Benchmade 551BKSN-AS Griptilian Knife Review

With a rich history dating back over 30 years, Benchmade is the product of many dedicated employees, a never-quit demand for excellence and the de Asis family’s vision and total commitment to culture, service and innovation.

In 1979 the Benchmade adventure began when Les de Asis wanted a knife that reflected the latest in materials and manufacturing technology to replace the cheap butterfly knives, known as Bali-Songs, he played with as a kid. Using his high-school shop skills, he blueprinted his dream knife before eventually meeting Victor Anselmo, who helped to grind the first ever pre-Benchmade Bali-Song® prototype. Paired with handles that Les sourced from a small machine shop in California, he assembled and finished his first Bali-Song® in his own garage. Proud of his creation, he took this first Bali-Song® into a local gun store and the owner asked, “Could you build 100 more?”

Les incorporated as Bali-Song®, Inc. in 1980 and rented a small shop in a second story mezzanine in California. The original equipment was purchased from the owner of a manufacturing operation who was looking to retire. Utilizing the rudimentary technology available to him at the time, Les began building handmade custom Bali-Songs, along with Jody Sampson, who ground all the blades. The success of these custom Balis spurred the creation of the first production Bali-Song®: The model 68.

Over the next seven years, the company expanded its product offerings into fixed blades and conventional folding knives, and evolving its name from Bali-song®, Inc. to Pacific Cutlery Corp.

1987 brought a different tune. Due to its inability to control quality, price and delivery, Pacific Cutlery Corp. filed for bankruptcy and was dissolved. In 1988, Les reintroduced a new company and new version of the Model 68; This time with a drive to produce product in the US and an even stronger commitment to product availability, quality and customer relationships. The company now needed a new name.

While there was “handmade” and “factory-made,” it was “Benchmade” that described the quality of Les’ product. He was building an operation that made precision parts, but with hand assembly on the finished products. This was a “bench” operation and Les wanted the name to reflect the marriage of manufactured and custom. In short, it describes Benchmade’s position in the market- even to this day.

To this day Benchmade continues to focus on innovation, customer needs, responsible business ethics and operations to bring the highest quality products to the world’s elite.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Mel Pardue. Benchmade says, “The senior team member, Mel has been grinding sparks, making knives and creating a following for 25-plus years. His style has a class and simplicity all its own. The Pardue collaborations offer great utility to the everyday knife user while at the same time presenting an upscale distinction. Less is definitely more with Mel’s designs.”

 

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 154CM stainless steel. This is a high end steel that is made by Crucible Industries. This is a pretty hard steel that is normally viewed as an upgraded version of 440C steel, because of the addition of Molybdenum. The Molybdenum helps the steel achieves superior edge holding, especially when being compared to 440C. However, it also allows the steel to keep its high levels of corrosion resistance even though it has less Chromium in it. The steel is tough enough to stand up to most of your tasks, while also holding its edge well. If you have the correct equipment, the steel is not too hard to sharpen.

The blade has been finished with a coating. The black coating not only looks sleek, but also provides the knife with added wear and corrosion resistance. This is because the coating forms a barrier in between the blade steel and the environment. This protects against any of the elements, including water. The coating on the blade also works to cut down on glares and reflections, which isn’t a huge deal when you are using this knife as your everyday knife, but is a bigger deal when you are using it as our outdoors knife. The drawback that comes with having a coated blade is that when the coating scratches off, it will not provide you with the same benefits that it does when it has the coating on it. This means that the life of the blade will no longer be prolonged and it is prone to rusting and corrosion. Coatings do scratch off after time or with heavy use.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape, which is the most popular blade shape that is on the market to date. The drop point blade is formed by having the spine of the blade extend from the handle to the tip in a slow, curving manner, which creates a lowered point. The lowered point allows the user to have more control over their cuts and slices, which also means that they will be able to perform fine detail work with this knife. The point on this knife is also broad, which is why the drop point blade shape is so durable. This is going to come in handy with your outdoors knife, because you won’t have to worry about whether or not the knife can actually complete the task. This blade shape is also very versatile, mainly because of the large belly that makes slicing a breeze. This characteristic of the drop point knife is going to come in handy the most when you are using this knife as an everyday carry knife. The drop point blade shape does have one major disadvantage: because the tip of the blade is so broad, you do lose out on a lot of your piercing and stabbing capabilities. This should not be a huge issue with this knife, because it is designed as an everyday carry and outdoors knife. Plus, because of the lack of piercing capabilities, you get a lot more strength to the knife, which most people view as the bigger benefit. Overall, the drop point blade shape is tough and versatile, which is a combination that allows you to take on almost any task.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Glass-Filled Nylon, which is the same material is Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon or FRN. This is a thermoplastic material that is really strong, really resistant to bending and abrasion, as well as being almost indestructible.

This material is almost indestructible because of the way that it is designed. Although it is similar to the other fiberglass materials such as G-10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, GFN has all of its nylon fibers arranged haphazardly throughout the material. This means that it can be stretched or stressed in any direction and not break down. This is different than the other materials, where their fibers are arranged in one direction.

This material is also extremely cheap because it can be injection molded into any shape and textured in the production process. This means that the manufacturer can make these handles at a high volume, which always decreases the cost.

The overall benefits to this knife handle material is that it is strong, touch, requires no maintenance, and does not raise the cost of the knife too much. The overall disadvantages are that it does have less grip than G-10.

Benchmade 551BKSN-AS Griptilian
Benchmade 551BKSN-AS Griptilian

The handle is relatively simple. It has more curves than angles, which will provide a comfortable, and still secure grip to this knife. The spine of the knife curves very slowly from the blade to the butt, which is rounded. There is a long row of jimping right when the handle begins and the blade ends, which will give you more control when you are using this knife. Right before the butt of the handle begins there is another row of jimping which will help with control. The belly of the handle has an elongated finger groove, which is also equipped with jimping. The elongated finger groove creates a finger guard, which will help protect your fingers if you do happen to slip. It also provides a comfortable place for you to rest your fingers and have a solid grip on the knife. The belly bulges out very slightly, which will help with comfort. On the belly of this knife, near the butt, there is a short row of jimping. The middle of this handle has an intensely textured portion that will give the user a more secure grip while they are using this knife. This is especially ideal when you are using this knife as an outdoors knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is just a standard pocket clip, which means it won’t fit as deeply into your pocket. This means that the knife will not be as secure in your pocket or as concealed in your pocket. The clip is designed to be attached only tip-up, although it is reversible for either left or right handed carry. Because it is reversible, the knife is almost fully ambidextrous.

The clip is black, which contrasts with the sand colored handle and matches the blade. The clip is kept in place by three black screws, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife has been equipped with a thumb stud to help the user open the knife. The thumb stud is a small barrel that sits in the place of the nail nick that you can find on more traditional knives. The thumb stud is arguably the most common one handed opening system that you can find today. The thumb stud is extremely easy to use, so the user doesn’t have to really get the hang of it, like they would with a flipper. However, in terms of safety, it is not the safest opening mechanism. It puts your fingers pretty directly into the path of the blade when you are opening the knife, which means the user is more likely to slice themselves on accident.

The knife is also equipped with the AXIS locking mechanism. A patented Benchmade exclusive, AXIS® has been turning heads and winning fans ever since its introduction. A 100 percent ambidextrous design, AXIS® gets its function from a small, hardened steel bar that rides forward and back in a slot machined into both steel liners. The bar extends to both sides of the knife, spans the liners and is positioned over the rear of the blade. It engages a ramped tang portion of the knife blade when it is opened. Two omega-style springs, one on each liner, give the locking bar its inertia to engage the knife tang. As a result, the tang is wedged solidly between a sizable stop pin and the AXIS® bar itself.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.45 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.62 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 8.07 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.2 ounces and was made in the United States of America.

 

What Benchmade has to say about it:

Benchmade Knife Company and AmericanSnipers.org have teamed up to bring you a special edition Griptilian® with custom laser markings of the AmericanSnipers.org logo and iconic AmericanSnipers.org skull. Made in USA.
AmericanSnipers.org is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization comprised of active and retired Law Enforcement and Military snipers who volunteer their time to raise equipment and monetary donations at firearms industry and military event/functions. All funds donated go towards the procurement of requested supplies that will deploy with snipers to help aid them in their missions around the globe.
Benchmade is proud to support this effort by donating a portion of sales from this special edition knife directly to AmericanSnipers.org.

 

Conclusion:

This knife has been designed as a great everyday carry or outdoors knife. You can pick it up today at BladeOps.

 

Benchmade 417 Fact Knife Review

Benchmade 417 Fact
Benchmade 417 Fact

Benchmade says, “Our knives are made of many things: steel, aluminum and titanium, to name a few. But perhaps the most important part of a Benchmade knife is expertise. We carefully measure every part at every step in the process. We use the best materials and equipment. We make world-class knives for world-class users and this is how.”

The first step in a Benchmade knife’s life is laser cutting. Each of their blades begins as a single sheet of steel. A laser cutting technician programs the laser to cut the steel into blanks giving the blade its basic profile. The blanks are hammered out of the sheet by hand, and for the first time, the steel begins to look like a knife. Of course, the blanks are measured to make sure they meet the tight specifications.

The second step is surface grinding, which is where the blank is ground to its precise width. A surface grind technician places each blank in its rack by hand and each side is ground to its specified thickness. The tolerances that they use are within the width of a human hair because Benchmade believes that their knives have no room for error, which means that the blank’s thickness also has no room for error.

The third step in the process is milling, which is when blade holes, handles, and grooves are cut on high-speed mills. For every knife, the blade milling technician programs the mill and measures the blade or handle to make sure it meets their tolerances. One of the holes that is cut in this step is the blade pivot, which his crucial to the folding mechanism. The pivot tolerance is actually .0005 inches, because even the slightest deviation at this point becomes exponential at the blade’s tip.

The fourth step in the process is beveling. This is the step where the blade actually begins to take shape. Before this step, the blade is flat on each side. It is at this step the bevels are ground into the blade and of course, a Blade Beveling Technician measures the blade to verify that it meets the specified tolerances. This is especially important because an imprecise bevel can hamper the blade’s balance, sharpness, strength, and mechanism function.

The fifth step is combined with the sixth: Back-sanding and finishing. Back sanding is where the back of the blade gets attention and finishing gives the blade a more refined look.

