Buck 110 Automatic Knife Review

This story about Buck Knives goes like this. A young blacksmith apprentice named Hoyt Buck was looking for a better way to temper steel so it would hold an edge longer. His unique approach produced the first Buck Knife in 1902. Hoyt made each knife by hand, using worn-out file blades as raw material. His handiwork was greatly appreciated during World War II. Hoyt’s eldest son Al had relocated from the Pacific Northwest to San Diego California after finishing a stint in the navy a decade earlier. Hoyt, and his wife Daisy, moved in with Al and his young family in 1945 and set up shop as H.H. Buck and Son.

Following the death of his father, Al kept the fledgling custom knife business going until incorporating Buck Knives, Inc. in 1961. Al introduced his son, Chuck, to the knife business at an early age and Chuck and his wife, Lori, were both involved when the company was incorporated. IN n1964, the knife industry was revolutionized with the introduction of the Model 110 Folding Hunter, making Buck Knives a leader in the field. A position that they still hold proudly today.

Chuck worked his way up through the company serving as President and CEO for many years before handling over the reins to his, CJ, in 1999. Chuck remained active as Chairman of the Board until his passing in 2015. Lori now serves on the Board of Directors and is actively involved with Buck promotional events throughout the U.S., continuing Chuck’s legacy.

CJ, the 4th generation family member to run Buck Knives and current CEO, President and Chairman, started out with the company on the production line in 1978. He has been quoted saying, “We have been helping people thrive with reliable and trustworthy edged products for over a century. Since our own name is on the knife, our quality, focus, and attention to detail is very personal.”

Hoyt and Al Buck’s ingenuity may have put the company on the map. But it is our ongoing commitment to developing innovative new products and improving what we have by third and fourth generation Buck family members that have made Buck the successful knife maker it is today.

Today we will be talking about the Buck 0110BRSA 110 Automatic knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this sleek knife is made out of 420HC High Carbon Stainless Steel. This comes from the 400 series which remains one of the most popular choice for knife makers because it is easy to sharpen and it is resistant to corrosion. 420 series contain several types with various carbon content between .15% and .40% this steel grade is widely used to make high end razor blades, surgical scalpels, etc. It obtains about 57 HRC after suitable heat treatment. 420HC is a higher carbon content, which is where the HC comes from. It holds a higher carbon production rate than stainless steel. The content is much softer than the higher number steel count 440, yet it’s more rugged than other similar proudcts. This steel can be brought to a higher hardness than 420 and should not be mistaken for it. Buck Knives is known for using this type of steel in many of their knives. This steel material has a greater carbon base and is mixed to a harder content than 420 stingless steels. There are many different levels of steel, but products made from 420HC steel are definitely different from other types of steel in terms of performance and reliability. Knives that are made with this steel are easy to sharpen and are durable when in constant use. Blades made from this steel are less prone to corrosion.

Buck Auto Knife
Buck Auto Knife

The blade has been finished with the classic satin finish. This is one of the most typical knife finishes. It is slightly less shiny than a polished finish, and it is less expensive than both the mirror and polished finishes. The luster of this finish usually falls between bead blasted, which is a matte finish, and a mirror polish, which is a high gloss finish. This finish works to show fine buffing lines with two directional finishes that better display the bevels of a blade. It actually takes great hand skill to finish. This finish is created by sanding the blade in one direction with increasing degrees of a fine abrasive, which is usually a sandpaper. The finer the abrasive and the more even the lines; the cleaner the satin finish blade looks.

This blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. The clip point is one of the three most common knife blade shapes used today. The other two are the drop point and the spear point. Clip point blades have the appearance of having the front third of the blade “clipped” off. Traditionally, the spine or unsharpened edge of the knife begins at the hilt and continues to a point between one third to one fourth of the blade length. The blade spine than tapers in thickness in a recurve to the knife’s point. The clip point blade design actually dates back to at least Macedonian times, where examples of knapped flint clip point knives have been unearthed. Variants of this style include the California clip, which uses a clip greatly extended in length, and the Turkish clip point with its extreme recurve. One of the most recognizable clip-point blades is used on the famous Bowie knife. The clip point allows a quicker, and thus deeper, puncture upon insertion because clip point blades are thinner at the spine. The clip point lends itself to a quicker stabbing advantage with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. However, when you are comparing the clip point design to the drop point design, the clip point is going to seem a lot weaker because of this thin characteristic. If you want a knife that is going to be able to take on all the challenges that you throw at it, I would recommend the sturdier drop point. The clip point blade does feature a large belly that is perfect for slicing or skinning. And because this knife has a plain edge, you are going to be able to skin or peel just about anything with this blade. The plain edge is also going to excel at push cuts of any kind, shaving, and traditional uses for your knife. The plain edge is going to give you the clean cuts that you long for, without fraying what you are working with.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of Dymondwood and brass. Dymondwood is phenolic resin impregnated wood veneers that are laminated and compressed. This material is extremely similar to Micarta, G10, and Carbon Fiber, except that the base material is wood instead of an unnatural material. Wood has been used as a knife handle since knives came into existence, really. A good quality wood handle can be durable and attractive, making wood a relatively inexpensive material for heavy duty knives. But, unlike many of the other budget friendly options, wood has a quality aesthetic that it adds to the knife, making your knife look sleek and elegant. In fact, wood hands are very popular among collector’s knives. There are many different types of woods used in knife handles, so you have to choose based on how you are going to use the knife. In this case, the handle has been made out of Macassar Ebony wood. This is an exotic wood with heartwood that is reported to be strong, very heavy, and very hard. The black heart is usually brittle, and the wood is used mostly for decorative purposes. This is a very dark wood that contrasts nicely with the bright brass hardware and ends.

Brass is known and valued for its easy machinability and the ease that the metal can be formed into desired shapes and forms while still retaining its high strength. All brasses are considered malleable and ductile and due to its low melting point, brass can also be cast relatively easily. This metal has both good heat and electrical conductivity and it is wear and spark resistant. Other you won’t need to worry about the electrical and spark related characteristics, the other two are important to knife users. The heat conductivity means that even if you are planning on working with this knife in cold environments, you won’t have to worry about it biting into your hand because it will quickly draw in your body heat. And, being wear resistant means that it is going to stand up to many of the elements and resist scratching easily.

The combination of the dark Ebony Dymondwood and the bright brass create an elegant feel to your knife. This knife is going to be a classic and as the years pass, this knife will always be in style. The handle has a slight curve to make your grip comfortable and secure, even after using it for long periods of time.

This knife does not sport a pocket clip.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife, sometimes known as a switchblade. The typical switchblade knife has been around since the 1920s and is really not all that different from a folding knife. The handle is going to be longer and thicker than the blade itself because it has to be able to store the blade in the handle. The handle has been hollowed out and has a slit going down the length of one side. IT contains the folded knife blade, a spring, and a locking mechanism that is attached to a button that extends form one of the flat sides of the handle. When the knife blade is hidden, it is folded into the base of the handle form the side, passing through the slit in the side of the handle. This pulls the spring, which catches on a lever connected to the activation button, effectively preventing the spring form exerting force on the hinged base of the blade. When the button is pushed, the lever, which is on a small rocker, is pulled out of the spring’s way. The spring snaps back into its original shape, pulling the base of the blade around das it does so, flipping the blade’s point out from the side of the handle. The only way to then close the knife is to physically pill upward on the hinged hilt before folding the blade back again. The lever attached to the activation button simply clicks into place against that underside the blade the same way as it would against the spring.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this Buck knife is 3.75 inches long, with a handle measuring in at 4.875 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 8.625 inches long. This knife weighs in at 7.1 ounces. This knife is made in the United States of America.

 

The Sheath:

Because this knife does not have a pocket clip attached to it, it does come with a leather sheath. Leather is one of the traditional materials that is used to make a knife sheath. Leather is very rugged, tough, and strong. A leather knife sheath feels and looks good, and the attractiveness of a leather sheath only gets better as it ages. One of the best features about a leather knife sheath is that they are silent, so you can easily pull the knife out or put it back in without making a sound. Unfortunately, leather is not waterproof, so getting it wet a lot or exposing it to extreme heat can dry out the oils in the leather which could lead the sheath to crack. To combat that, oiling the sheath from time to time can help make it last longer.

 

Conclusion:

The iconic Buck 110 folder first debuted in 1964 and quickly propelled the company into one of the country’s most prominent manufacturers to date. The name and style has always maintained its heritage but over the years we have seen emerging variations in both finish and functionality. Buck finally took wind of the popular auto-converted 110 model and now produces the knife from start to finish and is 100% eligible for Buck’s limited lifetime warranty. Each product features a high carbon stainless steel blade that has been hardened to a standard RC 58-60 for ideal performance with both edge retention and corrosion resistance and the handle styling boasts a flared base for proper grip security. This model features a brown Macassar Ebony Dymondwood handle complete with brass bolsters, a clip point style blade in a satin finish, no pocket clip and the black leather sheath provides a convenient belt carry option.

 

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Gerber Grey Shark Belly Knife Review

Gerber Gear has a charming backstory. What once started out as Gerber Legendary Blades, a young knife company, it quickly grew into a big business. Joseph R. Gerber started this company out in 1939 as a small batch of handmade cutlery sets given as holiday gifts. But this quickly turned into thousands of retail accounts around the country. By 1960, Gerber had quickly become one of the most trusted, appreciated, and collected names in knives.

It has now been 70 years since its founding and Gerber continues to grow. Still grounded in the same principles that first guided Joseph R. Gerber’s enterprise, Gerber is a company dedicated to making knives and tool that combine high quality materials and innovative designs that will stand up to a lifetime of use. The sleek, stainless steel sheath knives of the 50s and 60s have given birth to today’s lightweight, open-frame clip folders. Gerber is, however, no longer just a knife company. Multi-tools, axes, handsaws, machetes, headlamps, flashlights, survival kits, digging implements—these are the newest directions that Gerber explores with the same standards of quality and design that inform their revered knife making.

When talking about who they are, Gerber has said, “Like the mean and women who carry our gear, Gerber is Unstoppable. Decades of innovation and dedication have put us ere. Renowned as a master of knives and tools, Gerber’s problem-solving, life-saving products are designed with the unique needs of specific activities in Inc. Today that includes much more than a blade.”

These knives are carried extensively by hunters, soldiers, and tradesmen, and Gerber’s heritage runs deep. They are now looking toward the future, where tomorrow’s problems will be solved by the next generation of innovations.

