Boker Saga 4-Piece Kitchen Knife Set Review

Boker knives have been dated back as far as the 17th century, and it seems that Boker tools have always been successful, because they ranked among the leading products in Germany and neighboring countries a hundred years later. Boker started in Germany and then slowly moved outwards to the neighboring countries. It was in the early 1900’s that the US market became the main customer of Boker production with H. Boker & Co. in New York. While Boker had been producing scissors, razors, and pocket knives, it was the pocket knives that won out in the US market. In due course, the Solingen capacities were exhausted and the New Yorkers started their own pocket-knife product line, to which pliers were added later. Since then, there were two different lines of Boker knives on the US-market, with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers, one line Made in USA, the other Made in Solingen.

However, during WWII the contact to USA died. The Solingen factory was completely destroyed with no remaining machines, tools, catalogues or samples. The company also lost one of its most precious commodities: the tree-brand registration was seized according to US law. John Boker Jr. bought it in New York to save it for the further sale of American and German products. Soon aft her war new life began to wake in the destroyed factory. The former craftsmen came back and helped to reconstruct building and production and to regain the high standard of quality.

Restoring their business relationship to Solingen the American cousins placed first orders. Within a few years Boker New York as the principle customer again.

In the early 1960s, Boker USA was sold to the well-known scissors-manufacturer Wiss & Sons, who kept up the production of Boker knives to sell them with Solingen products. Boker scissors disappeared from the market, being a competitor to Wiss. In the early 1970s Wiss sold to the multinational Cooper Industries. For Boker, this change proved beneficial, generating a close business and personal relationship with Cooper, who restore the name of Boker to its former greatness. Today Boker offers the broadest range of sports and collector’s knives with an unmatched variety of blade and handle materials. In July 1986, Boker USA, Inc. was established in Denver, Colorado with Chuck Hoffman, one of the original team members, still in position as general manager with a young, flexible team.

Boker develops premium made knives, and today we will be focusing on the 4-piece kitchen knife set. This set comes with four different styles of knives: the carving/paring knife, the all-purpose/utility knife, the Santoku, and the Chef’s knife.

Boker Saga 4-Piece Kitchen Knife Set
Boker Saga 4-Piece Kitchen Knife Set

The Blades:

Each of the blade’s in this set of knives have some similarities. The first similarites that these knives sport is the blade material. They are all made out of 440C stainless steel. This is an upper mid-range steel that was once considered the high-end in US knife steels. 440C is a good all-around steel that has been overshadowed by many of the newer super-steels on the block, but that does not take away from the high qualities that it possesses. This is a stainless steel that is commonly used on many mass-manufactured pocket knives and represents a solid affordable all around choice. It is reasonably tough and wear resistant, but it really excels at satin resistance, which makes it the perfect option for a knife that you will be using in the kitchen. This steel does hold an edge better than its 400-series counterpart, but this is at the expense of some corrosion resistance. Blades made out of this steel can be sharpened relatively easy. And, out of the 400 level steels, it has the highest levels of carbon and chromium. This steel is usually heat treated to reach a hardness of 58-60 HRC.

These steels have also been finished with a stonewash finish. Personally, the stonewash finish is my favorite steel finish. It has a variety of benefits that make it a great option to use in the kitchen, while also providing you with an appealing, rugged look to the blade. With a stonewash finish, the steel is rolled with pebbles or another abrasive material. You can achieve a variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and the steel that is used. Once the steel has been tumbled around with the pebbles, it is removed and smoothed out. This creates a very rugged, textured look. Some of the benefits of this type of steel is that hides scratches a lot better than other finishes. This finish is one of the lowest maintenance finishes that you can get and the finish works to preserve the blades original look over time. This finish also provides a less reflective nature than a brushed or stain finished blade. Another very positive benefit of having a stonewash finish is that it works to hides the fingerprints very well, so you won’t need to polish this blade as often as blade’s with other finishes.

These blades are stellar for use in the kitchen because they are low maintenance, hide scratches well, and the steel is very stain resistant. These qualities will make your time in the kitchen much more relaxing and smooth, because all you have to worry about is how your food tastes, and not on upkeeping your knife.

 

The Handles:
Another thing that this set of knives have in common is their handles. All of the knives have handles made out of G-10. G-10 is how the knife community describes a glass-based epoxy resin laminate. In layman’s terms, it means that you take a glass-based cloth (usually a fiberglass) and soak it an epoxy resin. Then, using heat and pressure, the manufacturer compresses it into the shape that they desire. G-10 is a great handle material because of how strong it is. Fiberglass is already strong and durable, but weaving it makes it stronger. Then, that fabric is covered in an epoxy resin, which cures into a hard, plastic-like material. G-10 is also a very low maintenance material, which means that it is going to last for a long period of time. It won’t rust, it won’t become brittle, and it won’t soften over time. This material is light, easily workable, and does not expand or contract due to normal temperature and moisture exposure. It is extremely rugged, making it the ideal solution for your kitchen knife set.

 

The Carving/Paring Knife:

Paring knives are designed specifically for intricate tasks because they have a thin blade of 3 to 4 inches that tapers to a point. They can be sued for these more intricate tasks because the user has much more control over them than they would by using a larger knife. However, paring knives can be used for many of the basic utility tasks in the kitchen. These are ideal for cutting garlic and small berries, for peeling fruits and vegetables, and for slicing small food items. This knife is going to be ideal for trimming, slicing (especially the smaller fruits and vegetables, such as garlic and berries), food that needs intricate detail, and coring foods. This knife is not going to excel if you are using it for harder vegetables, because eth knife doesn’t carry enough weight behind it to actually slice the food without applying too much pressure.

The blade on the carving/paring knife in this set has a blade that measures in at 3.9 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 7.3 inches long. The blade has a thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle measures in at 3.4 inches long and this knife weighs in at 1.8 ounces.

 

The All-Purpose/Utility Knife:

The next knife in this set is the all-purpose/utility knife. This knife is sometimes known as a Sandwich Knife, because it is perfect for slicing sandwich meats. This knife is slightly smaller than the chef’s knife, ranging from 4 to 7 inches long, but it is just as versatile as a chef’s knife. It falls right in between the chef’s knife and the paring knife and really gives you the best of both worlds. It is large enough to use on most things that the chef’s knife can be used for such as apples and squashes. But, it is small enough to be used for garlic, small fruits and vegetables, and herbs. This utility knife does have a straight edge which means that you will be able to do more with it; however, you will have to sharpen it more often. This style of knife is really great for all the everyday kitchen tasks. This knife will not excel at larger or heavy duty tasks, or super small tasks, such as berries.

The blade on this knife measures in at 6 inches, with the handle measuring in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 10.5 inches long, with a blade thickens of 0.1 inches. This utility knife weighs in at 3.5 ounces.

 

The Santoku Knife:

Santoku knives are a Japanese-style that is becoming more popular in the United States. Santoku actually translates as “three uses” and refers to the three types of cuts this knife is made for: slicing, dicing, and mincing. This blade has a flat cutting edge and the handle is in line with the top edge of the blade. The end of the blade has a rounded curve. Because of the flat blade, the Santoku doesn’t rock on the cutting surface the way that the blade of a chef’s knife does, so it might take some practice to get used to the style. Most Santoku knives have a blade that is around 6 or 7 inches.

The blade on the Santoku knife that is included in this set is 6.3 inches long, with a blade thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle measures in at 5 inches long, so the overall length of the knife measures in at 11.3 inches long. This knife does weigh in at 6.6 ounces.

 

The Chef’s Knife:

The last knife that is included in this Boker set is the Chef’s knife. Every single kitchen should have a chef’s knife. These are some of the most versatile knives in the kitchen and can really stand up to most tasks. If you could only have one style of knife in your kitchen, I would recommend that you choose a high quality chef’s knife. The average size of this type of knife is between 8 to 10 inches long, which can seem long, but with the extra length comes extra efficiency and more versatility. A spine on the perfect chef’s knife should be thick because the thicker the spin, the more durable the blade is. Chef’s knives are ideal for slicing, dicing, chopping, mincing, and for being used on vegetables, fruits, meats, and fish. Chef’s knives should not be used for skinning large vegetables and butchering and carving meats.

This chef’s knife is on the smaller size, with the blade measuring in at 7.8 inches, the blade has a thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle measures in at 5 inches, making the overall length of the blade 12.8 incest long. This chef’s knife weighs in at 7.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Saga kitchen knife series is a premium German-made set designed by none other than Danish knife maker Jesper Voxnaes. Spearheaded by years and years of experience, Voxnaes set out to incorporate an advanced level of ergonomics that translated well with the high intensity culinary world. For starters, each knife was equipped with G-10 handles–ideal because this virtually indestructible composite is impervious to temperature, but more importantly, moisture. Furthermore, grip security is no issue thanks to the incorporation of flared handle bellies and pommels on the larger models. Each model features black G-10 handles which possess Voxnaes’s signature hollow rivets, stonewash finished blades which assist in hiding wear marks and the black display block allows for the magnetic attachment of each one of the knives. With the four knives that Boker has chosen to include, you will be equipped to take on any cutlery challenge.

 

Boker Magnum Leader Knife Review

A fun fact about Boker is that this knife company as one of the first companies to offer ceramic knives as a featured product line. The history of Boker is that it traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. And a huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently, Boker tools were very successful, because the company claims that it was procuring 200 sabres a week by 1839 for the use in various wars. By the time the 1860s rolled around the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North American and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. In fact, Boker USA was even allowed to take the tree-brand with him across the river without troubles or payments. Since then, not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory as destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and the 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker and Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boke reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boke USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA has four brands that it produces knives from. There is the Boker Premium Collection, the Boker traditional line, the Boker Plus line that focuses on Innovation, and Magnum by Boker, which is designed for price and performance. The Boker Leader, the knife that we are focusing on today, stems from the Magnum brand. When talking about Magnum by Boker, Boker says, “The attractive brand form Boker with a great price-performance ration. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction, and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives form all categories, from traditional pocket knives to hunting knives and modern knives. Latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.

The knife that we are talking about today is the Boker Magnum 01MB702 OD Green/Tan Leader Flipper Knife, with a dark grey blade.

Boker Magnum Leader
Boker Magnum Leader

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440B stainless steel. This steel comes from the 440 series of steel. There are three different types of 440 steel: 440A, 440B, and 440C. 440B steel is a low cost stainless steel. It has a carbon content range of .75%-.95% and is almost identical to 440A stainless steel except for the carbon content. This type of stele is not commonly seen in knives. This type of steel can be hardened to about Rc 58, it has good corrosion resistance, and is actually tougher than 440C. However, 440B is inferior to 440C in edge retention, edge sharpness, and is not a premium steel. But, 440B is more ductile than 440C and less brittle. Because of this, it is easier to machine and easier to sharpen as well, making it a cheaper blade steel for production purposes.

The blade on this knife has been finished with a dark grey finish. This is a coated finish that reduces the reflection and glare while reducing wear and corrosion. However, all coatings can be scratched off after continuous heavy use, and the blade would have to be re-coated. Coatings can prolong the life of a blade by preventing corrosion or rust. Quality coatings add cost to the knife, but will provide more corrosion resistance, less reflection, and require less maintenance.

The blade on this knife is carved into a drop point style blade. The drop point blade shape is a great all-purpose knife that can really stand up to almost anything. A drop point blade is one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today. The back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight from he handles to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. Because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are very popular on tactical and survival knives. And because the point on a drop point blade is easily controllable, they are a popular choice on hunting knives. It is the lowered, controllable point that makes it easier to avoid accidently nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. One of the reasons that the drop point blade shape is so versatile is because of the large belly area that is perfect for slicing. One of the biggest advantages of the drop point blade shape is also one of its biggest (and only) disadvantages: the broad tip. It is this broad tip that provides the point strength that you find on drop point knives and do not find on clip point knives. However, because of how broad the tip is, it does significantly reduce your stabbing capabilities with the Boker Leader. If you are looking for an all-purpose knife that doe shave stabbing capabilities, you should be looking for a knife with a clip point blade shape. But, when you have the stabbing capabilities, you will lose a decent amount of the strength behind it.

To keep the Leader such a good EDC knife, Boker has kept the edge on this blade plain. The plain edge is one continuous sharpened blade that makes it easier to sharpen and easier to get a finer edge. The plain edge is going to excel at push cuts, which are tasks such as peeling, skinning, and slicing. However, because it is a plain edge, you are going to have to sharpen your blade more often than if it were a serrated edge. The plain edge is easily the more traditional edge style out of serrated, plain, and the combo edge.

 

The Handle:
The handle on this knife has been made out of G-10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. IT has very similar properties to carbon fiber, yet it can be produced for almost a fraction of the cost. This is because the material is slightly inferior to carbon fiber, but you’ll still get a lot of the qualities that you are searching for. To make this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The resulting material from this process is extremely tough, very hard, super lightweight, and still strong. In fact, G-10 is supposed to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta (although it is more brittle than Micarta). The process of designing the G-10 makes it impervious to liquid and physically stable under extreme temperature fluctuations. G-10 is most commonly black, but is available in various colors, and is usually extremely non slip. In fact, G-10 gives you similar traction whether in wet or dry environments, and sometimes even give you better grip in the rough conditions. Because this material is such a lightweight material, it keeps the weigh to your knife down, so that you aren’t weighed down with this knife in your pocket.

You can get almost any color handle and you can even get a multi-colored handle because of the layering process used to make G-10. On the Boker Leader, the handle is Olive Drab Green and Tan.

The handle has four large divots going down the length of the handle. There are four grooves going down the bottom of the handle, giving your fingers a comfortable place to rest—even if you end up using this knife for long periods of time. The butt of the handle is flat, meaning that you can use it as a hammer if needed. Because this knife is a flipper, there is a finger guard to help keep your fingers safe from slipping and being sliced.

The liners on this handle are made out of stainless steel, which add durability and strength to the handle without weighing it down too much.

On the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole that has a generously dimensioned slit. This slit can even accommodate strong leather straps.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is finished with a satin finish and kept in place by two small screws that match the other hardware on this knife. IN the middle of the clip, there have been three small ovals cut out to add aesthetic.

 

The Mechanism:

The mechanism of this knife is a flipper mechanism with a liner lock. This is an assisted-opening knife, which means that it is a type of folding knife which uses an internal mechanism to finish the opening of the blade once the user has partially opened it using a flipper. The flipper mechanism is a small, triangular protrusion that juts out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. You pull back on this protrusion and it flips the blade out of the handle. Flipper knives offer another way to smoothly open both spring assisted and manual folding knives. The flipper is normally located on the spine of the knife as part of the blade The blade is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it, which not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade but also gives you an added finger guard once the blade is opened. If you are at all concerned for the safety of your thumb, a flipper knife will be more to your liking.

The liner locks are one of the more common mechanism that are seen on folding knives. This mechanisms’ characteristic component is a side spring bar located on the same side as sharp edge of the blade, “lining” the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When fully opened, that tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, keeping it firmly in place and preventing it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to use your thumb to push the spring bar “down” so that it clears contact form the butt of the blade. This lets you sue your index finger to push the blade just enough so that it keeps the bar pushed down so you can remove your thumb from the blade path, then continue to safely close the knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.7 inches long, with the handle measuring in at 4.7 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 8.4 inches long with the Leader weighing in at 5.2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Leader is one of many new mid-year models released by Boker this summer. Each liner lock designed model features a stainless steel blade that is seamlessly deployed with the spine flipper function and a gentle flick of the wrist and the darkened finished nature of the blade is great for hiding wear marks from all the tasks you will be able to accomplish with this workhorse. Couple those aspects with the elongated lanyard hole and multi-colored striped design and you have a product that is an all-in-one. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features two-toned olive drab green and tan colored G-10 handles, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a dark grey finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a real trendsetter that you should pick up today at BladeOps.

 

BladeOps Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 Automatic Knife Review

BladeOps Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 Automatic Knife
BladeOps Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 Automatic Knife

Boker traces its origins to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany—graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American favorites produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. IN 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker was actually one of the first companies that offered a ceramic knife as a featured product line.

Today we will be talking about the BladeOps exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 automatic knife that features an S30V stainless steel blade and an aluminum handle.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife has been made out of CPM-S30V steel, which is usually referred to as just S30V stainless steel. This steel was made by Crucible Industries, which is a United States based company.  CPM S30V is a martensitic stainless steel designed to offer the best combination of toughness, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance. Its chemistry has been specially balanced to promote the formation of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective than chromium carbides in providing wear resistance, as well as bringing in extreme hardness into the steel alloy matrix. CPM S30V offers substantial improvement in toughness over other high hardness steels such as 440C and D2, and its corrosion resistance is equal to or better than 440C in various environments. The CPM process produces very homogeneous, high quality steel that is characterized by superior dimensional stability, grindability, and toughness compared to steels produced by conventional processes. This super corrosion resistant steel is often used on kitchen cutlery as well as other knives that are going to be introduced to some of the more extreme environments. Dollar for dollar, CPM S30V steel is regarded as one of the highest quality knife blade steels that offers you the perfect balance between edge retention, hardness, and toughness. However, this steel does have one drawback: it does provide to be a trickier steel to sharpen and work with than some of the softer steels.

This Exclusive blade has been finished with a satin finish. The satin finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine sandpaper. This process will result in showing off the fine lines of the steel as well as the bevels in the blade. A good satin finish is the most popular blade finish that is used on pocket knives in today’s market; the satin finish is extremely traditional and the medium luster gives the blade a very classic look. A satin finish does slightly increase the blade’s corrosion resistance, although it would be hard to really notice this difference.

The mini Kalashnikov has been manufactured into a drop point blade. The drop point blade (along with the clip point) is the most popular blade shape in today’s cutlery industry. The drop point blade is durable, versatile, and can be found in any type of knives: ranging from hunting knives to a larger Swiss army knife. The blade shape itself is formed by having the unsharpened edge of the knife run straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point is a key component of a drop point blade because of all the things it does for the blade style. For starters, the lowered tip provides more control, which is why this blade style is popular choice on hunting knives. It is this ability to control your blade that makes it easier to avoid accidently ruining the meat. The lowered point also adds strength to the tip. And because of this tip strength and the blades overall ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are also a very popular option on tactical and survival knives. Drop point blades are also very versatile; making them the perfect blade shape for your everyday carry knife. The blade style features a large belly that makes slicing a breeze; the most common thing that you are going to be doing with your knife is slicing, so if you are in the market for a new EDC blade, look for one with a large belly, such as this exclusive Kalashnikov. Drop points really only have one disadvantage to them and that is the broad tip. While the tip does add a significant amount of strength to the blade tip, it does take away most of your ability to effectively pierce. If you are looking for a better piercing knife, look for one that features a clip point style blade. Because of the classic drop point blade on the Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov, you will be prepared to take on almost any task. You will be capable of opening letters, cutting up cardboard boxes, or even skinning game if it comes down to it.

This knife also has a plain edged blade, which is a continuous blade without any teeth. The plain edged blade enables you to take on tasks that are done with push cuts, which are when you push the edge of the blade through the thing to be cut. Some examples are when you peel an apple, you push the edge of the knife under the skin of the apple. When you are chopping wood, you try to push the edge into and through the word. The plain edge is also going to be the better option if you are looking for better control, better accuracy, or if you need to have clean cuts, instead of the jagged edges that a serrated blade would produce.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this Boker knife is made out of aluminum. Aluminum really is a great knife handle option for a variety of reasons. For starters, it is a low-density metal, so while it is very tough, it is also very lightweight. But, it still provides you with the hefty feel that makes you feel as if the knife can actually back you up when needed—because it can. Aluminum is strong, durable, and very resistant to corrosion, which means that maintenance time on this knife is going to be lower than say a knife with a stainless steel handle on it. When the handle is properly texturized, an aluminum handle can provide a pretty solid grip that is also comfortable, even if you are going to be using for extended periods of time. However, aluminum has high conductive properties; if you are going to be using this knife in the winter, be prepared with some gloves, because it will feel like it is biting into your fingers if you don’t. Aluminum is also prone to scratches and dings—although an anodization process will help significantly with that.

The ergonomics make this handle comfortable to hold. There are four deep finger grooves to give you a comfortable grip and also to make this handle easier to hold. The finger groove that is closest to the blade also creates a slight finger guard to protect your fingers from getting sliced if your hand does slip. The aluminum has been heavily textured so that it is not slippery like many aluminum handles are. Along the face of the handle, there have also been three horizontal ridges added to provide an extra portion of texture to help with your grip. To help with control over the knife, there is a section of jimping on the spine of the handle where the handle meets the blade. There is also jimping on the butt of the handle.

Also on the butt of the handle is a lanyard hole. While you might originally thing that lanyards only serve a beneficial purpose on fixed blades, they actually make a great addition to your EDC. While the deep carry pocket clip does keep the knife properly hidden, it does take a little longer to draw your knife out. Enter the lanyard: you can easily grab the lanyard (which doesn’t matter if it is hanging out of your pocket, as opposed to a portion of your knife handle hanging out) and whip your knife out in seconds. Some other reasons to tie a lanyard onto your EDC is to keep this knife from getting lost, or keeping yourself from dropping it into water, or you could add a lanyard on purely for a fashion or style statement.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a deep carry, which means that it will ride as low as it can in your pocket. Not only does this keep it a little more secure, it keeps it more out of sight. This clip is stainless steel and satin finished to match the blade and the other hardware on the knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is an automatic knife. However, it is referred to as an auto-conversion knife. An automatic knife is a type of knife with a folding or sliding blade that is held in the handle. This blade is opened when a button activates a spring inside of the handle.

Automatic knives have a strict set of laws that surround them in the United States, because there has bene a tumultuous history surrounding them. In many states, cities, and areas of the US, automatic knives are not legal to own or purchase. That being said, it is your responsibility before purchasing or owning these knives to know the consequences—not the responsibility of BladeOps.

One of the other laws surrounding automatic knives is that they are mostly illegal to import. This is why this Boker knife is an auto-conversion knife. It was imported as a manual folding knife, but BladeOps has added a spring, along with a few other parts, to make it work like an automatic knife. And, because of these changes, it is now considered to be an automatic knife and the same strict laws surround it.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.5 inches long, with a handle length of 3.25 inches long. The overall length of the knife when it is open is 5.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Kalashnikov automatic knife is one of the most popular side open automatics on the market today considering the price point. This knife, as well as the rest of the Kalashnikov auto family, is referred to an auto-conversion knife which means the knife is produced as a folder knife and then converted via third party to offer the automatic function. The mini Kalashnikov, which is slightly smaller than its full sized predecessor, features an aluminum handle scale with integrated finger grooves for a comfortable ergonomic experience and our exclusive model now features CPM-S30V blade material for unprecedented edge retention and strength. This steel will also cut down on your required maintenance time, because it is so resistant to rust and corrosion. This particular model features a black handle with standard hardware and a drop point blade in a satin finish. The drop point blade is a classic blade shape that will enable you to take on almost any task—from your regular everyday needs to defending yourself. Finally, the deep carry pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only.

*Please note that the seals on the box will arrive broken due to the knife being converted

Pick up your BladeOps Exclusive Boker Mini Kalashnikov 73 automatic today at BladeOps.

 

 

Boker Plus Strike Automatic Knife Review

The Boker name and logo can be dated back until the 17th century where it seems like the Boker tools were very successful on the markets; the tools were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries for hundreds of years.

Due to the rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 200 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders, and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. SO Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery exert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

The Bokers in Remscheid and their cousins overseas were very interested and in demand of razors, scissors, and pocket knives from Heinrich’s new enterprise. They had to label their products in a simple manner for overseas markets, as many customers had problems spelling the German name Boker—apart from the widespread analphabetism. Heinrich considered the chestnut tree as an ideal, memorable logo which belonged to the Remscheid company with an arrow as well. One of the rare and precious documents which survived the total destruction of WW II is an ad of Boker Remscheid from 1874, showing both logos.

The US market quickly became Boker’s most important sales territory. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn’t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well.

Today, there are four lines of Bokers. Boker Manufaktur Solingen, which is the premium collection. Boker Arbolito, which is the tradition collection. Magnum by Boker, which is the line that gives you the best price with the best performance. The Boker Strike Automatic is a member of the fourth group: The Boker Plus collection which focuses on innovation. This lien is in close cooperation with international acknowledged experts form military, police, and security as they develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus Knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design, and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA, and Asia.

Boker Plus Strike Automatic Knife
Boker Plus Strike Automatic Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of AUS 8 stainless steel. This is a Japanese made steel that is very similar to 440B steel. This steel is also slightly more resistant to rust and corrosion than 440C but it is going to be less hard. This steel is very tough, although it might not hold its edge as well as some of the more premium steels that do carry a greater degree of carbon. This is because more carbon means more hardness and edge holding. AUS 8 stainless steel is very easy to sharpen as well as it being able to take a razor sharp edge.

The blade on this knife has been stonewash finished. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material, which is generally small pebbles. After the blade has been tumbled with the pebbles, it is removed, and smoothed out. The resulting look is rugged and well-worn which also means that the finish will easily hide scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. One of the biggest advantages to a stonewashed blade is that it is extremely low maintenance. The stonewashed finish also helps the blade preserve its original look overtime because the finish easily hides the scratches and smudges that occur overtime and with use.

The blade on the Striker has been carved into a spear point blade style. This style of blade is very similar to the needle point blade, because they have both been designed to be good for piercing. However, the spear point is a little bit more of a hybrid blade, made for more things than just piercing, so the point on this style of knife is stronger and the blade shape does sport a small belly that can be used for some slicing applications. The shape of the spear point is made up of a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center of the blade’s long axis. Both of the knife’s edges rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. One of the best characteristics of the spear point knife is that it is sharp enough for piercing while still having a strong point; this is almost a combination of the best characteristics of a clip point and a drop point. The spear point knife also does feature a lowered tip that makes slicing more easily controlled while also being useful for fine tip work. Like previously mentioned, spear point blades do contain a small belly, but when being compared to a drop or clip point knife, the belly is extremely small. The best parts about a spear point knife is that it is a very well balanced knife. It has a good balance between piercing and slicing, it also has the balance of the sharp point and tip strength, plus, it sports a small belly that will assist you in slicing. This hybrid blade design is extremely functional.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of black textured aluminum. There are a few characteristics about having an aluminum knife handle that really stand out. For starters, aluminum is a very low-density metal, so while it is going to be super tough, it is also going to be lightweight and not weigh your knife down. Plus, this handle is crazy durable especially when used for knife handles. Unfortunately, aluminum can be pretty slippery, so you have to make sure that your knife is properly texturized to have a secure grip on it. To guarantee that you have a solid grip on this knife, Boker has added a deep finger groove that will give your fingers a place to rest while also protecting your fingers because the groove creates a slight finger guard as well. Opposite the finger groove, there is a slight inward curve that has a row of jimping to give you added control when cutting with this knife. Across the face of the handle, Boker has carved in a series of diagonal grooves. In between the diagonal grooves the face of the handle has been intensely textured to provide you with the best grip around. You won’t have to worry about the environment that you use this knife in—because you are going to be able to use it in almost any environment.

One of the other disadvantages to an aluminum handle is that it does have high conductive properties, which means that if you are using this knife in the winter, it is going to bite into your hand. The last disadvantage is that aluminum is prone to scratches and dings.

The ergonomics of this handle give you a comfortable grip, which is perfect for using for long periods of time. The butt of the handle is slightly triangular and does have a lanyard hole carved into it. This lanyard hole is perfect for keeping your knife near you without it getting in the way. This is ideal for tactical and outdoor adventures, which is exactly what this knife is designed for.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this Boker knife is deep carry, which means that not only is your knife going to stay more secure, but you can also discreetly carry. The clip is long and simple, and has been stonewashed to match the handle. The clip is kept in place by two silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The handle has been drilled so that you can carry this knife tip up or down, but it is only on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is what is known as an auto conversion which means that it has been converted form a manual button lock to an aftermarket automatic knife. Because of this, you need to keep two things in mind. First, your box will be opened, because it has been converted. Second, because it is now an automatic knife, it falls under the automatic knife laws, which are very strict. Automatic knives are not legal in all states, cities, or areas and it is your responsibility to know your local knife laws. BladeOps is not responsible for any consequences.

This is an automatic knife, which is often known as a switchblade. This is a style of knife with a folding blade that is contained in the handle and is automatically opened when a button is pressed on the handle where it locks into the opened position. Many of the current laws stem form 1954, when Democratic Rep. James J Delaney of New York authored the first bill submitted to the U.S. Congress banning the manufacture and sale of switchblades, beginning a wave of legal restrictions worldwide and a consequent decline in their popularity. In 1955, U.S. newspapers promoted the image of a young delinquent with a stiletto switchblade with lurid stories of urban youth gang warfare, often featuring lower class youth and racial minorities, which put fear in the hearts of many people. These people, in turn, voted for the restrictions to be brought into place.
Although it is not as extreme as it was once suggested, this knife is an auto conversion knife because it is still illegal to import switchblades. This is through the Switchblade Knife Act that was passed in 1958, however, in 2009 an amendment was put in place that provides the Act shall not apply to spring assist or assisted opening knives which are knives whit closure biased springs that require physical force applied to the blade to assist in opening the knife. The knives are imported and upon arrival a spring is put into the handle which turns it into a switchblade. If your spring wears down, you can also purchase new springs at BladeOps.

Switchblades do date from the mid-18th century when the earliest known examples of spring loaded blades were constructed by craftsmen in Europe, who developed an automatic folding spike bayonet for use on flintlock pistols and coach guns.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long with a handle that is 4.25 inches long. The overall length of this open knife is 7.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.7 ounces, which is hefty enough that you are going to feel like the knife can take a beating, but light enough that you can have it with you at all times.

 

Conclusion:

This Boker Plus Strike auto knife delivers fast opening action for all your outdoor adventures. Delivering heavy duty, reliable auto action for decades, this Boker features an AUS 8 stainless steel blade and textured polymer handle with finger (index/thumb) grooves for superb EDC satisfaction. This model features a spear point stonewash blade with plain edge. The handle cradles your hand and fingers, while the deep carry pocket clip allows for discreet carry. The knife is an auto conversion which means it has been converted from a manual button lock to an aftermarket automatic knife. Come pick up this phenomenal tactical knife today at BladeOps.

 

Boker Magnum Champagne Automatic Knife Review

Boker Magnum Champagne Automatic Knife
Boker Magnum Champagne Automatic Knife

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 195-s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker has four lines of knives: The Boker Premium Collection, which is known for high-quality, handmade sports and collectible knives from the Boker manufacturer in Solingen; the Boker Arbolito, which is known for their traditional knives such as handmade hunting and leisure time knives form the Boker knife manufacturer in Buenos Aires; and the Boker Plus line which is known for their innovation and function and operational knives for the professional user. The last lien is the Boker Magnum line which is the line that the Champagne Automatic knife belongs to.

Magnum by Boker is an attractive brand from Boker with a great price-performance ration. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction, and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives from all categories, from traditional pocket knives, to hunting knives and modern knives. They use the latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Champagne is made out of AUS-8 stainless steel. This is one of the more common stainless steels and is readily available in a large amount of places around the world. This steel is a decent, all around steel. It is tough enough, hard enough, and stain resistant enough. However, because of the lower cost, when being compared to a super steel, it is not going to measure up. Overall and to sum up AUS 8 stainless steel is a high grade chromium Japanese steel that boasts a good balance of toughness and strength, edge holding ability, corrosion resistance, and cost. The typical Rockwell hardness is between a 56-58.

The AUS-8 blade has been finished with a bead blast. This is done using abrasive glass or ceramic beads, which are blasted at the steel at a high pressure, which results in an even grey finish. A blasted finish reduces reflection and glare due to its even matte finish. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. A blasted blade, even from stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in a very humid environment.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point style blade shape. This is one of the most popular blade styles that is in use today because it is so durable, versatile, and tough. This blade style helps your knife stand up to almost any task that you throw at it. The most common place that you are going to see this blade shape is on a hunting knife, but you are going to find it on almost every other style of knife as well. To form the shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow coring manner, which creates a lowered point on this knife. Because of the lowered point, you are going to have more control over your slices and the tip has added strength. And while the tip on the drop point is more broad than the clip point, which means you are not going to have the same piercing and stabbing capabilities, it is much stronger. It is the classic drop point tip strength that makes it a popular option on tactical and survival knives. This blade shape is a popular option on hunting knives, because the point is so easily controlled, which means that it is going to be easier to avoid accidentally ruining the meat. Drop point blades are so versatile because they feature a large belly that is perfect for slicing anything. Drop points really only have one disadvantage, which is its broad tip, because it takes away your ability to slice. But, you should remember that it is because of this broad tip that you are able to have so much strength backing you up. It makes perfect sense that this blade shape is one of the most popular blade shapes around—it isn’t going to let you down.

To help give you a little bit more control over this knife, the portion of the blade that meets the handle does have a short row of jimping on it.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife has been made out of aluminum. There are a couple of reasons why an aluminum handle is such a great knife handle material, and there a couple of reasons why it is not a great knife handle material. But, to get to know aluminum: it is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother Titanium, which you are going to find on more premium knives. However, aluminum is cheaper and it is easier to work with, which are two qualities that set it apart from Titanium. Aluminum is a very durable material especially when considering it for a knife handle. It is a low density metal that provides for a nice, hefty feel to the knife without actually weighing the knife down. When an aluminum handle is properly texturized, you will be able to have a secure grip on it, while it is also more comfortable. However, if it is not properly texturized, it is going to feel very slippery. To make sure that you have the most secure grip possible, Boker has cut out portions in the middle of the knife that add a little bit of texture while also keeping the weight of the knife down.

One of the other drawbacks to an aluminum knife handle is that it does have high conductive properties, so if you were planning to use this knife during the winter, be prepared for it to be uncomfortably cold to hold. Also, aluminum is susceptible to dings and scratches.

The handle on this knife has been curved to fit inside your hand comfortable. There is a lanyard hole on the butt of this knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The clip on this knife has been designed for tip down carry only, which is one of the drawbacks. However, this is a deep carry clip, which means that it will stay very secure in your pocket while also making it easier to conceal. The clip is silver, which matches the blade, and contrasts slightly with the champagne colored handle. The clip is kept in place by three silver screws, which do match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is referred to as an auto-conversion knife which means that the knife is produced as a folder knife and then converted via third party to offer the automatic function. Because of this, there are a couple of things that you should remember. For starters, the seals on the box will arrive broken due to the knife being converted. This does not mean that the knife has been used, it has just been altered to give you the automatic function. Second, because it is now an official automatic knife, the same strict laws that surround automatic knives are the laws that you need to follow with this knife. Automatic knives, or switchblades, are not legal in all states, areas, or cities. You are responsible to know your local knife laws and consequences, because this knife may not be legal to carry in all areas. BladeOps is not the responsible party for these laws or their consequences.

A switchblade is a type of knife with a folding blade contained in the handle which is opened automatically by a spring when a button on the handle has bene activated. Most switchblades do incorporate a locking blade, in which the blade is locked against closure when the spring extends the blade to the fully opened position. The blade is unlocked by manually operating a mechanism that unlocks he blade and allows it to be folded and locked in the closed positon. There are a handful of benefits to a switchblade as well as a few drawbacks. First, switchblades are going to open more efficiently and quickly than a regular folding knife. This comes in handy during tactical situations, because the blade can be brought into play at a much quicker rate than your manual folding knife. However, maintenance is going to be a little bit trickier because you do have to worry about all of the inner mechanisms that are constantly moving. When you are cleaning this knife, you may have to completely take apart the knife to ensure that it has been properly cleaned. And, switchblades are more likely to break than a fixed blade because all of the little parts on the inside are more likely to break.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.75 inches long. The overall length of this opened knife is 8 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.4 ounces, which is relatively light due to the lightweight aluminum knife handle.

 

The Pros of the Magnum Champagne:

  • A good, all-around, well-balanced steel.
  • The steel has a good balance between hardness, toughness, and stain resistance.
  • The bead blasted finish creates an even, matte, grey finish.
  • The drop point blade style has a strong point that is also sharp and controllable.
  • The drop point blade boasts a large belly, or cutting edge, that is going to make slicing a breeze for you.
  • The pocket clip is deep carry, which means that it is easily secured and hidden.
  • Aluminum is strong.
  • The aluminum handle is lightweight.
  • The handle is durable.
  • The aluminum is resistant to corrosion.
  • The handle has been anodized a champagne color, which is unique and a color that you would not typically see.
  • The knife does sport a lanyard hole.
  • Automatic knife can be brought into play quicker.

 

The Cons of the Magnum Champagne:

  • The steel will not compare with a super steel.
  • Because the bead blasted finish creates micro abrasions in the steel, you have to be very careful with maintenance to ensure that it does not rust.
  • The drop point tip is not as sharp as a clip point’s tip, which does mean that it is less suitable for piercing than a clip point.
  • The pocket clip is only designed for tip down carry.
  • The aluminum handle is going to be cold to hold if you are in a cold environment.
  • The handle is going to be a little more slippery than a handle of a different material.
  • The aluminum handle is susceptible to dings and scratches.
  • Maintenance on an automatic knife is going to be trickier.
  • Automatic knives are not legal in all areas.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Magnum automatic knife is one of the more popular side open automatics on the market today considering the price point. This knife is referred to an auto-conversion knife which means the knife is produced as a folder knife and then converted via third party to offer the automatic function. The Magnum series features an aluminum handle scale that is comfortable and ergonomic and the AUS-8 blade material offers better edge retention than you would expect. This particular model features a champagne handle with standard hardware and a drop point blade in a bead blast finish. Finally, the pocket clip is designed for tip down carry only. Pick up this popular automatic knife today at BladeOps.

 

Boker Plus Petite Urban Trapper Knife Review

Boker dates back to the 17th century at a small hardware factory. Above the factory, there was a huge chestnut-tree towering above the Boker factory. Apparently, Boker tools were very successful, for they ranked among the leading products in Germany, and then in neighboring counties a hundred years later. With an ever growing variety of tools and cutlery combined with the possibilities of international marketing the family realized that responsibility assignment was crucial to keep their chances. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and 1865 a branch of it in Mexico, market leaders under the name of Casa Boker to this very day.

The Bokers in Remscheid and their cousins overseas were very interested and in demand of razors, scissors, and pocket-knives form Heinrich’s new enterprise. They had to label their products in a simple manner for overseas-markets, for many customers had problems spelling the German name Boker. Heinrich considered the chestnut-tree as an ideal memorable logo, which belonged to the Remscheid company with another one, an arrow.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree-brand with him across the river without troubles or payments. Since then, not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. The US market became the main customer of Boker production as early as 1900 with H Boker & Co in New York concentrating on Solingen cutlery. This demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. In due course, the Solingen capacities were exhausted and the New Yorkers started their own pocket-knife production, to which pliers were added alter. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family there wasn’t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American products too. Since then there were two different lines of Boker knives on the US market.

This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boke USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA has four different lines of knives. The Boker Premium Collection, the Boker Tradition, Magnum by Boker, and Boker Plus, which is the line that the Petite Urban Trapper knife falls under.

Boker Plus is in close cooperation with internationally acknowledged experts form military, police, and security they develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use.  Conception, design, and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA, and Asia.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Petite Urban Trapper is made out of VG-10 stainless steel. This is a high ends stele that is very similar to 154CM and ATS34 with slightly more chromium for enhanced corrosion resistance but also contains vanadium which makes it marginally tougher than these two. This is a cutlery grade stainless steel that is produced in Japan. The G stands for “gold”, which refers to the gold standard that this level of stainless steel is considered to have met. This Japanese steel is very popular on the Japanese cutlery market that has traditionally made the most of this particular type of steel in its knives. Because of how well VG10 holds an edge and its ability to withstand rust, VG10 has become the most popular steel for professional chefs and cooking enthusiasts. VG10 also has an amazing ability to have designs created into the blade during temperament.

Boker Plus Petite Urban Trapper Knife
Boker Plus Petite Urban Trapper Knife

The blade of this knife has been finished with a satin finish. A satin finish is the most typical knife finish. It is slightly less shiny than a polished finish, and it is less expensive than both the mirror and polished finishes. It has decent corrosion resistance, but less than polish or mirror finished knives. This finish shows fine buffing lines with two directional finishes that display the bevels of a blade. This finish does require great hand skill to accomplish. To create this finish, the steel is sanded in one direction with an increasing level of an abrasive, usually a sandpaper. This finish works to reduce the reflective glare of the blade.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a clip point style blade. This blade is perfect if you are looking for a great all-purpose blade. A clip point is one of the most popular blade shapes in use today. The most common place that you are going to find this blade shape is on the Bowie knife, but it is also very popular on a variety of pocket knives and fixed blade knives. To form the clip point blade shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight from the handle and stops about halfway up the knife. Then, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This “cut-out” area is straight, and is referred to as the “clip”, which is how this shape got its name. Clip point knives look as if the part of the knife from the spine to the point has literally been clipped off. Clip point blades have a lowered tip, which helps you with control when you are using the knife. The clip point blade shape is perfect for stabbing because the tip is controllable, sharp, and thin at the spine. When stabbing with the clip point blade shape, the knife lends itself to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. One of the reasons that the clip point blade shape is such a popular blade shape is because they feature a large “belly” area that is perfect for slicing. When you are looking for a great everyday knife, you should be looking for a knife that has great slicing capabilities. One of the only disadvantages that a clip point blade has is that it’s tip is relatively narrow. And because of how sharp and narrow it is, it does have the tendency to be weak and can break fairly easily.

The plain edge is a straight, continuous edge. Plain edges are better than the serrated edge when the application involves push cuts. The plain edge is also superior when you need control, accuracy, and clean cuts. The plain edge is going to work phenomenally when you are shaving, skinning, peeling, or slicing. This is because most of these applications involve mostly push cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of Carbon Fiber handle scales with titanium liners. Carbon fiber is a somewhat generic term referring to thin strands of carbon begin tightly woven then set in resin. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer is what you get when you buy a knife marketed with a carbon fiber handle. The resulting material is a tremendously strong, yet lightweight material that is unfortunately rather expensive. While it is a strong material, it is still farm from indestructible and does suffer from being brittle. This is because the carbon fibers have been woven together in a single direction. When the strands are stressed in that direction, it is crazy strong. When the fibers are stressed in any other direction, the material will start to break apart. And because it is brittle, it can crack if it is subjected to sharp impacts.

Titanium is a lightweight metal alloy, and it does offer the best corrosion resistance of any metal. Unfortunately, it is expensive to machine. Titanium is a very sturdy material, yet it is still “spring” which is why you commonly see titanium used as the liner material for knives. Unfortunately, titanium does suffer from being prone to scratches.

The handle has a slight finger groove to provide you with a very comfortable and safe grip. There is also a finger guard to give you extra protection from slicing your fingers. Other than the slight finger groove, the handle is perfectly straight. The handle does flare out at the butt slightly to better your grip on the handle knife. The carbon fiber is textured enough that you will have a solid grip on the handle during most scenarios.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a deep carry titanium clip that has been statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The titanium clip has been acid stonewashed to provide a very rugged, well-worn look. An acid stonewash finish or a black stonewash finish is a stele that has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. The stonewash finishes are very low maintenance and preserve the original look of the steel overtime. And, the stonewashed finish will hide the scratches that can occur with use over time. At the top of the pocket clip, there are two small holes punched out. You can use these holes to attach a lanyard—if that is something that you desire.

 

The Mechanism:

The blade operates on a ball bearing pivot and is deployed with an ambidextrous flipper function. The flipper mechanism is a small rectangular protrusion that juts out of the spine of the handle when the blade is closed. Flipper knives offer a smooth way to open your knife. The blade is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it. This not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade but gives you an added finger guard once opened. The flipper on this knife will actually swing around and end up underneath the knife continuing to offer protection from accidental knife injuries. If you are concerned about the safety of your thumb, a flipper knife will be more to your liking. Many people have reported that deploying a flipper reliably does take a bit of practice, and for the most part that is highly accurate. An essential element of a great flipper is a high quality pivot mechanism.

This knife also features a liner lock to securely lock your blade into place once it has been deployed. Liner locks are one of the most common form of lock on modern folding knives. They are easy to use, they are easy to assemble, and the cost is not much. The basic design uses one of the blade’s liners, cut out and bent to create a spring effect, to engage the back of the blade tang when the blade is opened. While liner locks have been around for a long time, the modern implementation of the liner lock is credited to custom knife maker Michael Walker, who made two important upgrades: using a stop pin anchored to the scales to precisely align the blade when open, and adding a detent ball on the liner lock to hold the blade closed, providing a snappy opening action—as well as added safety to keep the blade from accidently opening.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 2.8 inches long with a handle of 3.4 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 6.2 inches long. The knife weighs in at 1.1 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Plus Urban Trapper series is a Brad Zinker designed folder that comes in many different designs and finishes. This newly released petite version of this knife boasts a frame lock design and the VG-10 stainless steel blade operates on a ball bearing pivot and is deployed with an ambidextrous flipper function. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This smaller model features carbon fiber handle scales atop titanium liners, a clip point style blade in a satin finish and the deep carry titanium pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

 

Boker Arbolito Stag Horn Fixed Blade Knife Review

Boker traces its origins to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany, graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabers a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fracture with a branch of the family emigrating to North American and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker owes its high importance to the South American markets in Argentina, Chile, and Mexico and the able men of the Boker family who worked for them there in the 19th and 20th centuries. The current trademark includes the labels Treebrand and Arbolito. Due to the extreme economic and political fluctuations in Argentina, the good name of Arbolito was on the verge of falling into oblivion. In 1983 Boker Arbolito S.A. was established in cooperation with the Salzmann family, specializing chiefly on household and working knives.

In the Boker Arbolito Manufactory in Buenos Aires, they are producing handmade high quality knives with the best materials, specially focused on hunting an outdoor knife with handle scales out of wood and stag. Either for professional use, sport, and every day carry, or ambitious collectors, the traditional knives from Argentina are up to every task.

A fun fact about Boker is that they were one of the first companies to offer ceramic knives as a featured product line.

Today we will be going over the Boker Arbolito Stag Horn Fixed Blade Knife with the satin blade.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440A Stainless steel. This steel is a member of the 440 steel family. Also included in this family are the 440B, 440C, and the rarer 440F. This entire family are considered to be fully stainless, but out of them, 440A does have the highest corrosion resistance. This high level of corrosion resistance is due to the fact that out of the family, it contains the least amount of carbon. This steel is made by heating the steel to 850-900 degrees Celsius and then slowly cooling it to around 600 degrees Celsius in the furnace. Once it has reached that point, the steel is air cooled and then hardened at a temperature of around 1010-1065 degrees Celsius. This steel is quenched in air and sometimes warmed oil. As soon as this steel is finished hardening, it is tempered at a temperature range of 150-370 degrees. The lower the temperature is during this process, the harder the end steel will be. However, with 440A steel, if the tempering is done at a temperature about 370 degrees Celsius, the impact resistance of the blade will be compromised. When being compared to other kinds of stainless steels, 440A is a very commonly used steel. This is a relatively cheap steel, especially when being compared to the higher end steels. This steel is often seen on outdoors knives and even diving knives, because the saltier environments do not negatively affect it. In fact, this steel stands up to being submerged in the ocean with very little corrosive effect. Unfortunately, this steel does not have super high wear resistance—which is why this steel is often used on replica weapons. You shouldn’t have to worry about the wear resistance in this hunting knife because you aren’t going to be using this knife every single day.

The blade on this Arbolito Stag knife has a satin finish. The satin finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of fine abrasive. The abrasive that is most commonly used is a sandpaper. The finish is designed to show off the fine lines and bevels of the blade. It does boost your wear resistance slightly, although not much. This is one of the most popular blade finishes that is in use today, because it does provide you with such a classic look that will never go out of style. The stain finish gives you a subtle look that won’t take away from the star of the show on this knife: the handle.

The blade has been carved into an upswept trialing point style blade. A trailing point knife is a very lightweight knife that gets its name because the point trails higher than the general axis of the spine. This blade shape is produced by have the back edge curve upwards. This blade shape does provide a very large belly that is perfectly designed to excel at slicing or skinning. This blade shape provides you with a very sharp point for fine, delicate, and small work, which is what you need if you are skinning and caping game and fish. In fact, it is believed that this blade shape gives you one of the sharpest tips out of all blade shapes. To use this knife, you draw the blade toward the user in a sweeping motion, which will cleanly separate the skin form the game or fish. This makes a perfect hunting knife, because it is so optimized for skinning. Of course, there are some disadvantages to this blade shape. The first one being its weak point. Like I mentioned, this knife is designed to perform fine and delicate work, which means that the blade will easily bend or break if you choose to use it on tougher materials. Plus, because of the upswept shape, this knife is going to be a little bit tricky when you are trying to put it back in your sheath.  Because this is a hunting or skinning knife, it does sport a plain edge, which will give you the cleanest, smoothest cuts.

Boker Arbolito Stag Horn Fixed Blade Knife
Boker Arbolito Stag Horn Fixed Blade Knife

The Handle:

The handle of this blade is this knife’s defining characteristic; it is made out of stag horn. This is a type of bone handle and is one of the few natural handle materials that is still commonly found. Bone handles have been used really since the beginning of knives themselves. Bone handles are still very popular among the knife collector community; it is actually the most common material today for classic pocket knives. In this case, the bone has been derived from a naturally deceased stag. Many people like having a stag horn handle just because of tradition—if you have been around knives for much of your life, it is almost guaranteed that you have been around a classic knife with a bone handle. Normally, bone is a slippery material, especially if you are planning on using your knife in wet situations. So, the bone is usually textured to help give you a better grip. Another drawback to this handle is that the bone is porous which does affect its stability and does make it susceptible to deformation and cracking. Temperature, light, and moisture can all impact the characteristics of a bone handle. But, bone is an inexpensive material to use for your knife handle.

This knife is a full tang blade, which means that the piece of metal that the blade is made out of extends down the entire length of the handle. The Stag Horn has been inlayed on this tang, adding character, a more traditional look, and a more comfortable hold on it. There is really no drawback to a full tang blade except that it might be a little heavier. But, because there are no spots where the handle and blade have been meddled together there are no weak spots. And no weak spots mean that this knife is going to stand up to almost anything. If you are working on a tougher task, there is no way that the handle and the blade will become separated.

On the butt of the handle, there has been a lanyard hole carved out. This hole will allow you to always have this knife with you when you are out hunting or fishing. This lanyard will also protect against accidental loss, and with a knife this classy, you aren’t going to want to lose it.

The handle has a slight curve to give you a more comfortable grip. To protect your fingers, there is finger guard extending right before the blade begins.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade knife. There are a variety of benefits that come from having your hunting and outdoors knife being a fixed blade. One of the first ones is that because there are no moving parts, they are strong and reliable. One of the major benefits to using a fixed blade for your hunting knife is that fixed blades are very easy to maintain. You don’t have to worry about cleaning all of the inner mechanisms or worry about the inner mechanisms rusting if you don’t clean them. With a fixed blade, you can easily just wipe down the blade and handle and then oil the blade every so often. This is huge with a hunting knife because you are going to be working with your blade in very messy situations.

There are a couple of downsides though, because you have to carry the knife in a sheath, it becomes a lot bulkier. And, you have to find a place to wear it instead of concealing it inside of your pocket.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is a leather one. Leather is one of the traditional materials that is commonly used to make a knife sheath. Leather is very rugged, tough, and strong. It won’t break like plastic does and it can easily be resewn or prepared if the stitches should come loose. A leather knife sheath feels and looks good. Plus, this is what the mountain men and cowboys used as knife sheaths in the Wild, Wild, West, making it the perfect sheath for this traditional hunting knife. An added bonus is that the attractiveness of a leather sheath only gets better as it ages (when you properly care for it). A leather sheath is quite versatile and will provide a custom fit to your knife once it is broken in. And, the best part about a leather sheath for a hunting knife is that they are totally silent. You can easily pull the knife out or put it back in without it making a sound.  Unfortunately, leather is not waterproof, so getting it wet a lot or exposing it to extreme heat can dry out the oils in the leather which could lead the leather sheath to crack. To combat and prevent that, you can oil your leather sheath from time to time.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 4.5 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.125 inches. The handle measures in at 4 inches long, with the overall length of this fixed blade measuring in at 8.5 inches long. The knife itself weighs in at a hefty 7.5 ounces. The included leather sheath weighs in at 2.1 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Arbolito Stag Horn fixed blade knife is a modern take on a classic hunting style knife. This full tang model features an ergonomically designed handle that boasts a finger guard for extra security, textured handle scales, thumb jimping as well as a lanyard hole at the base. The blade style is common on many fillet and skinning knives thanks to its larger cutting “belly”–perfect for slicing. Manufactured in Argentina, this model features a unique genuine stag horn handle scales, an upswept trailing point style blade in a satin finish and a dark brown leather belt sheath complete with the Boker Arbolito tree logo. Pick up your new favorite hunting knife today at BladeOps.

Boker Magnum Passenger Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17t century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until he German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. IN 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA has four different lines of knives: The Boker Premium Collection, the Boker Tradition line, the Boker Plus line which focuses on innovation, and lastly, Magnum by Boker. It is this last line that we will be focusing on today. Magnum by Boker is made for its Price and Performance. When Boker describes this line they say, “The attractive brand from Boker with a great price-performance ration. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction, and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives form all categories, from traditional pocket knives, to hunting knives and modern knives. Latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.” Because this line is form Boker, you know that you can rely on it, but because the Passenger is from Magnum, you won’t have to worry about spending a fortune to get a quality pocket knife. Today, we will be focusing on the Boker Magnum Passenger knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440B stainless steel. This steel is part of the 440 series of steels. It is a low cost stainless steel and is the second most rust resistant out of the 440 steels. But, the 400 series are some of the most rust resistant knives that you can find. 440B stainless steel is very similar to 440A but it does have a higher carbon content range, measuring in at .75%-.95%. 440B steel can be hardened to about RC 58 and has good corrosion resistance. It is also a tougher steel than the more commonly used 440C stainless steel. However, 440B steel is inferior to 440C when it comes to edge retention and edge sharpness. But, because it is easier to work with and less brittle, it makes it easier for the manufacturer to machine meaning that it is going to make for a cheaper blade steel. Overall, the 400 series of steel remains one of the most popular choices for knife makers because it is easy to sharpen and it is very resistant to corrosion.

The blade on the Passenger has been finished with a stonewash finish. Personally, the stonewash finish is one of my all-time favorite blade finishes. This is for a variety of reasons ranging from the way that it looks to how low maintenance it really is. The stonewash finish got its name because the steel literally is “washed” with stones. The steel is rolled around with a small abrasive material, which is usually pebbles, to give the steel the rugged and textured look. Once it has been rolled with the pebbles, it is removed and smoothed out. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is actually a wide variety of stonewashed finish because the look will vary depending on the shape of the stones used, what the steel looked like originally, and the tumbling motion that the steel will go through. The stonewash finish also hides fingerprints very well, so the blade will not need to be polished as often as blades with different finishes. The stonewash finish is low maintenance and works to preserve the original look overtime.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade style. The clip point and the drop point blades are both very similar and they are also some of the most popular blade styles used today. This is because they are such great all-purpose knives. However, there are some key differences, so not only will I explain what a clip point blade is like, I will go over the differences between the two styles. The shape of the clip point blade has the back, or unsharpened, edge runs straight form the handle and then stop about halfway up the knife. Then, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This “cut-out” area can be curved or straight, but on this particular knife, it is straight. This cut-out area is also referred to as the “clip”, which is where the shape got its name. Clip point knives look as if the part of the knife from the spine to the point has been clipped off. Because of this clipped of portion, the point is lowered, which provides more control when you are using the knife. Because the tip is controllable, sharper, and thinner at the spine, a clip point knife lends itself to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. One of the reasons that this blade shape is so versatile is because of the large belly area that makes it perfect for slicing.

The differences between a drop point and a clip point really just comes down to the tip. On the drop point, the tip is also lowered, but much broader. Because of this, a drop point is much stronger and can take on harder tasks, but you aren’t going to have stabbing capabilities with it. A clip point has a lowered tip, but because it is thinner and sharper, you have fantastic stabbing capabilities. On the other hand, the tip is narrow and weak; more prone to snapping off. This weakness is really the blades only disadvantage.

The blade on the Passenger is a plain edge. This makes the knife capable of taking on a very large variety of tasks. With the plain edge, you will be able to get a finer edge and it will be easier to sharpen than a serrated blade. However, you will also have to sharpen your blade more often than if it were a serrated edge.

 

The Handle:

Boker Magnum Passenger Knife
Boker Magnum Passenger Knife

The handle on this knife is made out of G-10 handle scales with stainless steel liners. G-10 is a very durable reinforced material that is made up of fiberglass soaked in resin, then highly compressed and baked. This process makes it impervious to liquid and physically stable under extreme temperature fluctuations. G-10 is most commonly black, but can come in different colors. On the Passenger, the G-10 does come in black. This material is typically very non-slip. Many knife lovers love to use G-10 because of a variety of reasons. For starters, G-10 is very shapeable which means that it is more comfortable and will feature grippable handle shapes. Secondly, it gives you very similar traction whether in wet or dry environments, and will give you a very solid grip in rough conditions. Another reason that G-10 is such a fantastic knife handle material is that you can get different texture finishes that allow for higher or lower grip handles, depending on the expected use conditions. Also, because of the lower weight of G-10, the Passenger is going to be a lighter knife and not weigh you down.

The handle has ribbing down the palm of the handle to give you phenomenal grip in any environment. There is a finger guard and a deep finger groove to give you a solid grip and keep your fingers safe. In the finger groove, there is jimping to give you an even more secure grip. The spine of the handle slopes down slowly, fitting perfectly in your hand, and giving you a comfortable grip for long periods of time.

The liners are made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but it is not particularly lightweight. Because the stainless steel is just used for the liners, it won’t weigh down the knife enough for it to be a hassle. And, because of the heftiness behind the stainless steel liners, your knife is going to be noticeably stronger and more durable than it would have been without.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional ide of the handle. The pocket clip is silver, with a satin finish and held in place by three small screws. The clip and the screws match the rest of the hardware on the Passenger knife.

 

The Mechanism:

The Boker Magnum Passenger knife features a flipper mechanism. Flipper knives offer another way to smoothly open both spring assisted and manual folding knives. The flipper is normally located on the spine of the knife as part of the blade. The blade is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it. This not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade but gives you an added finger guard once opened. The flipper in most cases will actually swing around and end up underneath the knife continuing to offer protection from accidental knife injuries. If you are concerned the safety of your thumb, a flipper will be more to your liking than a thumb stud. The flipper is a relative newcomer on the one-hand-opening scene, at least in terms of popularity. While studs and holes enlist a thumb to open the knife, a flipper employs an index finger, and the feature is naturally ambidextrous. Some people do argue that deploying a flipper reliably takes a bit of practice, and that is pretty true.

The blade is secured with a liner lock. Liner locks are one of the more common mechanisms that you are going to find on a folding knife. This knife was invented in the early 80s by knife-maker Michael Walker. The liner lock functions with one section of the liner angled inward toward the inside of the knife. Form this position, the liner is only able to go back to its old positon with manual force, therefore locking it in place. The tail of the liner lock, which is closest to the blade, is cut to engage the bottom of the blade under the pivot. If the user wants to disengage the lock, they must manually move the liner to the side, away from the blade bottom.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.4 inches long. The G-10 handle on the Passenger measures in at 4.6 inches. The overall length of the knife measures in at an even 8 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Passenger is one of many new mid-year models released by Boker this summer. Each liner lock designed model features a stainless steel blade that is seamlessly deployed with the spine flipper function and a gentle flick of the wrist and the stonewashed finished nature of the blade is great for hiding wear marks from all the tasks you will be able to accomplish with this workhorse. The tough blade made of 440B is going to be able to take on those harder tasks while always keeping its sharp edge. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features black G-10 handles, stainless steel liners, a clip point style blade in a stonewash finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a powerful pocket knife that is designed for demanding work. Pick up your Passenger knife today at BladeOps.

Boker Exclusive Tan XL Kalashnikov Recurve Tanto Auto Knife Review

Boker is one of the oldest knife makers that is still around; you can trace its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany. By the 1800s Boker had graduated to swords and blades instead of the tools. The company claims that it was produced 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for various wars that Germany was fighting in. by the 1860s the company fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and set up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and continued using the “Tree Brand” trademark.

This process continued until World War II when the Solingen factory as destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the Germany factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Today we will be talking about the BladeOps Exclusive Boker XL Kalashnikov that has a tan handle and a recurve tanto blade.

 

The Blade:

The blade of this Kalashnikov is made out of AUS-8 stainless steel. This is a Japanese produced steel that is very similar to the 440 series of steel in terms of performance and very similar to 8Cr13MoV in terms of composition. Although the chemical composition does have additional vanadium, this steel is not going to hold an edge as well as you hope. But on the positive side, this steel is very easy to sharpen—so when it gets dull, sharpening it won’t be a hassle. Along with the vanadium, the composition also has additional nickel which both work to give this blade extra wear resistance and toughness, especially when being compared to the 440 series. Overall AUS-8 is a well-rounded steel for your knives, because it does give you an easy sharpen and it is pretty rust resistant. You should keep in mind that it is not going to be able to keep up with the higher end powder metal blades, but for a solid EDC knife, this metal gives you great qualities for a good price.

The blade has been finished with a black coating finish. A coated finish reduces the reflection and glare while reducing wear and corrosion. Unfortunately, this coating will be scratched off after long term or heavy use. Once the coating has been scratched off, if you want to keep the coatings benefits, the blade will have to be re-coated. Overall though, the coating finish will increase the wear life of a blade, while also adding an elegant black look to the blade.

The blade on this knife has been cut into a recurve tanto blade shape. The tanto blade shape is not an all-purpose blade shape; in fact, it has been specifically designed to do one thing and do that one thing really well. The tanto blade shape has been designed to be able to effectively price through tough materials, because it was modeled after the samurai’s swords, which were made to pierce through armor. Cold Steel popularized the tanto blade shape in the early 80s. The tanto has a high point with a flat grind, which creates an extremely strong point because it is not thin, which means it is less likely to break. On a typical tanto blade, instead of the belly curving up to meet the point, a tanto has the blade go from a straight edge to an angled edge which leads to the point, which means that there is no belly for slicing. On this recurve tanto blade shape, the original straight edge has been curved inward to create an “opposite belly”. This recurve not only looks very interesting, but it also acts slightly like a hawksbill. This shape forces the material you are cutting to bunch up against the cutting edge, which allows you to easily shred some of those tougher materials. Because the recurve is not as severe as the hawksbill blade shape, you do retain some of the ability for your more general utility tasks. So while you aren’t going to be able to slice a ton with this knife, you do have a very strong point that is perfect for certain tasks. Unfortunately, the point is a little harder to control.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife has been made out of aluminum that is anodized tan. Aluminum is often chosen for a knife handle because of how durable it is. Plus, it is a low density metal which means that it is going to be lightweight while still giving you the heft that you want to back you up. When an aluminum handle is properly texturized, it is going to give you a secure grip in most environments and it will be comfortable even if you are using it for long periods of time. One of the few drawbacks with aluminum is that it does have high conductive properties meaning if you use it in the winter, it is going to be pretty cold.  Aluminum is also more susceptible to scratches and dings than many other knife handle materials. I would say that one of the biggest benefits of having an aluminum knife handle is that it is very resistant to corrosion.

This Kalashnikov aluminum handle has bene anodized for color, hardness, and protection. Anodizing is a method of increasing the corrosion resistance of a metal by forming a layer of oxide on its surface. The process to create this oxide coating is achieved electrolytically. The handle is first going to be submerged in an electrolytic solution bath along with a cathode. When a current is passed through the acid solution hydrogen is released form the cathode and oxygen forms on the surface of an anode. This results in a metal oxide film growing on the surface of the handle that is going to be treated. This handle has been anodized tan.

To help you with having the best grip possible, Boker has textured the handle pretty aggressively. Plus, there are three ridges that go horizontally across the face of the handle. To help with control when you are cutting with this knife, there is a row of jimping that starts on the spine of the blade by the handle and continues onto the handle. There is also jimping on the butt of the handle. To give you the most comfortable grip possible, there are four finger grooves going across the bottom of this handle. There is a slight finger guard which helps to protect against slicing your fingers.

On the butt of the handle, there has been a lanyard hole carved in.

Boker Exclusive Tan XL Kalashnikov Recurve Tanto Auto Knife
Boker Exclusive Tan XL Kalashnikov Recurve Tanto Auto Knife

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is deep carry, which means that not only is it going to be a little more secure in your pocket, it will also be easier to conceal. It has been slightly shortened to allow you to draw your knife a little bit quicker.  The clip is designed for tip up carry only. It is black, which matches the blade and the rest of the hardware on this Boker knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife. Automatic knives have a strict set of laws surrounding them and it is up to you, the purchaser, to know your local knife laws before purchasing or carrying this knife. The responsibility does not lie on BladeOps.

Automatic knives are also often known as a switchblade, which is a type of knife that has a folding blade contained in the handle. The knife is opened automatic when the oversized button on the handle is pressed. The button activates a spring inside of the handle which pops the blade out.

Automatic knives were developed in the mid-18th century and have had a tumultuous history ever since. In the 1950s, automatic knives became an extreme controversy because of an article that was released in a widely used periodical. The article talked about the gang usage and spurred a campaign that would eventually result in state and federal laws criminalizing the importation, sale, and possession of automatic-opening knives. Now, the ability to purchase or carry switchblades continues to be heavily restricted throughout much the United States.

Because it is illegal to import an automatic knife, this Boker knife is actually known as an auto-conversion knife. It was imported as a manual knife and was converted by a third party into an automatic knife.

 

The Specs:

This is a larger knife, with the blade measuring in at 3.82 inches long and the handle measuring in at 4.82 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at 8.64 inches long. This knife is a little bit heavier because of how large it is, weighing in at 4.5 ounces.

