A Review of Four Exceptional CRKT Knives.

Columbia River Knife and Tool Inc., or CRKT, is a knife company that was born in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. They weren’t noticed at first, but when they released the K.I.S.S. knife in 1997, they began to gain ground. CRKT produces a wide range of tools including fixed blades, folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has also collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Pat Crawford, Greg Lightfoot, and the Graham Brothers. Today I have chosen four of the most popular CRKT knives. I’ll go over the pros and cons of each one as well as what makes it a unique knife.

 

The Folts Minimalist Knife:

Folts Minimalist Knife
Folts Minimalist Knife

This knife was a collaboration between CRKT and Allan Folts, who is an acclaimed custom knife maker. He is truly an artist, who looks at both form and function to give you the perfect balance. Folts says that this knife design took over two years to design. Folts took this knife to many different knife shows and took the feedback from hundreds of people to see what they liked and didn’t like about this knife. He would tweak the knife in small ways every time and what resulted was an amazing design and knife.

This knife has a 2 1/8-inch-long blade. This fixed blade is a full tang knife and the steel used is 5Cr13MoV. This is a softer steel than you would find if you were using a high end steel. And because of that, the edge is going to dull a faster than a high end steel; however, this knife is easy to sharpen and you can get a crazy sharp edge on it. Even when you get it right out of the box, this knife is going to be sharp. The Folts Minimalist actually comes in three different blade shapes. When it was originally designed, it had a wharncliffe blade. It wasn’t long before a bowie blade and then a tanto blade followed. The finish on this knife is a stonewash finish. The grind is a hollow grind and this begins around ¾ up the blade.

The handle on the Minimalist is made out of linen micarta scales which are a forest green. This material is actually a better material than you would usually find with a knife this price. The handle is an extremely comfortable handle that will fit well in almost any hand. But, because of the small size, you will probably only be able to fit three fingers on it. But, there are finger grooves in this handle, which help you have a more secure grip. There is a small lanyard at the butt of the handle to allow you to get a better grip on the handle.

The sheath for this knife is made out of Zytel, which is a hard plastic. The blade locks into this sheath very securely. On the sheath, there are six eyelets, which are perfect for attaching things if needed.

The overall length of this knife is just over five inches long and it weighs about 1.6 ounces. This is definitely on the smaller end of the knife spectrum.

Pros of the Folts Minimalist Knife:

  • You can get the edge extremely sharp.
  • This steel is easy to sharpen.
  • You have an option of three different blade shapes.
  • The handle fits perfectly in almost any hand.
  • There are eyelets on the sheath for attaching things.

Cons of the Folts Minimalist Knife:

  • The steel is a softer steel, so it will lose its edge quicker than other steels.
  • You will really only be able to fit three fingers on the handle of this knife.

 

The Hissatsu Tactical Folding Knife:

Hissatsu Tactical Folding Knife
Hissatsu Tactical Folding Knife

This knife got its name because Hissatsu can be translated to “final blow” and this knife is designed to be more of a self-defensive tool than a utility knife. The very first version of this knife was a fixed blade and it was an instant hit. However, the blade on that version was 7 inches long, so it wasn’t an easy knife to conceal or have with you at all times. When CRKT released the folder version, they shrunk the knife down so that it would be easier to have as your everyday carry option.

The blade on this knife is 3.8 inches long and 4mm thick. This is a skinnier blade than you would normally find and it is also on the thicker end of the spectrum. This blade shape was chosen to be able to stab first, and then slash. The shape is a classical samurai design made out of AUS-8 steel that has a non-reflective black coating. This coating is perfect for situations when you don’t want to give away your position and you are worried about the light reflecting off of it. The AUS-8 steel holds its edge very well and stays sharp. AUS-8 is known for its cutting ability. This knife has two flat grinds that each make up around half of the blade. The spine slowly sweeps upward.

The handle on the Hissatsu is five inches long. The handle is a plain handle that has an almost coffin like shape to it. There is a small choil at the cutout that is next to the thumb opening. The knife has a flatter handle than you would normally find. The flatness of the handle is so that you can control the orientation of the knife better than with a rounder handle. When the main purpose of this knife is to stab, you are going to want to have the blade up, so that you can get a better penetration. The handle is made out of Zytel scales which are black and pebbled to give you a better grip. The pocket clip on this knife is a reversible clip, so you can carry the knife on the left or right.

The opening mechanism on this knife is CRKT’s OutBurst assisted opening mechanism. You can also get a non-assisted version if that is what you prefer.

The overall length of this knife is 8.75 inches with a folded length of 5 inches. This knife weighs 4.8 ounces, so while this knife won’t weigh you down, it is sturdy enough to take on your tasks. This knife also has a lifetime warranty.

Pros of the Hissatsu Tactical Folding Knife:

  • The sole purpose of this knife is for self-defense and it can definitely defend you.
  • AUS-8 steel is known for its cutting ability and it holds an edge extremely well.
  • The flatter handle gives you fantastic control of your knife orientation.
  • Ambidextrous pocket clip.
  • This knife can be deeply carried.

Cons of the Hissatsu Tactical Folding Knife:

  • The only purpose of this knife is for self-defense/stabbing, and it won’t be able to do much else for you.

 

The No Time Off Knife:

The No Time Off Knife
The No Time Off Knife

This knife is a collaboration between CRKT and Flavio Ikoma. This is also the first folding knife by CRKT to sport the locking mechanism Ikoma Locking System, or ILS.

This knife has a wide blade that is 2.99 inches and 0.15 inches thick. The steel used in this blade is CTS BD1, which was a newer material for CRKT. This steel has a high carbon content, which means that it is a pretty hard steel. This steel also has good edge retention properties and it has high wear resistance properties. The CTS BD1 steel is also an easy steel to sharpen. The tip of this blade is very strong and can even stab or pry on harder materials. Because most of the curvature of the blade is closer to the tip, it is harder to stab or penetrate, but it is still able to accomplish most tasks that you throw at it.

The handle on this knife is made out of fiber glass reinforced nylon scales that are colored black. The scales also have a waffle iron pattern to add texture and grip. There are two sturdy liners made out of 420J2 steel and also a large spacer. This spacer is there to accommodate the larger blade. There is a pocket clip on this handle which is a tip down clip. It is placed specifically so that it does not affect the grip that you have on the handle.

One of the most unique aspects of this knife is the Ikoma Lock Safety mechanism. This is a steel spring that is automatically placed between the liner and the scale, which doesn’t allow the blade to unlock if you squeeze the handle harder than you normally would. Also, with this system, the knife no longer needs to have a spring protruding into the liner to allow blade closure. It will take a little bit of time and practice to become accustomed to this new locking system, but once you do, it’s almost impossible to no appreciate it.

The overall length of this knife is 7.25 inches with a closed length of 4.28 inches. The No Time Off weighs 5.9 ounces. This is a perfect size for an everyday carry knife.

Pros of the No Time Off Knife:

  • This knife is a perfect size for an everyday carry knife.
  • This knife sports the Ikoma Locking System which is a new and innovative locking mechanism.
  • The steel holds its edge for long periods of time and is easy to sharpen.
  • The tip of the blade is very strong which means you can stab or pry with it.

Cons of the No Time Off Knife:

  • Because of the blade shape, this is not an ideal knife for stabbing or penetrating.

 

The M21 Aluminum Folder:

M21 Aluminum Folder
M21 Aluminum Folder

When this knife was being designed, it was designed to be a variation of the highly popular Kit Carson Big Dog Deep Bellied. However, this knife has a simpler look to it.

The blade on this knife is 3.99 inches long made out of AUS-8 stainless steel. This is a high quality steel that holds an edge for long periods of time and is low maintenance. There are several different blade shapes for you to choose from. Some of these options are a spear tip edge, deep bellied, serrated, or recurve. You can also get razor sharp, semi razor sharp, combined, or triple point. The blade on this knife is 0.14 inches long. The blade is crazy sharp.

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061T6 anodized aluminum. You can get this handle in many different color options. The knife got its name because of the handle material. The locking system on this knife is the AutoLAWKS mechanism. This is a patented system, that ensures when the knife is open that it will stay open. The blade will not close accidently or by force. The knife uses the “Carson Flipper” blade extension which is a small protrusion in the blade that allows for easy opening. Plus, this protrusion doubles as a hand guard. You can open or close this knife easily with one hand.

The overall length of this knife is 9.25 inches long.

Pros of the M21 Aluminum Folder:

  • The steel is a high quality steel that will hold an edge for long periods of time.
  • The steel is a very low maintenance steel.
  • There are many options to choose from for the blade.
  • The blade on this knife is crazy sharp.
  • The handle comes in a variety of different color options.
  • The knife features the AutoLAWKS mechanism.

Cons of the M21 Aluminum Flipper:

  • The pocket clip position is awkward and it ends up being pretty annoying.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT makes a variety of different knives and tools. The four different knives that are in this article: The Folts Minimalist, the Hissatsu, the No Time Off, and the M21 Aluminum Folder are some of CRKT’s best knives. Two of these are fixed blades and the other two are folding knives. These four knives will be reliable and trustworthy for you. They will get the job done. CRKT’s has many unique and patented systems such as the ILS and the AutoLAWKS mechanism that everyone will love. These would be great knives to add to your collection.

 

 

 

CRKT Vizzle Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool Company is an American company that was founded in 1994. CRKT is known for their distinction in design, selection, and quality and for over 20 years, they have put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. This company operates on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To accomplish this, they have been collaborating with some of the best knife makers and designers in the world. Some of these well-known designers are Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham brothers. From these collaborations have been born about fifteen patents and now CRKT owns fifteen patens and patents pending. Some of the better known patents that they own are the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff Serrated edges.

There are two men behind CRKT knives, Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. At this point in time it seems as if they have created legendary knives and it almost seems like that process was a quick and easy one. The process was not quick nor easy. It took about three years for this company to truly take off; it was at the 1997 Shot Show when they introduced the K.I.S.S, Keep It Super Simple, knife. This is a small folder that Ed Halligan designed. It was within just the opening days of the Shot Show that the entire years’ worth of product sold out. They now produce a wide range of fixed and folding blades, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

CRKT has recently released a new everyday carry knife called the Vizzle.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this sleek everyday folder is Jesper Voxnaes. Something unique about him as a knife designer is that when he needs to test a design, he only has to step into his own backyard. The harsh elements and conditions of the fjords and forests in his native Denmark do the rest. When he was starting out, no one was making the kind of knives he wanted to design so he learned to make them himself by trial and error. Apparently his efforts paid off given his IF Award in 2013 for one of the Top European Designs. He now creates and uses knives like the Amicus as he sails, camps, and drives off road, which happens to be more often than he isn’t.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This specific formula of steel comes from a Chinese series of steel. Out of this series, the 9Cr steel is the top dog in quality levels, but 8Cr steel falls shortly behind it. When people are looking for a steel to compare 8Cr steel to, they normally pick AUS 8 steel, but between the two, AUS 8 is the superior steel. 8Cr steel is a stainless steel, but it is also an average steel, so while it does resist rust well, you do need to keep up on your maintenance to keep it in tip top shape. 8Cr is a softer steel, so it will be very easy to sharpen and you will be able to get a very fine edge on it. Surprisingly enough, the edge actually does stay sharp for very long periods of time, which is a total bonus. Especially since softer steels normally don’t have high levels of edge retention. This steel has a hardness level of 58-60 HRC. The biggest benefit that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. While it doesn’t excel at anything, it can take on the majority of tasks, and you get it at a very low cost.

The finish on this steel is a satin finish. This style of finish is created by repeatedly sanding the steel in one direction with an increasing level of an abrasive. The main purpose of a satin finish is to showcase the lines on the knife. This is a very classic finish and in terms of where it falls on the spectrum, it is a medium finish. There are a handful of finishes that are shinier than the satin finish but there are also a handful of finishes that are more matte than the satin finish. The satin finish provides you with a very traditional look.

The blade has been carved into a trailing point shape. The trialing point style is lightweight blade that has a back edge that curves upward. The style gets its name from the point which actually trails higher than the generalized axis of the spine of the knife and blade. Some of the benefits to having a trailing point is that it provides a large belly with plenty of length. This aspect of it is perfect for slicing or skinning. Another one of the benefits is that they offer the sharpest point for fine, delicate, and small work, such as skinning and caping game or fish. One of the most commonly found places for the trailing point blade is on skinning and fillet knives, but they are found elsewhere. The Vizzle would be great for skinning, but it has been designed to be an everyday carry knife, and the fact that it is such a great slicer makes it a great option for your everyday carry knife. With all of the advantages, there are also a couple of disadvantages to the trailing point style blade. The main disadvantage is its weak point. Because this style of blade has been designed for fine and delicate work, it will easily bend or break if it is used on tougher materials.

The edge on the Vizzle is a traditional plain edge. This style of edge is the perfect edge for push cuts, slicing, and skinning. You can get a very fine edge on this style of edge and it is very easy to sharpen. One of the concerns is that a plain edge is not going to be able to saw through some of the thicker materials, but with a sharp enough edge, you will be able to accomplish that.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Vizzle has been made out of stainless steel. One of the biggest benefits to having the handle made out of stainless steel is that it is very resistant to corrosion. With a knife that is so good at skinning and working with wet, bloody, or messy situations, the corrosion resistant handle material is going to be a huge blessing. One of the second main advantages that stainless steel works to give you is its excellent durability. This material can truly take a big beating, which makes it a great option for your everyday knife, when you never know what you are going to encounter. One of the drawbacks to a stainless steel knife handle is that it can be pretty slippery and it is heavy. You are going to feel this knife in your pocket at all times.

To combat the slipperiness of the handle, CRKT did add a row of light jimping on the spine of the handle, near the butt. However, it is still a stainless steel, so there are going to be other knife handles that you have a better grip on.

The handle is fairly straight, but it does still provide you with a comfortable grip. There is no finger groove for you to rest in, but there is a finger guard to protect your fingers from getting cut.

The stainless steel handle has been finished with a stonewash finish. This finish is created by tossing the steel around with small pebbles. It roughs up the steel just enough to give a textured look. After the steel has been tossed around, it is smoothed out and polished. This is one of the more rugged looks that you are going to get with a finish. The best aspect of the stonewash finish is that it preserves the look of the handle over time and effortlessly hides fingerprints and scratches that the handle would accumulate over time.

 

CRKT Vizzle
CRKT Vizzle

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is also made out of stainless steel and sports the same stonewashed finish. It has a flared end and is kept in place by two small silver screws that match the rest of the hardware. On the center of this clip, CRKT has stamped their logo in a darker gray. The pocket clip can only be used for tip up carry and only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a drawback, because it means that the knife is not ambidextrous carry friendly.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is a folding knife that features a flipper to help you open it. The flipper on the Vizzle is a rectangular triangle. The flipper is a small protrusion that juts out of the handle when the knife is closed. To deploy the blade, you pull back on the flipper, providing the knife with enough resistance to “flip” the blade open and then lock it into place.

The blade locks into place thanks to the frame lock mechanism that this knife features. This mechanism is one of the more common locking mechanism that you are going to come across. The frame lock mechanism is very similar to the popular liner lock, but the main difference between the two is that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. Just like the liner lock, the frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, which engages it at its furthest point. The frame locking mechanism is known for their strength and thickness, which means that you are going to be able to perform some of the heavier duty tasks with the Vizzle.

This knife also features the IKBS ball bearing pivot system. This system was designed by Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala. The system uses lubed ball bearings that have been set into the folding knife pivot. Because of the ball bearings, you can quickly deploy the blade, while keeping it smooth and fast. CRKT, talking about using the IKBS ball bearing pivot system has said, “Go ahead, set a flipping land speed record.”

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Vizzle is 3.353 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.144 inches. The overall length of this knife is an even 8 inches long. When the knife is closed, it sports a length of 4.605 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.7 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT said it best when they wrapped up this knife in a perfectly flowing paragraph: “Rough yet refined. Just like you. The stylish Vizzle™ everyday carry folder looks like it belongs in a speakeasy, but the long, sleek blade shape won’t hesitate when it’s time to get down to business. So minimal, it’s as at home in your pocket as your money clip, and it’s just as useful.

Jesper Voxnaes was inspired by traditional fixed blades like the Puukko and Telemark while designing the Vizzle™ in his shop in Loegstrup, Denmark. It mirrors the sleek, clean lines so common among Scandinavian knife designs while still remaining capable enough to come up against whatever it may find. The hollow-ground blade is deployed from the sleek stainless steel handle with a swift, smooth action thanks to the IKBS™ ball bearing pivot system. The stonewashed handle is punctuated with a radar-looking circular pocket for both aesthetics and to help your grip. Don’t worry, we won’t tell if you wipe it clean on your Sunday bests before tucking it away in your pocket. The Vizzle™ pairs best with dry whiskey, fresh air, and a little adventure.”

Pick your brand new Vizzle up today at BladeOps.

CRKT 2784 Desta Folder Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, Inc. is better known as CRKT. This is an American knife company that was established in 1994. Currently, the company is based in Tualatin, Oregon.

This company was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men had previously worked for Kershaw Knives, but decided to leave and create their own company. The company really didn’t take off until the 1997 Shot Show when they introduced the K.I.S.S. which is the Keep It Super Simple knife. This was a small knife designed by Ed Halligan and within the opening days of the show, the entire years’ worth of the product had sold out.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, along with multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

Through these collaborations as well as through their own designs, CKRT has come to own fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of the most popular of these patents include the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

Today we will be discussing the CRKT 2784 Desta folding knife.

 

The Designers:

The men behind this knife are Pat and Wes Crawford, who come from West Memphis, Arkansas. CRKT says, “The Crawford’s know what it’s like to combine old world traditions with new features. Pat, a Knifemakers’ Guild member since 1973, has been a pioneer in the combat folder genre, and was one of the first to use titanium and skeletonize his frames and handles. Wes, his son, has helped integrate exotic field materials including wood, ivory, and stag horn, into their offerings. They’re famous for the CRKT® Triumph N.E.C.K.™— and for pushing each other.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel that has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC. The series, which is an MoV series, originates from China and is most easily compared to AUS-8 steel. However, AUS-8 steel is considered the superior steel even though 8Cr13MoV steel does have a higher carbon content. This steel can hold up to your everyday carry tasks, but it is not going to excel at anything. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. For what you are paying for it, you get a quality steel that resists rust well as well as keeping its edge for long periods of time. However, you do get what you pay for, so this steel is not going to stand up to the newer super steels that are on the block.

The blade has been finished with a stonewash finish. A stonewashed finish is created by tumbling the blade in an abrasive material, which is usually small stones or pebbles. The finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A very positive benefit of stonewashed blades is that they are going to be very low maintenance and preserve their original look overtime. Also the stonewashed finish hides the scratches and smudges that occur with use and with time. This is an acid stonewashed knife, which means that the blade has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment.

The blade has been carved into a clip point. The clip point blade shape is an all-purpose blade. This is also one of the two most popular blade shapes that is in use today. While the most common place that you are going to find this knife is on a Bowie knife, it is also a popular option for everyday pocket knives, such as this one. The shape of the knife is created by having the edge of the knife run straight form the handle before it stops about halfway up the knife. At this point, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This “cut-out” area can be either straight or curved, but on the Desta, it is curved. The “cut-out” area is known as the clip, which is where the blade shape got its name from. Because of the clip, the point is lowered, which provides more control when using the knife. One of the best things that this knife can do is pierce, because it is so easily controlled while also being sharp and thinner at the spine. These characteristics have less drag during insertion and can be withdrawn faster. One of the reasons that this knife is so versatile and all-purpose is because of the large belly area that is perfect for slicing. Of course, every knife shape does have its drawbacks. The clip point blade shapes biggest drawback is that because the point is thinner and sharper than the rest of the knife, it is more prone to breaking or snapping. Especially when inserted through hard objects.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel is going to be incredibly durable for your knife handle as well as being very resistant to corrosion. Unfortunately, this handle material is not going to be lightweight. Plus, stainless steel handles can be slippery, so the manufacturer has to carve in etches or ridges to give the user the needed texture. The overall pros of a stainless steel handle is that they are going to be strong, durable, and very resistant to corrosion. The overall cons of a stainless steel handle are that it is going to weigh the knife down and it can be pretty slippery.

The handle is definitely the most unique aspect of this knife. The front side of it (without the pocket clip) has been hollowed out. There is a slight ridge that is on the front, but other than that, the handle is very flat. To also keep the weight down, the handle has been further skeletonized by having rows of holes drilled on both edges of the knife handle. The side with the pocket knife looks solid. This style is going to keep the weight of the knife down, because it is made out of stainless steel.

The holes will add texture to the handle as well as the skeletonizing. While you aren’t going to have the best grip on the knife, you will have a good enough grip to get your everyday tasks completed.

The handle has a slow curve form the spine of the knife to the butt of the knife. The belly of the knife has an inward curve that is slow and shallow to give you a more comfortable grip. The handle of this knife has also been stonewashed, which matches the blade well while giving the handle a completed look.

CRKT 2784 Desta Folder Knife
CRKT 2784 Desta Folder Knife

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is not reversible. The clip has been attached for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a drawback to the knife because you are not going to be able to carry it in the most comfortable position for yourself. The clip is a deep carry clip, which is going to help your knife fit more securely inside your pocket. This means that while you are going about your daily activities, you won’t have to worry about it sliding out of your pocket. Also, it will help to conceal the knife better than a standard clip would, which means people won’t be as aware of your knife in your pocket unless you want them to be.

The pocket clip as well as the hardware on this knife is all stonewashed.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that has been equipped with a thumb hole as well as a lock back mechanism. This knife does not have a mechanism that makes it automatic or spring assisted, which means this knife is going to be legal in more areas than the other options. Of course, this also means that it is not going to be as efficient to open.

The thumb hole or window is a rectangle that has been cut out of the blade. This hole is in the same place that a nail nick or a thumb stud would be in. This mechanism is easy to use, which is one of its biggest advantages. People will be able to get the hang of it pretty quickly and it isn’t too dangerous to use. Spyderco was the company that really popularized this opening mechanism, but now plenty of companies use it on their knives. One of the biggest advantages when being compared to a thumb stud is that it doesn’t protrude from the blade. This means that it isn’t going to snag on anything or get in the way when you are trying to use this knife.

The lock back mechanism is what you are going to commonly see on classic folding knives. It is made out of a spine on a spring. When the knife is opened, this spine locks into a notch that is carved into the back of the blade, which will hold it into place. When you want to close this knife, push down the exposed part of the spine, which will disengage the lock and allow you to push the blade into a closed position. The lock back has plenty of advantages including how reliable it is in terms of strength and safety. For example, the area to disengage the knife is out of the way of your grip when you are using this knife, which means that it is unlikely that you will have the knife accidentally close on you when you are using it. Plus, when you are closing the knife, the lock back keeps your fingers out of the blade’s path, which minimizes the likelihood of cutting yourself. Of course, every locking mechanism is going to have its disadvantage. The biggest one for this knife is that generally, the user does need to use both hands to close the lock back, which is going to be inconvenient if you are needing to keep one hand on whatever it is that you are cutting. Of course, people have learned how to close a knife with a lock back with only one hand, but it isn’t going to be easy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.574 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.107 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 3.664 inches long. The overall length of the Desta when it is opened measures in at 6.188 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2.3 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT is talking about this knife, they say, “Two simple components designed to take on every last task.

This compact everyday carry folder is as sleek and simple as they come, but features an ahead-of-the-curve forward lock back folding mechanism—the tighter you grip it, the tighter it locks into place. Leave no daily duty left undone with the Desta™.

You’d expect nothing short of innovation from West Memphis, Arkansas designer Pat Crawford. He’s renowned as a pioneer in the combat folder genre, and has clearly demonstrated his expertise with the Desta™.

This unique everyday carry folder was originally designed as a compact self-defense knife, but evolved to be an easy-to-carry everyday companion. Both the blade and the handle feature a black stonewash finish as does the low-profile one-position pocket clip. A covert thumb slot blade deployment activates the smooth action and the forward lock back mechanism secures the blade in place. To close the blade, push up the spine of the handle near the pivot screw to disengage the lock.

Desta translates to joy and happiness—take down daily tasks with delight with this compact EDC.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps and have your new favorite EDC knife.

 

 

CRKT Drip Tighe Spring Assist Knife Review

CRKT Drip Tighe Spring Assist Knife
CRKT Drip Tighe Spring Assist Knife

Columbia River Knife and Tool, CRKT, company is an American company known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over twenty years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. This company was established in 1994 and is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. It was founded by Paul Gillespie and Rod Bremer. Both of these individuals were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. The company did to truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife was introduced. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan, was a success. Within the opening days of the show the years’ worth of the product was sold out. They sold 4-5 times original production numbers resulting in a tripling of production efforts.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. These include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges. The Outburst is the company’s proprietary mechanism for their assisted-opening knives. These knives are standard pivot joint liner lock or frame lock folding knife. Inside the knife there is a spring tab that catches the tang of the blade as it is manually opened. Once the blade reaches thirty degrees, the spring takes over and quickly snaps the knife open.
The Lock Back Safety mechanism, also invented by Ron Lake, is similar in faction to the LAWKS mechanism. It is a lock back folder with a switch that can prevent the locking bar form depressed. Inside the handle there is a small rod with a flange near the butt of the handle. The other end is connected to a switch near the pivot end. When the switch is pulled back the lock functions as a regular lock back. When the switch is closed the flange on the rod slides under tip of the locking bar at the butt end. This prevents the depressing of the bar and the blade from unlocking. When the knife is closed the system functions the same way to lock it closed or allow it to open.

CRKT operates on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand and it is these collaborations with these designers in the world that help them get there. It is with these collaborations that they pull out the game-changing designs.

Today, we are going to be going over the Drip Tighe Spring Assist knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. This is an upper mid-range steel that originates from China and is comparable to AUS-8 but containing slightly higher carbon content. You typically get great value for money with this steel and good manufacturers have mastered the heat treatment process to bring out the best qualities in it. With quality heat treatments, the steel will be able to retain for a long time the sharpness of the cutting edge and will have very good corrosion resistance. This is a popular budge brand of knife steel and at its low cost demonstrates very worthy characteristics of cutting. Knives made out of this steel will keep sharpening well and at the same time, they are easy to sharpen, and have highly aggressive cuts on soft materials. Many popular manufacturers often use this steel in their products. This steel is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. Many features made the 8Cr13MoV steel suitable for production of non-expensive tourist and urban knives with good average performance. As a note: don’t bother with anything less than 8Cr in this series—7Cr and less isn’t worth your time or money, lacking the carbon necessary to hold an edge even during mild use.

This blade has been finished with a satin finish. The satin finish is a semi-shiny finish with a luster falling between bead blasted, which is matte, and mirror polish, which is a high gloss. This is the most popular blade finish on production knife blades, it shows fin buffing liens with two directional finishes that better display the bevels of a blade. This finish is less expensive than both the mirror and polished finishes. It does have decent corrosion resistance, but less than polish or mirror finished knives. To create this blade finish, you sand the blade in one direction with increasing degrees of a fine abrasive, which is generally a sandpaper. The finer the abrasive and the more even the lines; the cleaner the satin finish blade looks. A nice satin finish takes time and can increase the cost of the knife, but it does give you one of the most traditional looks that you can get.

The blade on the CRKT Drip Tighe knife is a drop point blade shape. This is a great option if you are looking for a great all-purpose knife that can really stand up to anything. A drop point is one of the most popular blade shapes in use today. To from the shape of the blade, the back edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, creating a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. Because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are a very popular option on tactical and survival knives. And because the tip on a drop point blade is easily controllable, they are a popular choice on hunting knives. It is this lowered, controllable point that makes it easier to avoid accidently nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. One of the last benefits of this blades shape is that a drop point blade features a large belly area that is perfect for slicing. One of the only real disadvantages of the drop point blade is that it does sport a relatively broad tip, which makes it less suitable for piercing than the clip point. You should keep in mind that it is this broad tip that provides you with point strength that you could not find on a clip point knife.

This blade does sport a plain edge. The plain blade is one continuous sharp edge and is the most traditional edge option that you can find. They serve a much wider purpose as their most useful application is what most of us think of when we think of suing a knife: a strong, steady pressure. Another key advantage of a plain edge is that it doesn’t snag or fray when cutting through some ropes. A plain edge cuts cleanly.

 

The Handle:

The handle is the most unique part of this knife. It sports a very unique pattern that almost looks like paint runs/drips across the middle of the handle. The handle is made out of carbon fiber and G-10. Carbon fiber is when thin strands of carbon have been tightly woven and then set in resin. This material is a crazy strong, yet lightweight material that is also rather expensive. While it is strong, it is far from indestructible and suffers from being brittle. As an analogy, think of the carbon fiber as a bunch of straws that are stuck together. In one direction, it is super strong, but it will start to break apart when stressed in other directions. Because its brittle it can crack if subjected to sharp impacts. Due to the way in which the carbon “weave” reflects light you can achieve some nice looking results in a knife handle. Production of carbon fiber handles is a labor intensive process, though, so it tends to be found only on the higher end knives.

G-10 is a grade of Garolite that tis a laminate composite made of fiberglass. IT has very similar properties to carbon fiber, yet it can be had for almost a fraction of the cost. The manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass clothe and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. This material is extremely tough, hard, very lightweight, and strong. In fact, G-10 is considered the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta. While it is cheaper to produce than carbon fiber, it still has to be cut and machined into shape which is not as economical as the injection molding process used in FRN handles.

On the butt of the handle, there is an attachment that contains a lanyard hole. The handle is a mixture of light grey, dark grey, and darker grey. The handle of the knife has a curves pine to fit in your palm well. On the bottom of the handle, there are two long grooves, which help provide you with a very comfortable and secure grip, even in the toughest of situations. There is a very slight finger guard to help protect your fingers during use.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The handle is satin finished and skeletonized. The clip is kept in place by two small screws on the attachment at the butt of the handle. All of the hardware on this knife is silver, matching the blade.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is a spring assisted knife that uses the Outburst assisted opening mechanism. The Outburst assisted opening mechanism is lighting fast and ridiculously easy to use. To use this mechanism, you manually open the blade up to 30 degrees and the patented Outburst assisted opening mechanism springs the knife fully open so that you’re good to go. The powerful spring also holds the blade securely closed when not in use. On many of the CRKT knife models, they have equipped the Outburst system with their locking and actuation systems like Fire Safe for a new level of ease of operation, as well as security.

There is a thumb stud attached to this blade. This is arguably one of the most common one-handed opening feature. The stud essentially replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives. The principle is pretty straightforward—you grasp the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the CRKT Drip Tighe measures in at 3.1 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.2 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 7.3 inches long. This knife does weigh in at 4.2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Inspiration comes in many different forms and believe it or not, this knife was inspired by a stack of pancakes. The Drip Tighe is another Brian Tighe designed model that sports a liner lock design and each stainless steel blade is deployed quickly thanks to the Outburst™ assisted opening mechanism it houses. Additionally, grip security is no issue with the multi-layer outfit and the ribbed back spacer. From the beginning, CRKT has been driven by a single purpose: to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to today’s market. This model, the 1190, features a woven carbon fiber partial layer atop a black G-10 partial layer, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The CRKT Drip Tighe Spring Assist knife is a game changer, so pick yours up today at BladeOps.

 

CRKT 6215 Caligo Flipper Knife Review

CRKT is Columbia River Knife and Tool, Inc. They are an American knife company that was established in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. The company is currently based out of Oregon.

Both of the founders had previously worked with Kershaw, but then decided to pursue their own knife designs. This company did not really begin to take off until the 1997 Shot Show. It was here that they introduced the K.I.S.S. knife, or the Keep It Super Simple knife. The small folder was designed by Ed Halligan was a complete success. In fact, within the opening days of the show, the entire years’ worth of the product was sold out. This knife sold at 4.-5 times the original production numbers.

Of course, no company has survived without some issues. The biggest inconvenience that has ever happened to CRKT was in 2000. On October 3 of 2000 US Customs seized a shipment of 80,000 CRKT folding knives worth more than $4.3 million. All 50 models seized had always passed every Customs test in prior situations. The shipment had cleared Customs on September 29 but on October 3 an inspector decided that the knives acted like switchblades despite the fact that none of them fit within the definition set forth by the U.S. Switch Blade Knife Act of 1958. On October 17 a letter was co-signed by Oregon U.S. Congresswoman Darlene Hooley and Senator Gordon Smith that petitioned the head of Customs to aid CRKT. Because of their action there was a Federal inquiry of the US Customs actions that had to be answered within thirty days. On October 20 the company was once again allowed to move their product. However, this was not before losing over $1 million in sales and spending over $30,000 on legal fees. Since then, they have clearly bounced back.

The company produces a wide range of tools that includes fixed blades, folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has also collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

Through these collaborations and with their own designs, they have come to own fifteen patents and patents pending.

Today we will be discussing the CRKT 6215 Caligo Flipper knife.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is T.J. Schwarz who is from Boise, Idaho. CRKT says, “TJ was destined to be a car designer. In high school he discovered his uncanny ability to draw cars—in fact, he was so good at it that by the time he was in college, he was accepting commissions from classic car owners. Just as his career was starting down the automotive path, his good friend Bill Koenig of Koenig Knives intervened and everything shifted. Once he got a taste of knife design, he never looked back. So when he says, “engineered for performance,” he means it.”

 

CRKT 6215 Caligo Flipper Knife
CRKT 6215 Caligo Flipper Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese stainless steel that has a high performance-to-cost ration. If you are looking to compare this steel to another style of steel, most people would choose AUS-8, although AUS-8 is the superior steel. 8Cr13MoV steel does hold its edge well, while also resisting rust extremely well. The biggest advantage that this steel has is how inexpensive it is. While you get fantastic qualities for its price, you are not going to be able to compare this steel to premium steels. You are getting what you pay for. For this everyday carry knife, it is a fantastic option that is going to get the job done.

The blade has been coated with a black oxide coating. Black oxide is also known as blacking, which is a conversion coating for ferrous materials that is used to add mild corrosion resistance as well as give the blade a sleek, black look. The coating is going to provide a couple of benefits. For starters, it is going to prolong the life of the blade by increasing the blade’s wear and corrosion resistance levels. This is done because there is a layer in between the environment and the steel.  The coating can also make the blade cut easier, because it cuts down on drag. Plus, it gives the blade a sleek, black look. Unfortunately, all coatings are going to scratch off after time and use. At that point, you are not going to keep any of the great benefits of the coating until it has been recoated.

The blade has been carved into a drop point bale shape. This is the most common blade shape on the market today and for good reason. The shape is tough as well as being extremely versatile. This is achieved because the spine of the blade extends from the handle to the tip of the blade in a slow, curving manner. This creates a lowered point which is easily controlled. Plus, because the lowered tip is so broad, the blade becomes very durable. It is the broad tip that gives this knife style its characteristic strength that people have come to love. It is the broad tip that allows users to really use this knife for nearly anything. The blade also has a very large belly, which makes slicing a complete breeze. The larger the belly, the easier it is going to be to use it for slicing. Since the Caligo is an everyday carry knife, you are most likely going to be doing a lot of slicing. The large belly is going to come in handy. Of course, every blade shape does have its drawbacks. The biggest drawback on a drop point blade shape is that because the tip is so broad, it is going to be tricky to use it for stabbing or piercing like you would be able to with a clip point knife. You have to keep in mind that it is that broadness that gives you the incredible strength and durability of this blade shape.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 aluminum. Aluminum is a very durable material, especially when it comes to knife handles. Aluminum is a low density metal that gives the handle a good, hefty feel to the knife without actually weighing the knife down. This means that you are going to feel like you have the weight to back you up (because you do) but you are also not going to notice the knife in your pocket as you go about your day to day activities and chores. The most common type of aluminum that is used today is the 6061-T6 alloy, which has incredible tensile strength. In fact, out of all the alloys, this alloy is the strongest and most durable.

When a knife is properly texturized, the user is going to have a secure grip that is also comfortable if they need to be using it for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, aluminum also has high conductive properties, which means that if you are planning on using this knife during the colder, winter months, it is probably going to be uncomfortable. The overall benefits to an aluminum handle is that it is going to be strong, lightweight, durable, and incredibly resistant to corrosion. The cons of an aluminum handle is that it is going to be cold to hold, it can be a little bit slippery, and it is going to be susceptible to scratches and dings.

The handle on this knife is pretty unique. The spine starts out going straight, but hen angles sharply toward the butt. There is a large finger guard (the flipper) that will protect your fingers well. Then there is a deep finger groove. Following that, there is a slightly shallower finger groove. The handle finishes out by slowly curving toward the butt. The handle does sport a lanyard hole.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is not reversible. It has been attached to the handle for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This clip has been slightly skeletonized near the top of the clip, to cut down on weight. This is not a deep carry clip, so it will not be as secure or concealed in your pocket.

The pocket clip and the hardware on this knife are all black, making this an entirely black knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that has been equipped with the IKBS system as well as a locking liner.

To create the IKBS system, designer Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala invented this system that sets lubed ball bearings into the folding knife pivot. The result is rapid blade deployment that is smooth and fast.

The IKBS was originally designed to fit in balisong knives, but because of its versatility it can be actually used in almost any kind of folding knife, mainly liner locks and frame locks.

Using bearings in balisongs is quite difficult because of its tight space in the pivot area, also this kind of knife is very susceptible to impact due to its high speed opening and closing, besides that, balisongs always have 2 pivot pins, meaning that the bearing system cannot be too complex or expensive.

Some of the characteristics of this mechanism is that it is going to be low maintenance, cheap, easily adjusted, durable and tough, will not allow blade play, as well as giving the user a smooth operation.
The locking liner is one of the most popular knife locks that is found on folding knives. It was invented in the early 80s and was quickly adopted by a number of mainstream knife makers. The locking liner functions with one section of the liner angled inward towards the inside of the knife. Because of this positon, the liner is only able to go back to its original position with manual force, which creates a very secure lock for your blade. This locking mechanism can be used with only one hand, which is one of the biggest advantages it offers.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.185 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.129 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.471 inches long. When the Caligo is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.625 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.4 ounces, which is a great weight for an everyday carry knife.

 

Conclusion:

             When CRKT is discussing this knife, they say, “Hello, horsepower. The Caligo™ is a study in high-aesthetics, but that’s not where designer TJ Schwarz called it quits with this everyday carry folding knife. He’s got a background in mechanical engineering an affinity for classic cars.…and it shows. Gentlemen, start your engines.

When designer TJ Schwarz of Boise, Idaho says, “engineered for performance,” he means it. In college, he started selling hand-drawn pencil sketches of classic cars. His art was so striking that classic car owners began to solicit commissions. With a background in mechanical engineering and his budding business, he was drawn like a magnet to the automotive industry…until a high school friend talked him into designing a knife. Then everything shifted. Years later, he’s made a name for himself among knife makers. And we’re proud to collaborate with him on the Caligo™ everyday carry pocket knife.

With a low-profile flipper opening and IKBS™ ball-bearing pivot mechanism, it goes from zero to sixty faster than a hot rod. Caligo™ is the Latin word for darkness, but you probably could have guessed that upon a first glance at the black oxide finish on the modified drop point blade. Coupled with the black anodized aluminum handles, it looks like it’s fresh off the showroom floor. The blue pivot ring elevates it to a league all its own.

Shift your everyday carry game into high gear with the Caligo™.” You can order this knife today from BladeOps.

 

CRKT Cuatro Knife Review

Columbia River Knife & Tool, Inc. or CRKT, is an American knife company established in 1994, and currently based in Tualatin, Oregon.

CRKT was founded in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both individuals were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. The company actually did not really take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife was introduced. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan, was a success. Within the opening days of the show, the year’s worth of the product was sold out.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steven Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. These include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism and Veff-Serrated edges.

CRKT says, “From day one, we put innovation and integrity first. We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand.”

Today we will be talking about the CRKT Cuatro, which is one of their new knives this year.

CRKT Cuatro
CRKT Cuatro

The Designer:

Richard Rogers is the man behind this new knife. CRKT says, “Though he’ll tell you he’s only been seriously designing for four years, his extensive list of awards dating back to ’97 paints different story. Richard Rogers is modest as modest comes, creating some of the simplest, most practical everyday carry folders in the industry. When he’s not at the bench, he’s at the helm of a working cattle ranch out in the arid shrublands of the southwest. His life both as a rancher and a designer are governed by one serious principle: ‘good enough’ isn’t acceptable. We’re on board.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel, which is a budget line of steel that comes from China. If you were looking to compare this steel’s qualities and characteristic with another steel, it is most similar in composition to AUS-8; however, AUS-8 is the superior of the steels. This is a softer steel, which means that this steel is going to be easier to sharpen and keep sharpening well throughout its lifetime. Surprisingly, it does keep an edge for long periods of time, even though it is a softer steel. One of the better characteristics of this steel is how resistant to corrosion it is. 8Cr13MoV steel has a steel hardness of 56-59HRC. This is a very inexpensive steel and with what you pay, you get a well-balanced steel when it comes to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. The absolute biggest selling point for this steel is how inexpensive it is, because it means that the overall cost of the knife will be kept down. However, when it comes to blade steels, you do mostly get what you pay for, so while it is well balanced and can take on your daily tasks, it is not going to stand up to the newer super steels that are around.

The blade has been finished with a bead blasted finish. This finish is crated using abrasive glass or ceramic beads that are blasted at the steel at a high pressure, which results in an even grey finish. A blasted finish reduces reflection and glare due to its even matte surface. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. A blasted blade, even from stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in a very humid environment.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade style. The drop point blade is one of the most popular blade styles that you are going to come across in the cutlery industry because of how tough and all-purpose it is. The blade shape is created by having the spine, or unsharpened, edge of the blade run straight from the handle to the tip in a slow curving manner. The spine slowly curves until it reaches the tip, which is lowered. The lowered tip is broad, so not only does it give you the control that you need for detail work, it also gives the drop point blade it’s standard strength. The broad tip is what allows this blade style to take on such a wide variety of activities and is also what makes this blade style good for tactical or survival knives. The drop point style knife also sports a very large belly, which is what makes this such a versatile knife. The belly is the cutting edge of the knife; the bigger the belly, the easier it is to use this knife for slicing. If you are choosing to use the Cuatro for your everyday knife, which is what it is designed for, the belly is going to come in handy constantly. The drop point blade shape does have one big disadvantage: because the tip on it is so broad, it is not going to excel at piercing or stabbing like a clip point blade would.

The blade on this knife is plain edged, which is going to give you cleaner cuts and allow you to take on a wider variety of tasks. The plain edge can get a finer edge and is easy to sharpen because of the lack of teeth.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of contoured G10. G10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material is very similar in properties to carbon fiber, although it is slightly inferior, and it can be made for a much smaller cost. Although it is cheaper to make than carbon fiber, it does still have to be cut and machined into shape which is not as economical as the injection molding process that is used in FRN handles.

To create this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin before compressing them and baking them under pressure. This process results in a very tough, hard, lightweight, and strong material. While G10 is considered to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates, it does tend to be a brittle material. This is because all of the fibers have been arranged in a single direction. When the material is stressed in that direction, it remains very strong, but when it is stressed in any of the other directions, it does tend to break down or chip.

One of the complaints when it comes to G10 is that it lacks elegance and sometimes personality. However, it is easy to add checkering or other patterns to the handle which add enough texture to have a secure, yet comfortable grip. All styles of knives benefit from G10 because it is non-porous, durable, and lightweight. Because it is non-porous, maintenance is easy, because it isn’t going to absorb any fluids that you happen to be working with.

The overall pros of having a G10 handle is that it is tough, light, and durable. The cons are that it is going to brittle and it can lack elegance.

The handle on this knife is simple, just like Richard Rogers likes it. The spine and the belly of the handle are simple and have no large grooves, curves, or angles. They both slightly taper in toward the butt to the handle. The top and the butt of the handle are both slightly arrow shaped. The G10 has been textured with slight grooves that extend form the top of the handle to the butt of handle. This grooves are going to give you enough texture that you will have a solid grip on this knife as you go about your day-to-day tasks.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is not reversible in terms of left or right handed carry or which direction the tip is facing. This clip has been statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a little bit of a disadvantage if that is not how you prefer to carry knives. The pocket clip matches the blade with a bead blasted finish. “CRKT” is stamped on the clip. Lastly, the clip is kept in place by two silver screws, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that is equipped with a flipper, the IKBS opening system, and a locking liner.

The flipper is a small hill shaped protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. You manually push on this and it flips the knife opened before it locks into place. A few of the benefits to a flipper is that it doesn’t get in the way like a thumb stud sometimes does, it acts as a finger guard when the knife is opened, and it is completely ambidextrous in its design.

IKBS, short for Ikoma Korth Bearing System, is ab earing system that was initially invented to help with smoother operation in balisong knives. Since then, the IKBS has been used in many different knives by many different makers. The IKBS is named after the two knife makers that crated it, Flavio Ikoma of Ikoma Knives, and Rick Lala of Korth Knives. The IKBS uses small ball bearings that sit in a space around the pivot.

The locking liner is easily the most popular knife lock found in folding knives. This style of locking mechanism was invented in the early 80s by knife-maker Michael Walker and was quickly adopted into a number of mainstream knife designers. The locking liner functions with one section of the liner angled inward toward the inside of the knife. From this position, the liner is only able to go back to is old position with manual forcer, which means that it is locked into place. The tail of the locking liner, which is closest to the blade, is cut to engage the bottom of the blade under the pivot. If the user wants to disengage the lock, they must manually move the liner to the side, away from the bottom of the blade. This style of locking mechanism can be used with just one hand.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this CRKT knife measures in at 3.199 inches long, with a blade thickness of 0.126 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.515 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at 7.75 inches long. The Cuatro weighs in at 3.1 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

For simplicity’s sake. Designer Richard Rogers spends the majority of his time driving cattle. And if there’s one thing he knows about carrying a pocket knife into the field, it’s that lighter is better—you shouldn’t notice you have one until you need it. On this conviction, the Cuatro everyday carry folder was born. Simply awesome. Richard Rogers spends his days in the arid, open shrubland of the Magdalena, New Mexico. This leaves space for dreaming up his next knife design. Herding livestock is a tough, dirty job, but one that has inspired the Cuatro and its big sister, the Maven. These everyday carry folding knives are lightweight but built to get beat up—the Cuatro features a modified drop point blade with a hollow grind and a bead blast finish. With an IKBS ball bearing pivot mechanism and an inconspicuous flipper, it’ll open fast and get to work in a hurry. A contoured G10 handle ensures a solid grip even through gloves or bad weather, and the locking liner keeps everything in place. Get the Cuatro into the pocket of your working jeans and it’ll perform until the cows come home. Pick up this brand new knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

CRKT Snicker Knife Review

CRKT Snicker
CRKT Snicker

Columbia River Knife and Tool company was founded in Oregon in 1994. CRKT is an American company that is well known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over two decades now, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They choose to operate on the simple principle that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To accomplish this, they have been collaborating with some of the best knife makers and designers in the world. Some of these collaborations have been with the Graham Brothers, Tom Veff, Michael Walker, Steven Ryan, Ron Lake, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Ken Onion, Allen Elishewitz, Harold “Kit” Carson, Pat Crawford, and Liong Mah. Out of these collaborations have been born many groundbreaking innovations. Some of these innovations have even given CRKT some patents. They have fifteen patents and patents pending, including the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men had been formerly employed by Kershaw Knives. At this point in time, these men have created a legacy and a fantastic reputation, but it wasn’t always that way. The company did not actually take off until the 1997 Shot Show when they introduced the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife. This was a small folding knife that had been designed by Ed Halligan and it was a total success. It was only within the opening days of the Shot Show that the entire years’ worth of product was sold out. They now produce a wide range of products form fixed blades and folding knives to multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

CRKT has just released a brand new knife called the Snicker.

 

The Designer:

The Snicker was designed by Philip Booth who is from Ithaca, Michigan. He is a modern day version of a human phoenix—when his art studio burned down in the late 80s, it left his life’s work of paintings and art prints reduced to ashes. Instead of letting it knock him down, he was reborn as a knife maker, and has since swept up a handful of prestigious awards like the Blade Show’s 2016 Most Innovative Design award, and their 2005 Best of the Rest award. He’s a mechanically orientated artist, and his innovative, artful tools are proof.

 

The Blade:

The steel is made out of 420J2 steel. This is a stainless steel that is a popular choice for knife manufacturers. This steel has a good level of corrosion resistance when it is salt free atmospheres. While some of the better quality stainless steels can resist rusting when submerged in salt water, the 420J2 steel cannot. This steel can resist rusting and corrosion tom any chemicals and household cleaners, and it is actually more durable than many of the other 440 grade steels. This steel is often used in making precision surgical instruments because of its sharpness as well as it’s corrosion resistance. One of the benefits about 420J2 steel is that it is great for producing a fine and smooth polished blade. This steel is very easily machined and has excellent hardening capability, which is why it makes such a good option for all purpose knives. Because it is so easily machined, it is also very easily sharpened.

The steel has been finished with a stonewash finish. This finish is created by tumbling the steel around with small pebbles that work as an abrasive. This creates a very textured and well-worn look to the blade. When it is finished tumbling around, the steel is smoothed out and then polished. The result is a dark gray steel that is semi-matte and works well to cut down on glares and reflections off of your blade. The biggest advantage of the stonewash finish is that it preserves the look of the blade overtime. It also effortlessly hides scratches, smudges, and fingerprints that your blade accumulates after use.

The steel has been ground into a modified drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is a perfect all-purpose knife shape and it is also extremely popular. One of the most common places that you are going to find this blade shape is on a hunting knife, although they are often used on many other types of knives. To form the shape, the back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. The lowered point helps to provide more control over your cuts and slices as well as adding strength to the tip. Because of the tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy sue, drop point blades are very popular on tactical and survival knives. The drop point blade shape is so popular on hunting knives because the point is so easily controllable. The lowered, controllable point makes it easier to avoid accidently nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. One of the other reasons that this is such a versatile blade shape is because it features a large belly that provides enough length for perfect slicing. The drop point and clip point blade shapes are very similar and often confused. The main differences between the two are the points. On a clip point blade shape, it has a lowered point, but the point is thinner and sharper than that of a drop point knife. Because it is thinner, it is weaker, but you also have stabbing capabilities. The drop point has a lowered point, but it is broader and thus stronger. However, with the broader point, you have basically no stabbing capabilities. That is really one of the only drawbacks on the drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape will prepare you for almost any situations, whether they are expected or unexpected. The modified drop point has less of a belly because there is a groove near where the handle and the blade meet. It will still provide you with plenty of length for slicing though.

The edge on the Snicker is a plain edge. This is the more traditional blade shape that is easier to sharpen and you can get a finer edge on it. The plain edge is best for push cuts, slicing, peeling, and skinning.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of injection molded Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN. This is a thermoplastic material. This material is extremely strong, very resistant to bending, abrasion, and practically indestructible. And, as a total bonus, it is a pretty inexpensive material. This is a cheaper material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. These characteristics leads to high volume manufacturing and thus the low cost. This is such a strong material because all of the nylon fibers have been arranged haphazardly throughout the handle which makes it strong and durable in all directions. On materials that are similar to GRN, such as G 10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, the fibers are all aligned in a single direction. This means that when those materials are stressed in the other directions, they will break down and are pretty brittle. However, may people did not warm up to this material because they claimed it felt cheap and almost hollow. As one of the other drawbacks, it tends to provide you with less grip than G 10.

To add texture to this knife, CRKT has added Carbon Fiber Texture. Carbon fiber is a material that is made by thin strands of carbon being tightly woven and then set in resin. This material is extremely strong, but still lightweight, however it is rather expensive. Even though it is so strong, it is not indestructible and does tend to be brittle. Like I previously mentioned, this material is brittle because the fibers are all woven in a single direction. This is an eye-catching material because of the way that the fibers have been woven together. The weave pattern on the Snicker looks like a classic basket weave.

The curved handle with the longer tail provides you with an extremely comfortable grip. While there is no finger groove, there is a finger guard to protect your finger from getting cut.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is skeletonized and made out of stainless steel, which also matches most of the hardware on the Snicker. The pocket clip is statically designed for tip down carry only on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that has a flipper mechanism to assist you in opening it. The flipper on this knife is a rectangular triangle. The flipper mechanism is a small protrusion on the blade of the knife that juts out of the spine of the handle when the blade is closed. To deploy the blade, you pull back on this protrusion to flip the blade out and lock it into place. One of the benefits about a flipper mechanism is that it keeps your hands and fingers out of the way when you are deploying the knife, which keeps your fingers safer than if the knife had a thumb stud.

The Snicker also supports a liner locking mechanism. Liner locks are one of the more common mechanism that can be found on folding knives. This mechanisms key characteristic is a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the sharp edge of the blade, essentially “lining” the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When fully opened, that same tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, keeping it firmly in place and preventing it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to use your thumb to push the spring bar down towards the pocket clip in the example knife shown above, so that it clears contact from the butt of the blade. This lets you use your index finger to push the blade just enough so that it keeps the bar pushed down so you can remove your thumb from the blade path, then continue to safely close the knife. Some of the advantages of a liner lock is that they allow a knife to have two true handle sides, which makes it ambidextrous friendly. Another advantage is that you can close the knife with one hand without switching grip, which is ideal for when you need both hands on the job. However, liner locks aren’t typically as strong as other locking mechanisms, so you should keep that in mind while performing the heavier duty tasks. Liner locks are plenty strong for most tasks, but because they are made form a thinner piece of metal, this locking mechanism is more prone to wearing out.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 1.845 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.106 inches. The overall length of this tiny knife is 4.688 inches long and the closed length is 2.938 inches long. The weight of this knife is 2.3 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT was describing this knife they said, “In the face of daily duties, the Snicker always has the last laugh.” While this is one of the most compact everyday carry folders that you are going to find, it still performs with the punch of a full size blade. “This folder is proof that skipping the bulk doesn’t mean skimping on performance”. This knife is made out of 420J2 steel that has been finished with a stonewash finish and then carved into one of the most versatile blade shapes: the drop point style. The handle on this knife is made out of injection molded glass reinforced nylon with carbon fiber texture. The flipper opening mechanism keeps your fingers safe while the locking liner secures your blade in place while you are using it. This tiny knife is going to do big things. Get yours today at BladeOps.

CRKT Maven Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT, was founded in 1994. Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer, the two founders, had both worked for Kershaw Knives before leaving to create CRKT.

From day one, they chose to put innovation and integrity first. They made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand.

This American company was born in Oregon and is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For more than 20 years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. Through those collaborations they have come to own fifteen patents.

Today we are talking about one of CRKT’s newest knives, the Maven.

 

The Designer:

Richard Rogers is the man behind this knife. Though he’ll tell you he’s only been seriously designing for four years, his extensive list of awards dating back to ’97 paint a different story. Richard Rogers is modest as modest comes, creating some of the simplest, most practical everyday carry folders in the industry. When Richard isn’t at the bench, he’s at the helm of a working cattle ranch out in the arid shrublands of the southwest. His life both as rancher and a designer are governed by one serious principle: “good enough” isn’t acceptable.

 

CRKT Maven
CRKT Maven

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel is a popular budget steel that is made in China. If you were going to compare it to another knife steel, the most common is AUS8, although 8Cr13MoV is the inferior steel between the two. The blade will retain its edge for a reasonable amount of time and because it is a softer steel, you can get a very fine edge on this. For the cost of this steel, it is surprisingly corrosion resistant. This steel has a good balance between strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. The biggest characteristic that this blade steel sports is how inexpensive it is. For the low cost, you get a good balance and variety of characteristics.

The blade has been bead blast finished. This finish is created using abrasive glass or ceramic bead that are blasted at the steel at a high pressure. This results in an even, grey finish. A blasted finish reduces reflection and glare due to its even matte surface. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. A blasted blade, even from stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in a very humid environment. Because of this, you are going to need to make sure that the blade is dry before putting it away. You will also need to oil it regularly.

The blade on the Maven has been carved into a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade style is the most popular blade style in the cutlery industry. This is an all-purpose, tough blade style. The blade is created by having the unsharpened edge of the knife run straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. The lowered tip is also easily controllable, which makes it easier to work on fine tip or detail work. The drop point blade style has a very large belly that makes slicing extremely easy. There is one disadvantage to a drop point blade is that it has a relatively broad tip, which does make it less suitable for piercing than the clip point. You do need to remember that it is this broad tip that gives you the strength you want and need from the Maven.

The blade on this knife has a plain edge, which is going to give you cleaner cuts, and allow you to take on a wider variety of tasks. The plain edge was the perfect choice for the Maven, because this is a simple knife that is meant to be the perfect everyday carry knife. A few of the other perks to a plain edge is that you can get a finer edge on the blade, because you don’t have to worry about the teeth. And, you don’t have to worry about the teeth when sharpening, so it is easier to sharpen.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Maven is made out of dark grey G-10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, although it is slightly inferior, so you can get it for a fraction of the cost. To create this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The resulting material is hard, tough, lightweight, and strong. Out of all the fiberglass resin laminates, G-10 is the toughest, although it is brittle.

One of the benefits to G-10 is that checkering and other patterns are easily added to add texture to the handle, which provides a comfortable, solid grip. Every style of knife benefits from this knife because it is durable and lightweight, while still being non-porous so that it does not absorb any liquids that you work with throughout the knife’s lifetime.

Overall, the benefits to a G-10 handle is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. The cons are that it is brittle and it does lack elegance and personality. Sometimes it can look just like a lump of plastic.

The handle on the knife is pretty basic, just like the knife is meant to be. Sometimes simplicity is the best. There is a deep finger groove that allows the user to have a very solid grip on the knife. The rest of the belly of the handle is pretty straight, although it is not going to be uncomfortable. The spine of the handle is curved, which creates a comfortable grip, even if you are using it for long periods of time. There is checkering across the handle scales, which give you enough texture to have a solid grip on the Maven throughout your day-to-day tasks. The butt of the handle is slightly rounded, and the head of the handle is slightly angled.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip matches the blade of the Maven. This is not a deep carry pocket clip and it is not reversible in terms of left or right handed carry or tip up tip down carry. This clip is attached on the traditional side of the handle and is designed for tip down carry. The clip is kept in place by two small screws that match the rest of the grey/silver hardware.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that is equipped with a locking liner, as well as an IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System, and a flipper opening mechanism.

The liner lock is one of the most popular types of locking systems. When the knife blade is opened, a vertical metal lock bar is angled from the side of the interior toward the center where it butts against the tang of the blade. The pressure of the lock bar, also called a leaf spring, prevents the blade from moving. To the fold the blade back into the knife, the lock bar has to be moved away from the tang to its original position.

The IKBS was designed by Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala. The system has lubed ball bearings set into the folding knife pivot. The result is rapid blade deployment that is smooth and fast.

The flipper is a small protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The protrusion is usually sharks-fin shaped. The flipper is mostly a newcomer on the one-hand opening scene, especially in terms of popularity. While studs and holes enlist a thumb to open the knife, a flipper employs an index finger, and the feature is naturally ambidextrous. Some people claim that deploying a flipper reliably takes a bit of practice, which is usually the case. The flipper offers a way to open your knife smoothly. The knife is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it, which not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade, but gives you an added finger guard once opened. In many cases, like this one, the flipper will actually swing around and end up underneath the knife continuing to offer protection form accidental knife injuries. Plus, if you are concerned about the safety of your thumb, a flipper will keep your fingers out of the way, unlike a thumb stud.

Some of the benefits to having a manual knife is that it is going to be legal in almost every single area that allows knives. The manual opening knife has none of the strict laws that an automatic knife does. In terms of maintenance, the manual is easier to maintain than an automatic, because there is no spring that might break. However, there are still a lot of internal mechanisms inside the handle that you need to maintain and keep clean and dry. One of the other disadvantages is that it is harder to bring a manual knife into play, because you have to pull it out of your pocket, then take the time to open it. This is opposed to a fixed blade that just requires you to unsheathe it or an automatic knife that you just have to push a button. Because of the flipper and IKBS you can easily open this knife with one hand with a little bit of practice.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.684 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.127 inches. The handle on the Maven measures in at 4.532 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 7.938 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.8 ounces, which is an ideal weight for an everyday carry knife.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT is writing about this new knife, they say, “When a cattle rancher finds his calling. Designer Richard Rogers lives on a working cattle ranch. His toughest critic is a cowboy and his field values no frills. So when he set out to make a reliable everyday carry knife, he vowed to keep it simple. The result: The Maven. Understated and designed to a T.

Richard Rogers calls Magdalena, New Mexico home. His life both as a rancher and a designer is governed by one serious principle: “good enough” isn’t acceptable. One might even use the word “maven”—a trusted expert in a field—to describe Richard himself. Though his is a simple, salt-of-the-earth style of living, its one that demands a commitment to working until the last steer has found his way home and the last detail of a knife is in place. If there’s any perfect illustration of this, it’s the Maven knife.

The Maven features a 3.7” modified drop point blade with a hollow grind and a bead blast finish. With an IKBS ball bearing pivot mechanism and a prominent flipper, it’ll open fast and hop on the job in a hurry. Contoured G10 handles with as solid first-finger notch ensure a grip even through gloves or bad weather, and the locking liner keeps everything in its place.

When the need for simplicity is serious, the Maven steps right in.”

CRKT says it best, this knife is one that you are going to want to own. So come to BladeOps and pick up this brand new CRKT knife today.

 

 

CRKT Remedy Knife Review

CRKT Remedy
CRKT Remedy

Columbia River Knife and Tool company was founded in Oregon in 1994. CRKT is an American company that is known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over two decades at this point, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To accomplish this principle, they have been collaborating with some of the greatest knife makers and designers in the world. These designers include Lion Mah, Steven James, Michael Walker, Greg Lightfoot, Tom Veff, Ron Lake, Steve Ryan, the Graham Brothers, Pat Crawford, Allen Elishewitz, Harold “Kit” Carson, and even Ken Onion. Throughout these collaborations, CRKT has ended up with fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of these have been the Veff Serrated edges, which was invented by Tom Veff, the OutBurst assist opening mechanism, and the Lock Back Safety mechanism.

CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer, both of whom were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. However, the company did not truly take off until 1997 Shot Show. This was the Shot Show that they introduced the K.I.S.S, Keep It Super Simple, knife, which was a small folder that Ed Halligan had designed. This folder was a major success and within the opening days of the Shot Show, the years’ worth of product had sold out. Since that year, they have expanded the width of their products and ow sell a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

They have recently released a brand new everyday folder that is called the Remedy.

 

The Designer:

Liong Mah is the man behind this knife. He is from Palm Bay, Florida. CRKT says, “IF we didn’t know any better, we’d think the English definition of Mah is ‘practical’.” This is because Liong incorporates useful sensibility into all of his designs. Some examples of this useful sensibility is the G.S.D, the Eat’N’Tool, and the 2015 Mah-chete. As a kid, where others doodles cartoons in their school notebooks, he drew knife designs. Later, having learned CAD, he was able to bring these ideas to life by collaborating with many of the top designers in the industry.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese steel that comes from the series Cr. In this series, the 9Cr formula is the top quality, with 8Cr falling shortly behind it. When comparing this steel to another type of steel, the most common comparison is AUS 8 steel, however, AUS 8 steel is slightly superior. 8Cr steel is a stainless steel, so it will resist rust up to a point, however, since it is a softer steel, you will need to keep up on your maintenance with the blade to keep it in great shape. Because this is a softer steel, it will be extremely easy to sharpen and you will be able to get a very sharp edge on it. And it will keep its edge for long periods of time. One of the best advantages that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. So while the steel will get the job done, it is considered an average steel, and it won’t excel at anything.

The finish on this steel is a satin finish. This finish is created by sanding the knife in one direction repeatedly with increasing levels of an abrasive. The main characteristic of this finish is how it showcases the lines of the steel. This finish provides you with a very classic look. This is because it is a traditional look that lies in the middle of how shiny the finish is. A mirror finish is going to be more reflective than a satin finish and a matte finish is going to be much less reflective than a satin finish.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape. This is one of the most popular blade shapes that you are going to find and for good reason: this is one of the best all-purpose styles that you can find. To form this shape, the back, or unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. The lowered point is what gives this blade shape so much control. One of the most common places that you are going to find a drop point blade shape is on a hunting knife. The reason that this is one of the most common places is because of how easily controllable the tip is. This tip makes it easier to avoid accidentally nicking the internal organs or ruining the meat of your game. The lowered point also adds strength to the tip. Drop point and clip point blade shapes are often times confused, because they are both very popular and very versatile. The biggest difference between the two is the tip and the strength behind the tip. On a clip point blade shape, the point is sharper, thinner, and finer, which gives you all of your stabbing capabilities. However, it also makes the tip much weaker and more prone to breaking or snapping during heavy duty use. The drop point is broad, so you don’t have most stabbing capabilities, which is one of the only drawbacks to this blade shape. However, because it is broader, you have crazy amounts of strength behind your point, which allows you to do the heavier duty tasks. This strong point also makes this blade shape a very popular style for tactical or survival knives. One of the last reasons that this blade shape is so crazy versatile is because of the large belly that provides you with enough length to make slicing a breeze. This large belly is why the drop point blade shape is found on so many everyday carry knives. All in all, the drop point blade shape is truly all encompassing. You will be prepared to take on all of the expected situations and also all of the unexpected ones that will pop up.

The edge on the Remedy is a traditional plain edge. One of the worries about having a plain edge is that it won’t be able to saw through those thicker and tougher materials like a serrated edge would be able to. While this is correct in most situations, and while a plain edge will never have the sawing capabilities that a plain edge will, if you get your plain edge sharp enough, it will be able to take on some of these materials. The plain edge has been designed for excelling at push cuts, slicing, skinning, and peeling. The plain edge is a perfect option for this everyday carry knife. One of the last benefits to an everyday carry knife is that it is easier to sharpen, because it does lack the teeth that a serrated or combo edge would sport.

On the spine of the handle, right where the blade meets the handle, there is a row of jimping to give you some extra control over your cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Remedy has been made out of stainless steel. This material is going to provide you with some of the best durability and resistance to corrosion and rusting that you can find. This is also an extremely strong material. Because of these three characteristics, the Remedy is going to excel at your everyday tasks, but it is also going to have the strength to take on those tougher tasks. There are a handful of drawbacks to a stainless steel handle though, the first being that it is not a lightweight material. Because the Remedy has a stainless steel handle, you are going to be able to feel it when it is in your pocket, but it isn’t so heavy that it is going to pull your pants down. The other major drawback to having a stainless steel handle is that it doesn’t provide you with exceptional grip and can be slippery. The jimping on the blade will help with grip, but CRKT has also added some layering/texturing to the back of the handle to provide you with a quality grip. There is also a very deep finger groove so that your fingers won’t slip and if by chance they do slip, there is a finger guard to protect yourself from getting sliced.

On the butt of the handle, there is a small lanyard hole. A lanyard will benefit you with this stainless steel handle because when you are using the Remedy, you can actually fold the lanyard over the palm of the knife to provide you with some extra texture. This benefit will be the best if you are trying to perform some of the heavier duty tasks. Or, you can loop the lanyard over your hand or wrist while using the Remedy to keep yourself from dropping the knife. This last point will be especially good if you are working in wet situations. With the remedy, the lanyard can really be an advantage.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is stainless steel to match the rest of the knife as well as the hardware on the knife. The pocket clip has a small waist and a flared end. It is not quite skeletonized, but it does have areas that have been carved out. The clip on the Remedy has been statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

The Remedy is a folding knife that features a flipper assist opening mechanism. It is this flipper that will become the finger guard when the blade has been deployed. There are a handful of benefits to having a flipper as opposed to a thumb stud or slot, and the biggest one is that it keeps your fingers out of the blade’s way during the entire deployment.

This knife also features the IKBS ball bearing system. This system was designed by Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala. The system sets lubed ball bearings into the folding knife pivot. The result of this system is a rapid blade deployment that is smooth and fast.

The last mechanism that this knife sports is the frame lock. The frame lock and the liner lock are very similar but the biggest difference between the two is that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. Just like the liner lock, the frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, engaging it at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness, so the Remedy is going to be able to take on those tougher tasks. And you won’t have to worry about it failing you and the blade snapping down on your fingers in the middle of a task.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Remedy is 3.572 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.137 inches. The overall length of this knife is 8.313 inches long with a closed length of 4.732 inches long. Because of the stainless steel handle, this knife does weigh more than your average knife, weighing in at 5.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Remedy is one of many new models that CRKT has released this year. It was designed by Liong Mah and the classy flipper was modeled after a traditional Finnish Puukko knife. This model features a stainless steel handle, a drop point style blade that is sports a satin finish, and a pocket clip that is designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The Remedy will change the way you view your everyday carry knives. Pick yours up at BladeOps today.

CRKT Scrub Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT was founded in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. They say, “From day one, we put innovation and integrity first. We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand.”

Both of the founders were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. However, they quit to being pursuing knives based on their own designs.

Kershaw did not really take off until the 1997 Shot Show. This was when Ed Halligan introduced his Keep It Super Simple knife. Within the opening days of the show, the entire years’ worth of the product was sold out.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT does collaborate with some of the greatest designers in the world such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and even the Graham Brothers.

Through these collaborations and through their own work, CRKT has come to own fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of the more popular of these patents are the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges.

Today we are going to discuss the CRKT Scrub, which is one of their brand new knives.

 

The Designer:

             The designer behind this knife is Corey Brewer from Lafayette, Alabama. CRKT says, “Corey Brewer’s conviction: ‘if you want to break out and do something that makes you happy, you damn well can.’ Coming from a relatively new designer with serious raw talent, that’s one we can get behind. From his cluttered garage in Lafayette, Alabama, he’s vowed to make knives that aren’t simply useful, but artful—pieces that people resonate with. Beyond that, he creates to inspire: ‘if there’s someone out there that gets online to learn how to create a knife because he saw one of mine? That’s a hell of a good feeling.’”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of Sk5 Carbon steel. This steel is the Japanese equivalent to the American 1080 and is one of the highest quality steels for knife blades. This is a hard steel, which helps to give it some of the good quality for blades. Plus, because of the hardness, it can cut through practically anything. Sk5 steel can have a hardness level of RC64. Plus, it is also a very tough steel, which is a harder balance to achieve than believed because usually the harder the steel, the more brittle that steel is going to be. This steel also has the capacity to get a razor sharp edge.

The blade has been finished with a magnesium phosphate coating. This is a tougher coating, which will help to prolong the life of the blade because of the barrier it creates. The coating helps increase the wear and corrosion resistance levels of the blade. The coating is also a matte black finish, which means it will cut down on glares and reflections that this knife tries to give off. That characteristic is crucial when it comes to field work with this tactical knife and you are trying to be as stealthy as you can. Unfortunately, all coatings can and will scratch off after time. Since this is a tougher coating, you won’t have to worry about it scratching off anytime soon. But you do need to be aware that may happen over time. If that does happen, the blade has to be re-coated to sustain the same great benefits that it did at the beginning.

The knife has been carved into a trailing point blade shape. A trailing point blade is a lightweight knife that has a back edge that curves upward. It got its name because the back point is higher than the rest of the spine. The biggest advantage that a trailing point blade offers is the large belly that is ideal for slicing. Next, the tip is very sharp, so you can easily perform fine detail work. However, because of the fine and sharp tip, you do need to remember that it is going to have a weaker tip. If you try to pierce this knife through a harder material, the fine tip will probably snap. This trailing point is not as exaggerated as a fillet knife’s trialing point will be, so it is not going to be as weak as some trialing point knives. This is a major benefit to the CRKT Scrub, because it allows you to better use this knife as what it was made for—an excellent tactical blade.

This knife also has a plain edge, which allows you to really slice and field sharpen if you need to.


The Handle:

Because this knife is a full tang, the handle is also made out of Sk5 Carbon Steel. This steel is going to make the handle very durable and strong. It will give you the feel of the heft that makes you feel like you have the capability of taking on any task—which is just what your favorite tactical knife needs.

To cut down on weight, the handle has been skeletonized. This is how such a large knife only weighs in at 2.6 ounces. Normally, a steel handle would not be comfortable or provide you with a solid enough grip for a tactical knife, so CRKT wrapped the handle in cord.

The cord is woven around the edges of the handle as well as through the skeletonized middle of the handle. The texture of the cord and the weave pattern will give you near perfect grip in almost any environment. Unlike many regular knife handle materials, when the cord gets wet, you will still have high texture. As an added bonus, if you ever end up in a survival situation, you will be able to unwrap the handle and use the cord for a variety of purposes.

The handle has a simple shape to it. The butt is rounded and large. There is a thicker section on the blade that hasn’t be sharpened, so that you avoid cutting yourself accidentally. There is a large, but elongated finger groove on the belly of the handle that curves all the way towards the butt. This will give you a comfortable place to rest your fingers as well as being a safer place to rest your fingers out of the way. The spine of the handle curves inward slightly before curving back up toward the butt of the handle.

The simple shape is easy to hold on to and not too distracting—the blade is still the star of the knife. The handle is comfortable to use for long periods of time. If you need the cord, you can unwrap the handle and have the cord. While the cord is on, it will give you high amounts of texture.

 

CRKT Scrub
CRKT Scrub

The Mechanism:

This is a tactical fixed blade. There are a couple of major benefits to having your go-to tactical blade being a fixed blade. For starters, a fixed blade can be brought into a tactical situation much quicker than a folding knife could be. This is because all you have to do is remove the knife from its sheath and it is ready to go. With a folding knife, you would have to remove it from your pocket, deploy it, and then you could use it.

There are a few other advantages as well. Fixed blades are strong and big, which also means that they aren’t going to break. The blade can be thicker and longer because it doesn’t have to fit inside of the handle. There are also no moving parts on a fixed blade, which means it is going to be a lot sturdier. With a pocket knife, you have to worry about cleaning and drying all of the internal parts and with an automatic knife, you have to worry about the spring. With a fixed blade, none of that is an issue. This also means that the knife is going to be much easier to maintain. Cleaning is simple and a breeze—all you have to do is wipe down the blade, pat dry the cord wrapped handle, and oil the blade when needed. This will be a quick process because you do not have to worry about the insides on this knife.

This is also a full tang knife, which means that the entire knife is made out of the same piece of metal. This means that the knife is going to be stronger than a non-full-tang knife, because there are no weaker parts where the handle has been welded together. This also means that if you lose the cord around the handle, you still have the shape of a handle, which means that you still have a full knife. Full tang knives are especially good for survival knives, but also benefit tactical knives in full because if you are in the field, you don’t have to worry about your knife breaking.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath is made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon. This is the same material as FRN and is the off-brand of Zytel. GRN is a thermoplastic material that is strong, cheap, and resistant to both bending and abrasion. These qualities make the material almost indestructible.

The qualities stem from the fact that the fibers in the material are arranged completely haphazardly throughout, which means that it is going to be strong in all the directions. This is different than the other materials made from fibers (such as G10 or Carbon Fiber) because those have the fibers arranged in a single direction.

This is an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded, which leads to high volume manufacturing and a low cost. Some people did not warm up to GFN because it does feel a little bit plastic-y and it does have a little less grip than G-10. However, when it is used for a sheath, instead of a handle, you are going to get all of the benefits and not have to worry about too many of the disadvantages.

Overall, this sheath is going to be strong, tough, have no maintenance, and will be inexpensive which will keep the overall cost of the knife down as well.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.939 inches long, with a blade thickness of 0.115 inches. The knife measures in at an overall length of 7.375 inches long. The Scrub weighs in at 2.6 ounces.


Conclusion:

When CRKT is talking about the Scrub, they say, “Simple stealth. Moving parts, burly knives, stout blades: they have their place. But in the heat of the moment, when everything is on the line, basic is better. That’s the conviction upon which the Scrub™ tactical fixed blade is built. Don’t get caught without one.

As he burns the midnight oil in his crowded garage in Lafayette, Alabama, designer Corey Brewer remembers what it’s all about. His mantra: “if you want to break out and do something that makes you happy then you damn well can.” His first CRKT® design, the Scrub™ is all the proof we need that Corey’s conviction is dead on; he’s on a fast track to asserting himself as a serious designer.

This lightweight, compact tactical fixed blade is a paradox: it’s both remarkably simple and packed full of thoughtful details. The 4” blade is carefully modeled after a traditional Persian pesh-kabz, renowned for both its strength and utility. He’s brought both the shapely SK5 carbon steel blade and handles definitively into the future with a magnesium phosphate coating for extreme corrosion resistance. For heightened utility options—from duty belt to covert carry—he’s wrapped both the handles and parts of the glass-reinforced nylon sheath with paracord.

The Scrub™: damn simple, damn near perfect.”

You can pick up this brand new knife today at BladeOps.