The seventh and eighth step are also combined: Assembly and sharpening. Each and every Benchmade knife is assembled by hand. An assembly technician receives all of the components—blade, liner, handle, hardware—and pieces them together. Next, is the sharpening, which takes longer to master than any other of the skills listed here. Each of Benchmade’s blades are sharpened to a targeted 30-degree inclusive angle, 15 degrees on each side. The knife is sharp enough when it can cut through ultra-thin phonebook paper effortlessly without tearing. This is when the knife becomes a true Benchmade.

Today we will be discussing the Benchmade 417 Fact.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V steel. Crucible says, “CPM S30V is a martensitic stainless steel designed to offer the best combination of toughness, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance. Its chemistry ha been specially balanced to promote the formation of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective than chromium carbides in providing wear resistance. CPM S30V offers substantial improvement in toughness over other high hardness steels such as 440C and D2, and its corrosion resistance is equal to or better than 440C in various environments.” Something that is unique about Crucible is that a lot of their steels are “CPM” steels. The CPM process produces very homogeneous, high quality steel characterized by superior dimensional stability, grind-ability, and toughness compared to steels produced by conventional processes. While CPM S30V steel is known for having the ideal balance between toughness, hardness, and edge retention, it is also known as being tricky to work with and sharpen. It is tricky because of the high hardness, so while an experienced blade sharpener will be able to get a very fine edge on this blade, a newer sharpener might want to hold off.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine sandpaper. This finish works to show off the bevels of the blade while also showcasing the fine liens of the steel. This is one of the most traditional blade finishes that you are going to come across as well as being the most popular blade finish that you are going to find I the cutlery industry today. The satin finish works to cut down on glares and reflections while also cutting down on corrosion.

The blade on the 417 Fact has been carved into a spear point blade style. The spear point blade style has been designed as a hybrid blade shape, which makes it perfect for using as an everyday carry blade as well as a tactical knife. The spear point is similar to the needle point blade because they have both been designed to pierce. However, the spear point has more than just piercing going for it because it is stronger and does contain a slight belly that is useful when going about your day-to-day tasks. The shape of the blade is made up of a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center line of the blade’s long axis. Both of the spear point’s edges fall and rise equally, which means that the center of the point is going to be exactly at the middle of the blade. While the spear point blade is sharp enough for piercing, it is also strong enough that you don’t have to worry about it snapping when you do pierce. Plus, the spear pint does contain a belly that can be used for some cutting. However, when the belly is compared to either a drop point or a clip point blade, it is going to look extremely strong and not be as useful as the other two shapes. Overall, this blade shape has a good balance between its piercing and slicing ability. Plus, it combines the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade. Because of the spear point blade shape, the Benchmade Fact is going to be very functional.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of black anodized 6061-T6 Billet aluminum.

Billet aluminum just means that the entire handle is made out of one single piece of aluminum. This guarantees that there are no weaker spots where two pieces have been molded together. Because it is billet aluminum, the handle is going to be stronger and more durable.

Aluminum is a very durable material, especially when it is used for knife handles. Aluminum is a low density metal that provides for a nice, hefty feel without actually weighing the knife down. This is the best of both worlds because you are going to feel like you have the heft behind the knife to actually take on the things that pop up, but you aren’t going to notice the weight in your pocket when you are just going about your business. The most common type of aluminum used today is the 6061-T6 alloy, which does have the highest tensile strength.

When an aluminum handle is texturized properly, it will provide a pretty secure grip that is also going to be comfortable and easy for long periods of use. Unfortunately, aluminum does have high conductive properties, which means if you were planning on using this in the winter, it will feel like it is biting into your palm. Some of the benefits to having an aluminum handle is that it is going to be strong, light, very durable, and very resistant o corrosion. All of these characteristics keep maintenance to a minimum. However, aluminum can be cold to hold, does tend to be slippery, and is susceptible to scratches and dings.

According to Wikipedia, “Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used the increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. The process is called anodizing because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit. Anodizing increases resistance to corrosion and wear.” This means that not only does the anodizing give the handle a sleek, black look, it also makes the already durable material even more durable.

The spine of the handle is very straight, while the belly of the handle does have a large finger guard as well as an elongated and shallow finger groove to make your hold a little more comfortable.

The handle has been skeletonized to cut down on weight.

 

The Pocket Clip:

This is a deep carry pocket clip, which is ideal for both an everyday carry knife as well as a tactical knife, exactly what the Fact has been designed as. The deep carry pocket clip will keep your knife securely in your pocket, even if you do move around throughout your day. This comes in handy when you are using the Fact as an everyday carry knife because you don’t have to worry about the knife slipping out of your pocket. In fact, you can just forget that it is even in your pocket—until you need to use it. The deep carry pocket clip will also keep your knife more concealed, which comes in handy when you are using this knife as a tactical tool.

The pocket clip on this knife is designed only to attach tip-up, but it is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which helps to make this an ambidextrous knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife that employs Benchmade’s AXIS lock. Because this is a manual opening knife, you don’t have to worry about the strict laws that surround an automatic opening knife. It will also be easier to maintain, because there is no spring that can break down and ruin your ability to open the knife smoothly.

The AXIS is a patented Benchmade exclusive that has been turning heads and winning fans ever since its introduction. A 100 percent ambidextrous design, AXIS gets its function from a small, hardened steel bar that rides forward and back in a slot machined into both steel liners. The bar extends to both sides of the knife, spans the liners and is positioned over the rear of the blade. It engages a ramped tang portion of the knife blade when it is opened. Tow omega-style springs, one on each liner, give the locking bar its inertia to engage the knife tang. As a result, the tang is wedged solidly between a sizable stop pin and the AXIS bar itself.

Because of the AXIS mechanism and a reversible pocket clip, the Benchmade Fact proves to be a great option for left or right handed people alike.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.95 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.110 inches. The handle length on the Fact measures in at 4.77 inches long, with a handle thickness of 0.48 inches. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 8.72 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.24 ounces. And of course, like Benchmade knives are, this knife was made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

Benchmade says, “This minimalist masterpiece won’t get in your way, but will be there when you need it, and that’s a FACT.” The CPM S30V steel makes maintenance a breeze and also gives you an incredibly strong blade. The satin finish and the aluminum handle are what give this knife such a classic look. The spear point blade shape is extremely functional; whether you are using this knife for a tactical or an EDC. Pick up this brand new Benchmade knife today at BladeOps.

Benchmade 3150 Impel Auto Knife Review

Benchmade 3150 Impel Auto Knife
Benchmade 3150 Impel Auto Knife

 

Benchmade says, “Our knives are made of many things: steel, aluminum and titanium, to name a few. But perhaps the most important part of a Benchmade knife is expertise. We carefully measure every part at every step in the process. We use the best materials and equipment. We make world-class knives for world-class users.” So let’s take a look at their process to see just how they create such fantastic knives.

The very first step in this process is laser cutting. Each and every blade begins as a sheet of steel. A laser cutting technician programs the laser to cut the steel into blanks, giving the blade its basic profile. The blanks are hammered out of the sheet by hand, and for the first time, the steel begins to look like a knife. The blanks are measured to make sure they meet specifications. Measurements are taken every step of the manufacturing process to guarantee an impeccable knife and streamline production. If a part isn’t “up-to-spec”, it doesn’t become a Benchmade.

The second step is surface grinding. This is where the blank is ground to its precise width. A surface grind technician places each blank in its rack by hand (racks vary by the number of blanks they can hold at one time), and each side is ground to its specified thickness. After grinding, the technician checks the thickness of each set of blanks. Tolerances are within the width of a human hair. Benchmade says, “Our knives have no room for error, and neither does a blank’s thickness.”

The third step is milling. This is where blade holes, handles and grooves are cut on high-speed mills. For every job (or batch), the blade milling technician programs the mill and measures the blade or handle to make sure it meets our precise tolerances. Blades and handles differ from knife to knife, so the technician gathers a specific set of measuring tools for each job. One of the holes that is cut here is the blade pivot, which is crucial to the folding mechanism. The pivot tolerance is .0005 inches, because the slightest deviation there becomes exponential at the blade’s tip. Handles require the same precision in order to fit the liners and blades properly and ensure a smooth mechanism.

The fourth step is beveling. Up to this point, the two sides of the blade were essentially flat. This is the step where the blade really begins to take shape. A Blade Beveling Technician bevels the knife blank one side at a time, and one of the most critical tasks here is to make sure the sides match perfectly. Once again, the technician measures the blade to verify that it meets the specified tolerances. An imprecise bevel can hamper the blade’s balance, sharpness, strength and mechanism function.

The fifth step is back sanding, which is the first time that the back of the blade gets special attention. Up until this point, the back of the blade has been relatively untouched. This step is combined with the sixth step, which is finishing. Finishing gives the blade a more refined look. Once the blade is cleaned up, it is taken to laser marking to receive its one of a kind Benchmade mark.

Last is assembly and sharpening. Each and every Benchmade knife is assembled by hand. An assembly technician receives all of the components and carefully pieces them together. Sharpening takes longer to master than any of the other steps. Each blade is sharpened to a targeted 30-degree inclusive angle, 15 degrees on each side. Benchmade says, “The knife is sharp enough when it can cut through ultra-thin phonebook paper effortlessly without tearing. And only then is it truly a Benchmade.”

Today we will be discussing the Benchmade Impel.

 

The Designer:

The designer behind this knife is Matthew Lerch. He says, “Welcome to my web-site.  I specialize in interframe and integral folders with each knife being individually crafted using the highest quality materials available.” He also believes that artistic carving is a skill that he uses to add dimension. He says that for steels and engravings, he looks for the finest artist in each of the individual crafts. Because of the time and skill, he puts into each of his knives, he has been able to provide knife users with truly unique pieces.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V steel. This steel is made and designed by Crucible Steel Industries, which is a US based steel manufacturer. They designed this steel with high end pocket knives and high end kitchen cutlery in mind, which means that you are going to get one of the most quality knife steels around. When Crucible is discussing this steel, they say, “CPM S30V is a martensitic stainless steel designed to offer the best combination of toughness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Its chemistry has been specially balanced to promote the formation of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective than chromium carbides in providing wear resistance. CPM S30V offers substantial improvement in toughness over other high hardness steels such as 440C and D2, and its corrosion resistance is equal to or better than 440C in various environments.” The vanadium carbides are what introduces extreme hardness into the steel matrix, but it does not make the steel brittle either. They accomplished what they were going for, because this steel is known to have the perfect balance between hardness, toughness, and edge retention. One of the only drawbacks to this steel is that it does prove rather tricky to sharpen.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is the most common blade finish on the market. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive, which is normally sandpaper. As a key, the finer the abrasive and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish is going to look. Because this is a Benchmade knife, you can expect the satin finish to look extremely clean. The satin finish is used to showcase the bevels of the blade and show off the fine lines of the steel. The satin finish also cuts down slightly on glares, reflections, and even corrosion a little bit. The satin finish is a very traditional finish that will help give your knife a classic look.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape, which is one of the two most popular blade shapes that is used in the cutlery industry today. It is so popular because the drop point blade shape is both versatile and durable, which makes it a great option for a wide variety of styles of knives. This everyday carry knife with especially benefit from it. The blade shape is formed by having the spine of the blade run from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow, curving manner. This creates a lowered point, which gives the user more control over their cuts. This lowered tip will allow you to perform fine detail work with this knife. The tip on this knife is also broad, which is what gives this knife its strength that it is known for. This broad tip is what makes this knife so durable. Lastly, this blade shape has a large belly, which will make slicing an absolute breeze. The only drawback that this blade shape really has is that because the tip is more broad, you do lose out on your piercing and stabbing capabilities. For the Impel, this shouldn’t be too big of a drawback, because it is an everyday carry knife.

 

The Handle:

The handle has been made out of 6061-T6 aluminum. Aluminum is one of the more low-density metals that is used in knife handles. This means that it will give you the heft that makes you feel like you can take on anything, without actually weighing the knife down. This steel is known for being extremely corrosion resistant. The most common type of aluminum is 6061-T6, which means the type of aluminum is 6061 and it is T6 tempered. This aluminum alloy has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys. Aluminum alloy is cheaper to machine and produce than Titanium, and is lighter, weaker, and less resistant to wear. For the most part, Aluminum is an inferior metal to Titanium aside from its lightness. However, when producing complex knives that require a large amount of CNC machining, such as the case with automatic knives, aluminum is much cheaper to produce and the material costs less.

The handle on this knife is tapered, which means that it is much wider near the blade than at the butt of the handle. This will help you have a more secure grip on it. The spine curves from the blade to the butt, which will help the knife fit more easily in your palm. The Belly of the handle also curves from the blade to the butt, but it does have an elongated finger groove near the blade. The groove will give you a comfortable and safe grip on this knife. Near the handle hasn’t been textured a ton and is satin finished. Near the butt, the handle is black and heavily textured so that you can go about your daily chores without worrying about your knife slipping out of your hand. The handle has a very traditional look that pairs very well with the satin blade.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip that is on this knife is not a deep carry pocket clip, which can be a drawback. This pocket clip is also not reversible for left or right hand carry, which means that it is not going to be an ambidextrous knife. The pocket clip has been designed to attach to the handle as a tip down pocket clip only. One of the little perks of a standard pocket clip is that some people believe it helps them to withdraw the knife more quickly than if it were a deep carry pocket clip.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife. This mean that it is going to fall under some very strict laws in the United States. An automatic knife is not going to be legal in all states, cities, or areas of the United States. It is the users’ responsibility to know their local knife laws before purchasing. BladeOps is not responsible for consequences.

This is a type of knife with a folding blade contained in the handle. This type of knife is opened automatically by a spring when a button on the handle is activated. Automatic knives are more efficient to use because all you have to do is press a button and you have your blade to work with. This means that it is going to be easy to open, even with one hand. This is perfect in case you are working on a chore that requires both of your hands. However, automatic knives are a little trickier to maintain because the spring is such a vital component of the knife. If the spring isn’t well taken care of, it can easily break and ruin the mechanism.

 

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 1.98 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.100 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 3.06 inches long with a handle thickness of 0.35 inches. The overall length of this knife is smaller, measuring in at only 5.03 inches long. Because this is a smaller knife, the Impel only weighs in at 1.39 ounces. This knife was made in the United States of America, so you can feel proud to own and use it.

 

Conclusion:

When Benchmade is discussing this knife, they say, “At less than 2″ in blade length, this is our smallest automatic knife. Don’t be fooled though, this automatic gent knife is packed with premium features.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Benchmade Fixed Contego Knife Review

 

Benchmade Fixed Contego
Benchmade Fixed Contego

When Benchmade was founded, they were founded under the mindset to build world-class products for world-class customers. For over thirty years, Benchmade has been designing and manufacturing world-class products for world-class customers.  When Benchmade was founded, the mission was to create something better; something exceptional. Today, they continue to innovate with the goal of taking performance and reliability to the next level. To exceed what is expected. Benchmade says, “Whether you are using a Griptilian® for every day duties or taking the fight to the enemy with the Infidel®, our knives are built to perform. When you choose to purchase a Benchmade, you do so because you want the best. You demand it. And programs like our LifeSharp Lifetime Service and Warranty are the foundation of our commitment to excellence. We live it and breathe it, and we know what you mean when you say: It’s not a knife. It’s my Benchmade.”

So what is it that makes a Benchmade so fantastic? Well, it all starts with the materials. Benchmade builds knives for the most demanding customers, from special operations forces to elite backcountry hunters, and building for the best requires the best raw materials. They select premium blade steels and pair them with aerospace-grade handle materials to create premium-grade knives and tools that provide great value for their customers.

Next is the mechanism. Benchmade knows that the mechanics of opening and closing a knife are essential to its function. So they ask themselves a few questions to see if they have accomplished an excellent mechanism: Is it easy to actuate? Can it be opened with one hand? Is it ambidextrous? Will it absolutely not fail when you need it the most? These are critical considerations when it comes to the mechanism.

The next component of an incredible knife is the manufacturing. They say, “The Benchmade factory employs modern laser cutters and CNC machining centers that offer control and tolerances commonly found in the aerospace industry – often to tolerances half the width of a human hair. Our commitment to modern machining techniques and rigid quality control has allowed Benchmade to bridge the gap between custom and manufactured.”

The last thing that Benchmade has that makes excellent knives and an excellent company is their LifeSharp guarantee. Benchmade describes it by saying, “Benchmade knives are all supported through a team of skilled technicians. Their only function is to ensure your Benchmade is in optimal working condition for your entire life. This service is called LifeSharp®. A name that speaks for itself. When you send your knife to the Benchmade LifeSharp team, the knife is completely disassembled and all worn parts are tuned or replaced. The knife is then lubricated and reassembled, a sharpener applies a factory edge to the blade and the knife is shipped back to you. All at no cost to you.”

Today we will be discussing the Benchmade Fixed Contego knife.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Warren Osborne. Benchmade says, “Being raised in the farming and ranching industry taught Warren early on what great utility a quality knife can offer. How a knife feels in the hand over extended use, blade design/edge configurations, and the types of materials used are all mandatory considerations of an Osborne design.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V steel, which was designed by US based steel manufacturer Crucible Industries. They designed this steel especially for knives, and not only knives, but especially for high end knives and kitchen cutlery. This means that they thought about each characteristic that is important for a knife to have and found a way to make it happen. This steel is regarded as having the best balance between hardness, toughness, and edge retention. This is one of the harder balances to achieve because often times, the harder the steel gets, and the more brittle it gets as well. Crucible accomplished this by adding vanadium carbides to the steel, which helped to bring out the extreme hardness while not compromising its toughness. This steel is also going to be able to resist rust effortlessly. CPM S30V steel is one of the more corrosion resistant steels that you are going to find. One of the only drawbacks to this steel is that because of the high hardness, it does prove to be tricky to sharpen. This shouldn’t be too big of an issue as long as you aren’t a beginner sharpener. Crucible explains the CPM process by saying, “The CPM process produces very homogeneous, high quality steel characterized by superior dimensional stability, grindability, and toughness compared to steels produced by conventional processes.”

The blade has been finished with a black coating. The coating is beneficial to the blade because it works to prolong the life of the blade. This is accomplished because it creates a barrier between the environment and the steel. The coating increases wear resistance as well as corrosion resistance. This knife is a survival and tactical knife, so the fact that the coating also reduces glares and reflections is very important. The coating cuts down on maintenance. However, coatings can and will scratch off after heavy use or after long periods of use. At this point, the blade would have to be re-coated to provide you with the benefits.

The blade has been carved into a reverse tanto blade shape. The tanto blade shape is designed to do one thing and that one thing really well. The tanto is able to pierce through hard material with ease. This style of knife is similar to Japanese swords and was originally designed for armor piercing. In the 1980s, Cold Steel altered the shape slightly and popularized it. While most tanto blade shapes don’t have a belly, because this is a reverse tanto, you do have a slight belly. This means that you will be able to slice a little bit with this knife. However, you still get the incredibly strong tip with a reverse tanto. The tip of a tanto is thick because it does contain a lot of metal near the tip, so it is able to repeatedly pierce through things that would cause most other knives to break. While this blade shape is not going to serve all your needs, when you need to pierce through something, this knife has your back.

The blade is a combo edge, which means that the upper two thirds of the blade is a plain edge and the lower one third is a serrated edge. The idea behind a combo edge is that you get the best of both worlds because you can still get clean cuts and use the plain edge to slice through things or perform fine detail work. Then, you can use the serrated portion to saw through thicker materials or even inflict more damage on your enemy. The biggest complaint with this edge style is that each portion is too small to fully utilize. Because this is such a large knife, that shouldn’t be too big of an issue. You should be able to have the best of both worlds with this combination edge on the Fixed Contego.

            

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of G10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, except that it can be made and bought for almost a fraction of the cost. To create this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results from this process is tough, hard, lightweight, and still very strong. Out of all the fiberglass resin laminates, G-10 is considered to be the toughest.

It is easy to add texture to the handle, which gives the user a more comfortable and secure grip. Tactical and survival knives really benefit from having a G-10 handle because it is so durable, lightweight, and non-porous. Because it is so non-porous, the maintenance is significantly reduced because it is not going to absorb any of the fluids you happen to come in contact with. Overall, the benefits of a G10 handle is that it is tough, durable, and won’t weigh you down. The overall cons of the G10 handle is that it can be brittle and it does lack elegance in certain cases.