All of Gerber’s products are designed and engineered in Portland, Oregon, where many are produced. They also tap their global supply chain to create a wide range of activity specific gear for wide variety of consumers. And no matter what, every product that bears the Gerber name is back by their famous lifetime warranty. “Quality, reliability, innovation. For over 70 years this is what our customers have expected from us. And whether our products are sued to save time, save the day, or save a life, Gerber always delivers.”

Today, we will be going over the Gerber Grey Shark Belly Wharncliffe folder knife, which was released just earlier this year.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 420HC High Carbon Stainless Steel. This steel is a 420 stainless steel that has been modified with more carbon, which is actually where the HC in the name comes from—High Carbon. This steel also usually sports a better heat treatment than a regular 420 stainless steel would have. 420HC holds a higher carbon production rate than a stainless steel. The content is much softer than the higher number steel count 440, yet it is more rugged than other similar products. This steel material has a greater carbon base and is mixed to a harder content than 420 stainless steels. Buck Knives is well known for using this type of steel in their products. There are many different levels of steel, but products made from 420HC steel are definitely different form other types of steel in terms of performance and reliability. Tools made from this steel are easy to sharpen and are durable even when in constant use. This makes this steel type a great option for machetes and tools. Blades made from this material are less prone to rusting or corroding as long as you remember to rinse, dry, and oil your knife after use. There are plenty of advantages to using 420HC steel, but one of the biggest is that they are so easy to sharpen. Knives made of this material stand up really well while fishing or hunting, making this knife a reliable work tool while on the trail or in the outdoors. This will be a strong and reliable blade.

This blade has been finished with the most traditional finishes on knife blades: a satin finish. This finish is created by sanding the blade in one direction with increasing levels of a fine abrasive, which is usually a sandpaper. A satin finish works to show the bevels of the blade, showcasing the lines of the knife, while also reducing its reflective glare. The finer the abrasive and the more even the lines; the cleaner the satin finish blade looks. This is a slightly less shiny finish than a polished finish, and it is less expensive than both the mirror and polished finishes. This is a semi-shiny finish with a luster falling between bead blasted—which is a matte finish, and mirror polish—which is a high gloss finish. This finish requires great hand skill to accomplish and does cut down on corrosion slightly.

This knife has been carved into a Wharncliffe blade shape, which is extremely similar to the sheepsfoot blade, but not to be confused with the sheepsfoot blade. The Wharncliffe is pretty much as standard blade shape that has been turned upside down. This means that the blade has a totally flat cutting edge, and the spine of the blade drops gradually until the tip forms a point. The history of this blade shape gets pretty muggy because there are a few main stories about how the Wharncliffe came to be. But, the actual name “Wharncliffe” did not exist until 1822, which means that this knife style was named after that point in history. Regardless of the history, the Wharncliffe is a very useful blade shape, although it might not at first appear to be. It is fantastic for opening boxes and envelopes, and for box cutting. However, it is not very good for preparing food and skinning as the lack of a belly makes it difficult for cutting soft tissue and using it on a cutting board.

There are a variety of things that are confusing between the Wharncliffe and the Sheepsfoot blade. It is generally accepted that a Sheepsfoot blade has an abruptly curving spine at the tip of the knife, creating very little point, while a Wharncliffe has a more gradually tapering spine creating a pointer tip. Unfortunately, this also means that the Wharncliffe shaped blades will also have a more fragile tip.

The blade does feature a plain edge, although there is some shallow jimping at the bottom of the blade near the handle. This is so that you have impeccable grip no matter what you are using this knife for. This jimping, along with a design on the handle is where the Grey Shark Belly got its name.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of Glass Filled Nylon, or GFN for short. This material is the same thing as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon, or FRN for short. They are both a nylon based plastic that tis reinforced with glass fiber and injection molded for use in knife handles. This handle material is one of the cheapest and toughest handle materials to produce in large scale production knives. This material is not going to be seen on custom knives because it is optimized for large scale production with dies for injection molding, and not unique custom made products. And even though GFN is perceived as a cheaper material, which it is, it makes for a very tough knife handle material and can take some serial abuse. TI is quite a bit more flexible than G 10 and other Resin Laminates, so it does not have the rigidity associated with them. However, it makes up for this in its impact toughness. Additionally, nearly any texture can be created on the surface of this material because it is injection molded, making it a very versatile material to work with, with infinite possibilities. As a general guide, the higher the glass content, the more rigid the nylon is going to be.

The characteristic that makes this material almost indestructible is that the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in it being strong in all directions as opposed to G 10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, which have the fiberglass strands aligned in a single direction. This means that the other materials are going to be extremely strong in a single direction, but as soon as they are stressed in a separate direction, they are prone to cracking and falling apart. These other materials are very brittle because of this characteristic and will crack if subjected to a hard or sharp object. GFN though, has the haphazardly arranged nylon fibers, which means that it is not going to be brittle. On the other hand, it is not going to be as “grippy” as G 10, and some people feel like it has a cheap, plastic feel to it. The last major benefit to having a knife handle made out of this material is that it requires zero maintenance.

This handle does sport a lanyard hole that has been carved into the butt of the handle. On the belly of the handle, there is a row of markings that do resemble shark markings, which is one of the reasons that this knife was named the Grey Shark Belly.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a skeletonized, wire pocket clip. It is silver, to go with the blade. The clip does have a slight bend to it, which will help it stay snugly in your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual folding knife that features a lock back mechanism and a thumb window to assist you in the opening process. The thumb window is very similar to the thumb hole, except that it is more rectangular and much larger. Since the 1980s, the thumb hole has most often been associated with folding knives from Spyderco. Over the years though, many other knife makers have adopted the feature because of how well the thumb hole does work. Opening a folder equipped with a thumb window is just like using a thumb stud. By its very design, it is ambidextrous. And, many knife enthusiasts prefer the thumb window to the thumb stud because it doesn’t protrude from the blade and get in the way.

This Gerber knife features the lock back locking mechanism which is also known as the back lock. This is one of the oldest and most reliable locking mechanism on the market. Due to its simplicity and affordability, the lock back mechanism is one of the most well-known knife locks. The lock back functions with a locking arm, which sits along the handle spine and is molded with a hook that fits into a notch on the back of the blade, behind the pivot. This hook is dragged by tension from the back spring into the notch, therefore locking the knife with a snap. Because it is reliable and economical to construct, the lock back is one of the most common used in folding knives.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.25 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 7.75 inches long and the knife weighs in at 2.3 ounces. This knife was made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

The Shark Belly is one of many new models released by Gerber in 2017. This manual folder features a lock back mechanism that utilizes a rocker arm to provide top-notch stability and ease of operation. Each high carbon stainless steel blade is deployed with the use of the thumb window which also provides an ambidextrous opening option. The name of this knife is indicative of the unidirectional pattern of the lower portion of the handle scales–providing an ideal amount of control regardless of the task at hand. This mode features grey GFN (Glass Filled Nylon) handles, a sheepsfoot style blade, that is partly serrated, in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. Pick up your Shark Belly knife today at BladeOps.

 

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Boker Magnum Automatic Knife Review

Boker is one of the oldest knife manufacturers around, dating back clear into the 17th century. Boker says that “a huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware-factory in eh 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful, for they ranked among the leading products in Germany and neighboring countries a hundred years later.”

In 1829, there was a rising demand in a politically restless era. Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabres in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 already prove a weekly production of 2000 pieces, made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders, and a large number of laborers. With an ever growing variety of tools and cutlery combined with the possibilities of international marketing the family realized that responsibility assignment was crucial to keep their chances. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada in 1865, and later a branch in Mexico.

Heinrich only cross the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming, to found Heiner. Boker & Co. with the well-known cutlery expect Hermann Heuser in 1869.

The Bokers in Remscheid and their cousins overseas were very interested and in demand of razors, scissors, and pocket knives from Heinrich’s new enterprise. They had to label their products in a simple manner for overseas-markets, for many customers had problems spelling the German name Boker. Heinrich considered the chestnut tree as an ideal memorable logo, which belonged to the Remscheid company with another one, an arrow. One of the rare and precious documents, which survived the total destruction of WWII is an ad of Boker Remscheid form 1874, showing both logos.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree-brand with him across the river without troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lighting in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original tree trunk, which adorns the executive’s office in Solingen.

The US market actually became the main customer of Boker production as early as 1900 with H. Boker & Co in New York concentrating on Solingen cutlery. The demand for pocket knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. In due course, the Solingen capacities were exhausted and the New Yorkers started their own pocket knife production. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn’t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American products too. Since then, there were two different lines of Boker knives son the US market, with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers, one line made in USA, the other made in Solingen. The only distinguishing characteristic is the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen.”

With such a rich history, you can expect rich, high quality knives. Today, we will be talking about the Boker Magnum.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of AUS-8 stainless steel. This is an upper mid-range steel. AUS-8 steel is Japanese made and extremely similar to 440B steel which is slightly more resistant to rust and corrosion than 440C but less hard. It’s also similar tough but may not hold its edge as well as some of the more premium steels which carry a greater degree of carbon. Remember, more carbon means more hardness and edge holding. This steel is really easy to sharpen and does take a razor sharp edge. This is one of the more common stainless steels, and it is one readily available in lots of different places worldwide. This is a decent all around steel. It is hard enough, tough enough, and stain resistant enough. It will not hang long with high end powder metal steels, but among the steels you are going to find on most knives, this is a pretty good choice.

The blade has been finished with a black coated finish. Coatings provide corrosion resistance, but they will scratch off eventually and at different rates, depending on the quality of the coating. Coated finishes are completely matte and reduce glares and reflections, while also reducing wear and corrosion. Coatings can prolong the life of a blade by preventing corrosion or rust. Quality coatings do add cost to a knife, but will provide more corrosion resistance, less reflection, and even require less maintenance.

Boker Magnum Auto Knife, Tanto
Boker Magnum Auto Knife, Tanto

The Boker Magnum has been carved into a tanto blade shape. The tanto blade shape is the perfect option if you don’t want an all-purpose knife. This blade shape is designed for doing one thing and that one thing really well. The thing that the tanto excels at is piercing through tough materials. This style of blade was originally designed for armor piercing, the tanto blade was popularized by Cold Steel and is similar in style to Japanese long and short swords. The tanto knife has a high point with a flat grind, leading to an extremely strong point that is perfect for stabbing into hard materials. The thick point of the tanto blade contains a lot of metal near the tips, so it is able to absorb the impact form repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to break. The front edge of the tanto knife meets the back edge at an angle, rather than a curve. As a result, the tanto blade does not have a belly, which is sacrificed in exchange for a stronger tip. Because it does lack a belly for slicing, it is not useful as a general utility knife. However, its extremely strong point allows it to be used in tough situations where piercing hard materials is required. When you choose this knife, you are choosing a knife that is specifically tailored to piercing tough materials.

This knife does feature a combo blade edge. This edge style is where the top portion of the blade is a plain edge and the bottom portion of the blade is a serrated edge. This style of blade edge has actually overtaken the all-serrated format. There are plenty of mixed feelings on this format. Many people actually swear by this format, and feel that it is a good compromise, giving the user the choice of precise push cuts form the plain edge, and the advantage of the serrated edge for tougher materials. However, because the edge is split, some people feel like the serrated portion is too short for the serrations to really be useful and the length of the plain edge is being sacrificed for no good gain. Really, when choosing a knife with a combo edge, it comes down to solely preference. There are plenty of good things to a combo edge, but there are also a few drawbacks. I would recommend looking at what you expect to be doing with this knife to see if it is a good option for you and your lifestyle.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Magnum has been made out of aluminum. This aluminum has been anodized black, not only for color, but also for hardness and protection. Aluminum is a very durable material for knife handles. It is in the category of low density metals, but it still has the hefty feel to it, without actually weighing the knife down. This balance is hard to achieve because you want the knife to feel hefty enough to take on your daily tasks, but you don’t want your knife to weigh you down, like a steel handle would. When this material is texturized correctly, it can provide you with a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use. Unfortunately, one of the biggest disadvantages is that if you are using your knife quite a bit during colder winter months, you might find the handle uncomfortably cold given its conductive properties. Aluminum is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother Titanium, which tends to be found on the more premium knives. One of the other drawbacks to this handle material is that it is susceptible to scratches and dings.

The ergonomics of this handle are excellent. The handle curves to fit in your palm smoothly and comfortably, even if you are using this knife for long periods of time. The butt of the handle is flared out slightly and three are grooves cut in down the palm of the handle to provide you with exceptional grip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip has been designed for tip down carry only. The clip is mostly straight, but the portion that is screwed into the handle does curved to match the curves of the handle top. The clip is black, matching the rest of the knife and three black screws keep it held in place.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife. Automatic knives do have a series of strict laws surrounding them in the United States. They are not legal in all states, cities, or areas. Make sure that you are certain about your local laws before purchasing and carrying this knife, because it might be illegal to carry. Automatic knives are also known as switchblades. This is a type of knife with a folding or sliding blade contained in the handle which is opened automatically by a spring when a button on the handle is activate. Most switchblade designs incorporate a locking blade, in which the blade is locked against closure when the spring extends the blade to the fully opened positon. The blade is unlocked by manually operating a mechanism that unlocks the blade and allows it to be folded and locked in the closed position.

There are plenty of advantages to having an automatic knife such as that they are fast and you can even open them one handed. Some of the disadvantages are that there is restricted ownership, they are usually more expensive, and since there are so many mechanical pieces, something could break and then the knife wouldn’t work. If you are in a tactical situation, an automatic knife is going to be a great option because they do have crazy fast blade deployment. However, while automatic knives are extremely fast to deploy, they are also typically slower to close.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Boker Magnum is 3.25 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 8 inches long, with the handle measuring in at 4.75 inches long. The knife weighs in at 4.4 ounces. When you order this knife from BladeOps, the seals on the box will arrive broken due to the knife being converted in our shop.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Magnum automatic knife is one of the more popular side open automatics on the market today considering the price point. This knife is referred to an auto-conversion knife which means the knife is produced as a folder knife and then converted via third party to offer the automatic function. The Magnum series features an aluminum handle scale that is comfortable and ergonomic and the AUS-8 blade material offers better edge retention than you would expect. The aluminum handle is extremely durable and resistant to rusting or corrosion. The AUS-8 is a quality, all-around steel that is going to be able to take on almost all of your daily challenges. With a knife made out of both of these materials, you can expect a knife that is going to step up to the plate and succeed under pressure. This particular model features a black handle with standard hardware and a tanto blade, that is partly serrated, in a black finish. Finally, the pocket clip is designed for tip down carry only. Pick up your Boker Magnum Tanto Automatic Knife today at BladeOps.

 

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Benchmade 3320 Pagan OTF Knife Review

In 1988, Benchmade set out to make the best knives in the world—and that’s exactly what they did. They’ve grown a lot since then, and while they have expanded to provide tools for elite tactical operators, first responders, and even collectors, their goal remains the same: make the best knives in the world.

It was in 1979 that the Benchmade adventure first began. It started when Les de Asis wanted a knife that reflected the latest in materials and manufacturing technology to replace the cheap butterfly knives, known as Bali-Songs, that he played with as a kid. Using his high school shop skills, he blueprinted his dream knife before eventually meeting Victor Anselmo, who helped to grind the first ever pre-Benchmade Bali-Song prototype. Paired with handles that Les sourced forma small machine shop in California, he assembled and finished his first Bali-Song in his own garage. Proud of his create, he took this first Bali-Song into a local gun store and the owner asked him if he could build 100 more.

In 1980, Les incorporated as Bali-Song, Inc. and rented a small shop in a second story mezzanine in California. The original equipment was purchased from the owner of a manufacturing operation who was looking to retire. Utilizing the rudimentary technology available to him at the time, Les began building handmade custom Bali-Songs, along with Jody Sampson, who ground all the blades. The success of these custom Balis spurred the creation of the first production Bali-Song: The model 68. Over the next seven years, the company expanded its product offerings into fixed blades and conventional folding knives, and evolving’s its name from Bali-song, Inc. to Pacific Cutlery Corp.

In 1987, due to its inability to control quality, price, and delivery, Pacific Cutlery Corp. filed for bankruptcy and was dissolved. In 1988, Les reintroduced a new company and new version of the Model 68; This time with a drive to produce product in the US and an even stronger commitment to product availability, quality, and customer relationships. The company now needed a new name.

While there was “handmade” and “factory made”, it was “Benchmade” that best described the quality of Les’ product. He was building an operation that made precision parts, but with hand assembly on the finished products. This was a “bench” operation and Les wanted the name to reflect the marriage of manufactured and custom. In short, it describes Benchmade position in the market—even to this day.

With its first ten years of manufacturing experience behind it, and by working with world-class custom knife makers like Mel Pardue and Warren Osborne, Benchmade perfected a business model that involved lending manufacturing process to custom knife designs; affording a level of innovation and quality to the largest market that was previously unavailable. This eventually led to Bill McHenry and Jason Williams approaching Benchmade with the AXIS lock. and the future of cutlery was born.

To this day, Benchmade continues to focus on innovation, customer needs, responsible business ethics, and operations to bring the highest quality products to the world’s elite.

Today, we are going to be talking about the Benchmade 3320 Pagan knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 154CM stainless steel. This is a higher end steel that is relatively hard and is generally considered an upgraded version of 440C through the addition of Molybdenum. This achieves superior edge holding compared to 440C while retaining similarly excellent levels of corrosion resistance despite having less Chromium. It does have decent toughness good enough for most uses and holds an edge well. This steel is not too difficult to sharpen with the right equipment. You will find a lot of quality pocket knives form top manufacturers like Benchmade using 154CM steel.

The blade has been finished with a stonewash finish. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is a wide variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and the type of finish the blade has before it entered the tumbler. A very positive benefit of a stonewashed blade is that they are low maintenance and preserve their original look overtime. The stonewashed finish hides the scratched that can occur with use over time. This finish also hides fingerprints pretty well, so the blade might not need to be polished as often as others with different finishes. Depending on the manufacturer, a stonewash finish can often look satin from a distance.

Benchmade Pagan OTF
Benchmade Pagan OTF

The blade has been cut into a dagger style blade shape. This is also known as a needle point blade shape. This style of blade shape has been created to enhance and accentuate the point. This is a double edged blade whose primary purpose is piercing and stabbing. It is made up of 2 symmetrical sharpened blades that taper to a very thing, sharp point, which pierces easily into soft targets. The two sharp edges reduce the profile of the knife and let it cut in on both sides equally. This makes it a favorite blade design for self-defense in close combat situations. Dagger blades are popular among military and police personnel because of their ability to be easily concealed (think of in a boot). However, there are some disadvantages to the dagger blade design. Because of the geometry of the blade, it does not have a belly and it does have quickly thickening edges, which means that it is not good for slicing or slashing. And, because the tip is very sharp and thin, it is weak and is prone to breaking when used on hard targets. If you are looking for a blade that is going to give you a good balance between stabbing and cutting, a better choice is the clip point blade. But, if you are looking for the ultimate blade designed specifically for piercing, the dagger style blade is exactly what you are looking for.

This knife does sport a plain edge. The plain edge is better than the serrated when the application involves push cuts. Also, the plain edge is superior when extreme control, accuracy, and clean cuts are necessary, regardless of whether or not the job is push cuts or slices. The plain edge will work better for applications like shaving, skinning an apple, skinning a deer. All of those applications involve either mostly push cuts, or the need for extreme control. And generally, the more push cuts are used, the more necessary it is for the plain edge to have a razor polished edge. A knife edge becomes more polished when you move to higher and higher grit stones. As a last advantage of a plain edge, it will offer you cleaner cuts than if you were using a serrated or combo edge.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 aluminum. Aluminum comes in many grades. It has good mechanical properties and is one of the most common alloys for general purpose use. This material is typically anodized for extra protection and color, because hard anodized coatings offer superior scratch resistance. Since aluminum is already prone to scratches and dings, the anodization process is ideal. Aluminum is very durable and provides a solid feel without the extra weight. It can be formed to provide a very comfortable and secure grip. One of the biggest drawbacks to having a knife handle that has been made out of this material is that it has fantastic conductive properties, which will make it extremely cold during the winter months. If you are planning on working with your knife lots during the colder months, I wouldn’t recommend getting this knife because it will feel like it is biting into your hand. Aluminum is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother Titanium which tends to be found on the more premium knives.

The handle has been anodized in two different colors. The middle of the handle is black, and the sides are dark gray. The handle has perfect curves to fit snugly in your palm. The top of the handle flares out, with two grooves cut out of each side. This is the perfect place to rest your fingers. Plus, these cut outs both sport jimping to really give you good control over your knife. The butt of the handle also flares out.

 

The Pocket Clip:

This is a deep carry pocket clip that is designed for tip down carry only. The back of the entire knife is black, but the pocket clip is a dark grey, which does make it stand out. Across the middle of the pocket knife, “Pagan” has been stamped in a lighter gray. This clip is kept in place by two small, black screws, which match the rest of the knives hardware.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is a dual action out the front, or OTF, automatic knife. This is a pocket knife with a blade that opens and closes through a hole in one end of the handle. Contrast this with the majority of knives, which are either standard folding knives or are fixed blades. OTF only refers to the basic portion of the knife’s mechanical operation where the blade slides parallel with the handle to deploy. An automatic OTF knife blade travels within an internal tack or channel in the same manner as a manual slider or gravity knife. But the automatic main spring drive and button mechanism enclosed within requires a switchblade handle to be thicker or longer than a similar sixed gravity or sliding knife. This is a double action OTF knife. This means that it deploys and retracts with a multifunction button and spring design.

Despite popular belief and movie magic, double action OTF knives are not powerful enough to open when pressed against an opponent and then pushing the button. Double action sliding autos are only spring powered 10 to 12 millimeters. Afterwards, kinetic impetus slides the blade to full open.

Because this is an automatic knife, there are strict laws that do surround owning and carrying this knife. Make sure that you know your local knife laws before purchasing and carrying the Benchmade 3320 Pagan.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.96 inches long and the knife sports an overall length of 8.96 inches long. The handle of the Pagan is 5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.1 ounces and was made in the USA.

 

The Sheath:

The Pagan does come with a nylon sheath. Nylon is a material that is commonly used in knife sheaths. Just like their leather counterpart, nylon sheaths are also tough and strong. Unlike leather though, nylon sheaths are resistant to rot and mildew. They are also not as vulnerable to water as leather sheaths. Another great aspect is that nylon sheaths aren’t easily scuffed or torn. The best thing about this nylon sheath is that it is MOLLE compatible.

 

Conclusion:

New for 2015, the Benchmade Pagan OTF auto knife is a double action out the front model that is a more refined yet still powerful version of the classic Benchmade Infidel OTF auto knife. With smooth black anodized aluminum handle scales, this tried and true warrior delivers maximum blade control in an ergonomic and stylish shape. The difference in this knife lies in the blade steel and blade grind–D2 tool steel has been swapped out with American-made 154CM stainless steel, in a dagger style, with a chisel grind for improved blade penetration. Furthermore, the enlarged slide trigger is housed on the broad side of the handle scale allowing for better accessibility, even while wearing gloves. Due to the size, this knife comes with a nylon sheath and includes a MOLLE compatible malice clip for multiple carry options. The deep carry pocket clip is designed for tip down carry only. Pick up your Benchmade 3320 Pagan Double Action Out-the-Front Automatic knife today at BladeOps.

 

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Gerber Coyote Brown Mini Covert Auto Knife Review

Joseph R. Gerber one time described his young knife company as the “birth of an enterprise that grew into a big business.” He nailed it right on the head, and while it was true, it was definitely an understatement. Gerber Gear started in 1939 as a small batch of handmade cutlery sets that were given as holiday gifts turned into thousands of retail accounts around the country. By 1960, Gerber had quickly become one of the most trusted, appreciated, and collected names in knives. Over 70 years since its founding and Gerber is continuing to grow. They are still grounded in the same principles that first guided Joseph R. Gerber’s enterprise, Gerber is a company dedicated to making knives and tools that combine high quality materials and innovative designs that will stand up to a lifetime of use. The sleek, stainless steel sheath knives of the 50s and 60s have given birth to today’s lightweight, open frame clip folders. Gerber is no longer just a knife company. They are now designing, making, and selling multi-tools, axes, handsaws, machetes, headlamps, flashlights, survival kits, and digging implements. These are all the newest directions that Gerber explores with the same standards of quality and design that inform their revered knife making.

“Like the men and women who carry our gear, Gerber is Unstoppable.” With decades of innovation and dedication, Gerber has come far. They are renowned as a master of knives and tools, Gerber’s problem solving, lifesaving products are designed with the unique needs of specific activities in mind. Today, that includes much more than a blade. This company was founded in 1939 and based in Portland, Oregon, Gerber is an American brand whose products have global reach and relevance. Carried extensively by hunters, soldiers, and tradesmen, Gerber’s heritage runs deep. They are now looking toward the future, where tomorrow’s problems will be solved by the next generation of innovations.

All of Gerber’s products are designed and engineered in Portland, OR where many of their products are produced. They also tap their global supply chain to create a wide range of activity specific gear for wide variety of consumers. And no matter what, every product that bears the Gerber name is back by their famous lifetime warranty.

“Quality, reliability, and innovation. For over 70 years this is what our customers have expected form us. And whether our products are used to save time, save the day, or save a life, Gerber always delivers.”

Today we are going to be talking about one of their Mini Covert automatic knives. This is their Coyote Brown version.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM-S30V stainless steel. This steel is a premium grade steel that is made by US based Crucible. This steel is often referred to as only S30V steel, instead of CPM-S30V steel. It has excellent edge retention and resists rust effortlessly. This steel was designed in the US and is typically used for the high-end premium pocket knives and expensive kitchen cutlery. Crucible added vanadium carbides to the steel alloy matrix to bring out the extreme hardness. Dollar for dollar, this is generally regarded as one of the finest knife blade steels with the optimal balance of edge retention, hardness, and toughness. One of the only drawbacks to this steel is that it does prove tricky to sharpen. Crucible has made a better looking brother, S35VN steel, which is distinctly similar, but easier for manufacturers to work with thanks to the niobium addition. S30V is really common these days and is one of my favorite steels for a blade.

This steel has been finished with a black coated finish. A coated finish helps to reduce the reflection and glare while also reducing wear and corrosion on the blade. Unfortunately, because it is a coated finish, it can and will be scratched off after continuous heavy use, and the blade on the Mini Covert will have to be re-coated if you wish to keep all of the high qualities. As a general guideline, the harder the finish, the more resistant to wear and corrosion, but also the more expensive to add to a knife. A coating finish also eliminated shiny surfaces, which is an absolute necessity if you are using this knife on a mission. Another great benefit is that a coating finish can reduce drag during a cut. Lastly, the coating finish does add aesthetic to the knife. It provides an even, matte surface to the blade.

This blade has been carved into a spear point blade shape. A spear point blade is similar to the needle point blade because they are both good for piercing. However, its point is stronger and it does contain a small belly that can be used for slicing. A spear point is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center lien of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. They can be single or double edged, although this version of the mini covert is single edged. In contrast to the needle-point blade which has a very sharp but weak point, a spear pint knife has a strong point that is also sharp enough for piercing. However, a spear point blade is only good for piercing if both edges are sharpened. The lowered point is easily controllable and is useful for fine tip work. Spear point blades contain a small belly which can be used for some cutting and slicing applications, however, the belly is relatively small when compared to drop point and clip point knives. A spear point knife is a great choice for the knife lover who is looking for a good balance between piercing and slicing ability. It combines the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade, while maintaining some of the belly that is used for slicing. This is a hybrid shape that is extremely functional.

This blade is a plain edged blade. Plain blades are best when you need precision and accuracy. Plain blades excel at tasks such as carving, dressing an animal, trimming your nails, or peeling an apple. The nice advantage of plain edge blades is their versatility. With a plain edge blade, you directly affect its purpose by changing how you sharpen it. It is standard practice to customize the edge of a plain edged blade to tackle a specific task. For some tasks, a highly polished, low friction edge will do the best job. Tasks such as food prep and wood carving are great examples of when a highly polished edge is ideal. For other tasks, a roughly sharpened edge that has hidden “micro-serration” is ideal and will often work similar to the way a true serrated blade would.

Because this blade is a plain edge blade and features the spear point blade shape, it is an extremely versatile blade shape that is going to meet your needs in a wide variety of situations.

 

The Handle:

Gerber Coyote Mini Covert
Gerber Coyote Mini Covert

The handle of this knife is made out of 6061-T6 Aluminum. This is the most common type of aluminum that is in use today, which has tremendous tensile strength. Aluminum is a very durable material for knife handles. It is a low density metal, so it is lightweight. However, it does provide a nice, hefty feel to the knife as well. This is a huge benefit of aluminum because you do want the weight or heft to complete tasks, but you also don’t want to be weighed down by a crazy heavy knife. When properly texturized, an aluminum handle can provide a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use. However, aluminum can prove to be a very slippery material. On the downside, if you use your knife quite a bit during colder winter months, you might find the handle uncomfortable cold given its conductive properties. Aluminum is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother Titanium which tends to be found on the more premium knives. One of the other drawbacks to this handle material is that it is susceptible to scratches and dings.

This knife handle has been anodized for color, hardness, and protection. Thus making it a more durable knife handle. The anodization process has made the handle a Coyote Brown, which is a light tan color. Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. The process is called anodizing because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit. Anodizing increases resistance to corrosion and wear and provides better adhesion for paint, primers, and glues than bare metal does. Anodizing changes the microscopic texture of the surface and the crystal structure of the metal near the surface. Thick coatings are normally porous, so a sealing process is often needed to achieve corrosion resistance. Anodized aluminum surfaces are harder than aluminum but have low to moderate wear resistance that can be improved with increasing thickness or by applying suitable sealing substances.

To help with grip, there are three skinny grooves cut across the palm of the handle. This knife has a skinnier top part of the handle, which has two curves cut out for added finger control. Then, the handle flares out to fit well into you hand, and tapers back towards the butt of the handle. This handle does sport a lanyard hole.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is designed for tip down carry only. The clip is black, to contrast with the handle and to match the blade. It is a deep carry pocket clip, helping it fit snugly in your pocket. “Gerber” has been stamped across the middle of the clip. This clip is kept in place by two small, black screws.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife that deploys with a lever on the palm of the knife handle. An automatic knife is also known as a switchblade or an ejector knife. This is a type of knife with a folding or sliding blade contained in the handle which is opened automatically by a spring when a lever on the handle is activated. The blade is unlocked manually operating a mechanism that unlocks the blade and allows it to be folded and locked in the closed positon.

You do need to keep in mind that automatic knives have strict laws surrounding them in certain states, cities, and areas. Make sure you know your local knife laws before purchasing and carrying this Gerber Mini Covert.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 2.8 inches long with the knife sporting an overall length of 6.5 inches long. The handle measures in at 3.7 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2.1 ounces. This knife is made in the USA.

 

Conclusion:

The Applegate-Fairbairn designed Gerber Covert automatic knife series was modeled after their best-in-class Covert folder model and combines premium elements with user-friendly functionality. This auto knife features coyote brown anodized aircraft aluminum handle scales that showcases a sleek symmetrical design with integrated dual finger grooves for a secure hold despite its size. A front-mounted slide safety has been built into the handle and even portrays a red dot so you know the knife is ready for action. This Mini Covert auto knife also features a plain edge spear point blade comprised of premium CPM-S30V stainless steel in a black finish and the pocket clip is designed for tip down carry only. The stainless steel is durable and strong, and maintains one of the best balances of toughness, hardness, and edge retention. The aluminum handle is durable and strong and very resistant to corrosion. However, it does accumulate scratches easily over time. With the combination of those two materials, you are going to get one of the most durable knives on the market.

Pick up your Coyote Brown Mini Covert Auto Knife today at BladeOps.

 

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The Boker Plus 01BO777 Lateralus Knife Review

Boker has been around since the 17th century. There was a huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century, which is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. For hundreds of years, it seems as if Boker tools have been successful and ranked among the leading products in Germany and spreading to the neighboring countries and then worldwide hundreds of years later.

It was due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 already prove a weekly production of 2000 pieces, made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders, and a large number of laborers. With an ever growing variety of tools and cutlery combined with the possibilities of international marketing, the family realized that responsibility assignment was crucial to keep their chances. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and 1865 a branch of it in Mexico.

The Boker’s in Remscheid and their cousins overseas were very interested and in demand of razors, scissors, and pocket knives from Heinrich’s new enterprise. They had to label their products in a simple manner for overseas-markets, for many customers had problems spelling the German name Boker—apart from widespread analphabetism. Heinrich considered the chestnut-tree as an ideal memorable log, which belonged to the Remscheid company with another one, an arrow. One of the rare and precious documents, which survived the total destruction of WWII is an ad of Boker Remscheid from 1874, showing both logos.

On Boker’s website, they say, “The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree-brand with him across the river without troubles or payments. Since then, not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lighting in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original tree trunk, which adorns the executive’s office in Solingen.”

Within the Boker Brand, there are four different lines. They have the Premium collection, the Boker Arboltio—which is the tradition collection, Boker Plus—which is the innovation collection, and lastly Magnum by Boker—which is Price and Performance.

The Lateralus is part of the Boker Plus line. The products in this line are in close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security as they develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design, and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA, and Asia.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of D2 Tool Steel. This steel is used in industrial settings. It has a high hardness and relatively high toughness that make it an excellent choice in the industrial setting and in cutlery. While it is technically not a stainless steel, it is relatively corrosion resistant. This steel is considered a “semi stainless” as it falls just short of the required amount of chromium to qualify as full stainless. D2 has been around for more than 20 years, which is considered an eternity in metallurgy terms. Over the years, different heat treats have emerged, but one has risen to the top as the best—Bob Dozier’s D2. Despite its age, it is a truly superior steel. D2 steel is much harder than other steels in the same category such as 154CM or ATS-34, and as a result, it does hold its edge a little better. With that being said, it is not as tough as many other steels and is exponentially tougher to sharpen. In fact, you will most likely need to be a master sharpener to get a fine edge eon D2 steel.

The Lateralus has been finished with a stonewash finish. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is a wide variety of stonewashed finish based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and the type of finish the blade has before it entered the tumbler. One of the very positive benefits of a stonewashed blade is that it is a very low maintenance finish and it easily preserves the original look of the blade overtime. A stonewash finish also hides fingerprints pretty well, so the blade might not need to be polished as often as others with different finishes. The stonewash finish provides the knife with a very rugged, well-worn look. Depending on the manufacturer, a stonewash finish can often look satin from a distance.

The blade has been carved into a drop point style blade. This is a great all-purpose knife that can stand up to almost anything. This shape is also one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today. The most recognizable knife that features a drop point is the hunting knife, although it is used on many other types of knives as well, including the larger blades in Swiss army knives. To form this shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which does create a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use that makes drop point blades a popular blade shape on tactical and survival knives. Drop point knives feature a large belly area that tis perfect for slicing. One of the only real disadvantages the drop point blade is its relatively broad tip, which makes it less suitable for piercing than the clip point. However, this broad tip provides point strength that is not found on the similar clip point knives. When you choose this knife, because of the drop point, you are equipping yourself with a blade that reacts well in many situations.

The Lateralus does sport a plain edge, which will give you very clean cuts. This plain edge will also be able to take on a wide variety of tasks—more tasks than a serrated or combo edge would be able to complete. The plain edge is easier to sharpen and you will also be able to get a finer edge on it.

On the spine of the blade, there is a row of thick, shallow jimping to help you have complete control over your cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle of this Boker knife is made out of G10 and stainless steel. The front handle scale is G10. G10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. It has very similar properties to carbon fiber yet can be had for almost a fraction of the cost. To make this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results is extremely tough hard, very lightweight, and strong. G10 is actually the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger, although more brittle, than Micarta. G10 is durable and lightweight, but

Boker Lateralus
Boker Lateralus

still non-porous. These qualities make it a phenomenal choice for tactical folder and fixed blades, because it is in these genres that things are going to messy. The G10 on the front handle scale is black.

The back handle scale is made out of stainless steel. This material provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion, but it is not lightweight. Also, stingless steel can be slippery. Because it is combined with the G10 handle scale though, the weight won’t be an issue and the G10 will give you a secure enough grip. Stainless steel is strong and durable.

For the texturing and solid grip, Boker has a series of grooves going down the palm of the handle. The shape of this handle is a unique one. The handle is much skinnier at the top of the knife, where the blade and handle meet. There is a deep, elongated finger groove carved out of the bottom part of the handle. This finger groove is going to give you a secure, comfortable grip on this knife. The butt of the handle is rectangular, but it does have an angled portion. It is on the angled portion that the knife features the lanyard hole.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is on the stainless steel handle scale, so it is stainless steel. This clip is kept in place by two small, silver screws, which do match the rest of the hardware on the Lateralus.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife features a flipper mechanism. This is an assisted-opening knife which means that it is a type of folding knife which uses an internal mechanism to finish the opening of the blade once the user has partially opened it using the flipper. When the knife is in the closed position, the blade is held in place by means of torsion springs and an additional blade lock. As the user applies manual pressure to the flipper, a mechanism such as a torsion spring moves along a track in the liner and rapidly rotates the blade into the open and locked position. Although commonly confused with switchblade knives, a switchblade can be opened automatically simply by the push of a button, but the user of an assisted-opening knife must open it about one quarter of the way before the mechanism opens the knife the rest of the way. The difference is important legally because the blade does not simply open by the push of a button or by the force of gravity, the assisted opening knife is typically not considered a switchblade and may escape the restrictions applying to those in many places.

The flipper mechanism is a square shaped protrusion that juts out of the pine of the handle when the knife is closed. You pull back on this piece of metal and it flips the knife open and locks it into place. The blade is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it. This not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade but gives you an added finger guard once opened. The flipper in most cases, including this one, will actually wing around and end up underneath the knife continuing to offer protection form accidental knife injuries. If you are concerned with the safety of your thumb, a flipper knife will be more to your liking.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.7 inches long with an overall knife length of 7.9 inches long. The handle of this Boker Plus knife is 4.2 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.7 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Lateralus is a Jason Stout designed flipper model that is a distant cousin to the Lucas Burnley designed Kihon–but with alternative styling, a longer blade and a lighter frame. Each frame lock designed model features a tool steel blade that is deployed with the spine flipper function and operates quick and fluid-like thanks to the ball bearing pivot. Stout also added his own personal flair–outfitting the Lateralus with a massive blood groove and the deep finger groove allows for accurate precision work. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features a black G-10 front handle scale, a stainless steel back handle scale, a drop point style blade in a stonewash finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can find your new Lateralus here on our website.

 

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The Joker’s Wild BlackOut Cupid Clone Knife Review

The Joker’s Wild OTF knife is patterned after the classic Cupid Clone knife that the Joker uses in the Dark Knight movie.  This single action Out the Front automatic has classic looks and rapid fire action.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. There are three different types of 440 steel. This is an upper mid-range steel that was once considered high-end in US knife steels. This steel is a good all-around steel that has now been overshadowed by many of the newer super steels that are everywhere. But, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t a good steel. This is a stainless steel that is a solid choice for most knives. This steel is reasonably tough and wear resistant, but it excels at stain resistance. This steel does hold a better edge than its sister steels, yet it still has the same corrosion resistance. Knives that are made out of this steel can be sharpened easily. And, out of the 440 steels, this formula does have the highest levels of carbon and chromium. The level of carbon is between .95-1.20%. It is this content that makes this steel a higher end stainless steel. This alloy of steel is one of the most common in knives because it is such a good all-around steel.

The blade has been finished with a black, coated finish. A coated finish reduces the reflection and glare while also reducing wear and corrosion. One of the drawbacks to a coated blade though is that ALL coatings can be scratched off after continuous heavy use and the blade will have to be recoated at that point if you wish for it to have the same qualities. As a guideline, the harder the finish, the more resistant to wear and the more expensive to add to a knife. Quality coatings do add cost to a knife, but they also provide much better corrosion resistance, less reflection, and require less maintenance. Many times, people do see the better quality coatings as a smart investment. Coatings are one of the few matte finishes.

The Joker’s Wild Blackout Cupid Clone knife has a dagger style blade. This type of blade shape is also known as a needle point blade. This style is basically the opposite of a sheepsfoot blade, which lacks a point. The dagger has been designed for the point. This shape of blade is a double edged blade whose primary purpose is piercing and stabbing. The blade is composed of 2 symmetrical sharpened blades that taper to a very thin sharp point, which pieces easily into soft targets. The two sharp edges reduce the profile of the knife and let it cut in on both sides equally. This is one of the reasons that makes them a favorite blade design for self-defense, especially in close combat situations. Dagger blades are very popular among military and police because of their ability to be easily concealed (think in a boot) and easily withdrawn from them sheathes. Of course, with all blade shapes, there are some disadvantages to the dagger blade design. Because of the geometry, the blade lacks any belly and contains quickly thickening edges. These two features means that this blade is not going to be good for slicing or slashing. One of the other disadvantages is that because the tip is very sharp and thin, it is weak and does have a tendency to break when used on hard targets. If you are searching for a good balance between stabbing and cutting, the best choice for you is probably the clip point blade. But, if you are looking for the ultimate blade designed specifically for piercing or stabbing, look no further, because you have found your best option.

The blade on this knife is plain edged. A plain blade is one continuous sharp edge and they are the most traditional option. Plain blades serve a much wider purpose as their most useful application is what most of us think of when we think of using a knife: a strong, steady pressure. One of the other huge advantages to owning a plain edge is that it won’t snag or fray when cutting though some ropes, although with other ropes, particularly ones made of plastics or other synthetic materials, the blade may simply slip instead of cut. In short, a plain edge will cut cleanly, while a serrated blade will give you jagged cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Cupid Clone is made out of aluminum. This is a very durable material for knife handles. It is a low density metal but it does provide a nice, hefty feel to the knife without actually weighing the knife down. This is a huge benefit because you want your knife to be able to have the weight behind it to take on life’s challenges, but you also don’t want the knife weighing you down. The most common type of aluminum that is used today is the T6-6061 alloy, which does have tremendous tensile strength. When an aluminum handle is properly texturized, it can provide you with a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use. On the flip side, if you use your knife quite a bit during colder winter months, you might find the handle uncomfortably cold given its conductive properties. Aluminum is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother Titanium which tends to be found on the more premium knives.

The aluminum on this knife handle has been anodized black. Anodizing is an electrochemical process that converts the metal surface into a decorative, durable, corrosion resistant, anodic oxide finish. Aluminum is ideally suited to anodizing, although other nonferrous metals can also be anodized. Because this knife has an anodized handle, the color is black, the handle is harder, and more protected. This is an ideal finish for the Cupid Clone knife.

The handle is rectangular with an arrow shaped top. The butt of the handle does flare out, which gives you a slight hammer, and helps with grip. To help you with your grip, there are deep grooves cut down the idle of the handle in a rectangular shape and also at the very top of the handle, in three arrows.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip has been statically designed for tip down carry only. It is a black pocket clip that is held in place by two small, black screws. These screws match the rest of the knives hardware, giving it the name Blackout. The pocket clip is straight and long, which will fit snugly and safely in your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is an out the front, or OTF, knife. An OTF knife is also known as a sliding knife or a telescoping knife. This is a pocket knife with a blade that opens and closes through a hole in one end of the handle. This contrasts with the majority of other knives, which are either standard folding knives or fixed blade knives. OTF only refers to the basic portion of the knife’s mechanical operation where the blade slides parallel with the handle to deploy. OTF knives are also further subdivided into two groups: automatic or manual OTF knives. The Joker’s Wild Blackout Cupid Clone knife is an automatic OTF knife. An automatic OTF knife blade travels within an internal track or channel in the same manner as a manual slider or gravity knife. But the automatic main spring drive and button mechanism enclosed within requires a switchblade handle to be thicker or longer than a similar size gravity or sliding knife. The term “slider” is usually not applied.

Once you get into the automatic OTF knife category, it is actually divided into two other categories. There are the single action and the double action. This knife is a single action which means that the knife will deploy automatically, but it must be manually cocked or retracted to close. This knife is deployed by the button in the middle of the knife handle.

Because this is an automatic knife, there are a variety of strict laws surrounding this knife. Automatic knives are not legal in all states, cities, or areas, so be aware of your local laws before purchasing and carrying this knife.

OTF knives have actually been around for a while. The first known patent, although for a manual one, was in 1860. The first spring powered OTF knife followed shortly the year after. These knives were originally designed to be light-duty knives designed for people who may have to hold on to something while opening a folding knife. Now, there is a myth that an OTF can be placed against someone and opened, piercing the victim. The spring in this style of knives I much too weak and really only propels the blade about a quarter of the way open, with inertia doing the rest. So while it might poke the person, it is highly unlikely that they would be stabbed.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.3 inches long, with the blade sporting an overall length of 8.4 inches The handle on this knife is 5.1 inches. This is a lightweight knife that weighs in at only 4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Joker’s wild Cupid Clone automatic knife is a single-action out the front knife that closely resembles that of the Dalton cupid model which The Joker was seen weilding in the iconic Batman movie. A single action out the front knife by definition means that the blade is automatically deployed with the push of a button and then is manually retracted with a lever feature—in this case found on the side of the handle. This wildly popular knife showcases amazing construction and a lockup that is as solid as knives even 10 times the price. This exclusive blackout model features a black aluminum handle, all-black hardware, a dagger style blade in a black finish and a pocket clip that is statically designed for tip down carry only. The 440 stainless steel is tough, hard, durable, and very resistant to corrosion. The aluminum handle is very durable, especially with the anodization process on it, however, it will feel cold in the winter months. The dagger style blade is ideal for piercing and stabbing, but does have a weak tip that is prone to snapping. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

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ESEE 4 Survival Knife Review

Randall Adventure Training has been around since 1997 as a military training school in the art of jungle survival. They also trained law enforcement and civilians in jungle survival. Jeff Randall and Mike Perrin realized that there weren’t any knives best suited for what they were teaching. So they developed their own line. The very first knife design that they developed was the RTAK. For them to be able to produce this knife, they signed a five-year contract with Ontario Knives. Jeff and Mike then wanted to, “build a higher quality line of knives outside of the mass production capabilities of Ontario”, so they began their own company which they named RAT Cutlery. However, they later changed their name to ESEE to avoid confusion. They currently make fixed blades and survival gear in the United States of America. ESEE focuses on making survival knives that can take heavy use and a hard beating. They have a very loyal following because of how reliable their knives are and because the knives are always backed by a warranty; one of the best warranties in the knife industry. Today I decided to focus on one of their knives in particular—the ESEE 4.

 

The ESEE 4 is what they call the “wilderness” model of the ESEE 3. Some of the main differences in the two knives are that the ESEE 4 has a thicker blade. It is a stronger, heavier duty version of the ESEE 3, but it is not as tough as the ESEE 5. The ESEE 4 is mainly designed to be a heavier duty camping knife—a knife that can stand up to the adventures of the woods. Many people carry this knife as their everyday carry knife, because it is a dependable knife that can stand up to almost any task. Yet, it is not a huge knife like the ESEE 5.

 

The blade on this knife is a 4.5-inch blade. Of this length, you can cut with 4.1 inches of it. The thickness of the blade is .188 inches. You can get this blade in either a partially serrated version or a plain edge option. This blade is shorter than the ESEE 6 blade, and really it is shorter than most outdoor or survival knife’s blade, but having the shorter blade makes this knife a better candidate for a survival situation. With the smaller blade, you have more control over it. This means that you can skin, cut, and even use the knife for sewing. The knife has a full tang, which means that the steel of the blade extends all the way through to the butt of the handle. Having a full tang gives you a more durable knife that can take on the heavier duty tasks that you throw at it. If you are using this knife for a survival situation, you are going to be very grateful that you have a full tang. Another huge benefit of having a full tang knife is that if your handle breaks, which it never should, but if it does, you still have a handle on your blade. You can wrap almost anything around the bottom half of the steel and you still have a full knife.

 

The blade is flat ground and has a drop point silhouette. The drop point design makes this a great candidate for using on almost any purpose. It has a large belly, which helps slice things. The drop point style gets its name because the point of the blade is low compared to the spine. Some pros of the drop point design are that the energy of cutting starts to disappear as it approaches the tip, which gives you more control. A drop point makes for a great hunting knife because it excels at skinning. The shape of the blade also works very well for pushing strokes, which is what you do when you are shaving wood to make tinder. It also is fantastic for survival situations, because you do have a strong, controlled tip. The spine of the knife is a thicker spine, and that along with the drop point make the knife fantastic for batoning. However, because of the thick spine and the drop point this is not a good knife for piercing and stabbing.

 

The blade on this knife has a large choil, which is the unsharpened part of the blade that connects to the handle. Because of the size of the choil, it makes the blade easier to sharpen than a knife without a choil. This blade on this knife is a crazy sharp blade that can hold an edge adequately.

 

On the spine of the blade, there is jimping. Jimping is serrations that are on the back of the blade. These serrations give your thumb a place to sit and add texture so that you can have a better grip while performing intricate cutting details.

 

ESEE 4S MB
ESEE 4S MB

The steel of this blade is 1095 high carbon steel. This steel is tough, but it is not a stainless steel. This means that the knife is going to be prone to rusting, staining, and corrosion. To prevent the staining, rusting, and corrosion, ESEE powder coats the knife. You still need to make sure the blade stays as dry as you can. Another thing you can do to extend the life of the steel is to lubricate it. By lubricating it after use, you can prevent stains and rusts. The powder coating on this blade is a thicker coating, which cuts down on your slicing abilities.  Unfortunately, this steel is also more prone to chipping than some other steels that you could find. But a pro of the 1095 steel is that it makes the blade very easy to sharpen, even in the field or on the go.

ESEE noticed its users distress over the poor quality steel on the original version, so they have recently released a new version of the 4. This new blade is made out of 440C stainless steel. This steel is very resistant to corrosion. This is a high strength steel with moderate corrosion resistance. It has good hardness and wear resistance.  This is a better choice of steel if you are going to be using it for your outdoor adventures and tasks. But, the 1095 steel is a tougher steel. This steel is also uncoated, which makes it a more suitable knife for slicing.

Because the 1095 steel is tougher than the 440C steel, you will get ESEE’s lifetime warranty with the 1095. You do not get the lifetime warranty if you choose the 440C steel. One of the most commonly heard complaints about the ESSE 4 is the two options of steel you are presented with. But, if ESEE were to truly upgrade the type and quality of steel, you would have to pay a much higher price for the knife.

 

ESEE 4S OD
ESEE 4S OD

The handle on this knife is made out of linen Micarta scales. Linen Micarta is one of the most common forms of Micarta that you are going to find. It is made similarly to G-10. To build linen Micarta, you take layers of linen cloths and soak them in phenolic resin. The finished material is lightweight, strong, and it looks classier than G10. Micarta really has no surface texture because it is so smooth to touch. But, because this handle is made out of scales, you will have a very good grip on your handle. This grip remains whether the handle is wet or dry. Another big bonus about having such a large choil is that when you need to choke up on the knife, this choil will work as a finger groove.

 

ESEE has been known for how well they design their handles. This specific knife is definitely not exempt from that reputation. The handle on this knife is the same handle of the ESEE 3, except it does not have the same thickness. They keep using this handle because it is trusted and well liked. This handle has been tested when it was put on the ESEE 3 and it had fantastic reactions. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. This handle fits fantastically in almost any hand. On the butt of the handle there is a rounded pommel with a convenient lanyard hole.

 

The sheath on this blade is truly a fantastic sheath. This is surprising because a lot of companies just try to make an adequate sheath. Something to cover and store your blade in. This sheath is designed to be fantastic. It was thought out and designed perfectly. The sheath is friction-fit molded so that the knife can lock firmly into place. There is also an attachment clip plate that can be mounted or attached to either side. Because you can attach it to either side, it makes this an ambidextrous carry knife. When ESEE first designed this knife, it came with a Kydex sheath. Which is a moderate sheath. The Kydex sheath is more than adequate. But it now comes with an injection molded sheath. While this is a more expensive process and it does add to the cost of the knife, the sheath can now stand up to hotter temperatures. The sheath has eyelets that you can use to thread a cord through and attach the sheath to your backpack.

 

Included with the sheath is a stretch of 550 cord and a cord lock. This cord can be used to attach the sheath/knife onto your backpack or belt. This cord is also perfect for using as a lanyard. If you want to purchase a MOLLE backing which is made out of ballistic black nylon, that is an option, but it is not included in your original purchase. This backing can be attached to any MOLLE gear or used as a leg sheath.

 

The overall length of this knife is 9 inches long and the width of the blade is 1.25 inches. This knife weighs 8 ounces. This knife is made in the United States of America. This knife comes in many different color options—the blade and the handle. Some of the options that BladeOps carries for the handle are: desert tan, orange, canvas, and gray. Some of the options that BladeOps carries for the blade are: desert tan, black, olive drab, plain stainless steel, and a special venom green.

 

Conclusion:

This is an amazing knife, especially if you are looking for a survival knife. If you, or anyone you know, is going to be spending time in the woods, you/they need this knife. This is also a great option to put in your emergency kit. This knife is durable, reliable, quality, and the perfect option for you. There are hundreds of different hunting, camping, and survival knives out on the market today. Deciding which one to pick can be a battle, because each one is going to excel at something that another option lacks in. The ESEE 4 is a knife that will work for any task that you throw at it. It is a knife that has many pros and hardly and cons.  Some things that people love in this knife are the different options that you are presented with. There are two different types of steels, many different blade colors, you can choose whether you want a partially serrated blade or a plain edged blade, you can also choose between many different handle color options. This knife is also an affordable knife, BladeOps offers this knife for between $92 and $127, depending on which version, materials, and options that you choose. ESEE offers a lifetime warranty on this knife, as long as you get the version with the 1095 carbon steel. This means that if it breaks, ESEE will replace it. Another thing that many people love about this knife is that it was made in the US, this means that you can trust the quality of the craftsmanship. This knife should definitely be on your radar. It is a great knife to add to your collection.  You can find the entire line of ESEE 4 knives here on our website.

 

 

 

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The CRKT TSR Terzuola Survival Rescue Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company was founded in 1994 in Oregon. This is an American Company that is known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over two decades, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. CRKT operates on a simple principle: that the creates thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To achieve this principle, they collaborate with the best knife makers and designers in the world. Some of these collaborations have been with Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. While they have been collaborating with these greats, they have racked up the patents that they own. They are now up to fifteen patents, including the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

At this point in time, CRKT produces a wide range of fixed blades, folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. It seems as if they have everything down pat and they have been around the block quite a few times at this point. However, it did take a couple of years for this company to truly take off. It wasn’t until 1997 at that years Shot Show that CRKT started to gain traction. It was there that they released the K.I.S.S knife (Keep It Super Simple). This is a small folder that had been designed by Ed Halligan and it was a raging success. Within only the opening days of the Shot Show, they sold out the years’ worth of products.

CRKT has recently released another home run of the knife: the TSR Terzuola Survival Rescue Knife.

 

The Designer:

Bob Terzuola, who is from Albuquerque New Mexico, made this knife. When CRKT is talking about Bob, they say, “Look up ‘tactical folding knife’ in the dictionary and you’re likely to see Bob’s picture next to it. After all, he virtually invented the category and continues to specialize in knives for professional use, like the BT-70.” He was born in New York and has had many adventures before he designed to settle into design in the early ‘80s. It was in 1981 that he joined the Knife Makers Guild.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel comes from a Chinese series that has many different formulas in it. The best quality formula of this series is the 9Cr steel, but the 8Cr steel does fall closely behind. If you were going to compare this steel to another more popular steel, the most similar steel would be AUS 8 steel, however 8Cr steel is the inferior of the two steels. This is considered a stainless steel, so while it can resist rust pretty well, you do steel need to keep on your cleaning and oiling of the blade. Even some of the higher quality stainless steels will rust if left in the worst conditions. This steel has a hardness of HRC 56-58. Because this is a softer steel, it is a total breeze to sharpen and can get a crazy fine edge on it. It also holds this edge longer than you would expect with such a soft steel. The biggest feature that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. However, this is steel an average steel so while it will be able to take on most tasks, it does not excel at anything.

The steel has been finished with a satin finish. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the steel in one direction with increasing levels of a fine abrasive, such as sandpaper. This steel is created to showcase the lines in the steel and gives you a very classic look for your blade. This is an average steel finish; it does cut down on glares and reflections up to a point, but it is in no terms matte.

This blade has been carved into a drop point style. This style of blade is one of the most popular because of how great of an all-purpose blade shape it is. The shape is created by having the back edge of the knife run straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. The lowered point helps to add strength to the tip and control over the tip. One of the most common places that you are going to find this blade shape is on hunting knives. This is because the tip is so easily controllable, so you can easily avoid nicking the internal organs and ruining the meat. Clip point blade shapes and drop point blade shapes are often confused. These two shapes are similar in terms of how popular and versatile they are. However, the tips on each of the blade shapes are pretty different. The clip point does have a lowered point, but it is thinner, finer, and sharper than a drop points point. This has a few advantages, the biggest one is that you have total stabbing capabilities. However, it is a weaker tip and prone to breaking. The drop point style is lowered and broad, which means that you won’t have many stabbing capabilities. However, you have so much more strength behind this tip. Because of that strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are very popular on tactical and survival knives, such as this knife: the TSR Terzuola Survival Rescue Knife. Another one of the reasons that this blade shape is so versatile is that it has a large belly that is perfect for slicing. The belly provides plenty of length that will make slicing a breeze for you. If you choose a knife with a drop point blade shape, you are preparing yourself for almost any situation that you could get yourself into.

The edge of this blade is a plain edge. On the spine of the knife, near where the blade meets the handle, there is a row of shallow jimping. This jimping will give you a better grip when you are performing those heavy duty tasks or if you are trying to use this knife in a wetter situation. On the bottom portion of the blade, there is a small hole drilled into it. This so that it might be attached to a wooden shaft and become a hunting spear if needed.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN. This material is crazy strong, very resistant tot bending and abrasion, and practically indestructible. And as an added bonus, it’s also very cheap. Something that makes this material unique when compared to similar materials is the ways that the fibers have been arranged. In GRN, the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in it being strong in all directions. Similar materials such as G 10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta have all of their fibers arranged in one direction. This means that those materials are extremely strong in that direction, but cannot be stressed in other directions without becoming brittle. GRN can essentially be stressed in all directions without breaking apart. This is a cheaper material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. These characteristics lend well to high volume manufacturing and the low cost. However, many knife enthusiasts did not warm up to GRN because they felt like it feels cheap and somewhat hollow. And, GRN does tend to be slightly less grippy than G 10 is.

The stainless steel tang is hollow and the glass reinforced nylon handles can be easily removed to reveal fishing line, fishing hooks, and dental floss, which is surprisingly useful and versa-tile when you find yourself in a backwoods pinch. “This handle comes with a powerful secret…in the form of an entire survival kit. Even though a skilled survivalist could fashion just about everything they would need from woodsy resources, sometimes a magnesium edge, a reflective stainless steel plate, and paracord can make a Darwinian difference.”

There is a lanyard hole at the butt of the handle that comes with a paracord lanyard tied through it. This lanyard will help you keep track of your knife; keep it in arms reach, yet still out of the way; and in a survival situation, you can utilize the paracord for a variety of uses.

 

The Mechanism:

The TSR Terzuola Survival Rescue Knife is a fixed blade. For a survival and rescue knife, a fixed blade is almost essential. There are so many different benefits to fixed blade, it seems like the list never ends, so we’ll go over a couple of the big advantages. Fixed blades are bigger and stronger than a folding knife. You can really get a fixed blade in any size that you need, this ranges from small but powerful to absolutely monstrous. For most fixed blade needs, you really only need a medium sized knife, but there are situations when you would need the larger kind. And, you aren’t going to be able to get such a big folding knife. This leads us to our next advantage: fixed blades don’t’ break. This is because there are no moving parts on a

CRKT TSR Terzuola
CRKT TSR Terzuola

fixed blade. And, because the blades are usually thicker (read: stronger), you can take on those heftier tasks without worrying about blade snapping. This is advantage is closely related to our third advantage: the easy maintenance. Because there are no small, moving, or inward pieces, all you have to do is quickly wipe the blade and handle down and oil the blade every once in a while. The cleaning process is much more straightforward and simple. With a folding knife, to get it completely clean, you would have to take apart the knife and work with many small and fragile pieces. Fourth, fixed blades are superior in terms of tactical use. Fixed blades can be brought into play much faster than a folding knife in a tactical situation. All you have to do with a fixed blade is draw it from its sheath and it is ready. If you are in the same situation, but with a folding knife, you have to pull you knife out, then deploy the blade, and then it will be ready to use. The last and in my opinion biggest advantage for this knife is that fixed blades are superior survival tools. Because of all of the previous advantages, fixed blades offer more versatility for your tasks such as: cutting, digging, splitting wood, first aid tool, food preparation tool, hunting weapon, hammering, and even a prying tool.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath is made out of the same material as the handle: Glass Reinforced Nylon. It also comes with a black paracord lanyard. The sheath that comes with the TSR Terzuola Survival and Rescue Knife has a variety of extra features. It sports a ceramic sharpening edge, a magnesium edge, and a reflective stainless steel signal plate.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 4.350 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.115 inches. The overall length of this knife is 9.25 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.3 ounces.

 

The Conclusion:

CRKT’s description for this knife was excellent, “A survivalist’s best friend, Mother Nature’s worst enemy. The TSR™ (Terzuola Survival Rescue) fixed blade outdoor knife doesn’t just stop at that—its handle comes with a powerful secret…in the form of an entire survival kit. Even though a skilled survivalist could fashion just about everything they would need from woodsy resources, sometimes a magnesium edge, a reflective stainless steel plate, and paracord can make a Darwinian difference. World-renowned knife-making pioneer Bob Terzuola designed his namesake knife in his shop in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He channeled years of experience serving in the Peace Corps in Guatemala and directing war damage surveys in Central American jungles to dream up the ultimate survival knife. It’s hard to imagine a single knife that’s worthy of his famous name, but the Terzuola Survival Rescue™ delivers with a modified drop point blade and a clean satin finish. There’s a small hole bored into the base of the blade so that it might be attached to a wooden shaft and become a hunting spear if needed. The stainless steel tang is hollow and the glass reinforced nylon handles can be easily removed to reveal fishing line, fishing hooks, and dental floss, which is surprisingly useful and versa-tile when you find yourself in a backwoods pinch. No space on the injection-molded sheath is wasted. It comes with extra paracord for wrapping, has a ceramic sharpening edge on one side, and the other boasts a magnesium edge to help start fires when the temperature drops. Lastly, one panel on the inside of the sheath has a reflective stainless steel plate for signaling aircraft or approaching parties when you need to get bailed out. Survival of the fittest is the name of the game. When the stakes are high, you’ll want to keep the TSR™ close.” Pick yours up at BladeOps today.

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Hoback Knives Kwaiback Fixed Blade Knife Review

This knife is made by Jake Hoback Knives. In 1990, Jake started making knives in his back yard. He would pound out the knives on a huge chunk of steel with a framing hammer and fence post nails. His next step was working a summer job at his dad’s blacksmith shop with his best friend. At this point in his life, he was hooked. He loved making knives. In 2003, he started professionally making and selling knives and the company has only grown.

Jake Hoback knives has been producing the Kwaiback flipper knife, which has become a huge hit over the years. Because the Kwaiback flipper was so popular, Jake decided to use many of the same characteristics of this knife, but make it into a fixed blade. This brand new knife is sure to be a hit.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is carved out of M390 steel. This type of steel is one of the newer steels around. It is manufactured by Bohler-Uddeholm and is considered a super steel. Bohler-Uddeholm uses third generation powder metal technology that has been devolved specifically for knife blades to produce a steel with fantastic corrosion resistant properties. This powder metal technology also keeps the steel very hard and gives it great wear resistance properties. Bohler-Uddeholm has added chromium, vanadium, tungsten, and molybdenum to the steel which assists the blade in getting crazy sharp and having superior edge retention abilities. Sharpening this steel is pretty difficult, so you might want to get the assistance of a sharpening professional to avoid ruining your blade. A unique aspect about M390 steel is that it has been called “MicroClean”, which means that it can be polished to a true mirror finish. This steel has been finished with a black Diamond Like Coating. The DLC is one of the hardest coatings that a knife can have. This coating reduces glares and reflections and helps to reduce wear and corrosion on the blade. The DLC is actually bonded chemically to the surface, so while most coatings have a tendency to scratch off, the DLC will last longer. Hoback Knives has actually finished this blade twice. After the DLC is added, the blade on the Kwaiback also goes through a stonewashed finishing process. This process is completed by tumbling the blade around with an abrasive material, usually small pebbles. This finish helps to hide scratches and also gives it a less reflective nature. The stonewashed finish adds a textured, or mottled, look to the blade. Because of both finishes, the resulting color is a light black, or charcoal colored blade.

 

The M390 steel has been carved into a tanto blade shape. Tanto blades have a rich history behind them; the shape is the same as the traditional Japanese short sword. But in the 80’s, Cold Steel revamped the traditional shape and popularized the new American tanto blade shape. The tanto blade shape is popular with military personnel and law enforcement groups because of the strength and ability to cut through almost anything. The thing about the tanto blade shape is that it doesn’t excel at everything, it is not an all-purpose knife, and it is not versatile. But it does one thing and it does that one thing better than any other knife shape. The tanto can stab through tough materials better than any other blade shape. The tanto blade shape was designed to be an excellent fighting knife, but the tanto is also a great option for outdoor purposes and survival situations. The tanto gets its shape from a high point with a flat grind, because of these two things, the point is incredibly strong. The shape a good amount of metal near the tip, so the point can actually absorb the impact from piercing tough materials, while other blade shapes would snap under the pressure. Because the tip is so strong, this blade shape is a suitable option if you need to pry with your blade. Because the blade is thick and the point is strong, this blade will also do well at chopping. The sharpened edge of the tanto blade shape meets the unsharpened edge at an angle, rather than the traditional curve. Because there is no curve, there is no belly, which also means slicing is going to be trickier. However, because the blade is slightly upswept, you can manage some slicing with it. Because you cannot slice, this blade is not going to be good for your everyday knife. Because there are two primary bevels to the blade, sharpening it will take time, patience, and practice. However, once you get it down, it is relatively easy. In fact, once you have it down, you can even sharpen it on a stone. People usually have a love/hate relationship with tanto blades. While they are not the traditional blade shape that can accomplish a variety of tasks; what they are good at, they excel at. If you are looking for a super strong blade that can pierce through almost anything, and would make a decent survival knife, look no further than the tanto blade.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of carbon fiber. Carbon fiber is a vague term that is used to refer to thin strands of carbon that have been woven tightly and then set in resin. This material is extremely strong, yet lightweight. Unfortunately, this material is also brittle. The carbon fibers are woven together in one direction, so they are crazy strong (stronger

Hoback Fixed Kwaiback
Hoback Fixed Kwaiback

than many types of steel) in that specific direction, but will start to break apart when pulled or stressed in the other directions. Carbon fiber has a tendency to break, chip, or crack when hit on sharp or hard objects. Another thing about carbon fiber is that it takes a lot of work to make, so it is on the expensive end of the spectrum. Because of the labor and cost put into carbon fiber, this material is usually saved for the higher end knives. The carbon fiber on the Kwaiback fixed blade is black. There are two deep grooves carved going down the middle of the knife to cut down on weight and add a little bit of grip. When talking about the handle on the Kwaiback fixed blade, Jake Hoback Knives has said, “The carbon fiber handle gives that touch of modern to an ancient design, while being comfortable for hard use.”

 

The Mechanism:

This version of the Kwaiback knife is a fixed blade. Fixed blades have many advantages to them. Unfortunately, many people don’t understand how great a fixed blade really can be. Many people get caught up in the advantages of folding knives and the disadvantages of fixed blades. But both styles of knives have their own advantages and their own set of disadvantages. So let’s start with the negative. Fixed blades are not as discreet or easy to conceal as a folding knife, it’s possible, but you can’t just shove it in your pocket. But, a fixed blade is a stronger knife that is more durable. There is not a plethora of moving parts that can rust, break, or stop working. And since fixed blades are usually thicker and longer, they have more power behind them; more strength behind them. Fixed blades are also much easier to maintain, because there are no innards that are open to getting dirty or wet. For the quick clean, all you have to do is wipe down the blade/handle. When you want to really clean your knife, all you have to do is oil the blade. Fixed blades are also the best for survival tools. Because they have so much strength and durability behind them, they can cut, dig, hammer, and even pry. Fixed blades are also great for using as a tactical tool, because you can get it out and into action quicker than a folding knife.

 

The Sheath:

The Kwaiback fixed blade comes with a black kydex sheath. Kydex is a thermoplastic material that was original used to make holsters. Kydex is one of the most durable sheath materials that you are going to find. Kydex can go in many environments, including salt water, without its quality being compromised. However, many people don’t like this sheath material because it has no personality to it. Basically, it is a lump of plastic. Another bummer about kydex is that it is a loud material. When you are unsheathing your knife and replacing it, it is going to make a lot of noise. In fact, if you are trying to be discreet, this sheath is going to give you away. The last bummer about the kydex sheath is that if you are continually drawing your knife and replacing it, it will dull the edge of your blade. So while the sheath is crazy durable, you do have to weigh the cons and see if that sheath is worth it for you.

 

The Specs:

The overall length of this knife is 9.64 inches. The blade on this knife is 5 inches long with a thickness of 0.19 inches. The handle on this knife is 4.64 inches long. This knife weighs 5.7 ounces, without the sheath.

 

Pro of the Kwaiback Fixed Blade:

  • The steel chosen for the blade is a super steel.
  • The steel is very hard and has great corrosion resistance properties.
  • The edge retention on this steel is excellent.
  • The steel has been finished with two different finishes, so the steel is more durable, more resistant to rust and wear, and the stonewash finish hides scratches.
  • The blade has a tanto shape, which is absolutely exceptional for piercing through hard materials.
  • The tanto shape is also great for tactical and survival purposes.
  • The carbon fiber handle is super strong.
  • The fixed blade is exceptionally strong.
  • The fixed blade gives it the ability to do tasks such as digging and cutting.
  • The fixed blade is easy to maintain.
  • The fixed blade is not likely to break, because there are no little parts that can break or stop working.
  • The kydex sheath is durable and strong.

 

Cons of the Kwaiback Fixed Blade:

  • The steel chosen for the blade is hard to sharpen.
  • Fixed blades are larger than folding knives, so they are harder to have with you at all times.
  • Kydex sheaths have the tendency to dull your blade edge over time.

 

Conclusion:

Jake Hoback, of Jake Hoback Knives, has loved making knives since 1990, when he would make knives in his backyard. He eventually got a summer job at his dad’s blacksmith shop and was immediately hooked. He started making and producing knives professionally in the early 2000’s and we are so glad that he did. Jake has produced a variety of exceptional knives that are loved in the knife community. One of those knives was the Kwaiback flipper, that had such a following, Jake decided to produce a new version but this time, a fixed blade.

To perfect this fixed blade, he started with a super steel that has great edge retention and fantastic corrosion and wear resistance. This steel is tough and strong. Next, he carved the super steel into a tanto blade shape, which is the perfect option for survival and tactical knives. This is a strong blade shape that is going to be able to pierce through almost any hard material. To add a little bit of modern to the traditional blade shape, the handle is made out of carbon fiber. As a cherry on top, the Kwaiback fixed blade comes with a kydex sheath. This new knife is going to become your new favorite if you give it the chance.

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