CRKT Hvas Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, Inc. is an American knife company that was established in 1994. The company is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. The founders of this company are Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer, who both previously worked or Kershaw Knives. This means that they know what they are doing when it comes to knives.

Their company did not really begin to get big until three years later, in 1997, at the Shot Show. This is when they introduced a small folder by Ed Halligan called the K.I.S.S knife. By the time the show was over, they had sold all of their product of this knife. In the end, they sold 5 times the original production numbers, which resulted in a tripling of production efforts.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of their most popular are the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges. CRKT has collaborated with a wide variety of some of the best knife designers in the world, which is where their high-quality knives come from.

They produce anything from fixed blades, folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

CRKT says, “From day one, we put innovation and integrity first. We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand®.”

Today we will be talking about one of their newest knives, the Hvas.

 

The Designer:

This knife was designed by Jesper Voxnaes, who comes from Loegstrup, Denmark. CRKT says, “When Jesper needs to test a design, he only has to step into his own backyard. The harsh elements and conditions of the fjords and forests in his native Denmark do the rest. When he was starting out, no one was making the kind of knives he wanted to design so he learned by trial and error. Apparently his efforts paid off given his IF Award in 2013 for one of the Top European Designs. Now he creates and uses knives like the Amicus® as he sails, camps, and drives off-road. Which is more often than not.”

 

The Blades:

The blade on this knife is made out of 1.4116 stainless steel. This steel is the steel that is used in Swiss Army Knives. This is a softer steel, which means that it is an excellent steel for a beginner sharpener. Because it is a softer steel, it does not hold an edge as well, but because it is so easy to sharpen, you can get it back to razor-levels in just a few minutes. Surprisingly, this steel has very high corrosion resistance. Plus, this steel is also very tough. The steel can be hardened to about a 55-57 HRC.

The steel has been finished satin, which is one of the most common blade finishes in the cutlery industry today. To create this finish, the blade is sanded in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive, which is usually a sandpaper. As a key, the finer the sandpaper and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish is going to look. The Hvas has a very clean satin finish. The satin finish is used to show off the bevels of the blade as well as showcasing the fine liens of the steel. Lastly, the satin finish does cut down slightly on glares, reflections, and corrosion.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade style is the most popular blade style that is used today. This is for good reason too. The style of blade is very tough and very versatile. The blade has a spine that curves slowly from the handle to the tip of the blade. The large belly curves upward to meet the spine of the knife in a lowered tip. The lowered tip is going to ensure that you have high levels of control over your cuts and you can perform fine detail work with this knife as well. The lowered tip is very broad, which is where the drop point gets its famous strength. The drop point style of blade is one of the strongest blade shapes in the industry, allowing you to take on almost any task. The drop point knife is also very versatile because it has a very large belly. The belly makes slicing a breeze. One of the only drawbacks to this knife style is that because the point is so broad and strong, it is not going to allow you to pierce or stab easily. The Hvas is designed to prepare you for almost any outdoor task, and the drop point blade is going to allow you to do any of that.

 

The Handle:

             The handle is made out of Glass Filled Nylon, or GFN. This is the same material as FRN and is the off-brand of Zytel. This material is a thermoplastic material which is very strong, resistant to bending and abrasion, and is practically indestructible. Plus, this is a cheap material to make. This material is cheap because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and also textured however the manufacturer wants during the production process. This means that the manufacturer is going to have high volume manufacturing and a low cost. This keeps the overall cost of the knife down.

CRKT Hvas
CRKT Hvas

This material is practically indestructible because the nylon fibers inside are arranged haphazardly throughout which means that it is going to be strong in all directions instead of a single direction. This material is similar to G-10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, except that in those other materials, the fibers are arranged in a single direction, which is why they are brittle and break apart more easily. The overall pros of this handle material is that it is going to be strong, tough, have practically zero maintenance, and will be inexpensive. The cons to this material is that it is a little less grippy than some of the other similar materials, and some people feel like it has a cheap plastic feel to it.

The handle, like the rest of the knife, is sleek, simple, and will work like a charm when it comes down to it. The handle is black and has been roughly textured to give plenty of texture, even in the wetter environments. The spine of the knife curves slightly from the handle to the butt, which is squared. The belly of the handle has two large finger grooves and a middle that bulges out slightly. There is a thick finger guard so that your fingers will stay safe while you are using this. In the first finger groove, there is a row of jimping, which will give you more control over your cuts.

 

The Pocket Clip:

             The handle has been drilled to attach the pocket clip for either left or right hand carry, which helps to make this knife fully ambidextrous. The clip can only be attached for tip up carry though. The clip is simple, which is Jesper’s favorite style of design. The clip is not a deep carry clip, but it does flare upwards at the bottom, which will help it attach to your pocket a little more securely. To cut down on weight the clip has been skeletonized at the top of the clip. The clip is black, which matches the handle on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that uses a finger hole to assist you in opening the knife. This knife is also equipped with a locking liner and CRKT’s Field Strip technology.

Because it is a folding knife, you do not have to worry as much about the innards, because there is no spring that can break down and ruin the ability to use this knife. That being said, you will still want to keep the inside clean and dry so that it does work to the best of its ability. Another benefit to it being a manual folding knife is that you don’t have to worry about all of the strict laws that surround an automatic knife.

The thumb hole has been around since around the 1980s. The hole was popularized by Spyderco, but over the years, plenty of other brands and designers have equipped their knives with the thumb hole. This opening mechanism really does work. Just like a thumb stud, a thumb hole is a similar opening mechanism, but instead of a stud, it’s a lost. By its very design, the mechanism is ambidextrous. Plus, it doesn’t protrude from the blade, which means that it isn’t going to get in the way once the knife is opened.

The locking liner is one of the more common locking mechanisms that you are going to find on folding knives. The locking liners key piece is a side spring bar that is located on the same side as the belly of the blade. This spring bar essentially lines the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, this spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, the same tension slips the bar inward to make contact with eh butt of the blade, which will keep it firmly in place and prevent it from closing. To close the knife, or disengage the lock, you just use your thumb to push the spring bard “down” so that it clears contact with the butt of the blade. At his point, you can use your index finger to push the blade so that it keeps the bar pushed down. You can then remove your thumb from the blade path, then continue to safely close the knife. One of the biggest benefits to a liner lock is that you can close the knife with one hand without switching grip, because they allow the knife to have two true handle sides. This characteristic is especially important when you are using both hands on the job. If you are planning on using the Hvas for more heavy duty tasks, you should know that the liner lock isn’t as tough as other locking systems. While it will give you the strength for the typical tasks that you come across, don’t plan on always performing really tough chores with the Hvas.

CRKT’s Field Strip technology is an award-winning, breakthrough innovation. This technology comes from the shop of legendary knife craftsman Ken Onion. This no-tool take-apart technology allows for practical and efficient tool cleaning & maintenance in the field. To disassemble: start with the knife in the closed position, push the front release lever up away from the blade, then spin the release wheel on the rear of the handle away from the pivot shaft—once you feel the handle release, pull it up and away from the blade. The knife comes apart in three sections. Reassembly is as easy as reversing the procedure.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.339 inches long with a thickness of 0.126 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.525 inches long. When the Hvas is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.875 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.7 ounces, which is a very good weight for your everyday carry knife. This knife is great to have with you at all times because it is going to equip you to take on almost any task, while it won’t weigh you down considerably.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT is discussing this knife, they say, “For a minimalist with an appetite for big adventure. Jesper Voxnaes’ Scandinavian backyard is filled with fjords, punctuated by mountains, and sliced by surging rivers. So when he sets out to design an outdoor knife, it’s crafted to perform. Everywhere. And with Field Strip technology, the HVAS™ is taking preparedness to the next level. Your move, Mother Nature.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

CRKT Burnley Squid Knife Review

CRKT, Columbia River Knife and Tool, was founded in 1994. From day one, they chose to put innovation and integrity first. They made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designs in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand.

The company is currently based out of Tualatin, Oregon and was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Some of the tools that they produce include fixed blades, folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. These are all quality tools that the users know they can rely on. Some of the fifteen patents that they own include the Outburst assist opening mechanisms, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges. The Outburst is the company’s proprietary mechanism for their assisted-opening knives. These knives are standard pivot joint liner lock or frame lock folding knives Inside the knife there is a spring tab that catches the tang of the blade as it is manually opened. The Lock Back Safety mechanism, also invented by Ron Lake, is similar in function the LAWKS mechanism. It is a lock back folder with a switch that can prevent he locking bar from being depressed. Inside the handle there is a small rod with a flange near the butt of the handle. The other end is connected to a switch near the pivot end. When the switch is pulled back, the lock functions as a regular lock back. Veff-Serrations were developed by Tom Veff, a sharpener and knife maker, and are exclusively licensed to CKRT for production. The Veff-Serrates differ from standard ones in that they are large and set at an angle of 60 degrees whereas most serrations are small and arranged 90 degrees form the cutting surface.

CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

Today we will be discussing the Burnley Squid knife.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Lucas Burnley who comes from Orleans, Massachusetts. CRKT says, “When you ask Lucas what drew him to the knife world as a teenager, he’ll tell you it was stories of survival, off-path adventures with his father, and a healthy dose of action movies.

Over the years, he has experimented with a broad range of styles to artfully combine classical examples with modern materials and techniques, such as with his Obake™ knife. Lucas believes knives are a personal expression of independence. We couldn’t agree more.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel that has been hardened to a 58-60 HRC. This is a Chinese produced steel that is becoming increasingly common on Chinese made knives. 8Cr is the most common formulation of this series and is often compared to AUS-8 steel. However, 8Cr13MoV steel is a little more prone to corrosion and not as hard as AUS-8. The biggest advantage that this steel has is that it is extremely inexpensive. When you are comparing it to the newer steels, it is not going to stand up. But when you are looking at the cost and what you get out of it, this is a great steel.

The blade has been finished with a black stonewash finish. The stonewash finish is created by tumbling the blade in an abrasive material, which is usually pebbles or rocks. This finish is designed to hide scratches while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A black stonewash is a blade that has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. The stonewashed finish works to maintain the look of the blade overtime.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point style blade. This blade shape is a great all-purpose shape that can really stand up to almost anything. This is also one of the most popular blade shapes on the market today. The back edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and add strength to the tip. It is also this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use that makes this blade shape a great option for tactical and survival knives. The drop point blade is easily controllable, which makes it easier to have control over your cuts. This also allows you to perform fine detail and tip work. One of the things that make this knife so versatile is the large belly that makes slicing extremely easy. Of course, the drop point style blade does have a disadvantage. Because of its relatively broad tip, it is less suitable for piercing than the clip point. The drop point is going to equip you to take on a large variety of tasks. The drop point on this knife is a chubbier drop point, which makes it great for everyday tasks.

The blade on this knife is a plain edge, which lets you take on a wider variety of activities, which is perfect for an EDC knife.


The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel is a great material for your knife handles because it provides great durability as well as being incredibly resistant to corrosion. Unfortunately, stainless steel is not going to be very lightweight. Also, stainless steel is pretty slippery, so the manufacturer has to add in texture, grooves, or ridges for you to have a solid grip on the knife. The overall benefits of a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and extremely corrosion resistant. That begin said, it is also going to be heavy and can be pretty slippery.

The handle on this knife is pretty classic. The spine of the handle slopes down slowly to the butt of the handle. The belly has a thick finger guard that will protect your fingers if you do happen to slip. The finger groove that follows the guard is deep, which will provide you with a comfortable grip. After the groove, the belly bulges out slightly before curving towards the butt of the handle.

The stainless steel on this handle has also been dark stonewashed to match the handle and give the knife a rugged look that will look good through the ages. The stonewash hides scratches and smudges well, which significantly cuts down on maintenance time. The butt of the handle does have a lanyard clip, which is a bonus for this knife. You can use a lanyard so that you don’t have to use the pocket clip. The lanyard will also let you remove your knife more quickly out of your pocket. Lastly, the lanyard will let you add a touch of your personal style to this knife.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is not reversible. It has been attached to the handle for tip up carry and only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a skinny pocket clip that is the same width the entire length down. The clip is kept in place by two black screws, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife. At the tip of the pocket clip, it dents inward, which helps the clip attach to your pocket more securely. This is a deep carry pocket clip, which will help the knife stay more securely inside your pocket while also being more concealed inside your pocket. The clip is black, which matches the handle and the blade.

 

CRKT Burnley Squid Knife
CRKT Burnley Squid Knife

The Mechanism:

This is a manually opening knife that has been equipped with a thumb stud as well as a frame lock. Because this is a manual knife without a mechanism that makes it spring assisted or automatic, it is going to be legal in more states and areas. However, it is not going to be as efficient as the two other styles of knives.

The thumb stud is a small barrel that has been attached to the blade where the nail nicks usually are. The thumb stud is easy to get the hang of. Plus, this thumb stud extends through both sides of the handle, which means that it is more ambidextrous. Of course, there are the drawbacks. For starters, the thumb stud does extend fully out of the handle. This means that it might get snagged on things or get in the way when you are trying to use your knife. Also, one of the biggest disadvantages is that the thumb stud does put your fingers in the path of the blade when you are opening the knife. There have been plenty of stories of people getting their fingers sliced when they are trying to open their knife. Don’t be careless when opening this knife and definitely make sure you know how to use the thumb stud before you try to open it quickly.