The handle has been intensely textured so that the user will have a secure grip in almost any environment. It is a black handle. The spine has a slight bulge which gives a comfortable grip. The belly of the handle has a large, deep, elongated finger groove. This will allow you to more easily grip the knife when you are using it while also keeping your fingers a little bit safer because it creates a finger guard. After that finger groove, there is a second, very shallow finger groove.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade, which means that there is no mechanism to break. There are a wide variety of benefits for a fixed blade, especially a tactical or survival knife like this one. The blade on a fixed knife can be longer and thicker because it does not have to fit inside of a handle. Because it is longer and thicker, the blade is less likely to break. The overall knife is less likely to break because there is no mechanism. When it comes to tactical knives, a fixed blade is more efficient. This is because all you have to do is pull it out of its sheath and it is ready to go. With a folding knife, you have to pull it out of your pocket, open it, and then you are ready to use it. When it comes to a survival knife, fixed blades are more beneficial because of all the other tasks it can complete. Survival knives are big enough and strong enough to use for cutting, digging, prying, preparing food, a hunting tool, a first aid tool, or even as a hammer if you use the butt of the knife. While fixed blades are not as discreet as a folding knife would be, for these purposes, the fixed blade is going to be more useful.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is MOLLE compatible and has been made out of Injection Molded Plastic. Plastic sheaths are some of the cheapest sheaths that you are going to find on the. You do get what you pay for, so while it will do its job, this sheath is not going to excel at its job. A plastic sheath is one of the worst places to home your blade for long periods of time. This is because they house water and humidity, which will eventually corrode your blade if it is in the sheath for long periods of time. Plus, they are not as durable as they could be. The plastic may end up dulling your blade as well. Because the Fixed Contego does come with a plastic sheath, I would recommend finding a different sheath as soon as you can if you want your knife to remain in good quality.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 4.97 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.164 inches. The handle on the Fixed Contego has a thickness of 0.62 inches. This is a beasty knife, with the overall length of it measuring in at 10.18 inches long. This is also a heavier knife, because of the overall size of it, weighing in at 7.14 ounces. The sheath that comes with this knife weighs in at 2.32 ounces. This knife was made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

When Benchmade is describing this knife, they say, “A tactical fixed blade from Warren Osborne. The fixed Contego has aggressive lines and a classic Osborne blade style that provide great tip strength and good all-around performance.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benchmade 916SBK Triage Blunt Tip Folder Knife Review

Benchmade was founded in 1987, when they set out to make the best knives in the world. And that’s exactly what they did. They’ve grown a lot since then, and while they have expanded to provide tools for elite tactical operates, first responders, and even collectors, their goal has remained the same: make the best knives in the world.

The Benchmade Knife Company is a knife manufacturer run by Roberta and Les de Asis in Oregon City, Oregon, United States. Its products are geared toward many niche markets, such as outdoor sporting cutlery, rescue, law-enforcement, martial-arts, and military. The company has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers since its inception.

Benchmade started in California in 1979 as Bali-Song, changing its name in 1988 to the Pacific Cutlery Corporation. In 1990 the company moved to Clackamas, Oregon. In 1996, the company moved to a 144,000 square foot facility in Oregon City, Oregon. Benchmade became known primarily as a manufacturer of butterfly, or balisong-style knives, which it continues to manufacture. These knives have been so identified with the company that Benchmade has registered Bali-Song as a trademark and logo. Benchmade’s original Bali-Song design by Jody Sampson was awarded Blade Magazine’s Knife of the Year Award in 1979.

Blade steels such as 154CM, D2, CPM S30V steel, CPMS90V, CPM20CV, N680 and M390 are used on many models. Benchmade is one of the few manufacturers to have offered high speed M2 and CPM M4 tool steels in a production knife.

Benchmade receives a significant amount of revenue from selling restricted-sales knives to the military and law enforcement. Benchmade produces a diverse selection of “auto”, or switchblade knives, along with a range of hunting, fishing, utility and miscellaneous knives, however balisong’s remain a core product.

Benchmade has three different classes when it comes to their knives. The first class is the Blue Class, also known as the Recreation class. This type of Benchmade knife is made for typical use by the everyday person. The next class is the Black Class, also known as the Professional class. This type of Benchmade knife is made for military, law enforcement, and public safety workers. They are knives made for more challenging work. The last class is the Gold class, also known as the Collector class. This class of Benchmade knife is made for collectors and are limited edition.

Benchmade has a patent on the locking mechanism used in most of the switchblades they produce. Benchmade additionally holds an exclusive license on use of the McHenry / Williams “AXIS Lock”, a strong, spring operated locking mechanism used in both automatic and manual action models.

Benchmade has a long tradition of incorporating knife design from noted custom cutlery makers into their production models. These include Jody Samson, Ernest Emerson, Allen Elishewitz, Mel Pardue, Bill McHenry, Mike Snody, Jason Williams, Warren Osborne, and Bob Lum. Several production Benchmade models based on the work of these designers have become influential within the industry.

Today we will be discussing the Benchmade Triage.

Benchmade 916SBK Triage Blunt Tip Folder Knife
Benchmade 916SBK Triage Blunt Tip Folder Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of N680 steel that has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC. This steel is a fairly cheap type of steel that has some really good qualities to it. This steel contains about 20% nitrogen, which means that it is going to be extremely corrosion resistant. However, because of that, it is not going to hold an edge as well as some of the other steels on the market. Because it is an inexpensive steel, it is going to keep the overall cost of the knife down without bringing the quality of the knife down. In comparison, it is only a little more expensive than 420 or 44 steel. This steel does outperform 420 steel and it does keep an edge better than 420 steel as well as being more corrosion resistant than 420 steel. This steel also won’t take a whole lot of work to sharpen the blade, which is always a benefit. This steel can be so extremely corrosion resistant because during smelting, N680 is infused with nitrogen. The nitrogen interacts with the chromium inside the steel to give the chromium a little more space. This allows the chromium to defend the iron from reacting with oxygen better, which is how to prevent rusting.

The blade on this knife has been coated black. Not only does the coating give this knife a very sleek look, it also works to prolong the life of the blade. This is because it creates a barrier between any of the environments and the steel. This means that the coating is going to increase the wear and corrosion resistance of the knife, which is great for all three purposes that this knife has been designed for. It also cuts down on glares and reflections, which is ideal for a tactical knife. One of the drawbacks to a coated blade is that overtime or with heavy use, the coating is going to scratch off. This means that you will lose out on all of the great benefits until it gets recoated.

The blade on this knife has been carved into what Benchmade calls an Opposing Bevel blade style, but is basically a sheepsfoot blade. A sheepsfoot blade has a straight cutting edge and an unsharpened spine that curves down to meet the straight edge and makes a false point. The primary purpose of a sheepsfoot is for cutting and slicing where a point is not wanted or needed. This is the perfect blade shape for a rescue knife, because you can get very close to the situation without worrying about stabbing anything on accident. Some of the overall advantages to this blade shape is that it is going to give you very clean cuts, it is very controllable and no point exists. However, the lack of point is also one of the disadvantages of a sheepsfoot blade, because it means that the blade is not as versatile as it could be.

The blade has been carved into a combination edge, which is where the upper half is a plain edge and the lower half is a serrated edge. The idea behind this blade style is that you can get the best of both worlds with each different edge style. In this knife, you can use the plain edge for clean cuts and the serrated portion to cut through thicker materials, such as a seatbelt. One of the complaints about a combo edge is that because each portion is smaller, you can’t actually utilize either. With this rescue and tactical knife, that shouldn’t be a problem, because each portion is going to come in handy in their own way pretty often.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of black G10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass.  It has very similar properties to carbon fiber yet can be had for almost a fraction of the cost.  The manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results it extremely tough, hard, very lightweight, and strong. Out of all the fiberglass resin laminates, G10 is consider to be the toughest. This material is also thought to be stronger than Micarta, although it is more brittle. Checkering can easily be added to this material, which gives the user a solid and comfortable grip. Tactical folders really benefit form the qualities of G10 because it is durable and lightweight, but also non-porous, which means it is not going to absorb any of the fluids or liquids you come in contact with. The overall benefits is that it is lightweight, durable, and strong. The overall disadvantage is that it doesn’t look great and it can be brittle.

This knife has intense checkering across the entire handle, which will give plenty of texture to use in a rescue situation or a tactile situation. The spine of the knife is straight. The belly of the knife has a large finger groove, but the rest is completely flat.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a deep carry clip, which is a major advantage. The knife has been designed as an everyday, rescue, and tactical knife, and the deep carry clip can benefit each of those styles of knives. If you are using this as an everyday carry knife, you can trust that it will be able to remain in your pocket while you go about your daily chores. If you are using this knife as a tactical knife, the deep carry clip is going to let this knife be more easily concealed in your pocket. If you are using this knife as a rescuer knife, the deep carry clip is going to keep it more secure in your pocket, you won’t have to worry about moving around a bunch, and it can be more easily concealed.

The pocket clip on this knife can only be attached for tip up carry, but it is a reversible clip for either left or right handed carry. The fact that it is reversible helps to make this knife fully ambidextrous.

The pocket clip, and all of the hardware, on this knife are black. This makes the 916SBK Triage an entirely black knife.


The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife that has been equipped with a thumb stud. In terms of legality, a manual opening knife is the way to go. It is not going to fall under the same strict laws that an automatic and even some spring-assisted knives are going to. If knives are legal in your area, it is almost positive that a manual opening knife is going to be legal. However, always know your local knife laws before buying or carrying one of BladeOps knives. BladeOps is not responsible for consequences. In terms of efficiency, the manual opening knife is not going to be as efficient as the semi-automatic or automatic options. Maintenance is going to be a little easier than with a spring assisted or automatic knife, because you don’t have to be as concerned about the insides. In the other two, you have to really take care of the spring, but there is not spring in a manual opening knife. The thumb stud allows you to easily open this knife with only one hand.

This knife has also been equipped with Benchmade’s AXIS lock. A patented Benchmade exclusive, AXIS® has been turning heads and winning fans ever since its introduction. A 100 percent ambidextrous design, AXIS® gets its function from a small, hardened steel bar that rides forward and back in a slot machined into both steel liners. The bar extends to both sides of the knife, spans the liners and is positioned over the rear of the blade. It engages a ramped tang portion of the knife blade when it is opened. Two omega-style springs, one on each liner, give the locking bar its inertia to engage the knife tang. As a result, the tang is wedged solidly between a sizable stop pin and the AXIS® bar itself.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.4 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.124 inches. The handle of this knife measures in at 4.85 inches long with a handle thickness of 0.45 inches. The overall length of this knife measures in at 8.25 inches long when the knife is opened. This knife weighs in at 5.24 ounces, which is on the heavier side, but not too heavy that people don’t want to have the knife with them at all times. This knife was designed and manufactured in the USA with Austrian Blade Steel.

 

Conclusion:

When Benchmade talks about this knife, they say, “This Triage® knife has all of the great features of the original Triage and the added safety-utility benefit of the opposing bevel blunt-tip blade.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

Benchmade 4300-1 Green/Black CLA Automatic Knife Review

In 1988, Benchmade set out to make the best knives in the world—and that’s exactly what they did. They’ve grown a lot since then, and while they have expanded to provide tools for elite tactical operators, first responders, and even collectors, their goal remains the same: make the best knives in the world.