 

Pros of the XL Kalashnikov:

  • The blade steel is very easy to sharpen.
  • The blade steel is very wear and corrosion resistant.
  • The tanto blade shape has an extremely strong point.
  • The recurve is going to help with shredding.
  • Coating helps cut down on reflections off the blade.
  • Coating helps reduce wear and corrosion.
  • The coating adds an elegant, sleek look to the already luxurious blade.
  • Aluminum is very corrosion resistant.
  • Aluminum is very durable and strong.
  • Aluminum is lightweight, but still gives you the heft that you want from a knife.
  • The aluminum has been anodized to add to its durability, strength, and give it a color.
  • Jimping on spine help with control while cutting with this knife.
  • There is jimping on the butt of the blade.
  • There is a lanyard hole on the butt of the knife.
  • There are four finger grooves to help with grip and comfort.
  • The face of the handle has been aggressively textured, so that you have a secure grip on it.
  • Deep carry pocket clip.
  • Because it is an automatic knife, it is going to open much quicker than a manual blade.
  • This knife does have an oversized button for easy access even if you are wearing gloves.

 

Cons of the XL Kalashnikov:

  • The blade does not hold an edge very well.
  • The blade does not have a belly, which does make slicing much harder, or impossible with this recurve.
  • The point on the blade is harder to control.
  • All coatings are going to be scratched off eventually.
  • Aluminum is prone to getting scratched and dinged.
  • Aluminum has high conductive properties, so if you are using this knife in the winter, be prepared to need gloves.
  • The pocket clip is only designed for tip up carry.
  • Because this is an automatic knife, there are strict laws surrounding it. This knife might not be legal in your state, city, or area.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Kalashnikov automatic knife is one of the most popular side open automatics on the market today considering the price point. The world was first introduced to the traditional size, then the mini, and finally, the BladeOps exclusive Kalashnikov XL. This knife, as well as the rest of the Kalashnikov auto family, is referred to an auto-conversion knife which means the knife is produced as a folder knife and then converted via third party to offer the automatic function. The Kalashnikov XL features an aluminum handle scale with 4 integrated finger grooves for a comfortable ergonomic experience and the AUS-8 blade material offers better edge retention than you would expect. This particular model features a tan handle with standard black hardware, an over-sized push button for easy access, and a recurve tanto style blade in a black finish. Finally, the deep carry pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only and was slightly shortened to provide quicker access when you need it now.
*Please note that the seals on the box will arrive broken due to the knife being converted

Pick up this BladeOps exclusive Boker Tan XL Kalashnikov with the recurve tanto blade today.

 

Boker Plus Sulaco Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA actually has four lines of knives that they produce. The first one is the Boker Premium Collection that focuses on high-quality, handmade sports, and collectible knives form the Boker manufacture in Solingen. The next line is the Boker Tradition—these are handmade hunting and leisure time knife from the Boker knife manufacture in Buenos Aires. Third is Magnum by Boker which focuses on Price and Performance—this line focuses on attractive sports and leisure time knife for the daily use and collectible swords. The last line is the Boker Plus line. This is the line of knives that produces the Sulaco knife. This line is in close cooperation with international acknowledged experts form military, police, and security to develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design, and construction of these knives are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA, and Asia.

Today we are going to focus on the Boker Sulaco Titanium Folder knife with a stonewashed blade.

Boker Plus Sulaco Knife
Boker Plus Sulaco Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. 440C is a 400 series stainless steel and it is the highest carbon content from 400 stainless steel series. It is usually heat treated to reach hardness of 58-60 HRC. It is a bearing steel and is used to make knife blades. This is an upper mid-range steel that was once considered the high-end in US knife steels, 440C is a good all-around steel that has now been overshadowed by many of the newer super-steels on the block, although that does not take away from the qualities that it still possesses. This is a stainless steel that is most commonly found on mass-manufactured pocket knives and is so popular because it is a solid, affordable, all-around choice. This steel is reasonably tough and wear resistant, but it excels most at how stain resistant it is. This steel does hold an edge better than its 400-sereis counterpart 420HC but, you do lose some of its corrosion resistance. This steel can easily be sharpened. It does have the highest levels of carbon and chromium in 400 series of stainless steels. This steel does have good resistance to the atmosphere, fresh water, and mild acids. It has the best resistance in the hardened, tempered, and passivated condition. This steel allows for razor sharp edges.

To create this finish, the blade starts with a dark wash to give the blade an initial protective finish Then the blade is washed with stones, or literally rolled around with pebbles, which marks it, bringing out the underlying color of the steel. The finished stone wash gives the knife an interesting pattern, while still maintaining the protective properties of the dark wash. This finish helps hide wear and tear on the knife as the knife is used. One of the stonewash finishes biggest advantage is that it preserves the look of the blade overtime. The stonewash finish gives you a textured, rugged look. This blade finish helps to hide scratches and fingerprints, so you won’t have to polish your blade as often as you would with other blade finishes. Also, depending on the manufacturer, a stonewash finish can often look satin from a distance.

This blade has been carved into a spear point style blade. This style of blade is very similar to the needle-point style of blade, because of how good it is for piercing. But, the spear point does have a stronger tip and it does contain a small belly that can be used for slicing, unlike the needle point blade shape. The spear point shape is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center line of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that line sup exactly with the equator of the bade. The spear point blade shape is a great choice if you are looking for a good balance between piercing and slicing ability. This blade shape combines the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade, while also maintaining some of the “belly” that is used for slicing. All in all, it is a great hybrid blade design that is extremely functional. With this blade, the point controllability is excellent and the point is extremely strong, so you can easily use this knife for detail and tip work. To help with overall controllability, the entire spine of the knife has thick, shallow jimping. This gives your fingers a little bit of grip to really have full control over your blade at all times and in all environments. This blade does sport a plain edged blade, which gives you the ability to use this knife in a wider variety of tasks. However, some people do love the serrated edge because they with a serrated edge you can saw through some of the tougher and thicker materials. On the other hand, serrated edges leave you with jagged cuts, while a plain edge will give you clean cuts and slices.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of titanium. Titanium is truly a phenomenal material for knife handles. For how light the material is, it is amazing how durable and tough it is. On the flip side, it is also the most expensive common metal used in knife handles. It offers an extremely high resistance to corrosion, it doesn’t conduct and retain cold as much as its counterparts, and it can be anodized just the same as aluminum. Surprisingly, titanium is actually less resistant to scratching than stainless steel, but the upside of lightness outweighs the downside.

Some of the pros of this material is that it is strong—titanium is ideal for high-end, high performance knives and gear because it is light and strong. Titanium has a very high tensile strength. The next advantage is that it is low weight—titanium has a very low density. This characteristic strength to weight ratio is absolutely crucial when making a decision on your everyday knife. Titanium is also very corrosion resistant—it is even resistant in saltwater environments; this trait is due to a continuous oxide outer layer when exposed to air. Unfortunately, with all of those pros, titanium will cost you a decent amount.

A rare characteristic of titanium is that it is one of those rare metals that has a warm feel to it, so it won’t make your hands suffer nearly as much in the winter time, especially when being compared to aluminum.

The handle on this Boker knife has a very deep finger groove with a shallower finger groove following it, to give you a very comfortable and safe grip. There is jimping on the spine of the knife as well as a small portion on the bottom of the handle. The handle is two-toned; with lighter grey in the middle and darker grey framing it. Across the palm of the handle, there is a lot of thick texturing to give you a very secure grip. And, as a bonus and a benefit to using this as your EDC of choice, there is a lanyard hole carved into the butt of this handle.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a deep carry pocket clip in a stonewash finish. This clip is kept in place by two small silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on the Boker Sulaco.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual folding knife that uses dual-thumb lugs and a frame lock design. A thumb lug is just a large thumb stud. This is arguably the most common one-hand-opening feature, and you can find this opening system through most knife manufacturers. A thumb lug essentially replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives. The principle is pretty straightforward—you grasp the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open. Because the thumb lugs extend through both sides of the blade, the knife becomes ambidextrous.

The locking mechanism that this knife is equipped with is a frame lock mechanism. You can think of a frame lock as a beefed up version of the liner lock. They are very similar to liner lock mechanisms, except instead of an internal spring bar moving into place, tis part of the handle itself. Frame lock knives tend to be stronger than liner locks, as the piece of metal that slips into place is more substantial than that in a liner. Because of their similarity to liner locks, closing a frame lock knife is virtually the same—you push down on the spring bar so it no longer blocks the butt of the blade, remove your thumb from the path, then fold the knife closed.

This type of locking system puts a large portion of metal against the blade, ensuring a strong lockup for piercing, cutting, slicing, and other heavy duty tasks. Frame locks are seen in lots of mid to upper range knives, typically rafted from titanium. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness, but it is only with the correct construction that they operate at full capacity. In the angle of the blade bottom is not matched correctly with the lock, the lock may not travel the correct distance, damaging its effectiveness.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Boker Sulaco measures in at 3.7 inches long with the handle measuring in at 4.8 inches. The overall length of the knife is 8.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.8 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Ram Maramba, late owner/operator of Zero Knives, is a Texas-born knife maker who was remembered for his contemporary non-nonsense forms and eye-catching conceptions. Each frame lock designed model sports a milled handle that is not only aesthetically pleasing but promotes plenty of grip security. Couple that with the dual over-sized thumb lugs and this folder is ready to go right out of the gate. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features an all-titanium handle, a modified spear point style blade in a stonewash finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The titanium handle is strong and durable, so you can take on all of your heavy duty tasks that come your way throughout your day. The spear point blade style is the perfect balance between point strength and belly, which helps with versatility. The stonewash finish and 440C stainless steel help preserve the look of your knife, because both of them are low maintenance. Pick up your Boker Plus 01BO034 Sulaco Titanium Folder Knife with a stonewashed blade today at BladeOps.