The knife has also been equipped with a frame lock. The frame lock and the liner lock are extremely similar except that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. Because of this, the handle does have two sides. Just like the liner lock. The frame lock is positioned with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. To disengage the lock, apply pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure eon the lock will force it to snap across the blade, locking it at its furthers point. Frame locks are most known for their strength and thickness, which is perfect if you are going to be doing lots of heavy duty tasks with the knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.14 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.11 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.490 inches long. When the Squid is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 5.71 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.4 ounces, which is an ideal weight for a knife that you want to have with you all the time.

 

Conclusion:

             When CRKT is discussing this knife, they say, “It’s a pistol of a knife: it obliterates tasks. This Lucas Burnley-designed everyday carry knife is compact in stature but packs some heat in the features department. It comes with a frame lock for safety, and friction grooves on the drop-point blade for a secure grip. Be careful where you point it.

The Squid™ is an everyday carry folding knife from designer Lucas Burnley of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the concept of a compact pistol, it’s small in size and big on ability. Don’t let the 2.25” blade fool you; this is a full-on, tactically inspired knife that’s ready to take on your largest cutting challenges. By keeping it wide at nearly one inch and using the drop-point style, Burnley was able to give the blade a good balance of tip strength and point geometry for utility tasks, packing all the functionality of a full-size tactical folder, into an easy to carry, compact design.

Just like any good gun, you want something that’ll keep you safe. That’s why the Squid™ comes with an internal frame lock and deep pocket clip for a secure carry.
When you’re ready for this knife to see some action, use the thumb stud to deploy the blade.

So go ahead and bring this sidearm with you wherever you go. Just remember, it’s loaded.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.com and get a new favorite EDC knife.

 

CRKT 1101 Moxie Spring Assist Knife Review

Columbia River Knife & Tool, Inc. is an American knife company established in 1994, and currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. CRKT was founded in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both individuals were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. The company did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S knife was introduced. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan was a success. Within the opening days of the show the years’ worth of the product was sold out. They sold at 4-5 times original production numbers resulting in a tripling of production efforts.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. These include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges. The Outburst is the company’s proprietary mechanism for their assisted-opening knives. These knives are standard pivot joint liner lock or frame lock folding knife. Inside the knife there is a spring tab that catches the tang of the blade as it is manually opened. Once the blade reaches thirty degrees the spring takes over and quickly snaps the knife open.

The Lock Back Safety mechanism, also invented by Ron Lake, is similar in function to the LAWKS mechanism. It is a lock back folder with a switch that can prevent the locking bar from being depressed. Inside the handle there is a small rod with a flange near the butt of the handle. The other end is connected to a switch near the pivot end. When the switch is pulled back the lock functions as a regular lock back. When the switch is closed the flange on the rod slides under tip of the locking bar at the butt end. This prevents the depression of the bar and the blade form unlocking. Veff-Serrations were developed by Tom Veff, a sharpener and knife maker, and are exclusively licensed to CRKT for production.

Today we will be talking about the CRKT Moxie spring assist knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Moxie is made out of 8Cr14MoV stainless steel. This is a budget brand of knife steel that is made in China. This steel is very similar to 8Cr13MoV steel, but it is a little bit higher quality. If you were to compare it to another type of steel (out of the steel family), it would be closest to AUS-8, which is a Japanese steel. The biggest benefit that this steel boast is how inexpensive it is. And at its low cost, it does show pretty balanced abilities. This steel is well balanced in terms of strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. Plus, knives made out of this steel keep sharpening well and are easy to sharpen when needed. This steel gives you a very reliable blade at a low cost, but you do need to keep in mind that you do get what you pay for, so it won’t stand up to tasks in the same way that premium steels do.

The blade has been coated with a black oxide finish. A coating serves a variety of purposes on a knife blade and the first and most important is to prevent corrosion. A good coating can greatly reduce maintenance time on a knife, which comes in handy in many situations. Plus, a coating eliminates any shiny surfaces. While you probably won’t be using this knife on a mission, since it is an everyday knife, that characteristic is not as important as it could be, but it does still serve its purpose. The coating, especially a black coating, gives this blade a very sleek look. Unfortunately, with coated blades, the coating will sooner or later come off. And while you might think it looks cool to have a beat up blade, the coating will not provide those quality benefits that it once did. One of the disadvantages about this knife is that it is a black oxide coating which is actually the lowest quality of coatings that you can find. It will serve its purpose, but it is going to scratch off with heavy use. Maybe stick to the everyday basics with this one.