Their knives are made of many things: steel, aluminum, and titanium, just to name a few. But the most important part of a Benchmade knife is expertise. They carefully measure every part at every step in the process. They use the best materials and equipment. They make world-class knives for world class users.

The first step in the process of is turning a sheet of steel into a blade. This begins by laser cutting. A laser cutting technician programs the laser to cut the steel into blanks, which gives the blade its basic profile. These blanks are then hammered out of the sheet and then measured. By taking measurements at every step of the manufacturing process, they guarantee an impeccable knife and streamline the production.

The second step in the process is surface grinding. This is the step where blanks are ground to the exact width. A surface grind technician places each blank in its rack by hand, and each side is ground to its specific thickness. After grinding, the blanks are measured again. The tolerances are within a width of a human hair, which is how Benchmade produces such quality knives each and every time.

The third step is milling, which is when blade holes, handles, and grooves are cut on high-speed mills. One of the holes that is cut during this process is the blade pivot, which is crucial to the folding mechanism. This pivot tolerance is .0005 inches, because even the slightest deviation there becomes exponential at the blade’s tip.

Next is beveling, which is where the blade really starts to take its shape. A Blade Beveling Technician bevels the knife blank one side at a time, making sure that the two sides match perfectly.

The next step is back-sanding, which is when the back of the blade gets special attention. Finishing is also completed at this point. Finishing gives the blade a more refined look because the finishing technician stone-washes the blades in a ceramic medium to remove any burrs and give the blades a clean, polished appearance.

The last two steps are assembly and sharpening. Each and every Benchmade knife is assembled by hand, so its no surprise that there are more hand operations performed at this point in a knife’s production than at any other stage in the process. Lastly, is sharpening. This takes longer to master blade sharpening than any other skill. A sharpening technician puts a razor edge on the knife using a standard belt sander, which takes crazy high concentration. The knife is sharp enough when it can cut through ultra-thin phonebook paper effortlessly without tearing. Then, it becomes a true Benchmade.

Today we will be discussing the Benchmade CLA automatic knife. This is a Black Class model which means that there is no room for error. Their Black Class knives are used by professional when quality tools can mean the difference between life and death. Form law enforcement and public safety to elite military troops, Benchmade feels that their obligation is still the same. They are designing the best equipment for the job.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 154CM stainless steel, which is a high end steel. This type of steel is relatively hard, and has been considered an upgraded version of 440C because of the addition of Molybdenum. It is the Molybdenum that helps the steel achieve superior edge holding, when compared to 440C, while also retaining its high levels of corrosion resistant. This steel has a decent toughness, which is good enough for the majority of uses. A bonus to this steel is that it holds an edge well and with the correct equipment, it isn’t hard to sharpen. This is an American made stainless steel with well-rounded characteristics including good edge retention, overall toughness, and corrosion resistance. This blade is a solid choice that helps make a solid knife.

The blade has been finished satin, which means that it was sanded in one direction with a fine sandpaper. This finish is created to show off the bevels of the blade while also showcasing the lines of the steel, and you can tell that Benchmade used a very fine sandpaper, because the lines of the knife are very smooth and clean. This is one of the more traditional knife finishes, because its luster falls in the middle of the spectrum. The satin finish is also the most popular blade finish that you are going to come across in today’s knife industry.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point style blade, which is the most popular blade style used on modern pocket knives. This blade shape allows your knife to be all-purpose, extremely versatile, while still being tough enough to take on the harder jobs. The blade shape is formed by having the unsharpened edge, or the spine, of the blade run straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. The lowered point provides a handful of characteristics that are some of the drop point blade style’s main advantage. For example, because the tip is lowered, you are going to be able to more successfully control your cuts and slices. And, the lowered point is broad, which means that it is stronger and less prone to breaking during use. This broad tip is also one of the drop point blade shapes drawbacks, because it doe limit your ability to pierce—especially when compared to the similar clip point style. But, because the tip is lowered and broad, the drop point blade shape is the prefect option for a tactical knife. This blade is going to hold up to heavy use easily. One of the other reasons that this is such an all-purpose knife is because it features one of the largest bellies out of all the knife blade shapes. It is the belly that is going to help you with slicing, which is the majority of tasks that you will be performing with this knife. Because of the phenomenal blade combination of metal and shape, this knife will prepare you for any challenge that you meet.

On the spine of the blade where the blade and handle meet each other, there is a short row of jimping that furthers the control you have over your cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this tactical knife is made out of green and black G-10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, except that it is slightly inferior and can be had for much less inexpensive. To form this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that you end up with is very tough, super hard, strong, and you get all of those characteristics in a lightweight package. In terms of toughness, G-10 is actually considered the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and even stronger than Micarta. Although, because it is stronger than Micarta, it is going to be more brittle.

Benchmade 4300-1 Green/Black CLA Automatic Knife
Benchmade 4300-1 Green/Black CLA Automatic Knife

One of the major benefits about G-10 with this specific knife is that the production process utilizes many layers, so you can use varying different colors to achieve a unique cosmetic look on the G-10 handle. On this handle, the manufacturer has used layers of green and black to look like camouflage.

 

 

Tactical knives especially benefit from the qualities of G-10 because it is lightweight and durable, also non-porous. This means that it is not going to absorb any gunk that you may encounter on the job or in the field and maintenance will be easy for you.

The ergonomics of this handle are designed for comfort and a secure grip. The bottom of the handle bulges out to fit inside of your palm well. There is also a finger guard that protects your fingers from getting sliced if you do slip while using this knife. This is an especially important benefit on a tactical knife because you are going to be using this knife in the heat of the moment and probably not slowly.

The butt of the handle does have a lanyard hole carved into it, which means that you can easily have this knife with you at all times without it getting in the way. Plus, if you wrap the lanyard around the face of the handle, it adds an extra element of grip and texture. This is a solid benefit if you will be in the field often or if you are working in wet or extreme environments.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The clip on this knife has been designed for tip up carry only, but it is reversible in terms of left or right handed carry. Because this clip is reversible, the CLA knife is almost fully ambidextrous. The clip is black, which matches all the hardware on this knife except for the push button.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife, which is often referred to as a switchblade. With this, you need to keep in mind that automatic knives have strict laws surrounding them. Purchasing, owning, and carrying an automatic knife is not legal in all states, cities, or areas. It is you, the user’s, responsibility to know your local knife laws.

An automatic knife, or a switchblade, is a type of knife with a folding or sliding blade contained in the handle which is opened automatically by a spring when a button on the handle is activated. Most switchblade designs incorporate a locking blade, in which the blade is locked against closure when the spring extends the blade to the fully opened position. The blade is unlocked by manually operating a mechanism that unlocks the blade and allows it to be folded and locked in the close position.

The deployment button on this knife is round, silver button near the top of the handle. Right underneath the button is a safety lock, which means that when it is activated, there is no way the button can deploy the blade. This means that you can safely have the knife in your pocket without worrying about accidental deployment and injury.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.4 inches with a handle that measures in at 4.45 inches long. When this Benchmade knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.85 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.5 ounces, which is the perfect weight for a tactical knife. It has enough heft behind it that you know you can always rely on it, but it is light enough that it won’t weigh you down when you are on the job or in the field. This knife was made in the United States of America, so you can feel proud to purchase, own, and carry the CLA automatic knife.

 

Conclusion:

The Benchmade 4300 CLA (Composite Lite Auto) side open automatic knife is Benchmade’s first Black Class auto to feature G-10 handle scales. This mid-sized knife features a slim profile design and contoured handle scales for quick and easy pocket deployment. Thanks to the recessed over-sized firing button and integrated slide safety, you can remain confident that this knife is just as safe as it is effective. This model, the 4300-1, features textured green and black handles and a drop point blade in a satin finish. The pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only but is eligible for a left or right hand carry option. Pick up this tactical knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

Benchmade Nestucca Cleaver Knife Review

Benchmade is known for creating knives, so how is it that they do it? Well, they started the company over thirty years ago with the mission to create something better; something exceptional. They knew that they were building world-class products for world-class customers, so even to this day, they continue to innovate with the goal of taking performance and reliability to the next level. They want to exceed what is expected.

They say, “Whether you are using a Griptilian® for every day duties or taking the fight to the enemy with the Infidel®, our knives are built to perform. When you choose to purchase a Benchmade, you do so because you want the best. You demand it. And programs like our LifeSharp Lifetime Service and Warranty are the foundation of our commitment to excellence. We live it and breathe it, and we know what you mean when you say: It’s not a knife. It’s my Benchmade.”

Not only do they work with their mission, but they also know how important the materials are. Benchmade builds knives for the most demanding customers, from special operations forces to elite backcountry hunters, and building for the best requires the best raw materials. They select premium blade steels and pair them with aerospace-grade handle materials to create premium-grade knives and tools that provide great value for their customers.

The next step to creating such fantastic knives are the mechanisms. The mechanics of opening and closing a knife are essential to its function. They ask themselves questions such as “Is it easy to actuate? Can it be opened with one hand? Is it ambidextrous? And will it absolutely not fail when you need it the most?” Benchmade understands that these are critical considerations when it comes to the mechanism of your knife.

Lastly, they know how important manufacturing really is t a knife. The Benchmade factory employs modern laser cutters and CNC machining centers that offer control and tolerances commonly found in the aerospace industry – often to tolerances half the width of a human hair. Their commitment to modern machining techniques and rigid quality control has allowed Benchmade to bridge the gap between custom and manufactured.

The last thing that really sets Benchmade apart is their LifeSharp guarantee. Benchmade explains it by saying, “Benchmade knives are all supported through a team of skilled technicians. Their only function is to ensure your Benchmade is in optimal working condition for your entire life. This service is called LifeSharp®. A name that speaks for itself. When you send your knife to the Benchmade LifeSharp team, the knife is completely disassembled and all worn parts are tuned or replaced. The knife is then lubricated and reassembled, a sharpener applies a factory edge to the blade and the knife is shipped back to you. All at no cost to you.”

