge on this knife blade. Another benefit of this type of steel is that the edge will last for long periods of time. The biggest feature that this type of steel boasts is how inexpensive this steel is. But while it is nice to keep the costs of your knife down, keep in mind you do get what you pay for. So while this steel is an average steel that is going to get the job done and be a breeze to sharpen, it is just an average steel that is not going to excel at anything.

The steel has been coated in a Black Oxide finish. This finish is a conversion coating that blackens the blade of your knife. This is a great finish for steels and is used to mainly add levels of corrosion resistance to the metal. Another two big reasons that people use this coating is because of the way it makes the blade look (sleek, all-black), and to minimize the glares and reflections off your blade. Keep in mind that it is a coating finish, so it will scratch off after time and/or hard use.

There is also another version of the knife that features a satin finish on the blade. The satin finish is created when the knife is continually sanded in one direction with a fine abrasive—normally sandpaper. This finish works to showcase the lines of the knife and is a very classic finish.

The steel on this blade has been carved into a spear point blade shape. This blade shape is very similar to the needle point blade. But there are a few differences between the two. The spear point blade shape is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center line of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that liens up exactly with the equator of the blade. This blade shape is often found on throwing knives, but are also on a variety of other knife types. The main differences between a spear point blade and a needle point blade is that the needle point blade has a very sharp but weak point. The spear point blade has a stronger point, that is a little less sharp, but still sharp enough to pierce. The spear point has a slightly lowered point that provides you with more control over your cuts and slices. Plus, the controllable point is excellent for fine point work, such as carving. Another great benefit that comes with a spear point blade is that it rocks a small belly. This can be used for some cutting and slicing, however, it is not going to compare to a drop point or a clip point. The spear point blade shape is a great choice for someone who is looking for a good balance between piercing and slicing. This blade shape is considered a hybrid blade design and it is a very functional shape.

The Bombastic knife that sports the Black Oxide finish sports a combo edge. This means that half of the edge is plain, while the other half (the half closer to the handle) is serrated. This edge gives you the best of both worlds, because you do have the plain edge for slicing, but you also have the serrated edge for the thicker or harder materials.

The Bombastic knife that has the satin edge features a plain edge. This edge is excellent if you know that the majority of your tasks will be some form of slicing. Plus, this type of edge is much easier to sharpen than a combo or serrated edge.

CRKT Satin Bombastic Flipper
CRKT Satin Bombastic Flipper

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of stainless steel and GFN. Stainless steel provides you with exceptional durability as well as resistance to corrosion. However, this is not a lightweight material, so it is going to add a chunk of weight to the knife. The stainless steel can also be very slippery, so CRKT has added GFN to the palm portion of the handle to add texture and grip. GFN is glass filled nylon and is the same thing as FRN. This handle is one of the cheapest, but still one of the toughest handle materials to produce. This material is more flexible than G10, so it does not sport the rigidity that is often associated with that material, but it is a lot tougher. To create this material, the manufacturer arranges all of the nylon fibers haphazardly which is why this material is stronger than G 10. Because G 10’s fibers are arranged in one direction, it ends up being weak in all of the other directions. Because GFN’s fibers are arranged haphazardly, the material can be stressed in all different directions and not break down. There was a group of knife enthusiasts that did not warm up to this material, because they felt like it feels cheap and hollow. Plus, it doesn’t provide you with as much grip as you would find in G 10, or other similar materials. This material can be so cheap, because it is created in an injection molded process. One of the other major benefits to GFN is that it requires almost zero maintenance. The stainless steel on this knife is dark grey and the GFN is black. On the black version, the GFN is still black, but so is the stainless steel, making that version an all-black knife.

In the center of the handle, right near where the blade starts, there is a circle with a star in it. This is black on both versions. There is no finger groove, but the knife does sport a finger guard.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on the satin version is a dark grey to match the stainless steel parts of the handle. On the black version, the pocket clip is black, as I’m sure you would have guessed. This is a skeletonized pocket clip that is kept in place by two small screws. The handle on this knife has been drilled to carry your knife tip down, but the pocket clip can only be placed on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife that sports the flipper mechanism to help the knife open. The flipper mechanism is a triangular shaped piece of steel that is connected to the blade. This piece will jut out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. To deploy the blade, you pull back on this flipper and it efficiently flips the knife open. Then, the blade will lock into place because this knife also features a frame lock.

The main difference between a liner lock and a frame locks is that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. The handle of a frame lock has two sides and is often cut from a steel that is much thicker than the liner of most locks. The frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When the knife is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, engaging it at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness. This is a safety mechanism that ensures that you won’t have to worry when you are using your knife, even when you are using it for harder tasks. The blade won’t snap closed onto your hand.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Bombastic is 3.311 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.122 inches. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 7.938 inches long, with a closed length of 4.506 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT has earned a reputation that they very well deserve. Over the years, they have introduced the knife community to many of the technologies that we now expect to find on our knives. They have collaborated with a  variety of differnet knife designers that means you have a variety of different looks and feels to their products. Basically, you can find anything that you want in one of the CRKT products.

To create such a great knife, the Bombastic starts out with an inexpensive steel that maintains a very fine edge for long periods of time. You can find your favorite style Bombastic flipper knife here.  The steel has been carved into a spear point blade shape, which provides you a great balance between piercing and slicing. This is a very versatile blade. The handle is made out of stainless steel and GFN. This combination gives you plenty of durability as well as a low maintenance knife handle. This knife sports the flipper opening mechanism. This knife will change the way you look at every day carry knives.

 

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT Fossil Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company, or CRKT, is an American company that is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For more than 20 years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. This company was founded in 1994 and is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. This company was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer.

CRKT did not truly take off until the Shot Show in 1997. This was when they introduced their knife the K.I.S.S. This was a small folder that had been designed by Ed Halligan and it was a success. Within the opening days of the Shot Show, the years’ worth of the knife had sold out.

CRKT produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. They have collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

As of right now, CRKT owns fifteen different patents and they have multiple patents pending. Some of the patents that they currently own is the Outburst Assist opening mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated Edges.

CRKT knives are durable, reliable, and will last a lifetime with you. They are committed to innovation, so you know that when you purchase a CRKT knife, you are purchasing a knife with the newest technology on the market. One of their newest releases is the Fossil, and it is a game changer.

 

The Designer:

This knife was designed by Flavio Ikoma, who is from Presidente Prudente, Brazil. He says that ever since he was a young kid, he has wanted to be a knife maker. In his adolescence, he worked on knives of the Japanese sword variety in his father’s shop. He has gone on to learn metallurgy, to work with Ken Onion, and to become a force for innovation. Flavio brought to market the revolutionary IKBS ball bearing pivot system, along with Rick Lala. He has also evolved the classic locking liner with the ILS safety, which is exclusively available from CRKT in the No Time Off knives.

CRKT Fossil Knife
CRKT Fossil Knife

The Blade:

The blade on the Fossil is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese steel that actually belongs in a series of different Cr formulas. The most quality out of the Cr steels is 9Cr, however, 8Cr is close behind. This steel is most commonly compared to AUS 8 steel. AUS 8 steel is the superior steel out of the two though. 8Cr steel is softer, less durable, and more prone to rusting and corrosion. But don’t let yourself be turned away from this steel because of that. Just because this steel doesn’t resist rust and corrosion as well as AUS 8, it is still considered to be a stainless steel and will resist rust and corrosion with the help of good maintenance and the proper environment. And because this steel is a little bit softer, it is a breeze to sharpen. Many knife sharpeners could sharpen 8Cr steel in their sleep. This steel also holds an edge very well and you can get a very fine edge on this steel. One of the biggest advantages that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. But, with steel, you do get what you pay for, so while this is an average steel that can get the job done, it will not excel at anything.

The finish on the 8Cr13MoV steel is a satin finish. This finish is created by sanding the steel in one direction with increasing levels of an abrasive material. This material is usually sandpaper. This finish is usually considered to be in the middle of all of the finishes. It does help to resist rust, but there are finishes that resist rust easier. And while it does cut down on glares and reflections, it is nowhere near matte. However, it is also not a super shiny finish like a mirror finish. This is a classic finish that will provide you with an elegant look. The biggest characteristic that the satin finish has it how it showcases the lines of the steel.

This steel has been carved into a drop point blade shape. This blade shape is created by having the unsharpened edge of the blade, or the back of the blade, slowly curve until it reaches the sharpened edge of the blade, forming a lowered point. The lowered, or dropped, point, is where this blade shape gets its name from. This dropped point provides the user with a variety of different advantages. One of these advantages is that with a lowered point, you have more control over your cuts and slices. This is open of the reasons that it is such a popular blade shape among hunters. They don’t have to worry about slipping or nicking any of the organs or damaging the game’s meat. One of the other advantages that the lowered point provides is that it makes it a broader point. Because of this, the knife has much more strength behind the tip, so you can take on the heavier duty tasks without worrying about snapping the point of your blade. This shape of blade is known as one of the most versatile blade shapes on the market. While the strong tip is one of the reasons it is so versatile, the biggest reason why it is so versatile is because of the large belly. This blade has a big belly with plenty of length to make slices a breeze. Most of your everyday tasks involve some form of slicing, so having a blade that can easily slice is a big feature that you should be looking for in an everyday carry blade.

On back end of the blade, near the handle, there is a cut out portion of the blade. This cut out portion adds a unique look to the blade, but you can also use it to flip the knife open if you prefer.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Fossil is made out of stainless steel with a G10 overlay. Stainless steel is one of the most durable handle materials that you are going to find. It is also extremely resistant to corrosion, which does cut down on maintenance time. However, this material is not lightweight at all; it adds quite a bit of heftiness to your knife. One of the other drawbacks to a stainless steel knife handle is that it can be rather slippery. To combat this, the manufacturer has to add some sort of texture to the handle. In the Fossil’s case, CRKT has carved out dimples in the stainless steel and the G10 overlay to make it look like an aged fossil.

The stainless steel portion of the handle has a G10 overlay. G10 is a laminate composite that is made out of fiberglass. This material has similar properties to carbon fiber, except that it is much cheaper to produce. To make this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The resulting material is crazy tough, hard, very lightweight, yet still strong. Because it is such a lightweight material, it helps to keep down the weight, because the stainless steel is so heavy. G10 is actually considered to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates. To make for a solid and comfortable grip, the manufacturer will add texture to the G10. Like I mentioned, this G10 has had dimpling added to make it look like an actual fossil. The G10 overlay on the Fossil is a dark brown color, which adds a nice contrast to the silver stainless steel. Where the dimples have been formed, the G10 has more of a black color to it.

On this handle, there is a deep finger groove to provide you with a secure grip no matter what the environment is. CRKT has also added a finger guard to keep your fingers safe from slipping and cutting yourself on the sharp blade. On the butt of the handle, there is some shallow, thick jimping.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is kept in place by three small, silver screws. The silver screws and pocket clip match the rest of the hardware on this knife. This is a tip up pocket clip that can be carried on the right hand side.

 

The Mechanism:

This is folding knife with that sports a frame lock. The frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engage the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, engaging at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness.

This knife uses a flipper mechanism to deploy the blade. The flipper is a triangular, sharks fin shaped protrusion that juts out of the back of the handle when the blade is closed. To deploy the knife, you pull back on the flipper, which puts enough of pressure on the blade to “flip” it open. Once the blade is opened, it locks into place because of the frame lock. The flipper protrusion is also the piece of the blade that turns into the finger guard when the blade is opened.

The Fossil also sports the IKBS ball bearing opening mechanism. This mechanism was invented by the designers Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala. This is a system that sets lube ball bearings into the folding knife pivot. The result is a rapid blade deployment that is smooth and fast.

Even though this is a manual opening knife, it won’t feel old fashioned at all. This knife opens quickly, smoothly, and efficiently. Because it is a manual opening knife, there won’t be any of the pesky knife laws that come with having a switchblade.

 

The Specs:

The Fossil comes with a lifetime warranty. The blade on this folding knife is 3.96 inches long, with a thickness of 0.15 inches. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 8.88 inches long, and has a closed length of 4.95 inches long. This knife weighs in at 6.1 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Even though Columbia River Knife and Tool company took around three years to truly take off, they haven’t really slowed down since. They have developed a reputation of designing and making quality knives that stand the test of time. They have a commitment to innovation, so they are always trying to collaborate with the best knife makers and designers in the world. Because of this, they can provide you with some of the newest, most innovative, and ground breaking technology that is around. When you purchase one of CRKT’s knives, you know that it will be able to take a beating and survive with you throughout your adventures.

The Fossil was designed by Flavio Ikoma. This knife will really be able to take on anything that you throw at it. To start off, Flavio chose 8Cr13MoV steel, which is a durable steel that can get a crazy fine and sharp edge. This steel is able to get the job done. The blade sports a pain edge and a satin finish that effectively shows off the lines in this blade. To match a great blade, Flavio chose to make the handle out of a stainless steel that sports G10 overlays. The dimpling in the handle provides you with an exceptional grip, while also making it look like an actual fossil. This is a manual opening knife that sports a flipper, a frame lock, and the IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System. This knife will be a fantastic addition to your knife collection. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

 

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT 2261 Tecpatl Knife Review

The CRKT 2261 Tecpatl

 

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT, was established in Oregon in 1994. Their purpose since the beginning was to bring the useful technological advancements to create brand new product concepts for the knife community. During these past two decades, CRKT has followed that purpose and brought many new ground breaking and innovative knives to the world. Their knives are built for everyday carry, for tactical purposes, for hunting and fishing, and even for survival scenarios. Their products are high quality and will be able to meet the demands that you throw at it. CRKT believes that if the knife doesn’t meet the user’s standards, it doesn’t meet their own standards. CRKT uses the most advanced equipment and production systems to manufacture their knifes with efficiency. CRKT believes that everyone should be able to afford to carry the highest quality knives and tools.

During the past two decades, CRKT has collaborated with many famous knife designers and makers. Resulting from these collaborations are not only superior knives, but also innovative features. Some of these features include the IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System, the OutBurst assist opening mechanism, and the Automated Liner Safety System. When you purchase a CRKT knife, you can know that you are getting an exceptional knife that is ahead of its time. You can be certain that if there is a game changing innovative feature, your knife will probably be rocking it. You are guaranteed that your knife will stand up to the test of time. Any CRKT knife would be a fantastic addition to your collection, and the brand new Tecpatl is no different.

 

CRKT Tecpatl Knife
CRKT Tecpatl Knife

The Blade:

The blade on the Tecpatl is made out of SK5 high carbon steel. SK5 high carbon steels originated in Japan, where they would make a variety of hand tools with it. Some of these hand tools that they have produced with SK5 are chisels and wood cutting saws. This type of steel is one of the highest quality steels for knife blades. This steel is a hard and tough steel. Because there are extra carbides in the metal, the steel has increased abrasion resistance and lets the steel attain an ideal balance of good blade toughness. Because it has such a good balance between hardness and toughness, this type of steel has endured through time in many different cultures. This blade also sports a plain edge, which is easier to sharpen, is better at skinning or peeling, and is great for detail work. Some people are bummed with a plain edge because they feel like a serrated edge would be able to cut through thicker materials, such as rope or thick branches, which is mostly true. However, when you get a plain edge sharp enough, it can almost match what a serrated edge can do.

 

The SK5 steel has been finished with a black powder coating. Coating finishes help to reduce the reflection and glare off of the blade, while also working to recue wear and corrosion. However, all coatings will eventually scratch off, and they will scratch off quicker with lots of use or with heavy use. The powder coating is actually one of the lowest quality blade coatings, so it does have a higher chance of chipping or scratching off sooner than a different coating would.

 

The blade on this knife is an interesting shape. I would probably describe it as a mix between a modified Wharncliffe and a modified Tanto. Both of those blade shapes have a very straight sharpened edge with no curve, but the blade on the Tecpatl does sport a slightly curved belly. The back, or the unsharpened edge of the knife, goes pretty straight and then angles downward sharply to meet the curve to make a tip. With this unique blade you get some of the benefits from a few different types of blade shapes. One of the pros to this blade is that the back is relatively wide and thick. This gives you more strength throughout the knife than you would have with a thinner, less wide blade. Because it is so thick towards the handle, this knife is going to be able to take on heavier tasks and cut through thicker materials. Another benefit of this unique blade shape is that you do have a slight belly. This belly is nothing if you compare it to a drop or clip point blade shape, but compared to Wharncliffe’s or Tanto’s, this knife definitely does have a belly. With the belly, slicing is easier and it makes this knife a good option for everyday tasks. The point on this blade is also going to be tough, because it is a broader tip than you would find, especially when being compared to a clip point blade. While stabbing is going to be a little more challenging, because it is broad, you will be able to stab through harder things, because of the strength behind the tip.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Tecpatl is made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel has fantastic durability. It is also very resistant to corrosion. However, stainless steel is also a heavier material. You are going to feel this knife when it is put away. Because stainless steel is such a heavy material, knives that are designed to be an everyday carry knife, or even a heavy duty knife, will usually not be made with stainless steel. There is just too much added weight. Another problem with stainless steel is that it is very slippery. To combat the slipperiness, CRKT has added laser markings/etchings, to provide you with the needed friction. These etchings tell a story told through a way inspired by sugar skulls. Another thing that CRKT did to reduce the level of slipperiness was to create a deep finger groove for when you are using it. There is also a pretty big circular hole cut out to put a different finger through. This handle has been designed to be a sugar skull. When you are holding this knife in front of you, with the blade pointed down, this finger holes actually end up looking like eye sockets in a skull. There is a much smaller hole cut out to look like the nose area of a skull.  Since this is a single piece knife, the handle has also been through a black powder coated finish. Because it is perfect for holding in a closed fist, this knife is the perfect knife for slashing or pushing.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is a fixed blade, which has many advantages to it. For starters, fixed blades are stronger and more durable than folding knives because there are no small or moving parts that can break or rust over. And because of this added strength and durability, fixed blades are the perfect survival tool. Not only can they cut, they can also dig, hammer, and pry if needed. Fixed blades are also easier to maintain. This is because while folding knives have many small parts that are prone to rusting, a fixed blade is what you see. All you have to do is wipe it down and you are good to go. Fixed blades are also excellent for tactical use because they can be brought into play much faster than a folding knife.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is a kydex sheath including a spring loaded MOLLE compatible gear clip. Kydex is a modern thermoplastic material that was originally used to make holsters, among other items. Kydex’s biggest advantages is how durable it is. It can stand up to a variety of extreme environments, and even be submerged in salt water and still hold up well. However, there are some disadvantages to having a kydex sheath. One of these is that it has no personality, it is basically just a lump of plastic. Another bummer about kydex is that it is pretty loud when you are unsheathing and putting away your knife. If this doesn’t bother you, then by all means, enjoy the benefits of it. However, if you are trying to conceal yourself, this sheath will give you away; it is that loud. The last drawback to having a kydex sheath is that with repeated drawing of your knife and putting it away, it will start to dull the edge of your knife.

 

The History:

This knife was designed by Michael R. Rodriguez. He designed this knife to be part of the CRKT Forged by War program. He says, “a good combat fighter relies on instinct; a great fighter understands the importance of an ergonomically flawless weapon.” Michael is a veteran, having served 21 years in the United States Army and retiring as a Green Beret. The laser markings are that of a sugar skull to reflect Michaels heritage and his own personal stories and history. On it, there are horns, the Crusader’s Cross, and the Office of Strategic Services Symbol. Michael also served in the 7th Special Forces group, and to commemorate that, he has engraved a 7 just above the blade. The arrow engraving is reminiscent of the crossed arrows of the Special Forces. And lastly, he has had three lightning bolts engraved into the knife, these are two represent the Green Berets and their shoulder patch. Michael believes that even in a world full of sophisticate missiles, there is no reason to skimp on your hand-to-hand combat companion. The Tecpatl should be your first choice for your last resort weapon.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.375 inches long, with a thickness of 0.203 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 5.813 inches long. The handle on the Tecpatl is 2.438 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.6 ounces.

 

The Pros of the CRKT Tecpatl:

  • The steel chosen for this knife is a great balance between hardness and toughness.
  • The straight edge makes sharpening a breeze.
  • The black powder coating helps reduce reflection and glare, and works to prevent rusting or corrosion.
  • The blade has enough of a belly to be able to slice.
  • The blade is wide and thick, providing you with plenty of strength.
  • The tip is broad, so you do have strength behind it, but it is still sharp, so you can still stab.
  • The stainless steel handle sports plenty of durability and is resistant to corrosion.
  • This is a fixed blade, so it has plenty of strength and is very capable of slashing or pushing.
  • There is a rich history that surrounds this knife, and you can see this history directly on the knife.
  • The kydex sheath is strong, durable, and very resistant to wear.
  • This sheath can survive in a variety of extreme environments, including being immersed in salt water.

 

Cons of the CRKT Tecpatl:

  • The black powder coating on the blade and handle is the most prone out of any coatings finishes to scratch or chip off.
  • The stainless steel handle is going to be slick, even when it is properly texturized.
  • The stainless steel handle does add quite a bit of weight to the knife.
  • This is a fixed blade, so it is harder to conceal than a folding knife.
  • The kydex sheath is noisy, has no personality, and will dull your blade after time.

 

Conclusion:

As a writer, I love a good story. I love the history behind the knives that are on the market. I love knowing why they are the way they are and what the different characteristics mean to the designer. The CRKT Tecpatl has one of the most symbolic and rich histories of any knife that I have reviewed.  You can buy yours here.

CRKT started off with a heavy duty steel that has been used for years as a tool steel in different cultures. The shape that they ground that steel into gives you a variety of different advantages. And the durable handle just helps with the tactical aspect of this knife. This is a durable knife that you will hopefully not have to use, but it should be your first choice for your last resort weapon.

 

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT ChanceinHell Knives Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company or CRKT was founded in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. This American company is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For more than 20 years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand.

CRKT produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. They have even collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of these patents include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff Serrated Edges.

CRKT didn’t truly take off as a company until the Shot Show in 1997. This is when they introduced the K.I.S.S knife (Keep It Super Simple). This knife is a small folder that has been designed by Ed Halligan. Within the opening days of the Shot Show, the entire years’ worth of product was sold out.

 

The Designer:

The Chanceinhell knives were designed by Ken Onion. Ken is considered to be the real deal. He was the youngest ever inductee in the Blade Magazine Hall of Fame in 2008. He is also recognized as one of the most innovative and successful knife designers of all time. In 1996 he created the first commercially successful assisted opening mechanism and 20 years later he unveiled his award winning Field Strip Technology. He is also the designer of the successful Eros folder series as well as the award winning Hi Jinx. It seems to me as if Ken Onion is never at a loss for ideas.

CRKT Hi Jinx
CRKT Hi Jinx

 

The Steel:

The steel that is used on all three of the machetes in this series is 65MN carbon steel. This type of steel was released in the early 2010’s. The steel is a Chinese steel that has been formulated to provide good wear resistance and hardness. The medium high content makes for a high degree of toughness and resilience. The manganese that has been added also works to improve the toughness and resilience as well as improving the hot working characteristics of the steel, making this an excellent candidate for forged sword blades, or machetes. Something unique about this type of steel is that it offers you all of the toughness without the brittleness. Because of this factor, it is one of the top choices of steels for extreme use edged tools, such as multi tools or machetes. The steel on the Chanceinhell series of knives ranks about a 52-56 on the HRC scale.

On all three of the different sized blades, they all have a plain edge. The plain edge is definitely the more traditional edge. It is much easier to sharpen than a serrated edge and you can get a much finer edge on your blade when you do sharpen it. The plain edge excels when there are large slices needed or any push cuts. The serrated edge is mostly used when you are needing to saw through a thicker or tougher material, such as branches or rope. However, when your plain edge is sharp enough, it too can cut through those thicker materials.

 

The Handles:

All three different knives in this series sport the same type of handle. It has a polypropylene core with a thermoplastic rubber over mold. The polypropylene, or PP, is a thermoplastic polymer that can be used in a wide variety of applications. PP has a relatively slippery low energy surface, which means that many common glues will not form adequate joints. To join two portions of PP together, a welding process is usually required. PP was first polymerized in 1951 by a pair of Philips petroleum scientists named Paul Hogan and Robert Banks and later by Italian and German scientists Natta and Rehn. This became prominent extremely fast, as commercial production began barely three years after Italian chemist, Professor Giulio Natta, first polymerized it. Today, it is one of the most commonly used and most versatile plastics in the world.

The over mold on these handles are made out of a thermoplastic rubber. Thermoplastic rubber is a class of copolymers or a physical mix of polymers, usually plastic and rubber. This material consists of materials with both thermoplastic and elastomeric properties. This material shows advantages typical of both rubbery materials and plastic materials. The handles all have the texture of a football, to provide you with a secure grip on your knife in any situation.

There is a deep finger groove as well as a few shallower finger grooves to keep your hand in positon and comfortable. You will be able to use these machetes for long periods of time without getting uncomfortable. For added protection, there is also a large finger guard.