CRKT 1101 Moxie Spring Assist Knife
CRKT 1101 Moxie Spring Assist Knife

The blade has been carved into a modified spear point style. A spear point blade style is very similar to the needle point blade because they are both good for piercing. But, in terms of strength, the spear point will win out any day. And, as a bonus, you also get a small belly with the spear point blade. The spear pint style is a symmetrically pointed blade with a pint hat is in line with the center lien of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. In contrast to the needle-point blade which has a very sharp but weak point, a spear point knife has a strong point that is also sharp enough for piercing. Spear point blade do contain a small belly that can be used form some cutting and slicing, but the belly is pretty small when being compared to drop point or clip point blade styles. Overall, this knife will offer you a good balance between piercing and slicing ability. It combines the sharpness that you get with a dagger and the strength that you will find on a drop point blade. This hybrid blade design is going to be versatile and functional—perfect for your go to everyday knife.

 

The Handle:

The most unique characteristic of this knife is its handle. It is made out of TPE, or Thermoplastic Elastomer, which is a composite of different polymers that have both thermoplastic and elastic properties. TPE has the positive characteristics of plastic and rubber, but their deep grooves will ensure slip resistance, even when you are in wet or slippery conditions.

The Moxie comes in a couple of different colors, but this version comes in a green and black handle. The green is the base of the handle, and there are intensely textured black inlays running throughout the handle to almost look like camo.

The portion of the handle that normally sports a finger guard actually boasts jimping, which is very unique. This jimping will give you more control over your slices, while also guaranteeing that you have a secure grip on your knife. After the jimping, there is an elongated, shallow curve that will comfortably rest the rest of your fingers. The spine of the handle is a little bit straighter, but the ergonomics aren’t going to be bad for long term use—just not great either. What this knife handle has really been designed for is not letting it slip out of your hand, no matter what the environment is.

On the corner of the butt of the handle, there has been a lanyard hole attached. This lanyard will come in handy in a couple of different scenarios. For starters, a lanyard helps you keep your knife deeper in your pocket, but still allows you to remove it quickly. Secondly, having a lanyard on your knife will allow you to keep your knife with you at all times a little more easily, without it getting in the way when you aren’t using it.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a tip down pocket clip. This is a black clip that is kept in place by three small screws. These screws are black and match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The clip has a large belly on it. Across the middle of the clip “CRKT” has been stamped.

 

The Mechanism:

This CRKT knife is spring assisted with a thumb stud as well as the Fire Safe Safety and the Outburst Assisted Opening mechanism. The locking mechanism on this knife is a locking liner.

The thumb stud makes for an easy and quite common operation used to open up a spring assisted knife. The thumb stud sits on the side of the blade near where the blade pivots on the handle. It makes for a comfortable way to sue on hand to open the knife. One thing to consider is how close this puts your hand to the blade itself. You should keep in mind that there are many people who have actually cut themselves while opening the blade. It is not uncommon for a rookie’s thumb to slip and get sliced.

The Outburst Assisted Opening mechanism is lighting fast and ridiculously easy to use. These are just a few of the ways people have described our patented opening system. Just manually open the blade up to 30 degrees and the patented OutBurst assisted opening mechanism springs the knife fully open so that you’re good to go. The powerful spring also holds the blade securely closed when not in use. On many models, such as this one, CRKT has combined this system with the FireSafe for a new level of ease of operation, as well as security.

The Fire Safe Safety mechanism is easy to open and incredibly safe, which is how they came up with such a perfect name for this patented system that relies on a pin at the locking liner. The actuation mechanism operations through a spring-loaded thumb stud to release the locking liner and pin. This mechanism is easy to use and intuitive. You simply nudge your thumb outward and OutBurst handles it form there propelling your blade into an open and locked positon. This pressing and nudging of the blade prevents accidental opening to put you (and your blade) in complete control of the situation.

The liner lock is a locking mechanism for folding pocket knives. A liner lock is a folding knife with a side-spring lock that can be opened and closed with one hand without repositioning the knife in the hand. The lock is self-adjusting for wear. The modern liner lock traces its lineage to the late 19th century, but in the 1980s the design was improved by American custom knife maker Michael Walker.