Today we will be talking about the Benchmade Nestucca Cleaver.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V steel that has been hardened to a 58-60 HRC. This steel was made and designed by Crucible Industries, specifically for high end pocket knives and kitchen cutlery. This means that you are going to be getting the absolute best qualities out of this steel, qualities that are exactly what you want from a knife. Crucible says, “CPM S30V is a martensitic stainless steel designed to offer the best combination of toughness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Its chemistry has been specially balanced to promote the formation of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective than chromium carbides in providing wear resistance. CPM S30V offers substantial improvement in toughness over other high hardness steels such as 440C and D2, and its corrosion resistance is equal to or better than 440C in various environments.” This steel can resist corrosion effortlessly, which significantly cuts down on blade maintenance. This is an ideal characteristic for your hunting knife, because you are going to be using it in the field often where you cannot take perfect care of it. Plus, hunting knives are going to come in contact with some serious fluids, so having a blade that can resist corrosion so well is crucial. This steel maintains its edge well and is known for having the perfect balance between hardness, toughness, and edge retention. This is a hard balance to achieve because usually the harder the steel gets, the less tough it is. One of the drawbacks to this steel is that because of the high hardness, it does tend to be a little complicated when it comes to sharpening. This should not deter you from getting the knife, but beginner sharpeners should be aware of this. Crucible goes on to explain the CPM process, “The CPM process produces very homogeneous, high quality steel characterized by superior dimensional stability, grindability, and toughness compared to steels produced by conventional processes.”

The blade has been finished satin, which is a very traditional blade finish. The finish is used to show off the bevels of the blade as well as showcasing the fine liens of the steel. This finish also helps to cut down on glares, reflections, and even improves the corrosion resistance levels of the knife.

There is a large finger hole in the middle of the blade, which allows for multiple hand positions. There is also a row of thick jimping on the spine of the blade, which helps adds control when needed the most.

The blade shape of this cleaver is extremely unique. Its biggest characteristic is the huge radius of the belly of the blade. This ginormous belly allows you to field dress even the largest of animals with ease. It makes quick work of your task while still allowing you to really have control over your cuts. If you are going to be doing a lot of field dressing, this is the ideal knife for you—especially if you are working with larger game.

 

The Handle:

This is a full tang knife, so instead of a handle, it rocks handle scales. The handle scales are made out of G10 and are designed to look like wood handles, more like a traditional hunting knife. G10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made out of fiberglass. This material is similar in properties to carbon fiber, along with the other fiberglass resin laminates, but is inferior and can be made for a much more inexpensive cost. Although this material is cheaper to make than carbon fiber is, it does have to be cut and machined into shape, which is nowhere near as cheap as making FRN.

G10 is an ideal material for a hunting knife because it is tough, hard, strong, but still lightweight, so it is not going to weigh you down when every ounce counts. Plus, this material is non-porous, which means it is not going to absorb any of the gunk that it happens to come in contact with. This cuts down on maintenance, which is a necessity when you are a long hunting trip.

Although it is one of the toughest fiberglass resin laminates, it does suffer from begin brittle. This is because the fiberglass fibers have been arranged in a single direction. When the handle is stressed in that specific direction, it remains incredibly strong, but when it gets stressed in other directions it begins to break apart. The handle is very simple, straight on the spine and the belly, although still comfortable to use for long periods of time. There is a giant finger groove and in turn, finger guard, so that you don’t have to worry about your fingers getting sliced if the handle gets slippery throughout the task.

One of the other benefits of this handle is that there is a lanyard hole, so you can keep the knife close by without it being in the way. The lanyard will also let you attach this knife to anything you want to, such as your backpack. Lastly, if you feel like you need a little extra grip, you can wrap your lanyard around the handle to add texture.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade, full tang knife. A full tang knife is where the metal from the blade actually extends down into the handle. This creates a much stronger knife, because you do not have any weaker spots where the handle and the blade have been welded together. This is also a major advantage when you are going to be using this knife in the field, because if the handle scales happen to break, you still have your entire knife shape to use. It will just be a little more uncomfortable.

A fixed blade knife is a knife that does not have a mechanism. Because the blade does not have to fit inside of the handle, the blade on a fixed blade knife can be longer and thicker. These characteristics mean that a blade on a fixed blade knife is going to be tougher and more durable, as well as being capable of taking on harder tasks.

Fixed blades are also more capable of taking on a wider variety of tasks. They can be used for cooking, first aid, hunting, and even digger or prying if needed. If you are in the field and need a knife, this is the knife you are going to want to rely on. The last major benefit to having a fixed blade knife for your hunting knife is how easy it is to take care of and clean it. All you really have to do is wipe down the blade and handle, and make sure that the blade is dry when you put it in its sheath. You are going to want to oil your blade occasionally, although when you are on a long hunting trip, this shouldn’t be too big of an issue or concern.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is made out of leather. Leather is one of the most traditional materials that is used to make a knife sheath. This material of sheaths has been around since knife sheaths have. Leather is known to be rugged, tough, and strong. People like this material because it won’t break like plastic does, and if the stitches happen to come undone, it is an easy repair. Plus, this is one of the materials that is going to get better as it ages. The biggest benefit to a leather sheath is that once it has been broken it, it is going to provide this knife with a custom fitting sheath. One of the other major benefits is that a leather sheath is completely silent. You can easily pull your knife out of the sheath or put it back in without it making a sound. This benefit is especially important when it comes to a hunting knife such as this one.

Of course, every sheath material also comes with its disadvantages. One of the biggest of a leather sheath is that it is not waterproof, so if it is exposed to water often or even extreme heat, the leather may begin to crack. To avoid this, you should oil this sheath occasionally to keep the oils in the leather.

 

The Benchmade Nestucca Cleaver
The Benchmade Nestucca Cleaver

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 4.41 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.140 inches. The handle on the Nestucca has a thickness of 0.57 inches. The overall length of this knife measures in at 6.58 inches long and weighs in at 4.95 ounces. This hunting knife was made in the United States of America, so you can feel proud to own, carry, and use it.

 

Conclusion:

             Benchmade explains this knife by saying, “Based on the traditional Alaskan ulu, the “cleaver” makes short work of big game with long cuts. The huge radius of the blade spreads cuts across a long CPM-S30V surface, affording incredible edge retention and the handle and finger hole allow for multiple hand positions.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps and have your new best field dressing knife.

 

 

 

 

 

Benchmade Emissary 3.5 Knife Review      

Benchmade has a history that dates back over three decades. They believe that they are the product of many dedicated employees, a never quite demand for excellence and the de Asis family’s vision and total commitment to culture, service, and innovation. This is the story of Benchmade.

In 1979, the Benchmade adventure really began. Using his high-school shop skills, he blueprinted his dream knife before eventually meeting Victor Anselmo, who helped to grind the first ever pre-Benchmade Bali-Song® prototype. Paired with handles that Les sourced from a small machine shop in California, he assembled and finished his first Bali-Song® in his own garage. Proud of his creation, he took this first Bali-Song® into a local gun store and the owner asked, “Could you build 100 more?”

In 1980, Les incorporated as Bali-Song, Inc. and rented a small shop in a second story building in California. The original equipment that Benchmade owned was purchased from the owner of a manufacturing operation who was looking to retire. Les utilized the rudimentary technology that was available to him at the time and began to build handmade custom Bali-Songs. He couldn’t have done it without the help of Jody Sampson, who ground each of the blades. The success of these custom Bali’s spurred the creation of the first production Bali-Song®: The model 68. Over the next seven years, the company expanded its product offerings into fixed blades and conventional folding knives, and evolving its name from Bali-song®, Inc. to Pacific Cutlery Corp.

Due to its inability to control quality, price, and delivery, Pacific Cutlery Corp. filed for bankruptcy and was dissolved in 1987. In 1988, Les reintroduced a new company and new version of the Model 68; This time with a drive to produce product in the US and an even stronger commitment to product availability, quality and customer relationships. The company now needed a new name.

While there was “handmade” and “factory-made,” it was “Benchmade” that described the quality of Les’ product. He was building an operation that made precision parts, but with hand assembly on the finished products. This was a “bench” operation and Les wanted the name to reflect the marriage of manufactured and custom. In short, it describes Benchmade’s position in the market- even to this day.

To this day Benchmade continues to focus on innovation, customer needs, responsible business ethics and operations to bring the highest quality products to the world’s elite.

Today we will be discussing the Benchmade Emissary 3.5.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Warren Osborne. He was raised in the farming and ranching industry, so early on he recognized the importance of a quality utility knife. He recognizes everything from how a knife feels in the hand over extended us, the blade design and edge configurations, and the types of materials used. He looks at each of these characteristics as mandatory considerations when it comes to an Osborne design.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Emissary 3.5 is made out of CPM S30V steel, which is a premium blade steel made by Crucible Industries. Crucible is a US based company, if that is important to you. They designed this blade steel specifically with high end kitchen cutlery and premium pocket knives in mind, so you know that you are getting the best qualities for this everyday carry and outdoors knife. Crucible sets this steel apart by adding in Vanadium Carbides, which work to bring out extreme hardness in the steel matrix. These carbides make the steel extremely hard, which means that the blade is going to retain its edge for long periods of time. However, normally when a steel gets that hard, it becomes brittle. Because of how the Carbides work, the steel retains its durable structure. This steel is known for having the best balance between hardness, toughness, and edge retention. CPM S30V steel is also able to resist rust effortlessly, which means you can take it with you into the great outdoors and not have to worry about it rusting or corroding. Because of its ability to resist rust, the maintenance time is reduced. Of course, this steel does have a drawback to it. It is an extremely hard steel, so it will be a little bit trickier to sharpen. This shouldn’t deter you, but if you are a beginner sharpener, you’ve been warned.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with a fine sandpaper. This finish is very classic. The finish is used to slightly reduce glares, reflections, and even improve its corrosion resistance levels. The finish is designed to showcase the bevels of the blade as well as showing off the fine lines of the steel.

The blade has been carved into a drop point style blade. The drop point blade style is one of the most popular blade shapes to date. This is because it is both tough and versatile, which means you can use it for truly almost anything. The blade shape is designed by having the spine of the knife run from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow, curving manner. This creates a dropped point, which is where the blade shape got its name from. The lowered point also helps to give the user more control over their cuts while using this knife. The lowered point is also broad, which is where the drop point blade style gets its known strength from. Because the tip is thicker, it is able to withstand tasks that many other blade styles would not be able to withstand, especially when being compared to the similar clip point style. The toughness of the tip is going to most benefit you when you are using the Emissary 3.5 as an everyday knife. Lastly, the belly on this knife is large, which makes slicing a breeze. This aspect of the knife is going to most benefit you when you are using the knife as an everyday carry knife.  The drop point blade does have one major disadvantage. Because the tip is so broad, you do lose out on stabbing or piercing capabilities.

 

Benchmade Emissary 3.5
Benchmade Emissary 3.5

The Handle:

The handle on this knife has been made out of anodized aluminum. Aluminum is a very durable material, especially when used for knife handles. This is a low-density metal, so it is going to give you the heft to back you up, but none of the weight that gets annoying. When an aluminum handle is properly texturized, it will give you a secure grip that is also going to be comfortable for long periods of time, just like Osborne is worried about. That being said, aluminum has high conductive properties, so if you use this during the winter, it is going to feel pretty cold. The overall benefits of having an aluminum handle is that it is going to be strong, light, durable, and very resistant to corrosion. The overall drawbacks of having an aluminum handle is that it is going to be cold to hold, it can be slippery, and it is susceptible to scratches and dings.

Anodizing aluminum helps to add hardness and protection to the handles. The anodization also helps cut down on the scratches that it will accumulate over time, as well as increasing the handles corrosion resistance. Lastly, the anodization adds an even, sleek, black look to the handles.

The handle has a spine that curves towards the butt slowly. There is a unique finger groove as well as a finger indent above the groove to give you maximum comfort. After the first finger groove, there is a larger groove that lets you have a secure grip on this knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a deep carry pocket clip, which is almost always an advantage. The deep carry clip will allow you to store the knife deeper in your pocket so you don’t have to worry about it slipping out of your pocket while you go about your daily chores. This also assists you when you are using this knife as an outdoors knife, because you want to be able to focus on your adventure, instead of keeping your knife in your pocket. The deep carry clip also helps to better conceal the knife inside your pocket, which is an advantage if you feel uncomfortable with other people knowing you are always carrying a knife.

The pocket clip is a reversible clip, which helps to make this a more ambidextrous knife. This allows you to carry the knife as comfortably as you can. However, the pocket clip is only designed for tip-up carry.

The hardware is silver.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife, which is a style of pocket knife that does have an internal mechanism such as an automatic knife, but the user has to partially open the blade before the internal mechanism will kick in. This means that the laws are not going to be as strict, because it is not fully automatic, which is one of its biggest advantages. Assisted opening knives are also going to be nearly as efficient as an automatic knife.

To assist you in opening this knife, the knife has been equipped with a thumb stud. The thumb stud is a small barrel in the same spot that a nail nick would be on a more traditional knife. This opening mechanism allows you to open the knife comfortably with only one hand. The thumb stud is also very easy to get the hang of when you first begin to use it. However, some people don’t like how the stud will always extend off the blade and feel as if it gets in the way.

The Emissary 3.5 has been equipped with the AXIS-Assist opening mechanism. A patented Benchmade exclusive, AXIS® has been turning heads and winning fans ever since its introduction. A 100 percent ambidextrous design, AXIS® gets its function from a small, hardened steel bar that rides forward and back in a slot machined into both steel liners. The bar extends to both sides of the knife, spans the liners and is positioned over the rear of the blade. It engages a ramped tang portion of the knife blade when it is opened. Two omega-style springs, one on each liner, give the locking bar its inertia to engage the knife tang. As a result, the tang is wedged solidly between a sizable stop pin and the AXIS® bar itself. When Benchmade is describing the AXIS-Assist, they say, “Easily opened, quickly and with one hand; this evolution of the AXIS® includes a spring that helps to fire the blade into the open position once the user pushes it beyond a certain point manually. The AXIS® lock also has the added benefit of “suck-back,” which encourages the blade to stay in the closed position. AXIS® Assist knives also feature integrated safety lock systems.”

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.45 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.100 inches. The handle measures in at 4.55 inches long with a handle thickness of 0.52 inches. When this knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 8.00 inches even. This knife weighs in at 3.95 ounces, which is lightweight for how large the knife is, as well as being a great weight for an everyday carry knife. This knife was made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

When Benchmade is describing this knife, they say, “Anodized machined aluminum handles and the patented AXIS® assist mechanism make this Warren Osborne knife a fantastic choice of every day carry or as a trail companion.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps and see for yourself just how fantastic it really is.

 

 

Benchmade 2017 SHOT Show Blue Sequel Folder Knife Review

Benchmade 2017 SHOT Show Blue Sequel Folder Knife
Benchmade 2017 SHOT Show Blue Sequel Folder Knife

TThe Benchmade Knife Company is a knife manufacturer run by Roberta and Les de Asis in Oregon City, Oregon. Its products are geared toward many niche markets, such as outdoor sporting, cutlery, rescue, law-enforcement, martial-arts, and the military. The company has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers since its birth.

Benchmade started in California in 1979 as Bali-Song, changing its name in 1988 to the Pacific Cutlery Corporation. In 1990 the company moved to Oregon. IN 1996, the company moved to a 144,000 square foot facility in Oregon City.

Benchmade became known primarily as a manufacturer of butterfly, or balisong style knives, which it does still continue to manufacture. These knives have been so identified with the company that Benchmade has registered “Bali-Song” as a trademark and logo. Benchmade’s original Bali-Song design by Jody Samson was awarded Blade Magazine’s Knife of the Year Award in 1979.

For over thirty years, Benchmade has been designing and manufacturing world-class products for world-class customers. When Benchmade was founded, the mission was to create something better; something exceptional. Today, they continue to innovate with the goal of taking performance and reliability to the next level. To exceed what is expected.

Whether you are using their Griptilian for every day duties or taking the fight to the enemy with the Infidel, their knives are built to perform. When you choose to purchase a Benchmade, you do so because you want the bet. You demand it. They say, “We live it and breathe it, and we know what you mean when you say: It’s not a knife. It’s my Benchmade.”

Today we will be going over the Benchmade 2017 SHOT Show Blue Sequel Folder Knife.

 

The Class:

This knife falls under the Benchmade Blue Class line. When Benchmade is talking about their blue class line, they say, “Day after day. A Blue Class knife is like your best friend. It’s always with you. In fact, it’s better, because your other friends aren’t made of steel.” You know that you can rely on your blue class knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V steel, which is a Premium steel designed and made by Crucible. This US based company made this steel with knives in mind, which means that you are going to get all of the qualities that you want in a blade out of this steel. This steel was actually specifically designed for the high-end premium pocket knives and expensive kitchen cutlery. They decide to add vanadium carbides to bring out the extreme hardness in the steel alloy matrix. Dollar for dollar, this is generally regarded as one of the finest knife blade steels with the optimal balance of edge retention, hardness, and toughness. Really the only drawback to this steel is that it does prove hard to work with. This characteristic will increase the cost of the blade slightly while also proving to be tricky to sharpen. Usually this single attribute is not enough to veer people away from such a phenomenal steel.

The blade has been finished with a satin look, which is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of an abrasive. The abrasive that is used is most commonly a sandpaper. As a general rule, the finer the sandpaper and the more even the lines, the cleaner the satin finish looks. Benchmade is one of the best when it come sot their satin finish, so you can expect a very clean look form this SHOT Show knife. The satin finish lies right in the middle of the spectrum in terms of luster. And although this is not a huge advantage of the finish, it does cut down slightly on corrosion. The satin finish is the most popular blade finish on the market today and is also one of the most traditional; with this blade finish, you know that your knife will always be in style.

The blade on this Benchmade knife has been carved into a drop point style blade, which is the most common blade shape on the market. This blade shape is tough, versatile, and the perfect shape if you want to be able to accomplish a lot with it. The spine of the blade runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife, which creates a lowered point. It is because of this lowered point that you have so much control over your blade and you can easily perform fine tip work with this knife. The lowered tip is also a broad tip, which means that it will not be prone to breaking and you will be able to take on even the toughest of tasks. One of the reasons that this is such a popular knife is because of the tip strength—you really never have to worry about what this knife can and cannot handle, because it can mostly handle anything. This blade also features a very large belly, which will make slicing a breeze for you. The only drawback to a drop point style blade is that because the tip is broad, you do lose out on your ability to pierce. However, you need to keep in mind that it is the broad tip that allows you to have the signature strength. By choosing this Benchmade knife, you will be prepared for anything that life chooses to throw at you, form the day to day tasks, to the completely unexpected. Get ready to take on life with this spectacular knife.

This satin blade does sport a plain edge, which equips you to take on a wider variety of tasks. This edge style will also give you cleaner cuts and be easier to sharpen.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 Aluminum. Aluminum is considered to be a low-density metal that is often used in knife making. This metal is also one of the most corrosion resistant metals that you will find in knife making. The most common alloy used is the 6061-T6 alloy, which is what this knife handle has been made out of. All that means is that the type of aluminum is 6061 and it has been T6 tempered. 6061-T6 aluminum also has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys.

Some of the drawbacks to having an aluminum handle is that they can be cold to hold because of their conductive properties. This means that if you are planning to use this knife mostly in the winter, you need to be prepared to have gloves—it can feel like it is biting into your hands. Another drawback is that aluminum is susceptible to scratches and dings. Lastly, aluminum handles can be pretty slippery. To give you the best possible grip on this knife, Benchmade has added a diagonally textured pattern across the face of the two handle scales.

The ergonomics of this handle are very comfortable. The spine has a slight inward curve to perfectly fit in your palm. And the bottom of the handle has a shallow and elongated finger groove that gives you a comfortable grip no matter how long you are using this knife for. There is a slight finger guard to help protect your fingers when you are cutting with the is knife.

This handle has been anodized bright blue. But not only does the anodization process yield a great color, it adds durability, corrosion resistance properties, and makes this handle less prone to scratches. Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. The process is called anodizing because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife has been designed for tip up carry, but is reversible in terms of whether you carry it on the left or right hand side. This is also a deep carry pocket clip, which means that this knife will be more secure in your pocket throughout the day, no matter how much you move around. Plus, because it is a deep carry clip, you can more easily conceal this knife deep within your pocket. The clip is black, which contrasts nicely with the blue handle and matches the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that uses a dual thumb stud to assist you in opening the knife. This knife also sports Benchmade’s AXIS lock mechanism which is a fully ambidextrous operating system.

The thumb stud is arguably the most common one-hand opening feature. It essentially replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives and is simple to use. You hold the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully opened. And because this knife features a dual thumb stud, which means that there is a thumb stud on either side of the handle, this knife is completely ambidextrous to open. There are two drawbacks to having a thumb stud as your opening mechanism: first, it does put your hand in the way of the blade when you open it. There have been plenty of cases where someone was trying to open their knife with a thumb stud and sliced their fingers. This shouldn’t happen to you if you are being careful and paying attention while you do open this Benchmade knife.

A patented Benchmade exclusive, AXIS has been turning heads and winning fans ever since its introduction. A 100 percent ambidextrous design, AXIS gets its function form a small, hardened steel bar that rides forward and back in a slot machined into both steel liners. The bar extends to both sides of the knife, spans the liners and is positioned over the rear of the blade. IT engages a ramped tang portion of the knife blade when it is opened. Two omega style springs, one on each liner, give the locking bar its inertia to engage the knife tang. As a result, the tang is wedged solidly between a sizable stop pin and the AXIS bar itself.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.95 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 3.8 inches long. When this special edition knife is opened, it measures in at 6.75 inches long. The Blue Sequel weighs in at 2.7 ounces. This knife was made in the United States of America, so you can be proud every time you use this Benchmade knife.

 

Conclusion:

The 2017 SHOT Show Edition Sequel folder knife is one of many new knives released by Benchmade this year. The Benchmade 707 Sequel family is another McHenry & Williams designed knife and was a follow-up to the original and smaller 705 McHenry & Williams folder knife as well as the full-size 710 model. Each Sequel folder knife utilizes Benchmade’s AXIS® lock mechanism which is a fully ambidextrous operating system utilizing a dual thumb stud design and the redesigned handle boasts a diagonally textured pattern as well as an integrated spine safety. This limited Blue Class model, the 707-1701, features a blue anodized aircraft aluminum handle featuring a 3-D machined sunburst pattern, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the deep carry pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only but is eligible for a left or right hand carry option. The S30V steel is the perfect balance between all of the characteristics that you want in a knife: edge retention, hardness, and toughness. Plus, with the satin finish, you can be sure that this knife will never go out of style. The satin finish goes perfectly with the anodized blue aluminum handles. And the aluminum handles are tough, durable, and extremely corrosion resistant, meaning maintenance will be a breeze. Pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

Benchmade 3350BK Mini Infidel OTF Knife Review

Benchmade knives are made of many things: steel, aluminum, and titanium, to name a few. But perhaps the most important part of a Benchmade knife is expertise. They carefully measure every part at every step in the process. They sue the best materials and equipment. They make world-class knives for world class users.

All of their blades begin as a sheet of steel. A laser cutting technicians programs the laser to cut the steel into blanks, giving the blade its basic profile. The blanks are hammered out of the sheet by hand, and for the first time, the steel begins to look like a knife. The blanks are measured to make sure they meet specifications. Measurements are taken every step of the manufacturing process to guarantee an impeccable knife and streamline production. If a part isn’t “up-to-spec”, it doesn’t become a Benchmade. The next step in the process is surface grinding. This is the step where the blank is ground to its precise width. A surface grind technician places each blank in its rack by hand and each side is ground to its specified thickness. After grinding, the technician checks the thickness of each set of blanks. Tolerances are within the width of a human hair. They knives have no room for error, and neither does a blank’s thickness. The third step in the process is milling. Blade holes, handles, and grooves are cut on high speed mills. One of the holes that is cut here is the blade pivot, which is crucial to he folding mechanism. The pivot tolerance is .0005 inches, because the slightest deviation there becomes exponential at the blade’s tip. The fourth step is beveling. Now the blade really starts to take shape. Up to this point, the two sides of the blade are essentially flat. A Blade Beveling Technician bevels the knife blank one side at a time, and one of the most critical tasks here is to make sure the sides match perfectly. An imprecise bevel can hamper the blade’s balance, sharpness, strength, and mechanism function. Some of the last steps are back sanding and finishing. Back sanding is where the back of the blade gets special attention. The finishing is when the blade gets a more refined look. The finishing technician stone-washes the blades in a ceramic medium to remove any burrs and give the blades a clean, polished appearance. The very last step in the Benchmade process is assembly and sharpening. Every Benchmade knife is assembled by hand, which helps to set them apart. Each blade is sharpened to a targeted 30-degree inclusive angle, 15 degrees on each side. The knife is only sharp enough when it can cut through ultra-thin phonebook paper effortlessly without tearing. At that point, and only at that part, is it truly a Benchmade.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of D2 tool steel. This is a high end steel that is often referred to as “semi-stainless” as it falls just short of the require amount of chromium to qualify as full stainless yet it still provides a good amount of resistance to corrosion. On the flip side, D2 steel is much harder than other steels in this category such as 154CM or ATS-34 and as a result holds its edge a litter better. That said, it’s not as tough as many other steels and exponentially tougher to sharpen. In fact, you are probably going to need to be a master-sharpener to get a find edge on D2. This steel has a high hardness and relatively high toughness to make it an excellent choice there and in cutlery.

The blade has been finished with a black coated finish. There are some big

Benchmade Mini Infidel
Benchmade Mini Infidel

benefits to having a coated finish such as it reduces the reflection and glare while reducing wear and corrosion. Also, coatings can prolong the life of a blade by preventing corrosion or rust. And while quality coatings do add cost to eh knife, they also provide more corrosion resistance, less reflection, and require less maintenance. Unfortunately, all coatings will be scratched off after continuous heavy use and the blade will have to be re-coated at that point. The coatings are also prone to chipping and scratching. And, sometimes the coating is painted unevenly, which does cut down on how quality the blade is.

The blade on this Mini Infidel is a dagger point style blade. The dagger style, also known as a needle point blade, is designed to have an excellent point. This is opposite of the sheepsfoot blade, which has no point. A dagger point blade is a double edged blade whose primary purpose is piercing and stabbing. It is composed of 2 symmetrical sharpened blades that taper to a very thin sharp point, which pierces easily into soft targets. The two sharp edges reduce the profile of the knife and let it cut on both sides equally. This makes them a favorite blade design for self-defense in close combat situations. Dagger style blades are popular among military and police personnel because of their ability to be easily concealed and easily withdrawn. However, there are also a handful of disadvantages to the dagger blade design. Because of the geometry of the blade lacks a belly and contains quickly thickening edges, it is not good for slicing or slashing. Also, because the tip is very sharp and thin, it is weak and has a tendency to break when used on hard targets. If you are looking for a good balance between stabbing and cutting, a better choice is the clip point blade. However, if you’re looking for the perfect blade that is designed for piercing, the dagger point is exactly what you’re looking for.

The blade on this knife has a plain edge. In general, the plain edge is better than the serrated when the application involves push cuts. Also, the plain edge is superior when extreme control, accuracy, and clean cuts are necessary, regardless of whether or not the job is push cuts or slices. The plain edge will work better for applications like shaving, skinning an apple, skinning a deer. It is because all of these tasks involve either mostly push cuts, or the need for extreme control.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 Aluminum. Aluminum is a very low density metal that is used in knife making and it is extremely corrosion resistant. Since it is such a soft metal, it is primarily used in knife handles and sometimes hard anodized for aesthetics and wear resistance. And even though it is a soft and low density metal, it provides you with plenty of heft, without the weight of a stainless steel knife. This is a huge benefit because it has the heft to take on all of the tough tasks, without the weight to make it a hassle to carry with you at all times. Fun fact about aluminum: it is the most abundant metal in the earth’s crust. 60601-T6 aluminum means that the type of aluminum is 6061 and it is T6 tempered. This type of aluminum has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys. This alloy of aluminum is also used commonly in aircraft, which is why it got the nickname of being aircraft aluminum. This is a nonferrous metal and the most common finish for this steel is anodizing, which is an electrochemical process which adds color the aluminum. This is especially conducive to this coloring process. Depending on eh voltage used in the anodization process, colors can vary. If you have a high voltage, you will get a dark color. If you have a low voltage, you will get a lighter color. The handle on the Mini Infidel is black, so they used a high voltage to provide the color. When aluminum is properly texturized, it can provide a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use. On the flip side, if you are planning on using your knife quite a bit during colder winter months, you might find the handle to be extremely cold because of its conductive properties. Aluminum is generally considering inferior to its stronger brother Titanium, which is most often used on the higher end knives. One of the other drawbacks to an aluminum handle is that it is susceptible to scratches and dings.

To help with your grip, there is ribbing that goes down the center of the handle. The handle has curves to fit your palm perfectly. In the top center of the handle, there is a light gray lever to deploy the blade. This handle will be comfortable to use even after long periods of time.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The deep carry pocket clip is designed for tip down carry only. It is a dark gray pocket clip that has “Infidel” stamped across the center. Because it is a deep carry clip, it is going to fit comfortably in your pocket without you needing to worry about it jostling out when you go about your daily activates. Another one of the benefits of a deep carry clip is that it is easier to conceal if you are trying to keep your knife out of the public’s eye.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a double action out the front automatic knife. An out the front knife is a pocket knife that has a blade that deploys and closes through a hole in one end of the handle. This is different than the majority of folding knives that one out of the side of the handle. Out the front only refers to the basic portion of the knife’s mechanical operation where the blade slides parallel with the handle to deploy. Then, out the front knives can be divided into whether it is an automatic or manual knife. An automatic out the front knife blade travels within an internal track in the same manner as a manual slider or gravity knife. But the automatic main spring drive and button mechanism enclosed within requires a switchblade handle to be thicker or longer than a similar size gravity or sliding knife.

Then, in the division of automatic knives, it can be divided into whether it is double action or single action. This specific knife is a double action out the front knife. This means that the knives deploy and retract with a multifunction button and spring design, whereas single action knives deploy automatically but must be manually cocked or retracted to close.

And despite popular movie magic, double action out the front knives are actually not powerful enough to open when pressed against an opponent and then pushing the button. In all actuality, double action sliding automatics are only spring powered 10 to 12 millimeters and then afterwards, kinetic impetus slides the blade to full open.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.1 inches long, with a handle length of 4 inches long. The overall length of the blade is 7.1 inches long, with the knife weighing in at 3.4 ounces. This knife is made in the United States of America.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that is included with this knife is made out of nylon. Nylon is a material that is commonly used in knife sheaths. Just like a leather sheath, nylon is also tough and strong. However, nylon is resistant to rot and mildew. And, they are not as vulnerable to water as leather sheaths would be. Another great aspect is that nylon sheaths aren’t easily scuffed or torn.

 

Conclusion:

The Benchmade 3350BK Mini Infidel double action out the front automatic knife, designed by McHenry & Williams, is a favorite amongst law enforcement and military professionals around the globe and is praised for its rugged construction, solid durability and an “X” factor of pure awesomeness that one can only experience when owning one. The design of the black anodized 6061-T6 aircraft grade aluminum handle boasts a milled “step” design that transitions seamlessly into the design of the slide trigger. On the black dagger style blade, you will find a blood groove that runs the length of the blade on both sides that further enhances the already aggressive nature of this black class model. Furthermore, the enlarged slide trigger is housed on the broad side of the handle scale allowing for better accessibility, even while wearing gloves. This knife also comes with a MOLLE compatible nylon sheath and malice clip for multiple carry options. You can pick yours up here.