Benchmade HK Turmoil w/ Black Blade

Benchmade HK 14808BK

Benchmade HK 14808BK

Turmoil OTF knives with the black coated blade are in.  Check them out here.  Interested in reading a bit more about them?  Read our Turmoil review from a couple days ago here.

 

Posted in benchmade, benchmade knife, Benchmade Knives | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Griptilian, by J.S.

Benchmade Griptilian

Benchmade Griptilian

The Griptilian is an excellent made knife. This knife is made out of 154 cm which has fantastic ratio of edge retention and sharpening. The knife has a nice jimping on the blade which keeps from slipping during use.
The handle is a nylon exterior with an aluminum liner. The thumb stud is strong and reliable. It slides easy and locks in place with a strong arc style lock. The knife has a standard pocket clip that is reversible for either right or left handed.
Overall this is a strong reliable knife. It feels great in the hand. I love this knife and applaud Benchmade for their work into this knife. It is priced very well for being a Benchmade with 154 cm steel. I give this knife 9 out of 10. The only thing that I didn’t like about was the handle felt a little hollow. However, this knife is very strong and will last you lifetimes.

Posted in benchmade, benchmade knife, Benchmade Knives, BladeOps, Blog Contest, Contest | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Al Mar & Las Vegas, by W.B.H

Al Mar

Al Mar

Starting in the mid 1980’s and early 1990’s I started going every year, with friends, to the Las Vegas Soldier Of Fortune Conventions. I was mainly interested in their huge gun show and the Firepower Display. The gun show portion had manufacturers and company booths with the latest and greatest of cool “toys”. All the best custom and production knife makers were present in addition to everything firearm.

At S.O.F.’s desert shooting range, where the Firepower Display was held, they had firearm rental bays where, for a fee, I was able to fire a 7.62×51 NATO GE Minigun, a .50 BMG “Ma Deuce” (mounted on a WWII half track), and even a full-auto .22 caliber American 180 w/275 round drum… all these for the first time! It was there that I got hooked on automatic weapons.

Another annual ritual I had at every S.O.F. Gun Show was visiting Al Mar at his company’s trade booth. A good friend in Seattle, who never attended the Vegas show, would give me cash to buy a dozen or more small Al Mar “blems” or seconds. These knives seemed to only be available at this venue. My friend would then give them out to his friends and family for Christmas gifts. Since the Al Mar booth was always the first place I went when the show doors opened Al got to know and expect me to show up. He would already have 20 or so assorted small knives ready for me to choose from. I would always buy the models that he recommended. His “blems” would be anyone else’s top of the line. He was VERY particular about what went out with his name on it.

As usual at the ’92 show I went right to the big Al Mar booth to get the “Christmas” knives. Al came right over and started to apologize that he had very few seconds to sell that year. He had cracked down on QC and the result was a big improvement. He only had 7 of the smaller folders to sell. I said that was fine and bought them all. After I paid for them Al reached into his pocket and brought out an AMK Hawk with titanwood scales. He said that since I had been a good repeat customer over the years it was just a small gesture of thanks.

Before we left SOF I went back again to thank Al. A friend took a picture of Al and me shaking hands. I remember he had a grip like a vise!

Back at home I turned the 7 knives I bought from AL to my friend and the balance of his cash. I never told him about “Al’s knife”. I have had it now for over 20 years. I carry it often.

Sadly, Al died a few months after the S.O.F. show in 1992 from an aneurysm. It was only after his passing that I learned he and I were both Industrial Design graduates of the same school; Art Center College of Design, then located in the Hancock Park section of Los Angeles, now located in Pasadena, CA.

Al had earned a Masters Degree at ACCD… his master’s thesis was building and launching a working 2-man submarine!

Rest In Peace Al.

Posted in BladeOps, Blog Contest, Contest | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Glock Handguns, by A.L.

Glock is an Austrian gun producer. This company started in 1981 and already has reached the top in the gun-manufacturing world. It makes highly durable polymer framed pistols called Glocks. The idea of a Glock came to a man named Gaston Glock in 1963. During that year Gaston Glock began his professional journey with plastics and metals. In 1981, after 18 years of experimenting, Gaston Glock founded his company, Glock. In the years to come, this company would accomplish a large amount of engineering feats, which would ultimately redefine the modern pistol. Glock is a major name in the world of guns and continues to produce some of the most advanced pistols in the world.