 

The Mechanism:

These are all fixed blade knives, because they are machetes. There is a variety of different benefits to having a fixed blade knife as opposed to a folding blade. For starters, fixed blades can be much larger, which means that they are able to tackle larger tasks. Fixed blades are much easier to maintain, because there are no inner mechanisms that can rust or need maintenance. For the most part, all you have to do is a quick wipe down of the blade and the handle and call it good. And, fixed blades are much less likely to break. This is also due to the fact that there are no inner mechanisms that can break or rust. Plus, everything is beefier on a fixed blade, so there are no fragile spots where the knife meets the handle.

 

The Chanceinhell Machete:

CRKT Chanceinhell Machete
CRKT Chanceinhell Machete

The Finish:

The 65Mn Carbon Steel has been finished with a Bead Blasted finish as well as a powder coating on this knife. The bead blast finish is created by blasting small glass bead at the steel at high pressures. This results in an even gray finish. The blasted finish reduces reflections and glares due to its even matte surface. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro abrasions on the steel. Because of this, the steel is more prone to rusting and corroding, so you do have to make sure that you are taking the correct precautions and maintaining your blade well.

The powder coating is black on this knife. So this finish also works to reduce the reflections and glares while also protecting the steel from rusting, corroding, and scratches. However, this is a painted on coating, so it is the lowest quality blade coating. This type of coating is the most likely to chip or scratch off.

In the upper corner of the blade, near the handle, CRKT and their logo has been applied.

 

The Specs:

This knife has a blade length of 12 inches long. The Chanceinhell has a blade thickness of 0.1 inches. The overall length of this knife is a whopping 17.88 inches. This is definitely on the beefier side of things and weighs in at 1 pound 4 ounces.

 

The Sheath:

This knife comes with a nylon sheath. This is a more inexpensive option for sheath materials, but they also get worn out quicker. Nylon sheaths are most prone to getting stretched out, so they will continue to work, but the fitting won’t be as snug.  You can order the Ken Onion Chanceinhell Machete here.

 

The Chanceinhell Machete 16”:

CRKT Chanceinhell 16" Machete
CRKT Chanceinhell 16″ Machete

The Finish:

This blade has the black powder coating that the other version does, however, this one does not have the bead blasted finish. Like I previously mentioned, this is one of the least quality coating finishes that you can find, because it will eventually scratch off. However, it does cut down on glares and reflections and does add a nice black color. The black color gives the knife a sleek look and matches the black handle perfectly.

 

The Specs:

The blade length on this knife is 16.063 inches long, with a thickness of 0.102 inches. The overall length of this knife is a 21.813 inches long. The knife weighs in at 1 pound and 4.6 ounces.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that accompanies the 16” long machete is made out of woven polyester. The sheath has a polypropylene black insert as well as a nylon cord, which is also black.  You can find the 16″ Chanceinhell Machete here.

 

The Chanceinhell Machete 18”:

Chanceinhell Machete
Chanceinhell Machete

The Finish:

This version of the knife also has the black powder coating. Because the entire knife is blackened, this is a great option to choose if you are trying to blend in to the surroundings or conceal yourself. It effectively cuts down on any glares and reflections that might accompany the steel, because it masks it. However, since it is painted on, it will scratch off at some point, and it might also run and not be even. Out of all coatings, this specific type is at the bottom of the barrel.

 

The Specs:

The length of this blade is 18 inches long, with a blade thickness of 0.106 inches. The overall length of this knife tops in at 23.625 inches, which is almost an entire two feet long. This is also the heaviest out of the series of Chanceinhell, weighing in at 1 pound 5.6 ounces.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is the same as the 16” version. The sheath is made out of woven polyester in a black color. It sports an insert of black polypropylene and has a black nylon cord.  You can pick up the 18″ Chanceinhell Machete here.

 

The Chanceinhell Survival Kit:

This is the last option that you have to purchase in the Chanceinhell series. This series comes with five different pieces. The Chanceinhell machete, the RSK MK6, the Para Saw, the Spark’N Sharp, and the Nylon CRKT Bag.

 

The RSK MK6:

This is a small pocket knife. The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel, which is a softer Chinese steel. You can get a very fine edge on this type of steel and it maintains an edge for long periods of time. However, it is an average steel that does not excel at anything. This steel has a plain edge that has a stonewashed finish. This blade is one piece, with a skeletonized handle that has been wrapped in orange paracord. This knife does come with a sheath.

 

The Para-Saw:

This piece that comes with the survival kit is a braided paracord bracelet. However, inside of the bracelet, there is a stainless steel tungsten carbide coated wire saw. This is a Ken Onion design and can work to save your bacon in emergency situations.

 

The Spark’N Sharp:

This tool comes with a lanyard to keep each of the pieces together. This, as the name implies, is a fire starter as well as a field sharpener. The lanyard is a quick release lanyard. This is a multi-tool.

 

The CRKT Nylon Bag:

Not only is this bag the perfect place to keep all of your items that you get with the survival kit, it is also the perfect place to keep your other survival necessities.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT is a fantastic company that has earned a reputation over the past twenty years. You know that when you purchase a knife from this company, you know that you are purchasing a product that will last with you through the ages.

The Chanceinhell series sports three different versions of a machete. These are quality, durable machetes that started out with a very durable steel. The steel that was chosen is used on knives and tools that have to undergo heavy usage. The handles on these machetes are just as durable, and because it is a fixed blade, maintenance is a breeze. You can get a 12-inch-long version, a 16-inch-long version, or an 18-inch-long version. You have a final option in the series, which is the survival kit, which includes one of the machetes as well as a variety of other tools. Get yours today at BladeOps.

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

CRKT Burnley Squid Knife Review

The Squid is not your typical everyday carry folding knife. From knife designer Lucas Burnley of Albuquerque, New Mexico comes this compact knife with great potential. He has based this knife on the concept of a compact pistol, meaning it can still fully function without the extra fluff. It is a tactically inspired knife that can stand up to any opposition.

 

CRKT Squid
CRKT Squid

Specs

As a compact knife, the Squid might be small in size, but not in stature. Listed below are the specs for this mighty knife.

  • Product Type: Folder
  • Locking Mechanism: Frame Lock
  • Overall Length: 5.70″
  • Weight:  3.50 oz.
  • Handle Length: 3.40”
  • Blade Length: 2.10″
  • Blade Thickness: 0.110″
  • Blade Steel: 8Cr13MoV
  • Blade Edge: Plain
  • Blade Style: Drop Back
  • Blade Finish: Stonewash
  • Handle Material: 2Cr13
  • Handle Color: Gray
  • Sheath Included: No
  • Lanyard Hole Included: Yes
  • Pocket Clip: Tip-Up

 

As you can see, the knife isn’t that large. Both in weight and in length it is small, but there is potential in the squid. In the wild, squids are pretty average in size (around 24 inches in length). However, there are those giant squids that always seem to wreak havoc in horror or action films. Although the CRKT Squid will not break into a rampage, the knife will still put up a good fight and be a great everyday tool.

 

Burnley Design

Burnley Knives was founded in 2003 by Lucas Burnley in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Their mission is to “create custom knives with a superlative level of design and function utilizing ever evolving techniques and materials.” Much of Burnley’s inspiration comes from spending time with his father, time out among Mother Nature, and action packed survival stories and films. Over the years, he has experimented with a range of styles to combine classical knife designs with modern materials and techniques. His goal in creating the Squid was to make a great quality knife, which is readily available to a broader spectrum of people to own and use. Even though the Burnley design is compact, it is still able to function at 100%.

 

Folder

While there are other opening mechanisms out in the market (spring assist, fixed, automatic, etc.) there is a reason why a folder knife is a viable tool, especially as an everyday carry. One reason a folder knife is beneficial to own is because of how quiet it opens. Another point to note is that in some places, having a spring assisted or automatic knife can get you into legal trouble whereas a folder knife will not. This isn’t true is all cases, but something to point out. One more thing to make mention of is that the more parts that move in the knife, can mean a greater potential to wear out and break down over time. Also, when compared to fixed blades, a folder can be more discrete when carrying it every day. It doesn’t draw as much attention to it compared to the attitude people have about the serious nature of fixed blades. It simply is much easier to carry around in the city. Plus a folder tends to be more compact than a fixed blade. This is especially true with the tiny size of the Squid.

 

Locking Mechanism

The frame lock on the CRKT Squid is a type of locking system that was first introduced with the Sebenza Folder. The Frame or Integral Lock was created by Chris Reeve of Chris Reeve Knives and first appeared on the Sebenza. Chris Reeve calls it an Integral Lock, but the common name used in the industry now is simply “Frame Lock”. The original Integral Lock was developed in 1987. It is used when a portion of the back handle is slotted in a groove on the knife to lock the knife into place. This groove is in place behind the blade to refrain it from closing. Many suggest that this is one of the best locking mechanisms for its life-long durability and its reliability. The locking system makes the Squid more reliable during use because of its ability to resist slipping while retaining its strength.

The Frame Lock is a modification of the Liner Lock created by Michael Walker to simplify and strengthen the design. This is done by removing the handle scales and thin liners from the knife and using thicker liners to serve as both the handles, and the integrated locking bar. Frame locks are stronger than normal liner locks and are simpler in design. While holding the knife, the lock is being reinforced since it is integrated into the handle. Having this type of lock improves the overall quality of the knife.

 

Blade Style

The drop point on the Squid is an all-purpose blade that is able to stand up to anything that it comes across. Its blade is one of the most popular blade shapes in use today. The unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner. The large edge for cutting makes it perfect for slicing. Another advantage that the drop point has is its tip. The point on the blade is sharp and is thicker than other styles, thus allowing for a stronger tip. The point is also great when it comes to controlling the blade. Accuracy is key, especially when it comes to fine tune cutting. The drop point is an all-around good blade to have on a knife and is popular on knives because of the controllable point and large slicing area.

 

Blade Steel

The steel used in the blade on the CRKT Squid is 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. For a knife that is very inexpensive, 8Cr13MoV is a tough steel to compete with. It is a Chinese steel with similar qualities to the Japanese AUS-8 stainless steel. 8Cr13Mov and its variations are excellent steels considering how little it costs to produce. Similar to AUS-8, 8Cr13MoV lacks the edge retention of the higher end steels. This is considerable based on the cost of making the steel. It can, however, take a sharp edge. It is considerably tough, and corrosion resistant. Owning a stainless steel knife does not require too much attention. Even though they are a little harder to sharpen, stainless steel blades are a popular choice because of the environment where the knife will be used; i.e. working in less than ideal weather conditions, dealing with corrosive liquids, etc.

 

Blade Finish

One of my all-time favorite finishes is a nice stonewash blade. It is the finish on the CRKT Squid. The process of getting a blade to look this way begins when the blade is rolled and tumbled with pebbles and an acid of sorts, then smoothed. In theory, it can hide scratches or other abrasions to the blade. This is a favorable characteristic that many knife owners desire. Because of the tumbling process to create this finish, it looks as if there are already hundreds of markings on it. Yet, the markings are done in a natural way to form a work of art. Similar to a snowflake, no two stonewashes are the same. The finish has a different look to it. It is able to reflect direct light off the surface blade. With all of the noticeable artistic markings on the knife, there is no need to worry about other markings that may come with using the knife. The knife can be used for its intended purpose of cutting and doing any other type of work while taking on any marking. Some suggest that because of the process, a stonewashed knife can become more resistant to rust as well. The acid oxidation it goes through in the process enhances a blade’s rust resistance with a stable oxide barrier between the steel and its surrounding. Another benefit of stonewashing a blade is their low maintenance and their ability to preserve their original look overtime. I am in love with this blade. It is amazing to look at, and it comes with benefits.

 

Handle

Stainless steel handles, such as that on the Squid, contain a minimum of 10-13% chromium. The chromium in the steel alloy helps to make the knife corrosive resistant. Chromium creates a barrier to oxygen and moisture which makes is rust resistant, but not rust proof. While it does provide excellent durability and resistance to corrosion, it is not particularly lightweight. Stainless steel handles can also be rather slick. The main advantages to having a stainless steel handle is that it is strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. The Squid is practically made solely from stainless steel. This will help extend the life of the knife. The pocket clip on the Squid runs half the length of the handle. Though not quite a discreet carry, it is pretty close. Though the clip is only available in one position, it still works great for any knife user out there.

 

Small Everyday Carry

As an everyday carry knife, it is important to know how the CRKT Squid feels when being carried around all the time. Especially as a small carry knife. Those criteria include its carry depth, its weight, its thickness and width, and its appearance.

Carry Depth

The CRKT Squid is comfortable to carry in your pocket. The slim design takes up minimal pocket real-estate. Because of its smaller size, it sacrifices the potential for a really secure and comfortable grip.  When closed, the knife is 3.40 inches long. You’ll find that most comfortable carry knives are anywhere between 3.5 to 5 inches long when closed. The knife rests just near the edge that range. Frequently, before any knife purchase, I ask myself, “Will the knife fit in my pant pocket?” But I also ask “Will the knife fall out of my pocket?” The knife isn’t too deep when resting in the pocket. However, the pocket clip allows the majority of the knife to fit within my pocket.

Weight

One of the more important aspects to consider when choosing an everyday carry is its weight. One of the worst feelings that can happen on a day to day basis is carrying something heavy in your pocket. A good knife weight ranges anywhere from as little as 3.0 ounces to 5.0 ounces. The CRKT Squid barely fits right into this range. Weighing in at 3.50 ounces, this knife is fairly lightweight. For the size of the knife, it is a good idea to take precaution when carrying it around. Because of its lack of weight, the knife has a greater potential to fly out of your pocket.

Thickness and Width

Like we mentioned before, the knife is very slim. At most, the knife is just about an inch thick. And the knife is just about a quarter of an inch wide from handle scale to handle scale. There is hardly anything to the CRKT Squid.

Appearance

The goal for the CRKT Squid is a simple look, nothing to extreme. It isn’t too dull, or to flamboyant. The conservative look is one of the advantages that this knife has. One other goal for this knife was to make it legal to carry all over the place. Though you are still responsible in keeping the law, it’s nice to know that there are some people out there trying to help you to have a decent knife that is legal, and useful.

 

The Test

The CRKT Squid is a tough knife that can the job done. To best show you how it gets the job done, there are certain tests that the blade undergoes to demonstrate its skill. Below are the results of these tests.

Paper- The Squid was easily able to cut through multiple layers of paper. But because of the tip on the blade, penetration wasn’t as good as other blade styles (such as a dagger or tanto). Shredding all of that unwanted mail will be easy with the Squid.

Cardboard- This is probably where the Squid excelled the most. The cuts were much simpler than those of the other tests. I was worried that the size of the Squid would prevent me from using the knife to its full capacity. Nevertheless, I was taken back.

Plastic- Again, the penetration problem persisted primarily in cutting the plastic. But once it had pushed through the tough material, it was easily able to slice through the rest of the plastic.

Rope/Paracord- Cutting the rope was pretty normal when compared to other knives. It got the job done, but nothing too impressive.

 

Conclusion

CRKT and Lucas Burnley did an excellent job at creating an inexpensive knife that is highly functional. I would be surprised if anyone couldn’t own this knife. It is supposedly legal everywhere, it is inexpensive, the size is small and comfortable, and it is good quality for what it is worth. I highly recommend this knife. Pick up the CRKT Squid today!

Facebooktwitterpinterest
Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram