Kershaw Vedder Knife Review

In 1974, Kershaw, a sub brand of Kai USA Ltd., was founded along with their founding mission. They wanted to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. They knew that this meant that each and every one of their knives must be of the highest quality. So whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and sate of the art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

 

Kershaw also has a strong commitment to innovation. From award winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, everything they make and design is innovative and effective. Kershaw has even been the company that has pioneered many of the technologies and advanced materials that are the standard in today’s knife industry. For some examples, Kershaw introduced the first assisted opening knives to the knife market, they called it the Speed Safe assisted opening mechanism. They also introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in their knives that they call their Blade Traders. And one of their more recent technologies that they have introduced is their Composite Blade technology. This technology works to combine two different types of steels into one blade, which effectively gives the user the best of both worlds. For example, the user can enjoy a blade that has extreme edge retention because of the steel chosen for that edge, while also having a very strong spine on their knife, because the steel on the spine is different than the steel on the edge.

 

You know that when you are carrying a Kershaw, you are carrying the real thing. And what does that mean? It means that your knife has value and plenty of it. You get incredible bang for your buck, because even their inexpensive models are impressive. You know that any of their models are going to be reliable. And one of their newest releases is the Vedder.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Vedder is made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. This is a Chinese steel that comes from the Cr series. The best out of the series is the 9Cr steel, but the 8Cr steel falls closely behind. This steel is most commonly compared to AUS 8 steel, however, AUS 8 is actually the better steel out of the two. 8Cr is a little bit softer, a little more prone to rusting or corroding, and a little less durable. However, 8Cr steel does hold an edge for a while and you can get a crazy fine edge on it. And, because it is a softer steel, when you do need to sharpen it, sharpening will be a breeze. This steel can also resist rust and corrosion well, with the proper maintenance. The biggest advantage that 8Cr steel boasts is the inexpensive price tag. This is a steel that is able to get the job done without adding a hefty cost to the overall price of the knife. On the flip side, you do get what you pay for when it comes to blade steels, so this will be an average steel that can get the job done. However, this type of steel does not excel at anything.

 

The steel has a titanium carbo-nitride coating. This coating was developed from Titanium Nitride and is a thin film coating. This coating is also known as TiCN. This coating helps to increase the hardness on the blade considerably, which helps limit the wear and tear that this blade will accumulate. This is one of the harder coatings that is going to last longer than some of the other coatings on the market. The color of this TiCN is a dark, matte gray. Because it is such a dark color and is matte, it does completely reduce glares and reflections on your blade.

 

This blade has been carved into a modified drop point blade shape. This is one of the most popular blade shapes on the market and for good reason. This blade shape is strong, durable, can take a beating, and is extremely versatile. The shape is created because the back, or the unsharpened, edge of the lade slowly curves until it meets the sharpened edge of the blade. This creates a lowered point, or a dropped point, which is where this blade shape got its name. The lowered point has plenty of benefits, one is that it gives the user much more control over their cuts and slices. This is the reason that it is so popular among hunters; they don’t have to worry about piercing any of the organs or damaging the meat of their game. Another one of the benefits that comes with a dropped point is that it creates a much broader point than you would commonly find on a blade. This gives the blade extra strength behind the tip, which means that you will be able to take on most tasks without having to worry about your blade snapping or breaking. However, the broader tip is also one of the only drawbacks to this blade shape. Because it is so broad, it drastically cuts down on any stabbing capabilities that you would have had. Many people consider this more of an advantage, because the benefits certainly outweigh the cons, however, in certain situations, it can be a major drawback. One of the other reasons that this blade shape is so popular and so versatile is because of the large belly that it sports. The belly is large and provides you with plenty of length for slicing. And since slicing is one of the most common things that you will have to do with your everyday tasks, this is a huge characteristic that you should be searching for. Drop points are one of the few blade shapes that prepare you for all of your daily tasks while also preparing you for the unexpected tasks that you might happen across.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is what really sets the Vedder apart aesthetically. It is made out of a stainless steel but also sports a 3D machined G10 overlay. The stainless steel is a great material to have on your knife handle because of how durable it is. It sports plenty of strength and has the weight behind it to get the harder tasks done. Plus, a stainless steel handle is extremely resistant to rusting or corroding. There are two major drawbacks to having a stainless steel knife handle. The first one is that it is a very heavy material. It has enough weight that you’re going to notice it when it is in your pocket. I wouldn’t say that it is going to weigh you down, but it does have a very hefty feel to it. The second major drawback to having a stainless steel handle is that it can be extremely slippery.

Kershaw decided to coat the stainless steel handle in the same coating as the knife’s blade. The titanium carbo-nitride coating helps add hardness to the stainless steel, giving you an extremely durable handle.

 

While there isn’t much that Kershaw could do about the weight that stainless steel has, they could do something about how slippery it is. And they did. They decided to overlay the stainless steel with 3D machined G10. G10 is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material is very similar to carbon fiber, but it can be made at a fraction of the cost, so it does help to keep the overall cost of the knife down. To build or manufacturer G10, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The resulting material is tough, hard, lightweight, and strong. In fact, G10 is the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates. To add texture to the G10, Kershaw carved out dimples to provide you with a very comfortable and secure grip. You will have a solid grip on this knife in any environment.

 

The finger groove on this handle is extremely elongated and extremely shallow. However, to protect your fingers, Kershaw did add a finger guard. This finger guard helps to stop your fingers if you slip, so that you don’t end up slicing them. Kershaw also added a lanyard hold into the top of the butt of the Vedder. I could go on about the benefits of having a lanyard tied onto your knife, but the biggest advantage of tying one on is convenience. You can easily tie the lanyard onto this knife and then attach it to either your belt or your pack strap. This keeps your hands free and you won’t have to worry about losing it while you don’t need it. But, it steel keeps it close enough that you can swiftly grab it whenever the need arises. A knife that sports a lanyard hole is a big bonus in my eyes.

Kershaw Vedder
Kershaw Vedder

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is black to match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The clip is kept in place by two small screws. This is a reversible pocket clip, which helps to make this knife ambidextrous friendly. You can switch which side you carry it on, however, the handle has only been drilled to attach this pocket clip tip up.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife sports a flipper opening mechanism as well as Kershaw’s Speed Safe assisted opening mechanism. The flipper on the Vedder is skeletonized and features an angular sharks fin shape. To deploy the blade, you push down on the flipper, which puts enough pressure on the blade to flip it out. The Speed Safe system is a patented system that assist the user to open the knife with a manual pull back on the flipper. This system works because of the Speed Safe’s torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps to prevent the knife from being opened by gravity, it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user will apply manual pressure to the flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. This mechanism also allows you to open the knife with only one hand, which is another reason that this blade is ambidextrous friendly. And while this mechanism helps your knife feel like a switchblade, it isn’t a switchblade, so you won’t have any of the strict laws surrounding the Vedder.

This knife also features a frame lock. This is a portion of the handle, in the knife frame, that moves behind the blade to lock it into positon during use. This is a safety feature of the knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Vedder is 3.25 inches long. When the Vedder is opened, it measures in at 7.5 inches long, but when this knife is closed, it measures in at 4.25 inches long. Because of the handle material, this is on the heavier side of things, weighing in at 4.1 ounces.

 

The Conclusion:

The Vedder provides the user with a distinctive look as well as top function. On the style side of things, the Vedder features an attention getting handle. The steel handle is titanium carbo-nitride coated in soft matte gray. But to add a little more depth and character, Kershaw has added two 3D machined G10 overlays that not only look great, but also provide you with a secure grip. On the function side of things, Kershaw started out with a steel that is going to get the job done and can get a crazy sharp edge. Plus, sharpening it is a breeze. The Speed Safe mechanism means that opening the blade will always be fast and easy, and as a bonus, you only need one hand. The deep carry pocket clip is just the cherry on top of this exceptional knife.

Kershaw Duck Commander Rayne Knife Review

Kershaw knows that there is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing.

The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw has a commitment to innovation and says, “Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Duck Commander Rayne.

Kershaw Duck Commander Rayne
Kershaw Duck Commander Rayne

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. 8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, Kershaw believes, offers our customers an excellent value. This steel has been hardened to a HRC: 57–59

The blade has been finished satin, which is one of the more common blade finishes. It is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive, usually a sandpaper. The satin finish shows off the bevels of the blade, while also showcasing the fine lines of the steel, cutting down on glares and reflections, and even increasing the corrosion resistance of this blade slightly.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. The clip point blade shape is a great all-purpose blade shape that is going to excel at stabbing. The back of the blade runs straight from the handle and then stops about halfway up the knife. At this point, in turns and continues to the point of the knife. This area looks as if it is “cut-out” and is where the blade shape got its name from. This area is referred to as the clip and on the Rayne, it is straight, although on some knives, it can be curved. The clip creates a lowered point, which is going to give the user more control when they are using the knife. And because the tip is so controllable, as well as being sharper and thinner at the spine, a clip point is going to excel at stabbing. This is because it has less drag during insertion as well as having a faster withdrawal. One of the other reasons that a clip point blade is so versatile is because of the large belly that they sport. The large belly makes slicing an absolute breeze, which is ideal for this hunting knife. Of course, every blade shape is going to have its disadvantages. This blade shapes biggest disadvantage is that because the tip is relatively narrow, it is prone to breaking, especially when used on harder targets.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of G10 with a 420HC bolster. G10 is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. The manufacturer makes this material by taking layers of fiberglass cloth and soaking them in resin, then compressing them and baking them under pressure. The result of this process is a meatal that is very tough, very hard, very strong, and still lightweight. This material is also inexpensive to create, although it is not going to be as inexpensive as FRN. One of the bigger advantages to having a G10 handle on your hunting knife is that it is a non-porous material, which means it is not going to absorb any of the fluids that this knife comes in contact with during your hunting process. This makes maintenance a lot easier, because you don’t have to worry about deep down cleaning it. A few of the other advantages for the Rayne having a G10 handle is that it is so durable and lightweight, so it is capable of taking on those harder tasks, but it isn’t going to weigh you down in the field.

The handle is a dark brown and pretty simple. There is a medium sized finger groove, which creates a more comfortable grip. Other than that, the belly is pretty straight. The spine of the handle angels up on the bolster, but then angles sharply down toward the butt once the G10 starts. The handle also sports the Duck Commander Medallion.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which helps to make this knife a little bit ambidextrous. The clip is silver and finished satin, which contrasts nicely with the bulk of the handle. The clip is kept in place by two small silver screws, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The clip is slightly hourglass shaped, with a rounded butt and head, but a cinched middle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife, which means that it is not fully automatic, but it does have an internal mechanism that helps the user fully open the knife once they have opened it slightly using the flipper. The assisted opening mechanism is a good balance between automatic and manual because you get the efficiency of an automatic knife, but you get the legality of a manual knife.

This knife has been equipped with a flipper, which is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper on the Rayne is thicker than your typical flipper, which means that you are going to have a wider finger guard. Once the knife is opened, the flipper is going to stand in place of the finger guard and protect your fingers. While the flipper does take a few tries to really get the hang of it, it does keep your fingers safer than a thumb stud would. This is because a thumb stud puts your fingers in the path of the blade, while a flipper keeps them out of the blade’s path during opening.

The knife has been equipped with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism. Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe® assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling knives. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

The knife has also been equipped with a liner lock. The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using a Kershaw folding knife even safer.


The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.1 inches long. When the Rayne is open, it measures in at an overall length of 7.25 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

             When Kershaw is explaining this knife, they say, “As a tip of the hat to Duck Commander’s southern heritage, the Rayne is named for the Louisiana city of Rayne and features classic good looks and a solid feel. The clip-point blade is sharpened to a razor edge and satin finished. The blade is quality stainless steel, heat treated to Kershaw’s demanding specifications to bring out the very best qualities in the steel. The handle features a stainless steel bolster with textured G10 handle scales inlaid with the Duck Commander logo medallion. The handle curves slightly to fit the palm for a secure grip. The Rayne opens quickly and easily with SpeedSafe® assisted opening and the built-in flipper makes it a breeze to open the knife one-handed. Once open, a locking liner secures the blade for safe use. The Rayne’s pocket clip is reversible for left- or right-handed carry. For a quality knife that’s perfect for outdoor use or every day carry, the Rayne reigns supreme.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Frame Lock Scallion Assist Knife Review

There really is nothing like a Kershaw, which is what many knife lovers will come to realize. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you are carrying a Kershaw, you know that you are carrying the real deal.

This means that you get value and you get plenty of it. No matter which Kershaw knife you choose to purchase, including their inexpensive modes, you are going to get incredible bang for your buck. Everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That is why they choose to back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people really do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime.

You can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box; sporting knives that work to make your hunting and fishing trips more enjoyable; sporting knives that help to make all your watersports and camping even better than they currently are; work knives that are never going to let you down; and tactical knives that ensure that you are ready for anything life throws at you.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 with a mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This means that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Kershaw doesn’t care if it’s an EDC pocket knife, a hunting knife, or even one of their special edition’s, they are going to choose the appropriate, high quality materials, and are always dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Kershaw also follows extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques that will ensure your Kershaw knife can perform a lifetime.

Kershaw actually pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are toady’s standard in the knife industry. They introduced their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives first on the market. They also introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in their Blade Trades. And more recently, they have introduced their Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels in to one blade, giving the knife user the best of both worlds by combining phenomenal edge retention with crazy strength. Kershaw is committed to keep on innovating, and bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry.

Kershaw knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, and a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions.

Kershaw warns, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more.”

Today we will be going over the classic Kershaw Scallion with a frame locking mechanism.

Kershaw Frame Lock Scallion Assist Knife
Kershaw Frame Lock Scallion Assist Knife

The Blade:

This steel holds a higher carbon production ate than stainless steel. The content is much softer than the higher number steel count 440, yet it is more rugged than other similar products. This steel material has a greater carbon base and is mixed to a harder content than 420 stainless steel. Knives made form 420HC steel are easy to sharpen and are durable even when inconstant use. This steel will make for a really durable knife. A knife made from this level of steel is one of the best products available when on any expedition. Blades made from this steel are less prone to corroding. While rusting is always an issue, you can easily avoid it if you rinse, dry, and oil your knife after use. This steel makes for a high quality outdoor knife, which means that it will also be a really good option for your go to EDC knife also.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of an abrasive. It is the most popular blade finish that is in use today and in terms of luster, it is a pretty medium level on the spectrum. This finish shows off the fine lines in the steel as well as showing off the bevels of the blade, giving the knife a very traditional look that will never go out of style.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is the most commonly found blade style on pocket knives today, mostly because of how all-purpose it proves to be. To form the shape of this blade style, the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. Blades with lowered points prove more control and do add strength to the tip. It is the strength of this lowered tip that makes this blade shape such a good option for your tactical and survival knives. It is this strong point that also sets apart the drop point blade shape and the clip point blade shape, which are sometimes confused. While the clip point blade shape does have a lowered point, its point is much finer and sharper. The clip point does give you the control from the lowered tip, but it also lets you pierce and stab because of how fine the tip is. The clip point can pierce and stab much better than the drop point can. But because it is such a fine tip, it is prone to breaking, whereas the drop point is not going to break. Drop points are so versatile because of their strength, their controllability, and the large belly that the blade style sports. It is this large belly that makes slicing such an easy task with a drop point blade, thus with the Kershaw Scallion. With Kershaw choosing a drop point blade shape for the Scallion, they have created the perfect everyday carry knife that is going to be able to assist you with virtually any task that comes your way.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this Scallion has been carved out of 410 stainless steel. This alloy of stainless steel is the basic, general purpose martensitic stainless steel that is used for highly stressed parts and provide good corrosion resistance plus high strength and hardness. This type of stainless steel contains a minimum of 11.5% chromium which is just sufficient enough to demonstrate corrosion resistance properties in mild atmospheres, steam, and many mild chemical environments. It is a general purpose grade that is often supplied in the hardened but still machine able condition for applications where high strength and moderate heat and corrosion resistance are required. Stainless steel provides fantastic durability and resistance to corrosion, but it isn’t super lightweight. Stainless steel handles are also known to be rather slippery.

To help with your grip on this slippery knife, Kershaw has created great ergonomics. The knife handle curves perfectly to fit in your hand comfortably. ON the spine of the handle, there is a short row of jimping to give you a little more control when slicing. There is an elongated finger groove and a small finger guard to give you a comfortable place to rest your fingers while also protecting them from getting sliced.

This Scallion does feature a lanyard hole carved into the butt of the handle. This is the perfect addition for your new favorite EDC knife, because it allows you to keep it with you at all times. A lanyard not only adds a little bit of personality to this full silver knife, but it will help you draw your blade out of your pocket a little bit quicker.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is also silver, creating a completely silver blade. This is a single position pocket clip, which is a drawback to some people. This pocket clip is fixed for tip-down, right-handed carry. But this pocket clip is going to be sturdy and keep your knife safely in your pocket. It is held in place by two small silver screws, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife has a flipper opening mechanism that is enhanced with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism. It also features two separate locks: the frame lock and the tip-lock slider.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle where it will lock into place with the two locks on this Scallion.

The SpeedSafe mechanism assists you to open this knife quickly and easily with a pull back on the flipper. It is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open this knife by using a torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife form being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed positon. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife.

The frame lock is portion of the handle (the knife frame) that moves behind the blade to lock it into positon during use. This is a safety feature of this Kershaw knife.

The Tip Lock is found on all of the Scallion versions that also feature the SpeedSafe. The Tip Lock prevents the blade form opening when you don’t want it to. To lock your blade closed, all you do is move the slider to the closed positon. You can find the Tip Lock near the bottom of the handle.

 

 

The Specs:

The blade on this Kershaw knife measures in at 2.4 inches long. This Scallion has a closed length of 3.5 inches long, with an open length of 5.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at a measly 2.9 ounces. This knife is the perfect size to be your go-to EDC knife.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “The Scallion is one of our most popular knives—and no wonder. With its 2 1/4-inch blade, the Scallion is the perfect size for lightweight and convenient pocket carry. But just because it’s smaller doesn’t mean it isn’t mighty. From breaking down a cardboard box to cutting twine to opening packages, the Scallion is perfect for just about any cutting task you’d care to ask it to do. One of the Scallion’s cool features is SpeedSafe assisted opening. With SpeedSafe, you can open the blade one-handed. Just pull back on the ambidextrous flipper and the blade moves out of the handle, ready for use. The high-carbon blade steel offers good edge retention and excellent corrosion resistance. The bead-blasted finish makes it easy to maintain. This Scallion’s handle is pure stainless steel, which enables us to build-in a frame lock. When the blade is opened, a part of the handle, or frame, moves into place behind the blade, locking it open and ensuring that it can’t accidentally close during use. The frame lock is an exceptionally strong blade lock. The second lock is the Tip-Lock. It’s a slider that locks the tip of the blade inside the handle until you release it, which ensures the knife won’t accidentally open during transport. A great all-stainless-steel look, blade security, and assisted opening…it all adds up to one great little knife.”
Kershaw’s Ken Onion Scallion offers high-performance styling and all the convenience of the SpeedSafe ambidextrous assisted opening system in a slightly larger knife. It’s ideal for everyday carrying. The blade is built of high-carbon 420HC stainless steel for good edge retention and excellent corrosion resistance. This model, the 1620FL, features a 410 stainless steel handle.  This special model is a framelock.  It also has a plain edge blade.  Pick up your new go-to EDC knife today at BladeOps.

Kershaw Natrix 7007 Spring Assist Knife Review

Kershaw, and many knife enthusiasts, know that there is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible ban for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality material and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. They introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blade in their Blade Traders. Recently, their Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling them to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And they will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies, and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon, they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for their customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be talking about the Kershaw Natrix spring assisted knife.

Kershaw Natrix 7007 Spring Assist Knife
Kershaw Natrix 7007 Spring Assist Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. This is a very popular budget brand of knife steel made in China. In terms of composition, the steel is very similar to the Japanese steel of AUS-8 grade. 8Cr13MoV steel at its low cost demonstrates very worthy characteristics of cutting. The range of the steel hardness is 56-59 HRC. Knives that are made out of this steel keep sharpening well and at the same they are easy to sharpen. This steel is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. This steel is good enough to get the job done, but it is no super steel. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is well inexpensive it is.

The blade has been finished with a stonewash finish. With this type of finish, the steel has literally been rolled with pebbles and then smoothed out. This creates a darker, rugged, look. Many people like this type of finish because it hides scratches better than other finishes. The biggest advantage to this finish is that it preserves the look of the blade overtime. Stonewash also hides fingerprints pretty well, so the blade might not need to be polished as often as others with different finishes.

The drop point blade shape is the most popular blade shape in the cutlery industry today. This style of blade is versatile, tough, and can take on almost any task that you throw at it. To from this blade shape, the unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades have become popular on tactical and survival knives. This lowered point also adds an element of control to the blade, which is why this blade shape works really well for fine detail work. Another characteristic that makes it such a versatile blade shape is because of the large belly that it boasts. Bellies are what makes slicing easy, and the majority of your everyday tasks will include some form of slicing. Drop point blades really only have one disadvantage and that is the broad tip. This broad tip will limit your piercing abilities, but you need to remember that it is also what provides you with so much strength. So while it is a drawback, it is not the biggest drawback that a blade style could have.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of black G-10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. It has very similar properties to carbon fiber yet it can be had for almost a fraction of the cost, because it is slightly inferior. The manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results from that process is very strong, tough, lightweight, and hard. Everyday folding knives benefit from G-10 because it is durable and lightweight, non-porous, and can be easily textured. Unfortunately, because of how hard it is, it is very brittle. If this handle is subjected to a hard or sharp impact, it will probably crack or break. One of the other disadvantages is that it does lack elegance—it is known to look and feel very plastic-y, lacking personality.

The handle has an elongated finger groove, and the portion across on the spine of the handle, curves in ward as well. This will create a comfortable hold on the handle, even if you are using it for long periods of time. There is a finger guar, but when the knife is opened, the flipper turns into an extra-long finger guard to protect your fingers form getting sliced if you slip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clips a deep carry clip, which means that it is going to stay more snug in your pocket—even if you are on the move for most of your day. The clip is only eligible for tip up carry, but it is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which makes this knife fully ambidextrous. Most of the hardware on this knife is black, but the pivot point is sliver.

 

The Mechanism:

The Natrix is a spring assisted knife. It features a flipper opening mechanism as well as Kershaw’s SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism. This knife also boasts a sub-frame locking mechanism.

The flipper on this knife is a small and triangular protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper helps to enable fast and easy one handed opening, while also making it ambidextrous. To open this knife, you hold the knife handle vertically in one hand and place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Then, you gently apply downward pressure on the flipper; the SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily and the blade will easily lock into place. When you are closing this knife, keep your fingers away from the blade edge while closing.

The SpeedSafe was first brought to market by Kershaw. The SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open this knife with a pull back on the flipper. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by gravity; it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. And no, a SpeedSafe knife is not a switchblade. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblades. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blades DO NOT deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead the user must overcome the torsion bar’s resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this, SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade.

The Kershaw Sub-Frame Lock is a variation of the traditional frame lock. In this case, a piece of the lighter weight frame is machined out and a piece of steel is riveted into its place. This piece of steel acts just like a standard frame lock. It’s angled inward and biased toward the locked position. When the blade is open, it moves into position behind the blade tang, blocking it open. As with other frame locks, the user moves it to the side and out of the way in order to close the knife. The Sub-Frame Lock is Kershaw patented technology and enables us to make a knife with a slimmer profile, while still providing the strength and security of a frame lock.

The SpeedSafe was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fisherman, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job site. The SpeedSafe mechanism is very safe, because once opened, a locking system that secures the blade in positon so that it does not close accidentally. New SpeedSafe users can ensure safe use of the technology by practicing to proficiency.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this Kershaw knife measures in at 3.25 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.25 inches long. When the Natrix is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.5 inches. This knife weighs in at 2.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about the Natrix, they say, “Where have I seen that profile before? That’s right. The new Kershaw Natrix is based on brother brand Zero Tolerance’s 0770, which itself was inspired by the award-winning ZT 0777. The design has—apparently—been the envy of certain other knife makers. And now we’re taking it back.

Kershaw’s new Natrix features a drop-point blade of 8Cr13MoV that offers solid performance with good edge-holding and easy resharpening. The stonewashed blade finish looks good and even helps hide use scratches. Accessed with the built-in flipper, SpeedSafe assisted opening makes it easy to open the Natrix one-handed so it’s always ready when you need it. The handle is lightweight G-10, 3D-machined and chamfered to fit comfortably in the hand. An oversized pivot provides an attention-grabbing detail on the front of the knife, while our patented Sub-Frame Lock secures the blade and provides a dramatic, contrasting line on the back. The Kershaw Sub-Frame Lock is covered under US Patent 9,120,234.

The Sub-Frame Lock design also enables us to lighten the weight of the Natrix, so that you get a big, useful blade in a knife that still weighs in at a mere 2.9 ounces. A decorative aluminum back spacer lightens the load even further and adds another embellishment. Finally, a custom-designed deep-carry pocket clip echoes the lines of a special recess machined into the handle to complete this good-looking knife.” Pick up this great everyday carry knife today at BladeOps.

Kershaw Grinder Folding Knife Review

There really is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. When Kershaw is talking about this, they say, “The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.)

The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

They were founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. They say, “Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Grinder.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 4Cr13 steel. This is a value priced steel that is extremely stain resistant. This steel is going to keep the overall cost of the knife at an incredibly low price. It is also going to be able to get most of the jobs done, while not needing too much maintenance. That being said, it is a lower end steel, so it is not going to stand up to the super steels or premium steels. You do get what you pay for as well, so this steel is not going to hold its edge as long as other steels. But, it is going to be easier to sharpen than other steels because it is so soft.

The steel has been finished with a bead blasted finish. This finish is created by using abrasive glass or ceramic beads that are blasted at the steel at a high pressure. This process results in an even, grey finish. A blasted finish reduces reflections and glares because of its even, matte surface. However, the blasting does create an increased surface area and micro-abrasions, both of which make the steel more prone to rusting or corrosion over time. In fact, a blasted blade can actually rust overnight if it is left in a very humid environment. While most environments are not humid enough to trigger overnight rusting, you should be aware that it is possible.

Kershaw Grinder Folding Knife
Kershaw Grinder Folding Knife

The blade is a clipped tanto style blade. This does have some significant differences form a typical tanto, but a tanto is definitely where the inspiration came from. For starters, instead of having a straight back, the back is curved inward until about 3/4ths of the way up the blade. At this point, it angles sharply down towards the point. The curves section has been outfitted with a row of jimping, which will give you the control you need to really benefit from this tough knife. Another one of the striking differences between a typical tanto and this tanto-inspired blade is that this blade does have a belly while a regular tanto blade does not. IT is not the largest belly that you are going to find, but it is enough to get the job done when it comes down to it. You will be able to slice with this knife, which allows it to be a general utility knife that you can always have on hand and trust to work. The point of the knife is going to be tough enough to pierce through things, but it is sharper than your typical tanto, so it is going to be easier to pierce into things as well. Overall, this is a modified version of the clip point blade shape and the tanto blade shape. This blade is going to get the job done and get it done well. It prepares you to take on a little bit of everything without excelling at anything. For a knife that you are going to have with you at all times, this is a great option.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Glass-filled nylon, or GFN. This is the same material as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon, or FRN, as it is more commonly known as. This is a modern material that is crazy strong while also being cheap.

This material is similar to G10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, except that it doesn’t suffer from being brittle and it is not going to break as easily as the other materials. This is because in the other materials, all of the nylons are arranged in a single direction. The handle will be strong in that direction, but will begin to break apart when it is stressed in any other direction. With GFN, the fibers are arranged haphazardly, so no matter which way the handle is stressed, it is going to stay together. This is also an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded which lets the manufacturer build lots more at the same time. And, because it is injection molded, the material can be textured in the manufacturing process, which does cut down on labor and thus cost. The overall benefits of this handle material is that it is strong, tough, inexpensive, and requires very little maintenance. The cons to this handle material is that it is not going to offer as much grip as G-10 would and some people think that it has a cheap plastic feel to it.

The ergonomics of this handle are built to be comfortable while also giving the user a solid grip on it, perfect for a general utility knife.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a deep carry, reversible pocket clip. This knife is designed to be used for utility or any other function that you can possibly think of. The deep carry comes in handy there, because you won’t have to worry about the knife falling out of your pocket when you have it with you every single day. This clip is reversible for either left or right handed carry, but can only be attached for tip down carry. Most people do prefer their clip to be tip-down so that if the knife accidentally opens inside of their pocket, they won’t get cut.

The clip is silver, matching the blade and the hardware on this knife. It is a tapered clip with a slight skeletonization on the upper portion of it.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife that has been equipped with a flipper as well as Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism and a liner lock.

The flipper is a small protrusion on the blade that allows for fast and easy one-handed opening. The flipper is also ambidextrous, which helps make this knife more fully ambidextrous. To open this knife, hold the knife handle vertically in one hand. Place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper or push outwards on the thumb stud. SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily, and the blade locks into place. Keep fingers away from blade edge while closing.

             Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe® assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original. So what exactly is SpeedSafe? Well, SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling knives. And how does it work? The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

Lastly, the Grinder has been equipped with a liner lock. The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using a Kershaw folding knife even safer.

 

The Specs:

             The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of the Grinder when it is opened is 7.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.5 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “The new Kershaw Grinder is designed to be put to work. To that end, the Grinder offers a blade with a slightly curved belly for all-purpose cutting and slicing. A clipped, tanto-inspired tip offers excellent piercing capabilities, too. If you need to bear down on the back of the blade during a particularly tough cutting job, the concave spine with heavy jimping provides additional grip security. The work-ready blade is made of 4Cr13MoV steel for solid service.

The Grinder is always ready to go to work quickly thanks to our SpeedSafe assisted opening and convenient built-in flipper. A secure liner lock keeps the blade securely open during work until the user releases it. The glass-filled nylon handle is ergonomically contoured to fit the hand securely and grooved to offer an extra-secure grip. The deep-carry pocket clip is easily reversible for tip-down, right- or left-handed carry.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Faultline Knife Review

Kershaw Knives is known for designing and manufacturing a wide range of knives. This range of knives includes pocket knives, sporting knives, and even kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd. They are based out of Tualatin, Oregon.

This brand of knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own knife designs and styles. Their early manufacturing was mostly done in Japan. Then, in 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. Then, because they were getting so large and had so many people wanting their products, Kershaw moved their facilities to a larger production site in 2003.

Kershaw has collaborated with a wide array of custom knife makers over the years to produce all your favorite ground-breaking knives. Some of these collaborations include Ken Onion, who worked on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and plenty of others.

When Kershaw was founded, they were founded to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to won, carry and use. This means that every Kershaw knife must be one of the highest quality. They say, “Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always choses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state of the art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.”

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation and has actually pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Faultline, which is one of their newest knives.

 

The Blade:

             The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8CR13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8CR13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8CR13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8CR13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. This is a top-of-the-line Chinese steel that Kershaw believes offers their customers and excellent value.

The blade has been finished with a black-oxide coating. This is performed by a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance to the blade.

This is a very broad clip point blade. The clip point is one of the most popular blade shapes that you are going to find in our cutlery industry. This is an all-purpose blade that has the spine of the knife run straight from the handle before it stops about hallway up the knife. At this point, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This area is called the clip and looks as if it is cut out of the blade. On the Faultline, the clip is straight. Because of the clip, the knife has a lowered tip, which is going to give you more control when you are using this knife. And because the tip is more easily controlled as well as being sharp and even thinner at the spine, the clip point is going to excel at stabbing. The clip point also has a very large belly, which helps to make this knife an all-purpose knife. The belly is going to make slicing a breeze, which comes in handy in almost any area of knife using. The clip point does have one major disadvantage, which is that the tip of the blade is narrow and sharp, which means it is going to be prone to breaking easily. Because the Faultline has such a broad blade, you shouldn’t have to worry too much about the tip breaking. However, keep in mind that it will break more easily than a drop point would.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of GFN with a rubber over mold insert. Glass filled nylon, or GFN is a nylon synthetic polymer that is reinforced with glass threads for increases strength, stiffness, and dimensional stability that is combined with excellent wear resistance. The rubber over mold is a textured rubber layer that provides extra grip, usually molded over a solid handle, like on the Faultline.

The handle has a pretty simple shape that has been dramatized. The back slopes towards the butt, but the angle of the curve is a little bit harsher than you would typically see on a regular folding knife. The handle also has a very large finger groove, which gives you a safe and comfortable place to rest your fingers. After the finger groove, there is a large curve down the butt. This curve is also dramatized. The butt is squared off. And the finger guard is enhanced with the flipper mechanism.

The GFN is a darker green while the rubber over mold is black. The over mold is textured with large squares that have texture on themselves. GFN does not provide a lot of texture, so the over mold is the perfect companion for this handle.

 

Kershaw Faultline
Kershaw Faultline

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a single positon pocket clip. This means that the handle has only been drilled to put the clip on in one direction. For the Faultline, that direction is on the right side of the handle for tip up carry. While some people do view this as a disadvantage, Kershaw makes up for it by making the clip a deep carry clip. This means that it is going to fit more snugly in your pocket, so you don’t have to worry about it falling out while you move around. Plus, since this is a tactical knife, the deep carry clip is going to help conceal the clip more easily in your pocket.

The clip is black, which matches the blade, the hardware, and the over mold. The clip is skinny and is skeletonized at the top slightly.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual knife that has no mechanical assist to open the folding knife. Kershaw says that it opens the class, old-school way. In terms of efficiently, this means that it is not going to open as quickly or smoothly. In terms of legality, the knife is going to be legal in the widest amount of states in the US. This is because it does not even come close to being an automatic.

To help you open the knife, it has been equipped with a flipper mechanism. This is a piece of the blade that protrudes out of the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip up, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper mechanism has plenty of advantages. The first one is that by its very design, it is an ambidextrous tool. Next, because it doesn’t protrude off of the blade, like a thumb stud does, you don’t need to worry about it getting in the way while you are using the knife. Also, once the knife is opened, it acts as a finger guard to further protect your hands during use. Lastly, the flipper keeps your fingers out of the path of the blade while you are opening and closing the knife. This means that it is going to be safer than the thumb stud, which puts your fingers pretty directly into the path of the blade. The only bummer about the flipper is that it does take a few runs to really get the hang of.

The Faultline is equipped with Kershaw’s KVT ball-bearing opening system. The Kershaw KVT ball-bearing system makes one-handed opening of your knife fast and easy—without the need for a mechanical assist. While SpeedSafe assisted opening uses a torsion bar to help move the knife blade out the handle, KVT relies on a ring of “caged” ball bearings that surround the knife’s pivot. (“Caged” means the ball bearings are secured within a ring that surrounds the pivot. It keeps the ball bearings in place, while allowing them to rotate freely.) When the user pulls back on the built-in flipper, the blade rotates out of the handle as the ball bearings roll in place. KVT makes one-handed opening quick, easy, and smooth as butter.

The knife is also equipped with a liner lock. When Kershaw is explaining their liner lock, they say, “The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using a Kershaw folding knife even safer.”

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4 inches long. The overall length of this knife measures in at 7 inches long. This is a pretty average size and weight of a knife, weighing in at 3.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

             When discussing this knife, they say, “This is the one you add to your truck box, toss in your go-bag, or slip into the pocket of your tactical pants. Everything about it says, “practical, reliable, and sturdy.” This right-sized knife fits comfortably in the hand, but offers a bigger blade than you might expect. The broad blade provides efficient slicing while the clipped point delivers good piercing capability. Made of quality 8Cr13MoV stainless steel, the Faultline’s blade is black-oxide coated to give it a tactical look while adding an extra layer of corrosion protection.

The handle is olive drab glass-filled nylon with a rubberized, super-grippy and textured over mold. Heavy jimping on the blade back adds additional grip. To bring this knife in at an adventure-ready weight, Kershaw adds an inset liner lock, which provides the blade-lockup security of a locking liner with less bulk and at a lighter weight.

The knife opens with a flipper and our KVT ball-bearing opening system. There’s no need for a mechanical assist; KVT makes it smooth and easy to open one-handed. A single-position, deep-carry pocket clip ensures the knife rides securely inside your pocket.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps for a great price that will give you a great knife.

 

 

Kershaw Pink Chive Knife Review

Kershaw has it all. They have the award winning technologies and advanced materials to give you a knife that you can trust. This means that when you are carrying a Kershaw, you are carrying the real thing. So what does the real thing mean? Well, to Kershaw it means that they are giving you value and lots of it.

They were founded in 1974 with a founding mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. They have actually pioneered the use of many of the technologies nada danced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Kershaw says, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw is also a brand of Kai USA Ltd. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in Kershaw’s 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be going over their classic Chive. This time, in pink.

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 420HC steel. This modified 420 steel has higher amounts of carbon and chromium to boost hardenability and corrosion resistance. It is an excellent everyday steel: tough, corrosion resistant, easy to sharpen and takes a good edge. This steel has been hardened to a 58 HRC.

The blade has been finished with a bead blasted finish. This finish is created by using abrasive class or ceramic beads that are blasted at the steel with a high pressure, which results in an even grey finish. A blasted finish works to reduce reflections and glares because of its even matte surface. The blasting process does create an increased surface area as well as micro abrasions in the steel which make the steel more prone to rusting or corrosion. In fact, a blasted blade can rust overnight if it is left in the exact wrong environment.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. This is going to be a great all-purpose blade. It is one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today. The most common place that you are going to find a clip point blade shape is on a Bowie knife, but you will be able to find it on pocket knives such as the Chive. The shape of the blade is formed by having the edge of the knife run straight form the handle before it stops about halfway up the knife. At this point, it will turn and continue to the point of the knife. This area is named the “clip,” because it looks as if that portion of the blade was clipped out. This is (obviously) how the knife got its name. While the clip can be curved or straight, on the Chive, it is straight. Because of the clip, the knife has a lowered point, which means that you are going to be able to better control your cuts when you are using this knife. This means that you are going to be able to perform fine detail work with this knife, or have very steady cuts. One of the things that the clip point really excels at is stabbing because there is less drag during insertion and then faster withdrawal. Clip points also have a very large belly, which is the perfect characteristic for your everyday knife. The bigger the belly, the easier it is going to be to slice. Clip points really only have one major disadvantage: because the point is so narrow, it is prone to breaking when used on harder targets.

 

Kershaw Pink Chive
Kershaw Pink Chive

The Handle:

             The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum. Aluminum is a very durable material for knife handles. It is a low density metal, but it will still give you a very hefty feel to the knife without it actually being weighed down. The most common alloy of aluminum that is being used today is the 6061-T6 alloy, which has the highest tensile strength.

When an aluminum handle is texturized correctly, it is going to give you a reasonably secure grip that is going to be comfortable enough that you can use it for extended use. However, aluminum also has high conductive properties. This means that if you are going to be using this knife during the winter months, it will probably be uncomfortable to use.

The overall pros of an aluminum handle are that it is strong, light, durable, and resistant to corrosion. The cons of an aluminum handle are that it is going to be cold to hold, it can be a little slippery, and it is susceptible to scratches and dings.

This knife has been anodized a bright pink. The anodization process not only adds this sleek color, but it also increases the wear and corrosion resistance of the knife. The handle is all curves, with a very elongated and shallow finger groove. The butt of the handle is rounded and does have a lanyard hold.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a single position pocket clip, which means that it can only be attached in one way. On this knife, the pocket clip is attached on the left hand side for tip-down carry. Tip-down carry is the preferred carry position when deciding between the two. This is because if the knife accidentally comes opened in your pocket, when you reach inside, you are not in danger of cutting yourself. The pocket clip on the Chive is a satin finish, which pairs well with the pink handle and matches the blade. The clip is kept in place by two silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

The Chive has been equipped with a SpeedSafe assisted opening knife, a flipper, a liner lock, and a Tip-Lock slider.

The SpeedSafe Assisted Opening helps you open your knife quickly and easily with a manual pull back on the flipper. This is built into many of Kershaw’s best sellers, such as this one. The SpeedSafe helps you open the knife with only one hand and does NOT make this knife a switchblade. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. And, the SpeedSafe is incredibly safe. When the user overcomes the resistance of the torsion bar, SpeedSafe assists in opening the knife. Once opened, a locking system secures the blade in position so that it does not close accidentally. When releasing the lock, the blade won’t snap shut due to resistance provided by the torsion bar. Since the torsion bar provides a bias towards the closed position, it will normally hold the blade securely closed. New SpeedSafe users can ensure safe use of the technology by practicing to proficiency.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, to move the blade easily out of the handle. Once the knife is opened, it acts as an extra-large finger guard. This also keeps your fingers out of the blade’s path, which creates a safer way to open the knife.

The Chive is also equipped with a liner lock. The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle.

Kershaw explains the Tip-Lock by saying, “There is an exception to the rule about the purpose of locking systems being to keep the blade open. Some Kershaw knives also have a Tip-Lock designed to keep the blade inside the handle. The Tip-Lock can be found on all Leek and Scallion SpeedSafe® knives. It’s a simple slider that, when engaged, ensures the blade will not accidentally open. It’s especially helpful in cases where the knife might be juggled in a briefcase, backpack, or purse.”

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 1.9 inches long with a handle that measures in at 2.9 inches long. The overall length of this miniature knife is 4.8 inches long. This knife weighs in at 1.5 ounces. This knife is tiny, but it is going to get the job done. You also aren’t going to feel it in your pocket, which is exactly what you want from your everyday knife. This knife was made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

             Kershaw says, “Perfect in pink. With its less-than-two-inch blade, the pink Chive is a small knife. This, of course, makes it perfect for pocket, pack, purse, or briefcase carry. But just because it’s small doesn’t mean the Chive isn’t mighty. In fact, the Chive is perfect for just about any cutting task you’d care to ask it to do—from opening packages to cutting duct tape.

To ensure this handy little blade is always ready when you need it, the pink Chive is equipped with SpeedSafe assisted opening. Just pull back on the flipper and the blade moves out of the handle, ready for use. The high-carbon blade steel offers good edge retention and excellent corrosion resistance. The bead-blasted finish is easy to maintain. This Chive’s handle scales are pink anodized aluminum over steel liners. Anodizing not only enables the aluminum to take a scratch resistant color, but it actually strengthens the aluminum.

The pink Chive’s handle is strong, lightweight, and colorful. For safety, it has a locking liner to keep it locked safely open and a Tip-Lock to keep it locked safely closed during transport. If pink is your color, the pink Chive just might be your knife.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Injection 3.5 Folding Knife

Kershaw knows that there is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. Kershaw says, “The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.)

The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

They were founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to won, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

They also have a commitment to innovation and even pioneered the use of many of the technologies that are now the standard in the knife industry.

Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, which is the premier blade producer in Japan for over 100 years now. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development, which is where some of Kershaw’s commitment to innovation comes from.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be talking about the Injection 3.5 folding knife.

Kershaw Injection 3.5 Folding Knife
Kershaw Injection 3.5 Folding Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” This steel has been hardened to a 57–59 HRC.

The blade on this knife has been bead blast finished. This finish is created when the manufacturer takes glass or ceramic beads and then blasts them at the steel at a high pressure. This process results in an even grey matte finish. A blasted finish reduces reflections and glares because it is so matte. This is nice because it means that when you are using the knife, the reflections are not going to blind you while you are trying to work. It also means that if you are ever in the field using this knife, you won’t have to worry about the glares giving your position away. Of course, this finish does have its disadvantages. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro-abrasions make the steel more prone to rusting or corroding. This means that a blasted blade, even if it is a stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in the absolute worst environment.

The blade on the Injection 3.5 is a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is one of the two most popular blade shapes on the market today. This is because it is versatile as well as being incredibly tough. The blade shape is formed by having the spine of the knife curve slowly from the handle to the tip of the knife in one, unbroken curve. This creates a lowered point, which is where the user gets the control over the knife. You can perform fine detail work with this knife because of the control, or you can just get really even cuts. The tip on the drop point is also lowered, which is going to give you the strength that the drop point is known for. This is the strength that allows you to take on more tasks than if you had a clip point, which is prone to breaking. The drop point also has a large belly area, which is why slicing is so easy with this knife. This is a huge advantage no matter what style of knife you are dealing with, because the bigger the belly, the easier it is to slice. One of the most common techniques you are going to be doing with your knife is slicing, or push cutting, which is what the drop point is going to excel at. That being said, the drop point does have one major disadvantage: because the tip is broad, you do lose out on many of your piercing or stabbing capabilities. You do need to keep in mind that it is that broadness that gives you your strength.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 3D machined G10. G10 is a grade of Garolite that is made out of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, except that it is slightly inferior, which means that you can get it for a much cheaper price.

To make this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin. Next, they will compress them, and then bake them under pressure. The material that you get is tough, hard, lightweight, strong. Out of all the fiberglass resin laminates (which include Micarta and carbon fiber) G10 is considered to be the strongest of them all.

Texture can easily be added to the handle, which helps to provide a very solid and comfortable grip. Tactical folders as well as fixed blades can benefit greatly from having G10 as its handle because it is durable, lightweight, and non-porous, which means that maintenance levels are going to be low.

While this is a cheaper material to produce, it is not going to compare to GFN, because GFN can be injection molded, while G10 has to be cut and machined into shape. That being said, out of the fiberglass materials, it is definitely on the cheaper end of the spectrum because the texturing is added during the production process.

The overall pros to a G10 handle is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons are that it does suffer from being brittle and it does not have a ton of personality. It suffers from being brittle because all of the fibers have been arranged in a single direction. While the knife is going to be strong in that direction, it will begin to break apart when it is stressed in any other direction.

The handle is all angles instead of the more common curves. The spine of the knife angles from the blade to the butt in a straight angle. The belly of the knife has a large finger guard that angles upward to create an angled finger groove. At this point, the belly of the handle goes towards the butt of the handle sharply. The butt of this handle is triangular. To cut down on weight and add texture, the handle has two long grooves cut out, to semi-skeletonize the handle. The rest of the G10 has texture so that you will have a solid grip on the knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is silver, which matches the blade. It is kept in place by two silver screws, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The pocket clip is straight, but tapered, which does help to keep it in your pocket. This is a reversible pocket clip; you can attach it for either left or right handed carry. That begin said, it can only be attached for tip up carry. This is a drawback, because if the knife happens to come open in your pocket, you could very easily slice yourself if you do reach into your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife, which means that there is no mechanical assist, such as SpeedSafe, used to open the folding knife. Kershaw says that it opens the “classic, old-school” way. In terms of efficiency, the manual opening knife is the least efficient between manual, assisted opening, and automatic. That begin said, it terms of legality, the manual opening knife is going to be legal in the most cities, states, and areas.

This knife has been equipped with a liner lock. The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using this Kershaw folding knife even safer.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of the knife measures in at 8 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Kershaw says, “Custom details without the custom price—that’s the new Injection 3.5 from Kershaw and custom knife maker Todd Rexford.

From the tip of its classic drop-point blade to its 3D-machined G10 handle, the manual opening Injection offers streamlined good looks. Details like decorative pivot hardware and machined thumb studs give the Injection a high-end custom look and feel. The G10 handle features six incised cutouts on each side, letting you see through to the stainless steel liners. The G10 is slightly textured for a secure grip. Even the back spacer is cool; it’s chamfered (cut at an angle) on the back end. Another nice detail is the inset lanyard pin so nothing interrupts the smooth line of the knife. And all of this at a price that definitely won’t break the bank.

The 3 1/2-in. blade gives you a little extra length for taking on larger tasks. Built of high-performance 8Cr13MoV, it comes razor-sharp and holds its edge well. The manual opening is smooth and easy. Once open, the blade is secured with a steel locking liner. The pocket clip is reversible for left- or right-handed carry. Want a slightly smaller knife? Check out the Injection 3.0.” Pick up this knife today at BladeOps today.

 

 

Kershaw Concierge Knife Review

Kershaw Concierge
Kershaw Concierge

Kershaw’s fan base knows that there is nothing like a Kershaw. Kershaw says, “From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing.” So what is the real thing? Real thing is value and lots of value. You know that when you purchase a Kershaw knife, you are going to get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive and budget models are impressive and use high-quality materials. You know that with a Kershaw, each and every portion is going to be solid, crafted, and reliable. Kershaw knows how solid and reliable their knives are, so they back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime warranty.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and sue. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Kershaw says, “Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knives, a hunting knife, or a special collector’s edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship.” Because of their extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, which ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Kershaw says, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine.” Kershaw promises that they will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 yeas, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon, but they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Concierge.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this Kershaw knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese steel that is similar to AUS-8 steel. However, between the two steels, AUS-8 is the superior steel. 8Cr13MoV steel is an inexpensive steel that still demonstrates very worthy characteristics of cutting. This steel, and thus this blade, will easily cut through softer materials. With a good heat treatment, the steel will retain the sharpness for a long time. This steel also has very high corrosion resistance. Because it is a softer steel, this blade will be able to keep sharpening well, while also being easy to sharpen. For the cost of this steel, it is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. But, when it comes to blade steel, you do get what you pay for, so know that this steel is not going to stand up to the newer super steels on the block. The biggest advantage that this steel has is how inexpensive it is.

The blade has been coated with a titanium carbo-nitride coating. Kershaw uses this coating to produce an attractive grey blade coating that increases the blade’s hardness, helps maintain the edge, and increases the overall lifetime of the blade. One of the biggest benefits to having a coated blade is that it does increase the lifetime of the blade. This is because it creates a barrier in between the blade and the environment. This cuts down on corrosion and wear. The biggest disadvantage of having a coated blade is that the coating can and will scratch off after long periods of time or heavy use. Once the coating does scratch off, the blade will have to be recoated if you want it to keep the benefits.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a modified drop point blade shape. The drop point style is known as being one of the toughest and most versatile blade style on the market. This modified drop point blade still has the same toughness levels as well as being extremely versatile. The biggest modification on this blade is that instead of the spine having a slow curve from the handle to the point, it swoops downward before it swoops back upwards. The point is still lowered when in comparison with the beginning of the spine, so you still get the control that the drop point blade offers. And, the blade is still very broad, so you still have the signature strength of the drop point blade. This modified drop point blade also has a large belly, which means that this blade is going to excel at slicing; making it a great option for your everyday carry knife. The biggest disadvantage to this modified drop point blade is the same as the typical drop point blade—because the tip is broad, you will not have piercing capabilities like you would with a clip point blade.

 

The Handle:

The handle on tis knife is made out of G10. This material is often use din handles because of its moisture imperviousness. This material is fiberglass based laminate made by layers of fiberglass cloth that are soaked in an epoxy resin, then compressed, and then baked The result is a material that is hard, lightweight, and strong. A unique property of the material is that the grip actually improves when wet. This material is difficult to break. It is also an ideal handle material because it does not shrink or swell in extreme hot or cold temperatures. G10 is considered the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates. The G10 is black and textured with small bumps, to give you a secure grip in most environments.

The spine of the handle is angled, first going straight towards the middle, then angling downwards. The angle that goes downwards is complete with thick jimping to give extra grip on this knife. The belly of the handle has as very shallow and elongated finger groove that makes this a comfortable handle to hold. There is a very small finger guard, but because of the flipper, which acts as an additional finger guard when the knife is opened, your fingers will be kept very safe when you are using this knife.

On the top of the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole carved out. Even though this is an everyday carry knife, the lanyard will come in handy. Even though there is a pocket clip, the lanyard can help you more smoothly pull your knife out of your pocket. Plus, having a lanyard on this knife can add a bit of your own personal style to the Concierge.

This handle is comfortable and will give you a secure grip to go about your daily tasks.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a deep carry pocket clip. This will guarantee that it is safe and secure in your pocket throughout all of your tasks. The clip is long and skinny, with a little bit of texture right underneath the screws to more securely grip onto your pocket. The clip is kept in place by two silver screws that match all of the hardware on the knife. Unfortunately, the clip is a single positon recessed pocket clip. It can only be attached on the right side of the handle for tip up carry.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife that has no mechanical assist. What it does have is a flipper, the KVT ball-bearing opening, and a liner lock.

A flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. Some of the benefits to a flipper is that it is easy to operate, even if you only have one hand to use. Plus, it keeps your hands out of the blade’s path while it is being opened.

The KVT ball-bearing opening system makes manual opening as easy as assisted. The KVT relies on a ring of “caged” ball bearings that surround the knife’s pivot. Caged just means the ball bearings are secured within a ring that surrounds the pivot. It keeps the ball bearings in place, while allowing them to rotate freely. When the user pulls back on the built-in flipper, the blade rotates out of the handle as the ball bearings roll in place. KVT makes one-handed opening quick, easy, and smooth as butter. In knives with the KVT ball-bearing system, you will also notice that the knife has additional “detent.” This is a design feature that helps hold the blade safely in the handle when the knife is closed. When opening the knife, you may notice a little ‘stickiness’ just as you pull back on the flipper and before the blade rolls out of the handle on the KVT ball bearings. With just a little extra pressure on the flipper, it will overcome the detent and the knife will open with ease.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade locking systems. I knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal plates on either side of the blade. Handle scales cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade and prevents the blade form closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked positon. To close the knife, the user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using this Kershaw folding knife even safer.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.25 inches long. The overall length of this knife measures in at 7.25 inches long. This is a lightweight knife, weighing in at only 4.3 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about the Concierge, they say, “Like its namesake, known for discreetly and efficiently taking care of tasks for hotel guests, the new Kershaw Concierge will take care of all your pocket knife needs—discreetly and efficiently. Designed by Dmitry Sinkevich, the Concierge has a clean, refined look. The modified drop-point blade of 8Cr13MoV opens with a flipper and Kershaw’s manual KVT ball-bearing system, providing fast an easy one-handed opening. A custom pivot adds interest without detracting from the knife’s clean lines. Yet it’s the handle that really takes this exciting knife out of the ordinary. Built of machined g10, it offers a substantial grip and fills even larger hands comfortably. Yet thanks to the crowned finish on the G10 scales, the Concierge still feels slim enough to be an easy everyday carry. For secure grip, we added a black, glass-filled nylon back spacer with raised jimping. Turn the knife over and you’ll see Dmitry’s unique inset pocket clip. The custom clip rests in a machined-out hollow in the handle—so that its flush with the handle scale. This pocket clip treatment also contributes to the knife’s slimmer feel and easy carry. The blade, liners, and hardware are titanium carbo-nitride coated for a sophisticated look—and is just one more reasons why the Concierge will be at home no matter where your tasks may take you.” Pick up this brand new Kershaw today at BladeOps.

 

Kershaw CQC-11K Knife Review

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI group. In 1997 the US production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, KAI USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kai USA Ltd. has three lines of products; Kershaw Knives brand of sporting and pocket knives, Shun Cutlery, hand crafted Japanese kitchen cutlery, and Zero Tolerance, a line of premium and professional knives.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grand and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

In 2002, Kershaw released a Steven Seagal model featuring stingray leather on the handle. In 2004 Kershaw developed a multi tool for the National Geographic Society with National Geographic filmmaker Bryan Harvey. Kershaw has also released models in collaboration with Jeep, Orange County Choppers, the American Professional Rodeo Association, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Kai USA Ltd. and its Kershaw, Zero Tolerance, and Shun brands have a history of garnering industry awards. In May 2005, Kai USA Ltd. won four of the top awards at the Blade Show in Atlanta, Georgia. This was the first time in the show’s history that one company won this number of awards in one year: 2005 Overall Knife of the Year, 2005 Most Innovative American Design, 2005 Kitchen Knife of the Year, and 2005 Knife Collaboration of the Year.

2009 brought a Kershaw win for the Speed form. In 2010, Kershaw won “American Made Knife of the Year” for the Tilt.

Kershaw had a founding mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This means that Kershaw builds each of their knives with the highest quality. They also have a commitment to innovation. In fact, Kershaw has pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. When you are carrying a Kershaw, you know that you are carrying the real deal—from solid sound of the blade lockup to award winning technologies and advanced materials.

Kershaw has earned a reputation of creating phenomenal knives that are exceptional—even their inexpensive knives are top quality. Today, we are going to be going over their CQC-11K model.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This type of steel comes from a Chinese series of steel. Out of the series, 9Cr steel is the highest quality, with 8Cr steel falling shortly behind. If you were going to compare this steel to another steel, the closest type is AUS 8 steel. However, AUS 8 steel is the higher quality one. 8Cr steel is a softer steel, so it will be an easy steel to sharpen, even if you are out in the field, and this steel can be repeatedly sharpened without losing its quality. As a total bonus, this steel does keep its fine edge for long periods of time. This is a stainless steel, so it does resist rusting and corroding fairly well. This is an average grade steel, so while it does stand up to most tasks, it does not excel at anything like a premium grade steel would. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is how budget friendly it is. This steel is jam packed full of value—it is a low cost steel that can stand up to the majority of things that you throw at it.

This steel has been finished with a stonewashed finish. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is a wide variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion and the type of finish the blade has before it enters the tumbler. A very positive benefit of stonewashed blades is that they are low maintenance and preserve their original look overtime. The stonewashed finish hides the scratches and smudges that occur with use over time.

The blade has been carved into an upswept clip point style blade. If you are looking for a great all-purpose blade, then the clip point blade is a great option for you. This is also one of the most popular blade shapes in use today. The most recognizable knife that features a clip point is the Bowie knife, but it is also popular on many pocket knives and fixed blade knives. The back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight form the handle and stops about halfway up the knife. Then, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This cut out area is a curved area and is referred to as the “clip”, which is how this shape got its name. Clip point knives look as if the part of the knife from the spine to the point has literally been clipped off. The area of the point is upswept but the actual point is still lowered, which does provide more control when you are using the knife. Because the tip is controllable, sharp, and thinner at the spine, a clip point knife lends itself to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. Clip point knives also feature a large belly area that is perfect for slicing. This CQC-11K has been designed as a hunting knife and the large belly is perfect for skinning any game that you are trying to dress. The large belly also offers superior slicing for a wide variety of tasks.

Because this knife has been designed as a hunting knife, the edge is a plain edge to help with skinning and slicing and providing you with clean cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of a textured G10 front scale with a 410 bead blasted finish back scale. G10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. It has very similar properties to carbon fiber, yet it can be had for almost a fraction of the cost. While it is cheaper to produce than carbon fiber, it still has to be cut and machined into shape which is not as economical as the injection molding process that is used in FRN handles. To make this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results is extremely tough, hard, very lightweight, and strong. In fact, G10 is considered the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta, although it is more brittle. Tactical folders and fixed blade knives benefit from the qualities of G10 because it is durable and lightweight, non-porous and available in a variety of colors. The fact that it is non-porous is what makes it an exceptional material for a hunting knife.

The back handle scale is made out of stainless steel. This material provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but is not particularly lightweight. Stainless steel is a slippery material, so that is why the dual material handle scales make such a great combination. The G10 gives you all of the grip that you need and the stainless steel gives you the durability that you want.

The stainless steel handle scale has been finished with a bead blasted finish. This finish is created by using abrasive, glass or ceramic beads. The bead are blasted at a high pressure against the metal, resulting in an even, grey finish. A blasted finish reduces reflection and glare due to its even matte surface. Creating a blasted finish is a base level or user level finish on a knife blade. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. However, a blasted finish, even from stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in a very humid environment.

Kershaw CQC-11K
Kershaw CQC-11K

The handle has a thick finger guard and a deep finger groove to protect your fingers from getting sliced as well as keeping your fingers comfortable. At the bottom of the handle, there is a row of jimping.

At the bottom of the handle, there is a lanyard hole carved into it. The lanyard is going to come in handy when you are processing a large animal. While field dressing a large game animal, there comes a time when you’ll reach inside the cavity to cut the esophagus so the intestines can be pulled out. This is a messy, bloody situation, which makes a knife handle slippery. You really don’t want your hand to slip down the handle onto the blade. Or suppose a lengthy fish-cleaning session is going on. As your knife dulls, the handle will probably get slippery from the slime, blood, and guts. All it takes is an inattentive instant to hurt yourself. A lanyard around your wrist or hand can prevent this from happening.

 

The Lanyard Hole:

The lanyard hole is black, in contrast with the bead blasted stainless steel. The knife has pre drilled holes in the handle that enable the user to change either the tip position or the side on which the knife carries.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual knife that has no mechanical assist, such as SpeedSafe, used to open the folding knife. It opens the classic, old school way. This knife has a thumb disk, “wave shaped opening feature”. This is also called the remote pocket opener and is built into the back end of the blade, similar to the flipper. The unique wave shape is a hook that enables the user to open the knife as it is withdrawn from the pocket. Make sure closed knife is snugged up against the rear seam of your pants pocket, tip up. Reach into the pocket to hold the handle of the knife, keeping your fingers away from the blade. Pull toward the rear seam, withdraw the knife form your pocket quickly and steadily so that the wave shaped opening feature hooks on the rear seam of the pocket. This will open the blade. By the time its fully out of the pocket, the knife will be open and ready for sue. Pull back quickly and smoothly to ensure blade lock up.

The CQC-11K also features a frame lock. This is a portion of the handle that moves behind the blade to lock it into positon during use. This is the safety feature of the knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 8.5 inches long and it sports a closed length of 4.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.8 ounces. This knife was designed by Emerson, built by Kershaw.

 

The Conclusion:

This knife is part of Kershaw’s series of hunting knives—for the toughness, durability, and edge holding capabilities your next hunting trip demands. The popular Kershaw—Emerson series is growing. The newest entry, the CQC-11K, is based on the Emerson Rendezvous. Originally designed as a hunting knife, it’s equally adept for survival, camping, bush crafting, or for just about any outdoor activity.

The CQC-11K features a blade of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel with a stonewashed finish. It holds an edge well, and then resharpens easily when out in the field. The blade offers plenty of belly for skinning and other game processing, as well as superior slicing for a wide variety of tasks. For a secure-grip, the CQC-11K has a G-10 front scale with stainless steel back and a sturdy frame lock. Of course, it’s also equipped with the Emerson “wave shaped opening feature” so that the folder can be opened as it is withdrawn from the pocket. Or use the thumb disk for simple, manual opening. The CQC-11K’s handle is contoured for comfort and grip security while you work. A reversible pocket clip enables left- or right-handed carry.
This brand new hunting knife is going to make all of your buddies jealous while also meeting and excelling at any task that you throw at it.