One of the number one reasons Glock is considered one of the best pistols on the market is because of the pistols’ simplicity. Its simplicity has revolutionized the gun and pistol world. The Glock pistols are so simple that they have been universally adopted as one of the number one pistols used for training, largely because of the gun’s ease in operation and use. Its simplicity also allows for the gun to be considered an easy to care for gun, in maintenance and cleaning.
“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

One of the major reasons Glock is considered one of the simplest pistols on the market is because of its low number of parts found in the pistols. The low number of parts found in the pistol also helps to contribute to its simple operation and makes the guns easy to care for. All of the Glock pistols contain a total number of 34 component parts. The only difference in the parts found within varying models is, simply, their size. There are no new parts added to different models nor are there any other parts taken away. The total number of parts found in the Glock is significantly lower than the number of parts found within other pistols on the market, such as modern, Colt 1911’s. These models can contain up to 53 component parts. Other pistols on the market can have up to 50 plus component parts, while the Glock only has a mere 34! This lower number greatly increases the pistols’ ease of operation. This lower number of parts also increases the pistols’ reliability. The pistol is so reliable that it rarely misfires or hardly ever malfunctions. Having a pistol like this, with a few number of parts, greatly decreases the chance of it breaking, malfunctioning, or not working properly. Another thing that is greatly affected by the pistols’ low number of parts is the cost to maintain them properly. The low number of parts means that there are less expensive parts to replace, if the pistol breaks. This allows for lower maintenance costs; thus, it adds to the benefit of owning a Glock pistol.
Another process or fact that proves the Glock pistols to be such simple pistols is their disassembly/reassembly process. Gaston Glock strove to make his line of pistols the best of the best, and he certainly did not let anyone down on the disassembly/reassembly process of the pistols. The Glocks’ simple design allows for them to be field striped and cleaned in literally seconds. A field strip is when a gun, specifically a pistol in this case, is disassembled. This process disassembles the gun to the point where the slide, which is the top part of the gun that chambers the next round, magazine, which is the part of the gun that holds the round in the pistol ready to be fired, barrel, which is the part of the gun that the bullet passes through when fired to expel the round, and the receiver, which is the lower section of the pistol where the handle, trigger, and the barrel mount are located, are completely detached from the pistol. This disassembly process is amazing because other pistols on the market take 10 plus minutes to field strip with tools, while the Glock can be field stripped without tools in seconds. The simple disassemble and reassemble process on the Glock’s also contributes to their easy fixes. It contributes to easier fixes because it lowers the amount of time it take to disassemble, fix and then reassembly the pistol. This lowers the amount of time it takes to completely fix the pistol, because of less complication during the process of fixing the pistol.

“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

Shideler, Dan. Greatest Guns of Gun Digest. Iola: Fw Media, 2010. Print.

Ramage, Ken, ed. Handguns 2001. 13th ed. Iola: Krause Publications, 2000. Print.

Gaston Glock also wanted his line of pistols to be the best ergonomically designed pistols ever. He wanted to design a pistol that was simple, good-looking, and yet ergonomically designed to be able to fit the human hand like a glove. He strove to achieve this during his eighteen years of experimenting with different polymers and metals to make the perfect pistol. As he was experimenting he also tried out different pistol designs, looks, and ideas. Model after model he went through, trying to find the best design, until one day he came up with the design still being used today.
“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

One of the great things about the Glocks’ ergonomical design is its grip design on the line of pistols. The Glock pistols grips are placed at a natural angle for the human hand, and have a natural feel to them that makes their design iconic. The grips on the Glocks’ allow for instinctive pointing and faster acquisition of the picture in front of you, which gives the shooter an advantage when clearing closed in and tight spaces. The grip design on the pistols makes it so much easier to handle and operate even when the shooter is placed under extreme stress in the heat of the moment. The design of the grips also allow for the gun to sit lower in the shooter’s hand. This design gives the shooter more of a sense of confidence and also lowers the amount of area of the gun’s profile sticking out. Having this design lowers the chance of the gun to be turned on its owner, if someone tries to grab or knock the gun away from you. Overall, the grip is so well designed and so well thought out, that it makes the gun easier to use and handle. Another great thing about the Glocks’ amazing ergonomical design is that is a hammerless design. While most pistols on the market use a hammer in their design the Glock does not. A hammer is what most pistols use to set off the round in the pistol’s chamber. A gun’s hammer is basically an external part on the gun that acts like a lever, and, when the trigger is pulled, it drops, hits a firing pin, and then sets off the round in the chamber. This design using a hammer in pistols to set of the rounds has been used for years and years but with one downfall to it. The downfall to this design is that it increases the chance of the gun being snagged on the shooter’s clothes or any other object when being drawn from the waist or its holster. If a shooter is confronted with a situation where he/she needs to draw their pistol fast, but the hammer on the pistol gets snagged, it can result in death for the shooter. The design of a pistol using a hammer or not using one can ultimately result in the death or survival of a shooter; however, Gaston Glock designed his line of pistols that would not use a hammer but only a firing pin. He designed his pistols to have an internal firing pin to set off the round in the pistol’s chamber instead of an external hammer and firing pin. This ergonomical design works the same as the hammer does and is just as reliable. This design lowers the chance of the gun being caught on the clothes when being drawn, from the waist or its holster.

“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

-Suermondt, Jan, ed. Illusstrated Guide to Handguns. Kent: Grange, 2004. Print.

Another advantage of the ergonomical design of Glock is its modular back strap system. The Glocks’ grip design is at the perfect angel for every hand, but since hand sizes vary from person to person, Glock designed its amazing back strap system to fix this problem. This system allows for different back straps (the back part of the grip) to be modified to fit hand sizes from extra small to extra large. The back straps are simple to install by taking out the magazine back strap, and then reinstalling the one that fits best. By adding the correct backstrap to the pistol’s grip,- it will fill the space between the shooter’s palm and the grip; therefore, this gives the shooter a finer grasp on the pistol, and protects the shooter reducing the chance of the gun being turned on him/her. The other design feat of the Glock is its rough textured frame. This design enhances your grip on the pistol and is located on the frame as well as the back straps. This design reduces the chance of the gun slipping out of your hand when it becomes wet, which will give the shooter yet another advantage when firing the pistol.

“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

The final major thing that makes Glock pistols such revolutionary guns is their engineering. The Glock pistols are an engineering feat that can function better than most other pistols on the market today. Even though the company is only 32 years old it produces some of the best-engineered pistols ever.

Glock is also recognized for its engineering of the breakthrough polymer frame. Its frame is made out of a matte black, highly reinforced, super strong polymer. The matte black color of the frame minimizes light reflection, which is an advantage in certain circumstances, as well the polymer material used on the frame is highly resistant to lubricants, color stable, corrosion free, absorbs recoil, and is highly resistant to different climatic conditions. The polymer pistol weighs significantly less than other pistols on the market. The average Glock weighs about twenty ounces while other pistols weigh 35 or more ounces. Durability is the other engineering breakthrough on the Glock. They are so durable that they have been adopted by approximately 65% of U.S. law enforcement. Glock combines high quality advanced engineering, precision manufacturing, and strict quality control to produce some of the most durable pistols on the market. What also contributes to the pistols durability is the use of the lightweight polymer. As described earlier, a Glock’s polymer frame is super strong and will not rust. The polymer frame is so strong that sometimes it is called a “diamond” frame because of how hard and durable it is. Even under some of the world’s harshest conditions they will hardly ever misfire of malfunction. Glock pistols are so durable that they can be firing underwater in salt water and function fine, and the only thing you have to replace later is a ten-dollar firing pin. They can even be soaked in mud for thirty minutes, dipped in water to clean, and fire and still operate fine. Overall Glock is considered one of the most durable pistols.

“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p.n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

The Glock pistol is a simple, well-designed and engineered pistol. Gaston Glock was a genius in the gun-engineering world and his pistols have paved the way for the modern pistols to come. He has created a worldwide sensation known as Glock. The company today lives up to Mr. Glocks expectations by producing the highly technological pistols that have changed the world.

Bibliography/works cited

“GLOCK USA – Pistols & Handguns.” GLOCK “Safe Action”® Pistols. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2013. .

Shideler, Dan. Greatest Guns of Gun Digest. Iola: Fw Media, 2010. Print.

Ramage, Ken, ed. Handguns 2001. 13th ed. Iola: Krause Publications, 2000. Print.

-Suermondt, Jan, ed. Illusstrated Guide to Handguns. Kent: Grange, 2004. Print.

Posted in BladeOps, Blog Contest, Contest | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

College Student Carry & Considerations, by C.O.

————————————————————————–

College Carry

College Carry

So you or someone you know is going off to school and they ask you for advice, what would you tell them? Study hard? Don’t forget to write home? Don’t skip classes? As a college student is it vital to be prepared for your courses…but why stop there? The everyday carry of a college student likely consists of a laptop, a few notebooks and folders, writing utensils and a calculator, but this is only part of the spectrum. I think it is important that every college student have a small kit of useful items they can carry with them every day; something that can slide into a backpack or purse and not take up too much space would certainly be ideal.

Kit contents:
——————————————–
First, something to contain the contents of your kit is important. Having a bunch of useful items is great, but if they’re all contained in one convenient location, the things you need are easier to find. It’s also convenient if you change backpacks or purses often. Having a container you can move from backpack to bag to purse is the easiest way to stay prepared. My container is a custom-made Cordura Pouch made by CloudRabbitDesigns and it ran about $30. Before that, I used a mesh/fabric pouch I picked up from Eastern Mountain Sports for about $15. I also understand that Maxpedition makes a good line of EDC pouches that would work well to contain an every-day-carry kit.
Now that we have a container, what do we put in it? Items contained in the kit will certainly vary between people but some of the essentials that every strong kit should have include: a first aid kit, a knife, paracord, a lighter, a handkerchief and chapstick.
I purchased a Johnson & Johnson travel first aid kit for $2. It came with a few band aids, gauze, and sterile pads. I added a few more band aids to this and a small bottle of Neosporin. In the small case it came in I also keep a book of matches, chapstick, a pencil wrapped in duct tape, and a small baggie containing a variety of paperclips and rubber bands. In addition to my first aid kit, I also keep a few large-sized adhesive bandages and a small re-sealable travel package of “Wet Wipes,” an antibacterial hand wipe. In the larger EDC case I also keep a mini bic lighter, 10 or so feet of thin paracord wrapped up tight, a handkerchief, a few zipties and two small knives. A knife is a very important tool and I believe in carrying multiple blades. In my EDC kit, I have two small, lightweight knives. One is a SOG Micron II Tanto, $22.50 at Bladeops, and the other is a Spyderco Dragonfly 2, $54.95 at Bladeops. The Micron II has always been reliable and has a very study lockup. The Dragonfly 2 has premium VG-10 steel and is one of the lightest knives I’ve carried. It’s a real work-horse and totally worth the money. Attached via strap on the back-side of my Cordura pouch, I have an extendable razor and a mini Maglite.

In addition to my EDC kit, I keep four items separate in an easily accessible pocket on my backpack. I keep my 16gb Sandisk flashdrive, my Fisher Spacepen, a Leatherman Juice CS4, and a sharpie in my front pocket because I use these items more frequently than those in my kit, so I’d like to have easier access to them.
In addition to what a student carries in their backpack, it is important that they keep their pockets stocked with the right equipment as well.

Pocket carry:
————————————–
I keep my knife in my front right pocket along with my mini-pouch. I carry a Kershaw-Emerson CQC-6k, $37.95 at Bladeops. This knife is not only tactical, as it deploys very quickly via the wave feature, but it also has a sturdy lock-up, a reversible pocket clip, a decent steel and not to mention it’s budget friendly and legal where I live. A person’s knife choice will vary depending on the legality, the price, and a variety of other factors. A few others I have carried or would suggest as EDC knives include: the Kersha Cryo ($34.95 at Bladeops), the Spyderco Tenacious ($45.75 at Bladeops), the Spyderco Delica 4 ($68.75 at Bladeops) and the Benchmade Griptilian or Mini-Griptilian ($90-$110 at Bladeops, depending on style, model etc).
In my mini-pouch I keep a pocket top (mostly for entertainment and sentimental purposes), a Fenix LD-01 flashlight, and a Gerber Dime Multitool ($19.95 at BladeOps). I also sometimes put my Fisher Spacepen in this pouch along with a few quarters.
In my front left pocket I keep my wallet and phone (although sometimes I keep my phone in my back right pocket). I also have a small keychain I keep attached to a beltloop or my pants which has a custom bottle opener/screw driver made by JWoytaz Knives and a Spyderco Ladybug that my girlfriend won in a Bladeops Giveaway a while back and gave to me as a gift :). In my back right or left pocket I keep a mini marble notebook to write down ideas, homework, and general tasks I need to complete.
——————————————————————————————
That concludes my University-Everyday-Carry. I hope this article was helpful. Keep in mind, everyone is different and may carry more or less, but the best carry is the one that works for you.

Posted in BladeOps, Blog Contest, Contest | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Boker Urban Trapper — Video Review

Superb new knife from Boker.  Get yours here.  Watch our video review down below.

Posted in BladeOps, boker, Boker Knife, Boker Knives, Video Knife Review, youtube | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Deep Carry Solution, by W.B.

Deep Carry Solution

Deep Carry Solution

Are you tired of making your new folders look old before their time with scratched and worn handles? Maybe you even leave your front pocket, that holds your knife, empty to avoid scratches and unwanted wear marks?! Have you wished that your pocket clip didn’t standout as much as it does, but enough to not consider it a concealed weapon? I did, too. Because I wear Levis most of the time I wanted a solution that included them, so I removed the stitches at the bottom of the watch pocket which allowed for knives much larger than a Buck Rush. This protects the handle and removes the pocket clip from it’s usual place, making it less noticeable, but keeping your carry legal. Additionally, a deep pocket clip will totally, yet legally, hide your knife. It draws as easily as if were in a front pocket and it just looks cool. You will thank me for this tip, and it doesn’t take 5 minutes to do, so try it.

m4s0n501
Posted in BladeOps, Blog Contest, Contest | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Spartan for a Little Guy, by T.F.

For the last three years of my life, I have carried as an EDC my Cold Steel Spartan. I have been in a love affair with this knife, serving in the military. But by far the best reactions I have ever gotten, pulling this rather large folder out of my pocket was one of my Sergeants saying ” Why in the world would you want to carry a sword around in your pocket?!” In which I replied I’m a little guy and I need a big knife.

Posted in BladeOps, Blog Contest, cold steel, cold steel knife, cold steel knives, Contest | Tagged , | Leave a comment

My Paramilitary 2 is a Pocket Sized Light Saber, by Z.M.

Pocket Sized Light Saber

Pocket Sized Light Saber, My Spyderco Paramilitary 2

I don’t have an excessive amount of knives, maybe 20-30 in all. Out of the collection, there are about 5-10 that I would say are “in rotation.” I put sarcastic quotation marks there, because one knife has not left my pocket for about a year. I will carry the Spyderco Paramilitary 2, and a SOG Twitch II. I might slip a Benchmade 915 Triage in my pocket before I walk out the door and realize that the Triage is in my back pocket and the Para 2 is in the front pocket. The same happens with most of my blades. I can’t seem to find a knife that is more suited for my EDC (Every Day Carry) than the Paramilitary 2.
I even tried not to buy The Para 2. I have seen a lot of reviews of the Para 2 on YouTube, and I mean a lot. Nutnfancy, cutlerylover, TheApostleP, the list goes on, and they gave the Paramilitary 2 high marks and recommended buying one. But I kept saying to myself, “Self the Paramilitary 2 has been around for years, there has got to be something better, Right?.” Than one sunny Tennessee Saturday I had the opportunity to fondle a Paramilitary, not the Para 2 but the first one. If I had the cash in hand I would be writing about the original Paramilitary. It is that awesome before the refinements of the Para 2, and it was a combo blade (partly serrated) which I am not a big fan of personally in the EDC role. I ordered one as soon as I had the enough cash in the Zack fund (where I save for buying sharp and pointy things).
When I opened the simple but iconic Black, Red, Silver, and Gold Spyderco box and removed the new addition to my knife collection and noticed something I had missed when I first handled the Para 1. It wasn’t the Cheshire cat smile that had taken control of my face. The Knife felt great in any hand position, but it was more than comfort. The balance is so spot on that knife feels like it is part of your hand. Not like Freddy Krueger or Wolverine, but like using the right tool for the job. The G-10 (Camo on my Para 2) is grippy but not so rough that is sands your pocket apart after a month. The Para 2 is my first compression lock and almost instantly became my favorite locking mechanism. It is everything I like about a liner/frame lock married to everything I like about the Benchmade Axis Lock.
The blade shape seems to be right for just about anything. The full flat grind slices through normal day to day tasks like a pocket sized light saber deconstruction object on a molecular level. That is to say the CMP S30V blade came sharp out of the box and into the phonebook paper that had suddenly created something that looked like the start of a paper mache project. The fine tip had me a little concerned about snapping it off, but I avoid using it like a screwdriver or pry bar and stick with the using it as a knife and it has held up great. I think it would make a capable self-defiance blade fast in hand great penetration and cutting.
The Paramilitary 2 may not be the perfect knife for every person or even every task, but it is so close to perfect for me that I can’t seem to get it out of the EDC rotation.

Posted in BladeOps, Blog Contest, Contest, spyderco, spyderco knife, spyderco knives | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spyderco Lum Tanto Sprint Run Knife Review — Video Review

Posted in spyderco, spyderco knife, spyderco knives, Video Knife Review, youtube | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment