The EDC Emergency Survival Blade, by N.W.

EDC Emergency Knife
EDC Emergency Knife

In an actual survival situation, what blade would you prefer to have on your person in order to help you survive? Think about that perfect blade, now forget about it. Survival situations do not happen on your schedule, and unless you EDC that perfect survival blade on you every day of your life, it is not going to help when the situation calls for it. Natural disasters or the inopportune flat tire in the middle of no where arejust a couple examples of when an emergency survival blade could be employed.

An emergency survival blade is any blade you happen to have on you when chaos strikes, for most individuals this would usually be a folding knife of some sort. There are pocket survival kits that are available which are normally housed in an Altoids tin and have just enough room for a small knife or razor blade, along with a way to start a fire, etc. However, considering one of your most important tools in a survival situation is a cutting device, a tiny knife or a razor blade can only be used to a certain point. A much more beneficial option is the folding knife you carry every day.

On a regular basis, your EDC may only be used for light tasks such as opening letters, cutting boxes, etc. Although this may be the image you think of, your EDC is capable of so much more. Nearly any folding knife can be put into the role of an emergency survival knife, because honestly, at the time you have no choice. You would have to use what you have available.

The edge itself is the most important aspect of the knife, which is why we use knives in the first place. But once the user knows the physical limitations of the knife, the strengths of the model’s design, and efficient techniques in using the knife for which ever type of task, the capability of the knife is increased one hundred fold. The basis for this knowledge and ability comes down to personal experience with the particular knife, skills, and knowledge of edged weapons.

Manual folders, spring assisted, old design styles, automatics, and well made OTF knives are all capable of filling the role as an emergency survival blade. This is not to say that the user should simply buy which ever knife is the cheapest, though it can be compared to the old firearm saying, “a .22 in the hand is better than a .45 at home.”

Which ever knife you choose to carry will fill multiple roles in its lifetime, from every day utility tasks to self defense. Look at your EDC and ask yourself, “If I had to, could I use this in an survival situation?” Do you have the experience to use the blade to it’s full potential? If not, what do you have to learn to make it so? A knife is limited only by the skill of the user.

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Nice Hare, by B.C.

Last year I was out in the country with a couple buddies of mine and we were hunting deer. We had waited almost the whole day and hadn’t seen a thing accept for some wild dogs. Then we called it quits and started walking back to the truck.

But I wasn’t going home empty handed after being out for 5+ hours and not so much as looked down the barrel. I spotted a nice meaty hare. I pulled out my magnum and got it right through the skull. It was a dinky little thing but it was one of the first kills of the season. I skinned and gutted it right in the back of my pickup with my Boker Mini Kalashnikov Automatic Knife.

I knew it wasn’t the right knife for the job but it got the job done. When I got home I gave it to my pups and they had a fight over it in the yard until it finally split in two. Unfortunately I didn’t take any pictures

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Today’s Email Flyer from BladeOps

 

 


     The super popular Boker Mini Kalashnikov Automatic Knife is now available with a CPM-S30V stainless steel blade exclusively from BladeOps.  For today only, we will have it on sale for a special introductory price.  Get yours before the price goes back up.

 

 

                                                     Why S30V?

 

“CPM S30V is a martensitic (hardened) powder-made (sintered) wear and corrosion resistant stainless steel developed by Dick Barber of Crucible Industries in collaboration with knifemaker Chris Reeve.  Its chemistry promotes the formation and even distribution of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective at cutting than chromium carbides.  These vanadium carbides give the steel a very refined grain, further improving the sharpness and toughness. . . .  Its composition is as follows: Carbon 1.45%, Chromium 14.00%, Vanadium 4.00%, Molebdenum 2.00%”

–Wikipedia

 







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Email: sales@bladeops.com
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BladeOps Exlusive Boker Kalashnikov S30V Auto Knife

 


     The industry classic Boker Kalashnikov Automatic Knife is now available with a CPM-S30V stainless steel blade, exclusively from BladeOps.  This fast opening auto knife features a satin finish on the razor sharp S30V blade. CPM-S30V resharpens wonderfully, holds an edge longer, and is more durable.  Each blade is individually serial numbered. At this price, there are no other automatics with S30V on the market.  Finally, get the performance of a high end automatic for a price that keeps your wallet intact.

 

                                                     Why S30V?

“CPM S30V is a martensitic (hardened) powder-made (sintered) wear and corrosion resistant stainless steel developed by Dick Barber of Crucible Industries in collaboration with knifemaker Chris Reeve.  Its chemistry promotes the formation and even distribution of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective at cutting than chromium carbides.  These vanadium carbides give the steel a very refined grain, further improving the sharpness and toughness. . . .  Its composition is as follows: Carbon 1.45%, Chromium 14.00%, Vanadium 4.00%, Molebdenum 2.00%”

–Wikipedia 







Home: www.bladeops.com
Email: sales@bladeops.com
Phone: 1.888.392.5233
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Copyright © 2014 BladeOps, LLC.

BladeOps, LLC, 1352 West 7800 South, West Jordan, UT 84088

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BladeOps One Day Sale on the Boker Kalashnikov 74 Auto Knife

Boker Kalashnikov 74 Auto
Boker Kalashnikov 74 Auto

Today only, find the classic Boker Kalashnikov 74 automatic knife for just $30 shipped!  That’s right–we just did that.  Place your order and in just a few short days, your pocket will be thanking you for giving it such a nice companion.  And your wallet will be thanking you for keeping it fat.

What, you have never heard of the Boker Kalashnikov 74 auto knife? Sit down and let me tell you all about it–this mid sized automatic conversion knife features a plain edge, bead blast finished AUS 8 blade.  The blade snaps out with the kind of authority you haven’t seen since you were in the 10th grade “visiting” the superintendent for throwing objects at teachers.  And the aluminum handle fits in everyman’s hand like it was meant to be there.  Well, that is probably because it is meant to be there.  Not enough info?  You greedy … just kidding.  You can find all kinds more information here about the time I carried this great knife for several months.  But, don’t stand there wasting time, get over to our site and order your Boker Kalashnikov 74 for just $30.

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Thirty Days with my Boker Kalashnikov 73 Auto Knife

Boker Kalashnikov 73 Auto
Boker Kalashnikov 73 Auto Conversion Knife

The Boker Kalashnikov 73 could just be the perfect size automatic knife.  A couple of years ago, I carried the Kalashnikov 74 for several months and was impressed by its durability.  So when I got my new 73, I was really excited to see how it would stack up against the bigger 74.  I choose to carry the standard 73 with a bead blast plain edge blade and a black handle.  The first thing I noticed was that other than the size, this knife is exactly like the bigger version Kalashnikov.  The handle is comfortable, built with choils for each of your fingers.  This is an auto conversion knife–meaning that it isn’t produced as an automatic knife by Boker.  Instead, it is converted after market into an automatic knife.  Press the button and the blade really snaps out hard.  Lock up is tight and there is no side to side or up and down play in the blade.  The blade is closed by pressing the button lock which frees the blade so you can close it.  The deep carry, tip up pocket clip is removable.

Day 3

Boker 73 Deep Carry
Boker 73 Deep Carry Pocket Clip

The Boker KAL Mini is a relatively simple construction.  The blade is AUS 8 stainless steel with a bead blast finish on my model.  You can also pick it up with a black finish.  The blade length is 2.5″ and when the knife is open it measures 5.75″.  When closed, the knife is a compact 3.25″.  This is the very first thing that struck me as impressive.  This knife takes up almost no real estate in my pocket.  I carry a lot of crap in my pockets–wallet, keys, cell phone, change (if I’m lucky enough to have any), and the occasional odds and ends.  Throw in my knife, and my pockets can easily get to bulging.  So I like a smaller knife.  Besides, in my normal day-to-day life, I don’t run into many things that a small knife won’t cut just as well as a large knife.  So this little beauty immediately caught my heart with its size.  The handle is aluminum.  It has a texture pattern that adds a bit of grip and some visual appeal.  There is also some wide jimping on the spine of the handle right near both ends.  On the top end, close to the blade the jimping runs for 5/8″ of an inch and is wide enough to give your thumb some serious grip when you are choking up on the blade for close work or fine cuts.  The butt of the handle has jimping for 1 1/8″ that runs right around the curve at the base of the handle.  This gives your thumb the perfect resting/grip spot for when you reverse grip the knife. Throw in the finger grooves as well as three ridges that run across the handle and you have a knife that isn’t going to slip in your hand.  I have average sized hands and because the knife is on the smaller end of the size scale, even my hand “hangs” off the butt end of the handle.  It doesn’t feel awkward or uncomfortable.  Sometimes with small knives, there is a strange, uncomfortable ridge or bump that makes it awkward to hold.  Not the case with the Mini KAL.    Here are the specs on the knife:

  • Overall length: 5 3/4″
  • Blade length: 2 1/2″
  • Handle Length:  3 1/4″
  • Handle Width:  7/8″ at the widest point
  • Handle Thickness:  3/8″
  • Weight: 2.1 oz.
  • Blade material: AUS-8
  • Handle material: Aluminum

 

Boker 73 Pocket Clip
Boker Kalashinkov 73 Pocket Clip

DAY 9

One of my favorite features is the deep carry pocket clip.  A true deep carry, when the knife is in my pocket nothing except the clip shows.  I also like how the clip is designed.  Some clips are extremely tight on my pocket which sometimes delays how fast I can get my knife out of my pocket and back into my pocket.  The Boker clip has space all the way down between the clip and the handle until the very end of the clip–where it indents back in toward the knife handle.  This small curve creates plenty of traction so the knife has never fallen out of my pocket–but it isn’t so tight that the knife is hard to get in and out of my pocket.  It also reduces wear and tear on the edge of my pocket since it isn’t absurdly tight.

Kalashnikov 73 Jimping
Kalashnikov 73 Jimping on the handle butt for reverse grip

DAY 15

As I mentioned back on Day 3, the handle has some really nice jimping at both ends of the back spine of the handle.  The butt of the handle has jimping that wraps all the way around the curved end of the butt so if you decide to hold the knife in a reverse grip your thumb has plenty of traction.  The blade end of the handle also has jimping on the spine that transitions smoothly into jimping on the blade.  This way, when you hold the knife in a traditional grip, your thumb also has plenty of traction.  I also really like the handle in general–I have been extremely tough on this little knife and have yet to get any visible damage on the handle.  No scratches, dents or chips.  I have purposely dropped it several times each day so as to simulate a longer time period with the knife.  Not a bit of damage to the handle.  Very impressive.

DAY 20

Took the 73 out into the warehouse today and spent nearly an hour cutting boxes.  At first, I just cut taped up boxes. As I expected, the knife had no problem with this.  Then I spent nearly thirty minutes cutting cardboard.  The blade performed extremely well.  Interestingly enough, the blade actually performs better on push cuts than it does on pull cuts.  I’m not too sure why this is.  But on a push cut, the blade performs at a high 9.5 out of 10.  On pull cuts the blade might be more of a 7 out of 10.  It seems to take a few moments before the blade actually engages and starts to cut when performing a pull cut.  After about thirty minutes cutting cardboard the blade was still making smooth cuts.  I can tell the blade needs to be sharpened, but it isn’t so dull that it is just mashing the cardboard on the cuts. Clean, smooth cutting blade that keeps an edge–that is important to me and the 73 passed the test.

Boker Kalashnikov 73
Boker Kalashnikov 73–Easy to clean, easy to maintain

DAY 26

I spent part of today disassembling and reassembling my Boker 73.  First of all–it is really simple to do.  There is a main pivot screw that requires a Torx size 8 screwdriver.  And then there are three smaller screws that keep the handle scales together.  These require a Torx size 6 screwdriver.  After you get all the screws out, the handle scales come apart easily.  Once apart, you have two handle scales, three barrel spacers, a pocket clip, three small screws, one large pivot screw, a push button, a push button spring, an alignment pin, the blade and the blade spring.  Easy to take apart, the whole process only took me three or four minutes.  From there, I spent a few minutes cleaning everything up.  Then I reassembled the knife.  This took about five minutes.  I like that the knife is simple to take apart–because this means that long-term maintenance will be fairly easy–and that means I will be more likely to do it on a regular basis.  Just take the knife apart, clean everything up and then put it all back together.  Less than a fifteen minute job.

DAY 30

If you need a perfect sized every day carry knife the automatic Boker Kalashnikov 73 could very well be the knife for you.  Small enough to fit perfectly in any pocket, this little auto gives you all the performance of a big knife in a package that is easy to carry.  My Boker 73 stood up to extremely heavy abuse over the past 30 days and didn’t flinch a bit.  The blade stayed sharp under heavy use, and I know that when time for a resharpen does come the AUS 8 will be easy to sharpen.  My favorite things are the durability of the knife, the deep carry pocket clip and the size. bThe Kal 73 gets an A grade from me.

Boker Kal 73 Auto
Boker Kal 73 Auto–Fantastic All Around Every Day Carry Auto Knife

 

Find the Boker Kalashnikov 73 here on our website.

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Boker Kalashnikov 74B Knife Review

The Boker Kalashnikov 74B automatic knife delivers compact cutting power to your hand on a daily basis. Built tough to withstand the rigors of heavy use, the delightful design on the 74B makes for performance cutting with comfort and ease along with a dash of class.

Boker Kalashnikov 74B
Boker Kalashnikov 74B Automatic Knife

The Kalashnikov name comes from Mikhail Kalashnikov, the Russian designer of the AK-47 automatic gun.  Over 100 million of these guns have been produced worldwide, and to celebrate this amazing designer, Boker produced the Automat Kalashnikov 74 series of knives.  Each one bears the word Automat Kalashnikov 74 on the blade and the pivot screw also reads Kalashnikov in English and Cyrillic.  The center of the pivot screw has the famous Russian Star–which I think is a fun touch.

Kalashnikov 74B Blade
Kalashnikov 74B Blade

The 74B comes standard with a 3.25″ classic profile drop point blade that features partial serrations.  The flat grind gives tapers from the top edge down to the cutting edge where it gives way to a secondary bevel.  The secondary bevel means that it keeps more edge durability while sacrificing very little sharpness.  Made of AUS8 stainless steel, this tough steel has .75% carbon that means it will hold an edge and can still be sharpened with relative ease.  The blade has a black coat finish.

Boker Kalashnikov 74B
Boker Kalashnikov 74B Handle and Clip

The grey aluminum handle boasts four finger grooves and three raised and angled “speed bumps” that channel your fingers into the correct position for maximum grip.  The two handle scales are held together with three small screws and barrel spacers as well as the pivot screw.  Open construction makes for simple cleaning and maintenance.  The spine features jimped areas both near the blade and near the base for maximum grip for your thumb whether you hold the knife in a traditional grip or have it in a reverse grip.

BOKKALS74B Pocket Clip
BOKKALS74B Pocket Clip

The deep carry pocket clip gives your knife a near invisible ride when in your pocket.  The clip is removable.

Boker Kalashnikov Front Handle
Boker Kalashnikov Front Handle

The blade on this automatic knife (auto conversion) snaps open with authority when the button lock is pressed.  The button resides in a small depression to prevent accidental opens.  When opening, the blade snaps up against a solid stop pin.

The Boker Kalashnikov is incredibly successful due to a simple design performed well. Produced from quality materials that withstand heavy use, the Kalashnikov 74B is a stellar all around carry knife.

The knife comes in a delightful box that is reminiscent of an AK-47 banana clip.

Kalashnikov 74B and Box
Kalashnikov 74B and Box

Looking to pick one up?  You can find the Boker Kalashnikov 74B here.

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Which is your favorite Boker Kalashnikov?

Boker Kalashnikov 74 BK
Boker Kalashnikov 74 BK

Boker Kalashnikov knives have become nearly an iconic part of knife culture.  These knives are built as an interpretation of the extremely famous Kalashnikov AK-47.  First designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov back in 1947, the AK-47 quickly became the main staple for eastern bloc countries looking for automatic guns.  In fact, by 2009, nearly 100 million of these guns had been produced–an interesting fact is that almost half are considered to be counterfeits.  The Boker Kalashnikov knives have an AUS-8 blade that can be found with a black, sand, or satin finish.  Combo edge or plain edge are available in both the satin and black styles, the sand finished blade comes only in a combo edge.  The handles are either black, green, sand or grey.  The appealing thing about these knives is that they are fairly simple to convert from a button lock manual folder into an automatic knife.  Most knife sites will sell both versions–either a manual button lock or an already “converted” auto knife.  One thing to remember about the “conversion” process is that it does void the warranty from Boker. Now the Boker Kalashnikov is available in a new smaller size called the mini.  This series was given the 73 code.  So if you see a Boker 73 for sale, it is the smaller version.
I especially like the details on the Boker Kalashnikov.  The main pivot screw has the classic Russian Star on the top.  The knife comes in a box shaped like an AK-47 banana clip.  Very cool details.  But the knife itself is an absolute workhorse.  I carried one of these for about six months and was absolutely brutal to it.  I used it for everything and anything.  It withstood the test.  At the end of six months, it had several scratches on the blade but it still functioned perfectly.  Similar to the AK-47, the Boker Kalashnikov knife is a deceptively simple design which makes maintenance, cleaning, and tune ups a breeze.  If you haven’t ever had one of these spectacular knives, you should definitely consider getting one.  If you already have one or two or more, you already know, the Boker 74 and now the Boker 73 series are knives to be reckoned with.

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My Boker Kalashnikov

Boker Kalashnikov 74
Boker Kalashnikov 74

Several years ago I purchased a Boker Kalashnikov knife.  Converted from a manual push button folder into a side open automatic knife, this beauty was the perfect everyday carry knife.  I used it hard for six months and then retired it to my wall of knives.  After giving it’s all to me for those 180 days, it was time for a rest.

Built with a 3 1/4″ blade of AUS8, the knife is about the perfect size for everything that I run into on a daily basis.  The blade was easy to keep sharp with my Spyderco Sharpmaker.  I had the desert tan model with partial serrations on the blade. The combo edge made it simple to cut straps and rope whenever I needed to–but even better, it made short work of that horrible plastic packaging strap stuff that boxes so often come bound up in.  I would just slide my knife under the strap, twist it so the blade was facing up and give it a quick pull/slide across the strap and the straps would slice right off of the box.

Of course my Boker Kalashnikov makes short work of opening packages, but really, almost any knife can do that. The real question was, could the knife do more than the average EDC knife.  The answer is a resounding YES.  One time, and I probably should be ashamed to admit this but I really like to put my knives through the paces to see if they are great or not, I even used my Kalashnikov to help me replace a section of my sprinkler system.  I used it to cut funny pipe.  I even used it once to cut through a piece of 3/4 pvc pipe because I wanted to see if the knife could do it.  It did.  I had to saw a bit to get the job done, but the serrations cut right through the pvc pipe and I got the sprinklers all repaired.  I don’t suggest you use your knife to do this, but I did and it was tough enough to get the job done.

After six months of hard use, my knife was still in surprisingly good shape.  The blade had a few scratches across the face–which is to be expected considering how hard I used the knife.  The handle had nearly no visible wear and tear.  I did have one short scratch on the front side of the handle where I scraped it across a metal bar as I was pulling my hand out of a tight spot where I was using the knife to cut a string that was behind some shelves.  The ding is almost not visible unless you know what you are looking for.

My review of the Boker Kalashnikov is that it can get nearly any job done.  The blade size is plenty big for most jobs and the AUS8 stainless steel is perfect for daily, heavy use.  The handle is comfortable and rugged.  The knife is nearly indestructible.  Looking for a great automatic conversion knife–consider the Kalashnikov.

 

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