Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife Review

A huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

Due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery expert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree brand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife.

Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife
Boker Plus Wasabi Non-Locking Flipper Knife

Boker Plus:

When Boker explains this line of knives, they say, “In close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security we develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA and Asia.”

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Kansei Matsuno. His bio says, “Kansei was born in 1951 in Japan. He loves fishing and tourism, that’s why, he always needed good hunting knifes. He found very few knifes, which meet his requirements, he decided to make knifes himself. He used difficult technology: using a file to shape the steel billet. He made knives in this way for two years and then bought a simple belt-sander, and in 1992 – the machine BurrKing. Needless to say that productivity and work quality has improved markedly. Kansei enjoyed using instrument, which he made himself, and which was even better, than knifes from stores. Soon, his friends began to ask him to design and built knives for them. Then, in 1998, Kansei started manufacturing knifes only.

In 2001 Kansei visited American knife exhibition for the first time, and in 2002, the quality of his knifes improved and he was admitted for a probationary period in the American Guild of manufacturers of knives. Today, Kansei prefer to create frameworks folding knives made of titanium, stainless steel blades are VG-10b, OU-31, CV-134. Lining the handle makes it out of steel G-10, deer antler, pearl and coral. He changes the design of knife depending on customer requirements. Now, Kansei is manufacturing a series of first-class folding knives with different original designs and high quality.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. This is a tough steel that is relatively corrosion resistant. It is also a martensitic steel that maintains a good edge. For a long while, this was the steel that was most wanted. However, now that super steels and higher end steels are coming out, not as many people are after 440C steel. It does still give people almost everything they want out of a steel. This steel is often compared to 154CM, although it is the inferior steel. The microstructure of 440C is not as fine and uniform as 154CM, which means that the edge is not going to maintain itself as well, you are not going to get as fine of an edge, and it may result in some chipping. That being said, it is easier to work with than 154CM, so it is favored in that manner.

The blade has been finished satin, which is a very common blade finish in today’s knife age. The finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive. The finish showcases the bevels of the blade as well as the fine lines of the steel. The finish gives the blade a very traditional look as well as cuts down on glares, reflections, and even increases the corrosion resistance of the knife.

The blade has been carved into a drop point style blade. This is one of the two most popular blade shapes that you can find. The shape is created with a spine that curves slowly from the handle to the tip of the blade. This creates a dropped point, which is where the knife got its name from. The dropped point allows you to have more control over the knife, which makes fine detail work easier to manage. The point is also broad, which is where the knife gets so much of its strength from. The drop point shape also has a large belly, which makes slicing a breeze—perfect for this traditional EDC knife. The only major drawback that the drop point shape has is because its tip is so broad, you do lose out on most of your piercing or stabbing capabilities. You need to remember that you exchanged these for the strength that you get in return. If you are looking for a knife that is going to pierce well, you should be looking for a clip point blade.

The blade on this knife is a plain edge, which is better suited for taking on a wider variety of tasks. It will give you cleaner cuts. The knife is going to be easier to sharpen as well. Plus, the plain edge is going to excel at push cuts, skinning, and slicing.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of G-10. This is a material that has been made out of fiberglass. It is very similar in properties to carbon fiber, except that it is slightly inferior. Because it is inferior, you can get this material for almost a fraction of the cost, which does keep the overall cost of the knife down. To create this material, the manufacturer is going to take layers of fiberglass cloth, soak them in resin, then compress them and bake them under pressure. This process creates a material that is tough, hard, strong, and even lightweight—perfect for this large knife. Tactical folders and even fixed blades benefit from this material because it is durable, lightweight, and non-porous. The overall pros to a G-10 handle is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons to a G-10 handle is that it is going to be brittle because all of the strands are arranged in a single direction. The other con is that some people feel like it is not as aesthetically pleasing and feel like it lacks elegance.

The G-10 on this handle is black. The handle is completely straight, on both the spine and the belly. The ergonomics are not going to be the most comfortable, but it will serve its purpose. The butt of the handle is slightly rounded and does have a lanyard hole carved into it. If you put a lanyard in it, you can easily wrap the lanyard around the handle if you are ever in dire need of a little extra grip, since this does not offer high amounts of grip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is an advantage for the look of the knife because it does not have holes carved into each end and side of the handle. It is also an advantage because tip down carry is the safer way to carry a knife, because you don’t risk getting your fingers cut if it accidentally opens in your pocket. This is especially important for this knife that is non-locking. However, it is a disadvantage because it is not going to be comfortable for everyone to carry in their own way.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fully manual knife that has been equipped with a flipper. It is a non-locking knife which means that there is no locking mechanism to keep it super secure when you are using it or securely closed when you are not. This just means that you are not going to want to use this knife for heavier duty tasks because it will probably close in on itself. Because it is a fully manual knife, it is going to be legal in more areas than an automatic knife would. This is because it does not fall under the strict set of laws that an automatic knife does. However, it is not going to be as efficient to use. This knife is going to be easier to maintain than a fully automatic knife, because there is not a spring that you need to worry about keeping in pristine condition. That being said, there are still small pieces inside the handle that you need to keep up on. And, you will need to keep up on the hinge maintenance as well.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4 inches long. The overall length of the knife measures in at 7 inches long. This knife is a lightweight knife, measuring in at only 1.7 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Designer Kansei Matsuno blends classic Japanese style elements with modern gentlemen’s aesthetics in the new Wasabi flipper. Built in 3 different configurations, the Wasabi comes complete with a non-locking slip joint mechanism that houses a decent ball for the blade to remain open but not locked and the ball bearings translates into ultra-fluid action. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features black G-10 handle scales, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade Knife Review

A huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

Due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery expert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the treebrand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of Bohler N690 Stainless Steel. This steel is similar to 440C steel and has a carbon content that is around 1.07%. This steel is a high end stainless steel with an alloy that is common in many good knives. This is a durable knife steel that is wear resistant while also being a hard steel. The most common steel that N690 steel is compared to is 440C, because it is also a high-chromium stainless steel. The steel is going to be easy to re-sharpen and it offers a good value.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is the most common blade finish that you are going to find on the market today. It is also the most traditional blade finish that you are going to find on the market today. The finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive, which is normally a sandpaper. As a key, the finer the sandpaper or other abrasive, and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish is going to look. Because it is a Boker knife, the finish is going to look incredibly clean. The satin finish does a few other things as well: it decreases the amount of glares and reflections that the knife is going to give off and it increases the corrosion resistance of this steel slightly.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point style blade. The drop point style blade is one of the two most common blade shapes on the market. This is because it is both versatile as well as tough. The shape is created with a spine that extends from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curve. This creates a lowered point, which is going to give you the ability to perform fine detail work with. The point is the key characteristic of the drop point knife, but not just because it is dropped. It is also because it is broad, which is where the drop point knife gets the strength that it is known for. The drop point blade shape is able to withstand more than the clip point because of how tough the point is. This blade shape also has a very large belly that is going to make slicing a breeze. The drop point blade shape does have one major disadvantage: because the point is so broad, you do lose out on much of your piercing and stabbing capabilities. This is the opposite of the clip point, which is ideal for piercing, but not ideal for strength.


The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Canvas Micarta. Micarta is a popular type of a phenolic, which is a substance made with the organic compound Phenol, a type of resin. This material is created with tin layers of canvas that are soaked in a phenolic resin. This creates a product that is lightweight, strong, and looks a little nicer than G-10. This material was actually originally introduced as an electrical insulator but was found to be a great option for knife handles.

That being said, Micarta does not have any surface texture. It requires a lot of hand labor to produce and then carve some sort of texture into the knife. The more manual labor a material requires, the more expensive it is going to be. This means that Micarta is definitely going to raise the cost of the knife. Some people worry that because the manufacturer carves the texture into the knife that the material is going to be easily scratched. That is not an issue. Micarta is incredibly hard and not easy to scratch, which is why it does cost so much to put the texture in it. The overall pros of this knife material are that it is tough, light, and durable. The overall cons to this knife material is that it is expensive and it is brittle, just like G-10.

The handle is very simple for a fixed blade. There are finger guards on each side of the handle. They are not the largest finger guards that you are going to find, but they will do the trick. The spine is pretty straight, but does bulge out slightly. Towards the end of the handle, it curves towards the butt, which is pretty pointed. The belly of the hadnle has a bulge in the middle, which is going to the user a more comfortable grip on the knife. On the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole, which allows you to have this knife with you throughout more situations. You can wear it around your neck or even tie it onto a pack of some sort.


The Mechanism:

This is a full tang fixed blade.

A full tang knife is a type of knife that has the metal from the handle extend clear through the handle to the butt. This is definitely the tougher of the fixed blades, because there are no weak spots where the handle and the blade have been welded together. Not only that, but if the handle scales happen to break, you still have the entire blade shape to use. This is an ideal option for a tactical knife, where you are going to need the strength. It is also an ideal option for a survival or outdoors knife where you are heavily relying on your knife. You will be able to take on harder tasks with this than you would be able to if it were not a full tang knife.

A fixed blade knife is a type of knife that lacks a mechanism. You do not fold the blade into the handle. It is one continuous knife. Fixed blades have a few advantages. For starters, they are the superior tactical and survival tool. They are superior in tactical situations because you can bring it into play much quicker than you would be able to bring a folding knife into play. All you have to do is pull the knife out of the sheath and then it is ready to go. With a folding knife, you would have to remove it from your pocket, open it, and then you would be ready to go. It is a superior survival tool because you can do more with it than just slice. Because it is a full tang, you can dig, split wood, use it for food preparation, use it for first aid, or almost anything you want. The fixed blade is also going to be easier to maintain and clean.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that this knife comes with is made out of leather. Leather is the most traditional material that you are going to find for a knife sheath. This material is very rugged, tough, and strong. This knife is not going to break like the modern material such as plastic would. If the stitches happen to come undone, they can easily be re-sewn. A leather sheath not only feels good, it looks good. Plus, if you take care of this knife sheath, it is only going to look better as it ages. There’s even more though, the leather sheath is very versatile and will actually provide your knife with a custom fit once it is broken in. The leather is also going to be silent, which means that you can easily pull the knife out and put it back in without making a single sound.

Of course, it is going to have its disadvantages. Leather is not waterproof. If you happen to get it wet a lot, it will dry out the oils and the leather will crack. On the flip end of the spectrum, if you expose this sheath to high heat, the oils will dry out and the sheath will crack. That being said, both of those cracking issues can be prevented if you oil it occasionally.

 

Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade
Boker Classic Green Cub Micarta Fixed Blade

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.8 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.6 inches long. The overall length of the knife measures in at 8.4 inches long. The knife itself weighs in at 4.6 ounces. The sheath that it comes with weighs in at 2 ounces. This knife was made in Germany.

 

Conclusion:

             The Cub is another Lucas Burnley designed fixed blade that has quickly gained praise from consumers on a global scale thanks to its clean versatile design and ergonomic profile. With a sturdy full tang design, each product is also complimented with Micarta handles that allow them to get wet without losing traction. The Boker Classic line of knives are manufactured in the City of Blades Solingen, Germany and have been since 1869–ranking as a global innovation leader for more than 145 years. This model features green canvas Micarta handle scales, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the brown leather sheath supports a belt carry option. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife Review

Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife
Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife

A huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

Due to rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery expert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

Heinrich considered the chestnut tree as an ideal, memorable logo which belonged to the Remscheid company with an arrow as well. One of the rare and precious documents which survived the total destruction of WW II is an ad of Böker Remscheid from 1874, showing both logos.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the treebrand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today, we will be discussing the Boker Plus Picador Flipper Knife.

 

Boker Plus:

When Boker explains this line of their knives they say, “In close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security we develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA and Asia.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. This is a tough and relatively corrosion resistant martensitic stainless steel that maintains a good edge. For many years, this was the peak of cutlery steel, but now there are super steels on the block. However, even today, it does make a great option for a blade steel that fits for most people’s requirements. This steel is similar to 154CM, although it is slightly inferior in corrosion resistance, wear resistance, hardness, and even edge holding. Also the microstructure of 440C is not as fine and uniform as 154 CM, which results in the steel not taking as fine of an edge and it can lead to some chipping on the blade as well. 440C belongs to the family of stainless steels that include 440A and 440B, the major differences being the variance in carbon content between the three.

The blade on this knife has been polished into a mirror finish. A mirror polish is done by hand, polishing the metal into a highly reflective surface. It gives the knife a fantastic look and does offer better corrosion resistance because of how smooth the blade is. However, this finish does require a lot of maintenance to keep its look, which makes it not a great option for tactical, survival, or any other heavy duty type of chores. Also, the amount of work that needs to be put into this blade to get it to a mirror polish does result in an expensive blade. This finish is mainly used for a presentation finish. It can be quickly scratched if you are choosing to use this blade.

The blade has been carved into a spear point blade shape. This is a symmetrically pointed blade that has a point that is in line with the center of the blade’s long axis. To create this uniform shape, both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the center of the blade. This knife has been known to be similar to the needle point blade because it is good for piercing. However, unlike the needle point blade, the spear point has a point that is strong and sharp enough for piercing. While the needle point has a very sharp but weak point that is known for snapping when used against harder targets. The spear point blade also features a lowered point, which is easily controllable and great for fine tip work. One of the other great features about the spear point blade is that they do contain a small belly that can be used for some cutting and slicing. If you were to compare the spear point belly with that of a drop point or a clip point though, it would look incredibly small. The spear point blade is known to be a hybrid design, great for somebody who wants a good balance between all of the traits.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of titanium liners with G-10 handle scales.

Titanium is a lightweight metal that is going to give the knife high corrosion resistance. Because it is a little tougher than your typical metal, it is going to be more expensive to machine, which does raise the cost of this knife. Titanium is a very sturdy metal while also having a springiness to it, which is why it makes a great liner material.

G-10 is made out of fiberglass that has been soaked in resin and then compressed together. It has also been baked under pressure, which creates a very tough, hard, strong material that is still incredibly lightweight. Although it is such a tough material, it does tend to be brittle. This is because all of the fiberglass strands are arranged in a single direction. This creates a material that is incredibly strong in that particular direction but will begin to break apart or crack if it is stressed in any of the other directions. Because the two handle materials are so lightweight, the overall weight of the knife is definitely going to be low. Texture can be easily added to the handle, which does create a very solid and comfortable grip. The overall pros to the G-10 is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons are that it is brittle and some people feel like it lacks elegance.

The titanium liners on this knife have been anodized blue, which show through the G-10 handle scales that are black. This creates a magical looking handle because the blue does shine through. The G-10 has been skeletonized with four holes of varying sizes carved out of the middle of the handle scale. The spine and the belly of the knife have the same symmetry that the blade does. Each side does have a finger guard that is a piece of the blade metal. Then each side curves in as a finger groove. This groove is both comfortable and will give you a solid grip on the knife. The middle of the handle does bulge out. Near the butt of the hadnle (which is pointed) there is a row of thick jimping that will give you even more control when you are using this knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a disadvantage because tip up carry is the more dangerous way to carry a knife. And because the hadnle has only been drilled for the traditional side of the handle, it is not going to be as ambidextrous.

 

The Mechanism:

             This knife has been equipped with a flipper as well as a liner lock.

The flipper is a small triangular piece of metal that is part of the blade. When the knife is closed, it extends out of the spine of the handle. The user can use this to pull back on, which will flip the knife out of the handle and lock it into place. The liner lock is a little more complicated to get the hang of than the thumb stud, but it is safer to use and does not protrude off the blade and get in the way.

Liner locks are one of the more common mechanism seen on folding knives. The mechanism’s key characteristic is a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the sharp edge of the blade, which lines the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, that tension will slip the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, allowing it to rest firmly in place. This tension will also prevent it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to use your thumb or other finger to push the spring bar down so that it clears contact. Then, you can push the blade into the hadnle and lock it into place. The liner lock allows a knife to have two true sides, which is perfect for this symmetrical blade. You can also close the knife with one hand without switching grip, which is perfect for those two-handed jobs. However, this is not the sturdiest locking system, which means you shouldn’t be doing your toughest jobs with this knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.4 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.4 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.8 inches long. This knife is a very lightweight knife, weighing in at only 2.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Picador is a liner lock designed flipper that combines tactical elements of the flipper with the refined elements of a 3-D machined pocket clip and blued titanium liners. Every Picador boasts a bearing-mounted blade that is deployed with the triangular spine flipper and the nature of the handle scales really help reduce the overall weight. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features skeletonized black G-10 handle, blue anodized titanium liners, a spear point blade in a mirror polished finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife.

Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife
Boker Magnum Doorkicker Folder Knife

Boker Magnum:

When Boker explains Magnum by Boker, they say, “The attractive brand from Boker with a great price-performance ratio. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives from all categories, from traditional pocket knives, to hunting knives and modern knives. Latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Doorkicker is made out of 440A stainless steel. This steel is in the 440 family which includes A, B, and C. Compared to B and C, A does have a lower carbon content, which is going to make the steel a little bit softer. This is not always a disadvantage because the softer the steel, the easier it is going to be to sharpen or work with the blade. 440A is extremely stain resistant, which will help cut down on maintenance time. The biggest advantage about this steel is that it is a budget steel and keeps the overall cost of the Doorkicker down considerably. That being said, 440A stainless steel does not have high wear resistance. It will probably have enough wear resistance for an EDC or ever some camping and outdoor tasks. However, this knife is not going to make a good survival knife because of the steel chosen.

The blade has been coated black. The coating is going to increase the wear resistance, which is a very important quality on this steel that is lacking the wear resistance already. It is also going to increase the corrosion resistance because it does create a barrier between the steel and the elements. Overall, the coating is going to prolong the life of the blade. However, all coatings do scratch off after time or heavy use. Once the coating has been scratched off, it does not provide the same benefits and can actually be worse for the blade than a non-coated blade. This is because the areas that are scratched off can create drag and unwanted friction.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. This is one of the two most popular blade shapes on the market today. It is a good all-purpose blade that is going to excel at piercing. The blade shape is similar to the drop point, but does differ slightly. The spine of the knife extends from the handle to about halfway up the knife. At this point, the spine turns own and continues to the point of the knife. This area looks as if it has been clipped off the knife and is referred to as the clip, which is where the knife shape got its name from. Because of the clip, the point is lowered, which is why this knife is so easily controllable. Also because of the clip, the blade is sharper and thinner at the spine, which is why this knife is going to excel at stabbing. However, this tip shape is also one of the shape’s biggest disadvantages. Because it is so narrow, it does have a tendency to break or chip when being used on harder targets. The clip point blade shape is so versatile because it does feature a very large belly area that will make slicing a piece of cake.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Doorkicker is made out of polymer. A polymer is a synthetic material that is either a plastic or a resin. Either way, this is a modern material that is going to be durable, but still lightweight. The handle is not completely prone to breaking and can suffer from being brittle, but it will get the job done while also keeping the cost of the Doorkicker down. The handle has been finished black, which creates an all-black knife.

The handle has a unique shape. In the middle of the handle, there are three rounded indents that run down the length of the handle. This will give you more texture and grip when you are using the knife. The spine of the knife is pretty straight, but does have a few rows of jimping-like grooves that are going to give you more texture when you use the knife. The belly of the handle has a finger guard that is enhanced by the flipper when the knife is opened. It then has a rectangular finger groove. This groove has jimping inside of it. The handle then bulges out before curving in toward the butt that does flare out slightly. This handle is going to be comfortable to use for long periods of item and give you the necessary grip for your EDC tasks.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife has been statically designed for tip down carry and only on the traditional side of the handle. The fact that it can only be attached for tip down carry is both an advantage and a disadvantage. This is an advantage because tip down carry is the safer way to carry a knife. This is because if the blade accidentally gets deployed while it is in your pocket, you can still safely reach into your pocket and remove the knife without a blade point waiting to greet you. It is a disadvantage because it will not allow each individual to carry this knife in the way that is most comfortable for them. This pocket clip can also only be attached on the traditional side of the handle. This is a disadvantage because of the same reason: every user is not going to be able to carry this knife in the direction that is most comfortable for them. However, from an aesthetics side, it does look nicer to not have drilled holes all over your knife.

The pocket clip is a deep gray that matches the blade and the handle. The pocket clip is attached by three metallic grey screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The clip is slightly skeletonized to cut down on weight, which is needed on this knife. The pocket clip also tapers triangularly towards the end of the clip.

This is a deep carry pocket clip which means that this knife is going to rest lower in your pocket than an average pocket clip. This accomplishes two things. First, it makes it easier to conceal your knife in your pocket. And second, it keeps the knife more secure inside your pocket so that you can move around more freely without worrying about your knife falling out.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a flipper knife that has been equipped with both a spine flipper as well as a dual thumb stud. The Doorkicker is also equipped with a liner locking mechanism.

The flipper is an opening mechanism that is easy to use once you get the hang of it. At first though, it is going to be the harder of the two opening mechanisms to use. It is a small triangular protrusion that extends off the blade. When the knife is closed, it extends out of the spine of the handle. The user can hold the knife with their hand while using their finger to pull back on the flipper and flip the knife open where it will lock into place. Once the knife is opened, the flipper does act as an enhancement to the finger guard. The flipper is the safer of the two mechanisms to use because when you are opening the knife, it does not put your fingers in the path of the blade like the thumb stud would. The flipper is ambidextrous by design, which is a major advantage.

A dual thumb stud is a thumb stud that extends out on both sides of the blade. This makes it ambidextrous. The thumb stud is probably the most common of opening features on folding knives. It is easy to get the hang of and easy to use. It is a small barrel that sits near the end of the blade where the handle begins. The user holds the knife with one hand and uses their thumb to push on the thumb stud which will flip the knife open. The thumb stud is easy to use, even with just one hand. However, when you are opening the knife, the thumb stud is going to put your hand in the pathway of the blade. There have been plenty of accounts of someone trying to open their knife with a thumb stud and cutting themselves instead. No matter which opening mechanism you choose to use, the knife is going to open smoothly and efficiently.

The Doorkicker has a liner locking mechanism. The liner lock is one of the more common opening mechanisms that you are going to find on folding knives in today’s cutlery industry. The key characteristic of a liner lock is that it has a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the sharpened edge of the blade, which will line the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, that spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, that same spring bar tension slips the bar inward, which puts it in the path of the butt of the blade, which will keep it locked in place. Liner locks are great because they do allow the knife to have two true sides, which does help this knife become more ambidextrous (too bad the pocket clip is not ambidextrous friendly.) While the liner lock is a great mechanism, it is not going to be a great mechanism if you want to do heavier duty tasks. This is because the liner lock is not as durable as other locking mechanisms.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.8 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 8.3 inches long. This knife weighs in at 6.6 ounces, which is definitely a heavier knife. This is partly due to how long the knife is; there is just going to be extra weight with the extra length. But it is also partly due to the fact that it has a stainless steel blade, which is going to add considerable weight to the knife.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Doorkicker breaks down the notion that all tactically inspired knives need to cost a fortune. Each liner locked designed models sports an all-black tactical profile complete with plenty of ergonomic contouring and each stainless steel blade can be deployed with the use of the spine flipper function or the dual thumb stud design. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features a black soft polymer handle, stainless steel liners, a clip point style blade in a black finish and the extra-long pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

Boker Plus Kihon Tanto Stainless Steel Flipper Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

A fun fact about Boker is that they were one of the first companies that offered ceramic knives as a featured product line.

 

Boker Plus:

             When Boker is describing their Boker Plus line, they say, “In close cooperation with international acknowledged experts from military, police and security we develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA and Asia.”

 

The Designer:

             This knife is designed by Lucas Burnley. Lucas’ formative years were spent traveling North America with his family where he was raised on a steady diet of adventure in the campgrounds of National Parks and under the tutelage of some of the best action movies of our time. Lucas views knives as a personal expression of independence, self-reliance, and fun—ideas and philosophies he began formulating as a, bowie-toting 7-year-old. He designs in a style that he considers to be Post-Tactical™, blending clean modern lines with tactical origins. Above all, he believes that utility shouldn’t come at the cost of beauty. Along with his custom line and BNRLY Brand (limited production), Lucas works closely with companies Böker and CRKT to continue making his designs available to a wider audience.

 

The Blade:

             The blade on this knife is made out of D2 Tool Steel. This is a high end tool steel that is often referred to as a semi-stainless steel. This is because it falls just short of the required amount of chromium, which is 13%, to qualify as a full stainless knife. However, it does still provide a good amount of resistance to corrosion. However, in the semi-stainless steel category, D2 is one of the hardest ones, especially when compared to the popular 154CM or ATS-34 steels. This means that it is going to hold its edge a little better than the other semi-stainless steels. However, it is not as tough as many other steels and it is also extremely hard to sharpen. You will need to be a master-sharpener, or will need to find a master-sharpener to get a fine enough edge on this steel, and thus, this blade.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is one of the most popular blade finishes in the cutlery industry to date. The finish creates a classic look, which Boker is known to love. Not only that, but the finish also showcases the fine lines in the steels as well as showcasing the bevels of the blade. The satin finish can also increase the blade’s corrosion resistance slightly, although not enough to really account for much. The finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive. The fine abrasive that is most commonly used is a fine sandpaper. The finer the sandpaper and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish is going to look. Because it is a Boker knife, and Boker is known for tradition, the finish is going to be very clean.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a tanto style blade. The tanto blade shape is not designed as an all-purpose blade, but rather a blade that is going to do one thing and do that one thing incredibly well. This blade shape was originally known and designed to pierce through armor, but was redesigned and popularized by Cold Steel in the 80s. This shape is still similar in style to the Japanese long and short swords that it was based off of. The tanto knife has a high point with a flat grind, which leads to an extremely strong point. This point is going to excel at stabbing into hard materials. This is because the point does contain a lot of excess metal near the tip, so it is able to absorb the impact form repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to break. Something else that is unique about this blade shape is that the front edge of the knife meets the spine at an angle, rather than your typical curve. This means that the blade is not going to have a belly, because it has been sacrificed for a stronger tip. That being said, because it does not have a belly for slicing, you aren’t going to want to use this knife as an EDC or a general utility knife. But, if you are ever in a situation where you need to pierce through hard materials, this knife is going to be your guy.

 

The Handle:

             The handle on this knife is made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel is going to provide high durability for a knife while also being incredibly resistant to corrosion. The biggest disadvantage of a stainless steel knife is that it is not very lightweight and will significantly increase the weight of this knife. Plus, stainless steel handles are sleek. While this sleekness does look good, it also causes the knife to be pretty slippery, so manufacturers have to incorporate etchings to give the user the needed friction. This extra work is also going to increase the cost of the knife. Because it is such a heavy material, stainless steel liners should be avoided in an EDC knife or even a heavy duty knife, because of the added weight. The overall pros to a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. The overall cons to a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be heavy and it can be slippery.

The knife handle is unique, which the spine of the knife being almost completely straight. This is similar to the belly, which is also incredibly straight. Both the spine and the belly do taper out towards the butt of the handle. Because it gets wider at the bottom, you are going to have a solid grip on the knife. While the other ergonomics are not the highest quality for a secure grip, the tapering of the hadnle really does do wonders. There is a finger indent that will also help with comfort as well as adding a little more grip. Underneath the finger indent is a thick row of jimping, that will give you even more control over the knife when you are using it to slice. The butt of the handle is angled with a point. The butt of the hadnle also has an oblong lanyard hole carved into it. This lanyard hole is ideal for when you want your knife close by but want it out of the way. The lanyard will also give you a little extra grip if you need it. All you have to do is wrap the lanyard around the handle before you grip it. It creates a thick ridge as well as giving you some texture so that you feel like you cannot slip. The manufacturer has carved some ray shapes into the handle, which will provide you with some grip, although not as much as you would find on many other knives.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is an advantage and a drawback. It is an advantage because it does look classy to not have the hadnle full of drilled holes. However, it is a disadvantage because tip up carry is definitely the more dangerous way to carry a knife. If it happens to come open in your pocket and you reach into your pocket, you can slice your hand. There have been plenty cases of people doing this, which is why many people prefer to carry it tip down. Also, because it can only be attached on the traditional side of the handle, it is not as ambidextrous or comfortable for a wide audience.

Boker Plus Kihon Tanto Stainless Steel Flipper Knife
Boker Plus Kihon Tanto Stainless Steel Flipper Knife


The Mechanism:

This is a flipper knife that has been equipped with both a dual thumb stud as well as a flipper. It has been finished off with a Japanese-inspired frame lock.

The dual thumb stud is the same as a regular thumb stud in all ways, except that it extends out of both sides. This means that it is going to be ambidextrous and give the blade to sides, instead of one front. The dual thumb stud is also going to be easy to use, easy to get the hang of, and can be used with only one hand comfortably.

The flipper is a piece of metal that extends off of the blade in a rectangular shape. The user pulls back on this to flip the knife open and lock it into place. It is a little harder to get the hang of than a thumb stud but is ambidextrous by design. When the knife is opened, the flipper does act as a finger guard.

The frame lock is really just the beefed up version of the liner lock. This is very similar to the liner lock, except that instead of an internal spring bar moving into place, it’s part of the hadnle itself. Frame locks are going to be stronger than liner locks, because the piece of metal that slips into place is usually thicker and more durable than that in a liner lock. But, because of their similarity, closing a frame lock is going to be the same as a closing a liner lock—you push down on the spring bar so that it no longer blocks the butt of the blade, remove your fingers from the path, then fold the knife closed. The frame lock is known for being ideal for heavy-duty tasks. This style of locking mechanism is seen more in mid to upper range knives.


The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.8 inches long. This is a heftier knife, partly because it is larger, and partly because of the heavy materials used. It weighs in at 5.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Plus Kihon is a Lucas Burnley designed flipper that is one of many new knives released by Boker this year. Burnley, who is the godfather behind the popular Kwaiken series, created another Japanese-inspired frame lock design that also features a Rick Hinderer designed lock stop that assists in limiting the travel of the frame lock actuator. Furthermore, the stainless steel blade is rapidly deployed with either the dual thumb studs or the spine flipper function thanks to the ball bearing pivot. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features stainless steel handles, a tanto style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

Boker Magnum Green Hope Folder Knife Review

The sign of Boker is a huge chestnut tree. This is the chestnut tree that towered above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century. It is also the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently, Boker tools were very successful on the markets, as they were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries hundred years later on.

The next step in their history was when Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 2000 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. So Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. Heinrich was allowed to take the tree brand with him across the river without any troubles or payments. Since then not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. After over 100 years of existence the venerable tree was cut down by a stroke of lightning in 1925. A gifted artist carved an image of the majestic tree into a piece of original trunk which adorns the CEO´s office in Solingen.

The US market quickly became Boker`s most important sales territory. In 1900 most of the production was shipped to the US and H. Boker & Co. in New York was more and more concentrating on products from the Solingen production. The demand for pocket-knives soon beat that for other products like scissors or razors. The demand on the products increased faster than the production capacities in Solingen, so the Bokers from New York decided to start their own pocket-knife production to which pliers were added later on. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn´t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well. Since then there have been two different product lines of Böker knives on the US market with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers; one product line Made in USA, the other product line Made in Solingen, only to be differentiated by the markings “Boker USA” or “H. Boker Improved Cutlery Solingen”.

Today we will be discussing the Boker Magnum Green Hope folding knife.

Boker Magnum Green Hope Folder Knife
Boker Magnum Green Hope Folder Knife

The Blade:

             The blade on this knife is made out of 440A stainless steel. This steel is considered to be one of the workhorses of the Sports and Tactical Knife industry. Also, the majority of entry level knives use this steel or other steels such as 420HC and AUS-6 steel. 440 steel is a medium carbon, martensitic stainless steel that is actually very corrosion resistant as well as being extremely tough. This steel is not considered to be a premium knife steel, but it is still going to demonstrate some good properties for cutting. This steel is going to take a razor fine edge. This steel is in the 440 series of steel, but it is more corrosion resistant and tougher than both 440B and 440C steel. 440A steel is not usually going to be used for custom knives, because there are better steels on the market.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish, which is the most common blade finish in the cutlery industry to date. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with a fine sandpaper. The finish creates a very traditional look, which was why it was chosen for this gentleman’s folder. The satin finish is also used to showcase the bevels of the blade while also showing off the fine lines of the steel. This finish can cut down on some glares and reflections. The satin finish is going to increase the corrosion resistance levels of the blade somewhat, although not significant enough to not have to worry about maintenance.

The blade has been carved into a drop point style blade, which is also the most popular blade shape that you are going to find on the market. This shape is both extremely versatile as well as being extremely tough, which is why it is perfect for an EDC knife. The blade has a spine that slowly curves from the handle to the point, which creates a dropped point. This is where the blade shape gets its name from. Not only is the tip the defining feature of this knife’s shape, it also is what makes the knife so tough. The tip is broad, which means that it is going to be able to withstand tougher tasks without breaking. The excess metal near the tip is going to allow the knife to take what you give it. Because the tip is dropped, you are going to have more control over it, allowing you to perform fine detail work with this knife. The knife also has a large belly that is ideal for slicing. As a key, the larger the belly, the easier it is to slice. The large belly is going to excel at push cuts, skinning, and slicing. The drop point blade does have one major drawback though—because the tip is so broad, you do lose out on many of your stabbing capabilities. You should remember that by sacrificing those capabilities, you keep the extreme strength that the knife is known for.

 

The Handle:

             The handle is made out of stainless steel liners and G-10 handles. The stainless steel is going to provide the knife with high durability while remaining very resistant to corrosion. Unfortunately, the stainless steel is not a lightweight material and is where this knife is going to get most of its high weight from. The stainless steel is very strong though and will allow you to take on some of those heavier tasks.

G-10 is a type of laminate composite that has been made out of fiberglass. This material is very similar to carbon fiber, except that it can be made at a fraction of a cost. Because it is so much less expensive; you can expect to sacrifice a little bit of the quality. To create this material, the manufacturer is going to take layers of fiberglass cloth, soak them in resin, then compress them and bake them under pressure. The resulting material is going to be tough, hard, lightweight, and strong. One of the reasons that this material is loved is because the manufacturer can create colors other than your typical neutrals, which gives the knife a look that you wouldn’t normally find. Tactical folder and fixed blades also benefit from G-10 because it is durable, lightweight, and does not absorb liquids. The overall pros of this knife hadnle material is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The overall cons to this knife hadnle is that it is going to be brittle and some people do feel like it lacks class or elegance.

The G10 that is on this knife is green. The shape of this knife is made up of a straight spine and a mostly straight belly. There is a very small finger groove, just enough to give you a little bit of grip or texture. Near the butt of the handle on the belly is a row of jimping, which will give you a little more control, wince the ergonomics on this traditional knife aren’t all there. The butt of the handle does have a lanyard hole carved into a small corner of the liner where the G-10 handle scales don’t reach.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip that is on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a drawback because it is not going to be comfortable for each person to use how they want to. However, it does keep the traditional look of the knife alive, which was Boker’s purpose with it. This clip is also not a deep carry clip, which is a drawback because it is not going to stay as secure or as concealed in your pocket as a deep carry clip would.

 

The Mechanism:

             This is a fully manual knife that has been equipped with a thumb stud and a liner lock.

Because it is a fully manual knife, you can expect it to be legal in more areas than a spring assisted knife would be and many more areas than an automatic knife would be. It does not fall under the strict laws of the automatic knife. However, it also does not open as smoothly or as efficiently as an automatic knife or a spring assisted knife would. You win some, you lose some.

The thumb stud is one of the most common opening mechanism that you are going to come across in today’s knife world. It is a small barrel that rests near the back of the blade. The thumb stud gives you a place to set your thumb on while you push on it, which will swing the knife open and lock it into place. The thumb stud allows people to easily open the knife, even with only one hand. It is also easy to get the hang of, which is one of the reasons that it is so popular. The biggest complaint is that the stud can get in the way once the knife is opened.

The liner lock is one of the most common locks that you are going to find on modern folding knives. It is such a popular option because it is easy to sue, easy to assemble or fix, while also staying low on cost. This is definitely not the fanciest lock that you are going to come across, but it is going to get the job done for sure. The lock is made out of the liners, hence the knife. One of the liners is going to be cut out and bent which creates a spring effect, which will engage the back of the blade tang when the blade is opened. Liner locks have been around for a while, but Michael Walker, a custom knife maker made two upgrades that have made them incredibly popular. The first upgrade was a stop pin that anchors to the scales to precisely align the blade when open. The second upgrade was to add a detent ball on the liner lock to hold the blade closed, which also gives you a more aggressive opening action.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.7 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.9 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 8.6 inches long. This knife is a heftier knife, weighing in at 5.7 ounces. Usually, the heaviest knife that you would want with you at all times would weigh in at a maximum of 5 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

             The Hope is an over-built manual folder that should absolutely be taken seriously. Complete with thick liners and circular stand-offs, each frame liner lock designed manual folder sports dual thumb studs for effortless blade deployment and the thumb ramp helps you excel at the finer tasks. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features green G-10 handles atop stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry on the traditional side of the handle. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

Boker Saga 4-Piece Kitchen Knife Set Review

Boker knives have been dated back as far as the 17th century, and it seems that Boker tools have always been successful, because they ranked among the leading products in Germany and neighboring countries a hundred years later. Boker started in Germany and then slowly moved outwards to the neighboring countries. It was in the early 1900’s that the US market became the main customer of Boker production with H. Boker & Co. in New York. While Boker had been producing scissors, razors, and pocket knives, it was the pocket knives that won out in the US market. In due course, the Solingen capacities were exhausted and the New Yorkers started their own pocket-knife product line, to which pliers were added later. Since then, there were two different lines of Boker knives on the US-market, with identical logos and sometimes even identical item numbers, one line Made in USA, the other Made in Solingen.

However, during WWII the contact to USA died. The Solingen factory was completely destroyed with no remaining machines, tools, catalogues or samples. The company also lost one of its most precious commodities: the tree-brand registration was seized according to US law. John Boker Jr. bought it in New York to save it for the further sale of American and German products. Soon aft her war new life began to wake in the destroyed factory. The former craftsmen came back and helped to reconstruct building and production and to regain the high standard of quality.

Restoring their business relationship to Solingen the American cousins placed first orders. Within a few years Boker New York as the principle customer again.

In the early 1960s, Boker USA was sold to the well-known scissors-manufacturer Wiss & Sons, who kept up the production of Boker knives to sell them with Solingen products. Boker scissors disappeared from the market, being a competitor to Wiss. In the early 1970s Wiss sold to the multinational Cooper Industries. For Boker, this change proved beneficial, generating a close business and personal relationship with Cooper, who restore the name of Boker to its former greatness. Today Boker offers the broadest range of sports and collector’s knives with an unmatched variety of blade and handle materials. In July 1986, Boker USA, Inc. was established in Denver, Colorado with Chuck Hoffman, one of the original team members, still in position as general manager with a young, flexible team.

Boker develops premium made knives, and today we will be focusing on the 4-piece kitchen knife set. This set comes with four different styles of knives: the carving/paring knife, the all-purpose/utility knife, the Santoku, and the Chef’s knife.

Boker Saga 4-Piece Kitchen Knife Set
Boker Saga 4-Piece Kitchen Knife Set

The Blades:

Each of the blade’s in this set of knives have some similarities. The first similarites that these knives sport is the blade material. They are all made out of 440C stainless steel. This is an upper mid-range steel that was once considered the high-end in US knife steels. 440C is a good all-around steel that has been overshadowed by many of the newer super-steels on the block, but that does not take away from the high qualities that it possesses. This is a stainless steel that is commonly used on many mass-manufactured pocket knives and represents a solid affordable all around choice. It is reasonably tough and wear resistant, but it really excels at satin resistance, which makes it the perfect option for a knife that you will be using in the kitchen. This steel does hold an edge better than its 400-series counterpart, but this is at the expense of some corrosion resistance. Blades made out of this steel can be sharpened relatively easy. And, out of the 400 level steels, it has the highest levels of carbon and chromium. This steel is usually heat treated to reach a hardness of 58-60 HRC.

These steels have also been finished with a stonewash finish. Personally, the stonewash finish is my favorite steel finish. It has a variety of benefits that make it a great option to use in the kitchen, while also providing you with an appealing, rugged look to the blade. With a stonewash finish, the steel is rolled with pebbles or another abrasive material. You can achieve a variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and the steel that is used. Once the steel has been tumbled around with the pebbles, it is removed and smoothed out. This creates a very rugged, textured look. Some of the benefits of this type of steel is that hides scratches a lot better than other finishes. This finish is one of the lowest maintenance finishes that you can get and the finish works to preserve the blades original look over time. This finish also provides a less reflective nature than a brushed or stain finished blade. Another very positive benefit of having a stonewash finish is that it works to hides the fingerprints very well, so you won’t need to polish this blade as often as blade’s with other finishes.

These blades are stellar for use in the kitchen because they are low maintenance, hide scratches well, and the steel is very stain resistant. These qualities will make your time in the kitchen much more relaxing and smooth, because all you have to worry about is how your food tastes, and not on upkeeping your knife.

 

The Handles:
Another thing that this set of knives have in common is their handles. All of the knives have handles made out of G-10. G-10 is how the knife community describes a glass-based epoxy resin laminate. In layman’s terms, it means that you take a glass-based cloth (usually a fiberglass) and soak it an epoxy resin. Then, using heat and pressure, the manufacturer compresses it into the shape that they desire. G-10 is a great handle material because of how strong it is. Fiberglass is already strong and durable, but weaving it makes it stronger. Then, that fabric is covered in an epoxy resin, which cures into a hard, plastic-like material. G-10 is also a very low maintenance material, which means that it is going to last for a long period of time. It won’t rust, it won’t become brittle, and it won’t soften over time. This material is light, easily workable, and does not expand or contract due to normal temperature and moisture exposure. It is extremely rugged, making it the ideal solution for your kitchen knife set.

 

The Carving/Paring Knife:

Paring knives are designed specifically for intricate tasks because they have a thin blade of 3 to 4 inches that tapers to a point. They can be sued for these more intricate tasks because the user has much more control over them than they would by using a larger knife. However, paring knives can be used for many of the basic utility tasks in the kitchen. These are ideal for cutting garlic and small berries, for peeling fruits and vegetables, and for slicing small food items. This knife is going to be ideal for trimming, slicing (especially the smaller fruits and vegetables, such as garlic and berries), food that needs intricate detail, and coring foods. This knife is not going to excel if you are using it for harder vegetables, because eth knife doesn’t carry enough weight behind it to actually slice the food without applying too much pressure.

The blade on the carving/paring knife in this set has a blade that measures in at 3.9 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 7.3 inches long. The blade has a thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle measures in at 3.4 inches long and this knife weighs in at 1.8 ounces.

 

The All-Purpose/Utility Knife:

The next knife in this set is the all-purpose/utility knife. This knife is sometimes known as a Sandwich Knife, because it is perfect for slicing sandwich meats. This knife is slightly smaller than the chef’s knife, ranging from 4 to 7 inches long, but it is just as versatile as a chef’s knife. It falls right in between the chef’s knife and the paring knife and really gives you the best of both worlds. It is large enough to use on most things that the chef’s knife can be used for such as apples and squashes. But, it is small enough to be used for garlic, small fruits and vegetables, and herbs. This utility knife does have a straight edge which means that you will be able to do more with it; however, you will have to sharpen it more often. This style of knife is really great for all the everyday kitchen tasks. This knife will not excel at larger or heavy duty tasks, or super small tasks, such as berries.

The blade on this knife measures in at 6 inches, with the handle measuring in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 10.5 inches long, with a blade thickens of 0.1 inches. This utility knife weighs in at 3.5 ounces.

 

The Santoku Knife:

Santoku knives are a Japanese-style that is becoming more popular in the United States. Santoku actually translates as “three uses” and refers to the three types of cuts this knife is made for: slicing, dicing, and mincing. This blade has a flat cutting edge and the handle is in line with the top edge of the blade. The end of the blade has a rounded curve. Because of the flat blade, the Santoku doesn’t rock on the cutting surface the way that the blade of a chef’s knife does, so it might take some practice to get used to the style. Most Santoku knives have a blade that is around 6 or 7 inches.

The blade on the Santoku knife that is included in this set is 6.3 inches long, with a blade thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle measures in at 5 inches long, so the overall length of the knife measures in at 11.3 inches long. This knife does weigh in at 6.6 ounces.

 

The Chef’s Knife:

The last knife that is included in this Boker set is the Chef’s knife. Every single kitchen should have a chef’s knife. These are some of the most versatile knives in the kitchen and can really stand up to most tasks. If you could only have one style of knife in your kitchen, I would recommend that you choose a high quality chef’s knife. The average size of this type of knife is between 8 to 10 inches long, which can seem long, but with the extra length comes extra efficiency and more versatility. A spine on the perfect chef’s knife should be thick because the thicker the spin, the more durable the blade is. Chef’s knives are ideal for slicing, dicing, chopping, mincing, and for being used on vegetables, fruits, meats, and fish. Chef’s knives should not be used for skinning large vegetables and butchering and carving meats.

This chef’s knife is on the smaller size, with the blade measuring in at 7.8 inches, the blade has a thickness of 0.1 inches. The handle measures in at 5 inches, making the overall length of the blade 12.8 incest long. This chef’s knife weighs in at 7.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Saga kitchen knife series is a premium German-made set designed by none other than Danish knife maker Jesper Voxnaes. Spearheaded by years and years of experience, Voxnaes set out to incorporate an advanced level of ergonomics that translated well with the high intensity culinary world. For starters, each knife was equipped with G-10 handles–ideal because this virtually indestructible composite is impervious to temperature, but more importantly, moisture. Furthermore, grip security is no issue thanks to the incorporation of flared handle bellies and pommels on the larger models. Each model features black G-10 handles which possess Voxnaes’s signature hollow rivets, stonewash finished blades which assist in hiding wear marks and the black display block allows for the magnetic attachment of each one of the knives. With the four knives that Boker has chosen to include, you will be equipped to take on any cutlery challenge.

 

Boker Magnum Leader Knife Review

A fun fact about Boker is that this knife company as one of the first companies to offer ceramic knives as a featured product line. The history of Boker is that it traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. And a huge chestnut tree towering above the small Boker hardware-factory in the 17th century is the oldest traceable fact about the Boker family. Apparently, Boker tools were very successful, because the company claims that it was procuring 200 sabres a week by 1839 for the use in various wars. By the time the 1860s rolled around the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North American and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. The relationship between the two Boker companies has always been very friendly. In fact, Boker USA was even allowed to take the tree-brand with him across the river without troubles or payments. Since then, not a single product has left the Solingen factory without this sign. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory as destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and the 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker and Co) shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boke reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boke USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA has four brands that it produces knives from. There is the Boker Premium Collection, the Boker traditional line, the Boker Plus line that focuses on Innovation, and Magnum by Boker, which is designed for price and performance. The Boker Leader, the knife that we are focusing on today, stems from the Magnum brand. When talking about Magnum by Boker, Boker says, “The attractive brand form Boker with a great price-performance ration. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction, and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives form all categories, from traditional pocket knives to hunting knives and modern knives. Latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.

The knife that we are talking about today is the Boker Magnum 01MB702 OD Green/Tan Leader Flipper Knife, with a dark grey blade.

Boker Magnum Leader
Boker Magnum Leader

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440B stainless steel. This steel comes from the 440 series of steel. There are three different types of 440 steel: 440A, 440B, and 440C. 440B steel is a low cost stainless steel. It has a carbon content range of .75%-.95% and is almost identical to 440A stainless steel except for the carbon content. This type of stele is not commonly seen in knives. This type of steel can be hardened to about Rc 58, it has good corrosion resistance, and is actually tougher than 440C. However, 440B is inferior to 440C in edge retention, edge sharpness, and is not a premium steel. But, 440B is more ductile than 440C and less brittle. Because of this, it is easier to machine and easier to sharpen as well, making it a cheaper blade steel for production purposes.

The blade on this knife has been finished with a dark grey finish. This is a coated finish that reduces the reflection and glare while reducing wear and corrosion. However, all coatings can be scratched off after continuous heavy use, and the blade would have to be re-coated. Coatings can prolong the life of a blade by preventing corrosion or rust. Quality coatings add cost to the knife, but will provide more corrosion resistance, less reflection, and require less maintenance.

The blade on this knife is carved into a drop point style blade. The drop point blade shape is a great all-purpose knife that can really stand up to almost anything. A drop point blade is one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today. The back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight from he handles to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. Because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are very popular on tactical and survival knives. And because the point on a drop point blade is easily controllable, they are a popular choice on hunting knives. It is the lowered, controllable point that makes it easier to avoid accidently nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. One of the reasons that the drop point blade shape is so versatile is because of the large belly area that is perfect for slicing. One of the biggest advantages of the drop point blade shape is also one of its biggest (and only) disadvantages: the broad tip. It is this broad tip that provides the point strength that you find on drop point knives and do not find on clip point knives. However, because of how broad the tip is, it does significantly reduce your stabbing capabilities with the Boker Leader. If you are looking for an all-purpose knife that doe shave stabbing capabilities, you should be looking for a knife with a clip point blade shape. But, when you have the stabbing capabilities, you will lose a decent amount of the strength behind it.

To keep the Leader such a good EDC knife, Boker has kept the edge on this blade plain. The plain edge is one continuous sharpened blade that makes it easier to sharpen and easier to get a finer edge. The plain edge is going to excel at push cuts, which are tasks such as peeling, skinning, and slicing. However, because it is a plain edge, you are going to have to sharpen your blade more often than if it were a serrated edge. The plain edge is easily the more traditional edge style out of serrated, plain, and the combo edge.

 

The Handle:
The handle on this knife has been made out of G-10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. IT has very similar properties to carbon fiber, yet it can be produced for almost a fraction of the cost. This is because the material is slightly inferior to carbon fiber, but you’ll still get a lot of the qualities that you are searching for. To make this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The resulting material from this process is extremely tough, very hard, super lightweight, and still strong. In fact, G-10 is supposed to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta (although it is more brittle than Micarta). The process of designing the G-10 makes it impervious to liquid and physically stable under extreme temperature fluctuations. G-10 is most commonly black, but is available in various colors, and is usually extremely non slip. In fact, G-10 gives you similar traction whether in wet or dry environments, and sometimes even give you better grip in the rough conditions. Because this material is such a lightweight material, it keeps the weigh to your knife down, so that you aren’t weighed down with this knife in your pocket.

You can get almost any color handle and you can even get a multi-colored handle because of the layering process used to make G-10. On the Boker Leader, the handle is Olive Drab Green and Tan.

The handle has four large divots going down the length of the handle. There are four grooves going down the bottom of the handle, giving your fingers a comfortable place to rest—even if you end up using this knife for long periods of time. The butt of the handle is flat, meaning that you can use it as a hammer if needed. Because this knife is a flipper, there is a finger guard to help keep your fingers safe from slipping and being sliced.

The liners on this handle are made out of stainless steel, which add durability and strength to the handle without weighing it down too much.

On the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole that has a generously dimensioned slit. This slit can even accommodate strong leather straps.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is finished with a satin finish and kept in place by two small screws that match the other hardware on this knife. IN the middle of the clip, there have been three small ovals cut out to add aesthetic.

 

The Mechanism:

The mechanism of this knife is a flipper mechanism with a liner lock. This is an assisted-opening knife, which means that it is a type of folding knife which uses an internal mechanism to finish the opening of the blade once the user has partially opened it using a flipper. The flipper mechanism is a small, triangular protrusion that juts out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. You pull back on this protrusion and it flips the blade out of the handle. Flipper knives offer another way to smoothly open both spring assisted and manual folding knives. The flipper is normally located on the spine of the knife as part of the blade The blade is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it, which not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade but also gives you an added finger guard once the blade is opened. If you are at all concerned for the safety of your thumb, a flipper knife will be more to your liking.

The liner locks are one of the more common mechanism that are seen on folding knives. This mechanisms’ characteristic component is a side spring bar located on the same side as sharp edge of the blade, “lining” the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When fully opened, that tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, keeping it firmly in place and preventing it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to use your thumb to push the spring bar “down” so that it clears contact form the butt of the blade. This lets you sue your index finger to push the blade just enough so that it keeps the bar pushed down so you can remove your thumb from the blade path, then continue to safely close the knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.7 inches long, with the handle measuring in at 4.7 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 8.4 inches long with the Leader weighing in at 5.2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Leader is one of many new mid-year models released by Boker this summer. Each liner lock designed model features a stainless steel blade that is seamlessly deployed with the spine flipper function and a gentle flick of the wrist and the darkened finished nature of the blade is great for hiding wear marks from all the tasks you will be able to accomplish with this workhorse. Couple those aspects with the elongated lanyard hole and multi-colored striped design and you have a product that is an all-in-one. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features two-toned olive drab green and tan colored G-10 handles, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a dark grey finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a real trendsetter that you should pick up today at BladeOps.

 

BladeOps Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 Automatic Knife Review

BladeOps Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 Automatic Knife
BladeOps Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 Automatic Knife

Boker traces its origins to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany—graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American favorites produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. IN 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker was actually one of the first companies that offered a ceramic knife as a featured product line.

Today we will be talking about the BladeOps exclusive Mini Kalashnikov 73 automatic knife that features an S30V stainless steel blade and an aluminum handle.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife has been made out of CPM-S30V steel, which is usually referred to as just S30V stainless steel. This steel was made by Crucible Industries, which is a United States based company.  CPM S30V is a martensitic stainless steel designed to offer the best combination of toughness, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance. Its chemistry has been specially balanced to promote the formation of vanadium carbides which are harder and more effective than chromium carbides in providing wear resistance, as well as bringing in extreme hardness into the steel alloy matrix. CPM S30V offers substantial improvement in toughness over other high hardness steels such as 440C and D2, and its corrosion resistance is equal to or better than 440C in various environments. The CPM process produces very homogeneous, high quality steel that is characterized by superior dimensional stability, grindability, and toughness compared to steels produced by conventional processes. This super corrosion resistant steel is often used on kitchen cutlery as well as other knives that are going to be introduced to some of the more extreme environments. Dollar for dollar, CPM S30V steel is regarded as one of the highest quality knife blade steels that offers you the perfect balance between edge retention, hardness, and toughness. However, this steel does have one drawback: it does provide to be a trickier steel to sharpen and work with than some of the softer steels.

This Exclusive blade has been finished with a satin finish. The satin finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine sandpaper. This process will result in showing off the fine lines of the steel as well as the bevels in the blade. A good satin finish is the most popular blade finish that is used on pocket knives in today’s market; the satin finish is extremely traditional and the medium luster gives the blade a very classic look. A satin finish does slightly increase the blade’s corrosion resistance, although it would be hard to really notice this difference.

The mini Kalashnikov has been manufactured into a drop point blade. The drop point blade (along with the clip point) is the most popular blade shape in today’s cutlery industry. The drop point blade is durable, versatile, and can be found in any type of knives: ranging from hunting knives to a larger Swiss army knife. The blade shape itself is formed by having the unsharpened edge of the knife run straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point is a key component of a drop point blade because of all the things it does for the blade style. For starters, the lowered tip provides more control, which is why this blade style is popular choice on hunting knives. It is this ability to control your blade that makes it easier to avoid accidently ruining the meat. The lowered point also adds strength to the tip. And because of this tip strength and the blades overall ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are also a very popular option on tactical and survival knives. Drop point blades are also very versatile; making them the perfect blade shape for your everyday carry knife. The blade style features a large belly that makes slicing a breeze; the most common thing that you are going to be doing with your knife is slicing, so if you are in the market for a new EDC blade, look for one with a large belly, such as this exclusive Kalashnikov. Drop points really only have one disadvantage to them and that is the broad tip. While the tip does add a significant amount of strength to the blade tip, it does take away most of your ability to effectively pierce. If you are looking for a better piercing knife, look for one that features a clip point style blade. Because of the classic drop point blade on the Exclusive Mini Kalashnikov, you will be prepared to take on almost any task. You will be capable of opening letters, cutting up cardboard boxes, or even skinning game if it comes down to it.

This knife also has a plain edged blade, which is a continuous blade without any teeth. The plain edged blade enables you to take on tasks that are done with push cuts, which are when you push the edge of the blade through the thing to be cut. Some examples are when you peel an apple, you push the edge of the knife under the skin of the apple. When you are chopping wood, you try to push the edge into and through the word. The plain edge is also going to be the better option if you are looking for better control, better accuracy, or if you need to have clean cuts, instead of the jagged edges that a serrated blade would produce.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this Boker knife is made out of aluminum. Aluminum really is a great knife handle option for a variety of reasons. For starters, it is a low-density metal, so while it is very tough, it is also very lightweight. But, it still provides you with the hefty feel that makes you feel as if the knife can actually back you up when needed—because it can. Aluminum is strong, durable, and very resistant to corrosion, which means that maintenance time on this knife is going to be lower than say a knife with a stainless steel handle on it. When the handle is properly texturized, an aluminum handle can provide a pretty solid grip that is also comfortable, even if you are going to be using for extended periods of time. However, aluminum has high conductive properties; if you are going to be using this knife in the winter, be prepared with some gloves, because it will feel like it is biting into your fingers if you don’t. Aluminum is also prone to scratches and dings—although an anodization process will help significantly with that.

The ergonomics make this handle comfortable to hold. There are four deep finger grooves to give you a comfortable grip and also to make this handle easier to hold. The finger groove that is closest to the blade also creates a slight finger guard to protect your fingers from getting sliced if your hand does slip. The aluminum has been heavily textured so that it is not slippery like many aluminum handles are. Along the face of the handle, there have also been three horizontal ridges added to provide an extra portion of texture to help with your grip. To help with control over the knife, there is a section of jimping on the spine of the handle where the handle meets the blade. There is also jimping on the butt of the handle.

Also on the butt of the handle is a lanyard hole. While you might originally thing that lanyards only serve a beneficial purpose on fixed blades, they actually make a great addition to your EDC. While the deep carry pocket clip does keep the knife properly hidden, it does take a little longer to draw your knife out. Enter the lanyard: you can easily grab the lanyard (which doesn’t matter if it is hanging out of your pocket, as opposed to a portion of your knife handle hanging out) and whip your knife out in seconds. Some other reasons to tie a lanyard onto your EDC is to keep this knife from getting lost, or keeping yourself from dropping it into water, or you could add a lanyard on purely for a fashion or style statement.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a deep carry, which means that it will ride as low as it can in your pocket. Not only does this keep it a little more secure, it keeps it more out of sight. This clip is stainless steel and satin finished to match the blade and the other hardware on the knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is an automatic knife. However, it is referred to as an auto-conversion knife. An automatic knife is a type of knife with a folding or sliding blade that is held in the handle. This blade is opened when a button activates a spring inside of the handle.

Automatic knives have a strict set of laws that surround them in the United States, because there has bene a tumultuous history surrounding them. In many states, cities, and areas of the US, automatic knives are not legal to own or purchase. That being said, it is your responsibility before purchasing or owning these knives to know the consequences—not the responsibility of BladeOps.

One of the other laws surrounding automatic knives is that they are mostly illegal to import. This is why this Boker knife is an auto-conversion knife. It was imported as a manual folding knife, but BladeOps has added a spring, along with a few other parts, to make it work like an automatic knife. And, because of these changes, it is now considered to be an automatic knife and the same strict laws surround it.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.5 inches long, with a handle length of 3.25 inches long. The overall length of the knife when it is open is 5.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Boker Kalashnikov automatic knife is one of the most popular side open automatics on the market today considering the price point. This knife, as well as the rest of the Kalashnikov auto family, is referred to an auto-conversion knife which means the knife is produced as a folder knife and then converted via third party to offer the automatic function. The mini Kalashnikov, which is slightly smaller than its full sized predecessor, features an aluminum handle scale with integrated finger grooves for a comfortable ergonomic experience and our exclusive model now features CPM-S30V blade material for unprecedented edge retention and strength. This steel will also cut down on your required maintenance time, because it is so resistant to rust and corrosion. This particular model features a black handle with standard hardware and a drop point blade in a satin finish. The drop point blade is a classic blade shape that will enable you to take on almost any task—from your regular everyday needs to defending yourself. Finally, the deep carry pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only.

*Please note that the seals on the box will arrive broken due to the knife being converted

Pick up your BladeOps Exclusive Boker Mini Kalashnikov 73 automatic today at BladeOps.

 

 

Boker Plus Strike Automatic Knife Review

The Boker name and logo can be dated back until the 17th century where it seems like the Boker tools were very successful on the markets; the tools were ranked among the leading manufactured goods in Germany and neighboring countries for hundreds of years.

Due to the rising demand in a politically restless era Hermann and Robert Boker decided to start with the production of sabers in 1829. Inventories of September 1830 had already proven a weekly production of 200 pieces made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders, and a large number of workers and trainees. With a permanently growing product line of tools and cutlery and the great opportunities of global sales, the family saw the need to distribute the tasks to make the best use of their interests. SO Hermann Boker emigrated to found Boker & Co. in New York, whereas the younger Robert established his company in Canada and in 1865 a branch in Mexico, being the market leaders under the name of Casa Boker until today.

Heinrich only crossed the river Wupper to go to Solingen, where the German cutlery industry was booming. Together with the well-known cutlery exert Hermann Heuser he founded Heinr. Boker & Co. in 1869.

The Bokers in Remscheid and their cousins overseas were very interested and in demand of razors, scissors, and pocket knives from Heinrich’s new enterprise. They had to label their products in a simple manner for overseas markets, as many customers had problems spelling the German name Boker—apart from the widespread analphabetism. Heinrich considered the chestnut tree as an ideal, memorable logo which belonged to the Remscheid company with an arrow as well. One of the rare and precious documents which survived the total destruction of WW II is an ad of Boker Remscheid from 1874, showing both logos.

The US market quickly became Boker’s most important sales territory. Because of the tree-brand being well established by then and the good understanding within the international Boker family, there wasn’t any problem to get permission from Solingen to use the tree-brand for American made products as well.

Today, there are four lines of Bokers. Boker Manufaktur Solingen, which is the premium collection. Boker Arbolito, which is the tradition collection. Magnum by Boker, which is the line that gives you the best price with the best performance. The Boker Strike Automatic is a member of the fourth group: The Boker Plus collection which focuses on innovation. This lien is in close cooperation with international acknowledged experts form military, police, and security as they develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus Knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design, and construction are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA, and Asia.

Boker Plus Strike Automatic Knife
Boker Plus Strike Automatic Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of AUS 8 stainless steel. This is a Japanese made steel that is very similar to 440B steel. This steel is also slightly more resistant to rust and corrosion than 440C but it is going to be less hard. This steel is very tough, although it might not hold its edge as well as some of the more premium steels that do carry a greater degree of carbon. This is because more carbon means more hardness and edge holding. AUS 8 stainless steel is very easy to sharpen as well as it being able to take a razor sharp edge.

The blade on this knife has been stonewash finished. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material, which is generally small pebbles. After the blade has been tumbled with the pebbles, it is removed, and smoothed out. The resulting look is rugged and well-worn which also means that the finish will easily hide scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. One of the biggest advantages to a stonewashed blade is that it is extremely low maintenance. The stonewashed finish also helps the blade preserve its original look overtime because the finish easily hides the scratches and smudges that occur overtime and with use.

The blade on the Striker has been carved into a spear point blade style. This style of blade is very similar to the needle point blade, because they have both been designed to be good for piercing. However, the spear point is a little bit more of a hybrid blade, made for more things than just piercing, so the point on this style of knife is stronger and the blade shape does sport a small belly that can be used for some slicing applications. The shape of the spear point is made up of a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center of the blade’s long axis. Both of the knife’s edges rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. One of the best characteristics of the spear point knife is that it is sharp enough for piercing while still having a strong point; this is almost a combination of the best characteristics of a clip point and a drop point. The spear point knife also does feature a lowered tip that makes slicing more easily controlled while also being useful for fine tip work. Like previously mentioned, spear point blades do contain a small belly, but when being compared to a drop or clip point knife, the belly is extremely small. The best parts about a spear point knife is that it is a very well balanced knife. It has a good balance between piercing and slicing, it also has the balance of the sharp point and tip strength, plus, it sports a small belly that will assist you in slicing. This hybrid blade design is extremely functional.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of black textured aluminum. There are a few characteristics about having an aluminum knife handle that really stand out. For starters, aluminum is a very low-density metal, so while it is going to be super tough, it is also going to be lightweight and not weigh your knife down. Plus, this handle is crazy durable especially when used for knife handles. Unfortunately, aluminum can be pretty slippery, so you have to make sure that your knife is properly texturized to have a secure grip on it. To guarantee that you have a solid grip on this knife, Boker has added a deep finger groove that will give your fingers a place to rest while also protecting your fingers because the groove creates a slight finger guard as well. Opposite the finger groove, there is a slight inward curve that has a row of jimping to give you added control when cutting with this knife. Across the face of the handle, Boker has carved in a series of diagonal grooves. In between the diagonal grooves the face of the handle has been intensely textured to provide you with the best grip around. You won’t have to worry about the environment that you use this knife in—because you are going to be able to use it in almost any environment.

One of the other disadvantages to an aluminum handle is that it does have high conductive properties, which means that if you are using this knife in the winter, it is going to bite into your hand. The last disadvantage is that aluminum is prone to scratches and dings.

The ergonomics of this handle give you a comfortable grip, which is perfect for using for long periods of time. The butt of the handle is slightly triangular and does have a lanyard hole carved into it. This lanyard hole is perfect for keeping your knife near you without it getting in the way. This is ideal for tactical and outdoor adventures, which is exactly what this knife is designed for.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this Boker knife is deep carry, which means that not only is your knife going to stay more secure, but you can also discreetly carry. The clip is long and simple, and has been stonewashed to match the handle. The clip is kept in place by two silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The handle has been drilled so that you can carry this knife tip up or down, but it is only on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is what is known as an auto conversion which means that it has been converted form a manual button lock to an aftermarket automatic knife. Because of this, you need to keep two things in mind. First, your box will be opened, because it has been converted. Second, because it is now an automatic knife, it falls under the automatic knife laws, which are very strict. Automatic knives are not legal in all states, cities, or areas and it is your responsibility to know your local knife laws. BladeOps is not responsible for any consequences.

This is an automatic knife, which is often known as a switchblade. This is a style of knife with a folding blade that is contained in the handle and is automatically opened when a button is pressed on the handle where it locks into the opened position. Many of the current laws stem form 1954, when Democratic Rep. James J Delaney of New York authored the first bill submitted to the U.S. Congress banning the manufacture and sale of switchblades, beginning a wave of legal restrictions worldwide and a consequent decline in their popularity. In 1955, U.S. newspapers promoted the image of a young delinquent with a stiletto switchblade with lurid stories of urban youth gang warfare, often featuring lower class youth and racial minorities, which put fear in the hearts of many people. These people, in turn, voted for the restrictions to be brought into place.
Although it is not as extreme as it was once suggested, this knife is an auto conversion knife because it is still illegal to import switchblades. This is through the Switchblade Knife Act that was passed in 1958, however, in 2009 an amendment was put in place that provides the Act shall not apply to spring assist or assisted opening knives which are knives whit closure biased springs that require physical force applied to the blade to assist in opening the knife. The knives are imported and upon arrival a spring is put into the handle which turns it into a switchblade. If your spring wears down, you can also purchase new springs at BladeOps.

Switchblades do date from the mid-18th century when the earliest known examples of spring loaded blades were constructed by craftsmen in Europe, who developed an automatic folding spike bayonet for use on flintlock pistols and coach guns.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long with a handle that is 4.25 inches long. The overall length of this open knife is 7.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.7 ounces, which is hefty enough that you are going to feel like the knife can take a beating, but light enough that you can have it with you at all times.

 

Conclusion:

This Boker Plus Strike auto knife delivers fast opening action for all your outdoor adventures. Delivering heavy duty, reliable auto action for decades, this Boker features an AUS 8 stainless steel blade and textured polymer handle with finger (index/thumb) grooves for superb EDC satisfaction. This model features a spear point stonewash blade with plain edge. The handle cradles your hand and fingers, while the deep carry pocket clip allows for discreet carry. The knife is an auto conversion which means it has been converted from a manual button lock to an aftermarket automatic knife. Come pick up this phenomenal tactical knife today at BladeOps.