 

The Designer:

The man behind the knife is Matthew Lerch. What happens when you cross art and mechanics? You get something that looks like Matthew Lerch. Trained initially as a jeweler/watchmaker, he progressed into manufacturing and tool making. Now he has a few patents under his belt for innovations, like the Fire Safe, and has been honored with some prestigious awards including the Buster Warenski award. Matt views knives as functional art, as evidenced in his Moxie and Blade Show Award-winning Endorser designer.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.29 inches long, with a handle length of 4.23 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 7.5 inches. The Moxie weighs in at 3.2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT talks about this knife they say, “An Honest Every Day Carry Folding Pocket Knife with Everything You Need and Nothing You Don’t. We’re excited to see just how far a little “Moxie” can go. With a name like that, you have a lot to live up to it—and Designer Matthew Lerch has made sure this one does. The steel InterFrame construction provides a solid footing for the molded handle scales, which feature a hard layer for strength and a softer layer for tactile grip. A modified spear point blade style proves effective in a wide variety of every day applications. Blade actuation is done through the patented Fire Safe release button incorporated into the thumb-stud opener. Simply, push down and out on the thumb-stud and as the blade begins to open, the Outburst opener assist kicks in and the blade opens fully. The Moxie is offered in three attractive color combinations; Black, Grey, and Green versions. All in all, the new Moxie folding pocket knife is an ideal choice for every day carry.” Pick up this great every day carry from BladeOps today.

CRKT Goken Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, Inc. or CRKT is an American knife company. This company was founded in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these people were previously employed with Kershaw Knives, which is where they really got their base for knife making. Their company did not really take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S knife was introduced. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan was a success. Within the opening days of the show the years’ worth of the product was sold out. They sold at 4-5 times original production numbers resulting in a tripling of production efforts.

Three years after their company really took off, US Customs seized a shipment of 80,000 CRKT folding knives worth more than $4.3 million. All of these models seized had always passed every Custom test in prior situations. The shipment that cleared once, but was then revoked was revoked because the inspector decided that the knives acted a little too much like switchblades. In the end, CKRT had to get a letter signed by an Oregon congresswoman and a Senator that petitioned the head of Customs to aid CKRT. CRKT did get their shipment back, but not before they lost $1 million in sales and had to spend tens of thousands on legal fees. After they overcame this roadblock, they have had a pretty smooth road ever since.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of the most popular patents include the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges.

Today we will be talking about the CRKT Goken, which is one of their newer knives.

 

The Designer:

The Goken was designed by James Williams, who is rom Encinitas, California. CRKT says, “You don’t want to mess with Sensei James Williams. Trust us. A former U.S. Army officer with more than 50 years of experience in the martial arts, he developed The System of Strategy. It’s a unique approach to unarmed combat that he teaches to Special Operations units and law enforcement worldwide. When he is armed, though, you’ll find him brandishing blades he’s created, like the Hisshou® and Hissatsu™ fixed blades, the Shizuka noh Ken™, and the now-legendary Hissatsu™ folder.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 1.4116 stainless steel. This steel is a softer steel, which has its benefits as well as its disadvantages. The biggest disadvantage that accompanies the soft steel is that it is not going to hold its edge for long periods of time or very well. However, the advantages are that it is an excellent steel for beginner sharpeners. And although you do have to sharpen this steel often, you are going to always be able to get a razor sharp edge on it. This steel is the steel that is always used in Swiss Army Knives. It is extremely corrosion resistant and very tough. While this isn’t a Swiss Army Knife, and while I wouldn’t recommend doing this, some people have reported cleaning their Swiss Army knives in a dishwasher. Even through the dishwasher, the steel stands up to the water. Again, I do not recommend doing this to the Goken. The steel can be hardened to a 55-57 HRC.

The blade on this knife has been coated with a black EDP Coating. This stands for Electro Deposit Primer. This coating is applied electrically and is almost like a plating process. This excellent rust-resistant coating can reach for every nook and cranny, which means that you are going to get unparalleled corrosion resistance. Because the blade has been coated, the life of the blade is lengthened considerably. Like all coatings, the EDP coating helps to resist wear and corrosion, while also cutting down on glares and reflections. The biggest disadvantage to coatings is that they do all scratch off after long periods of use or even just heavy use. At that point, you would lose out on all of the coating benefits.

The blade on this knife is unique. The spine of the knife is completely straight, reaching from the handle to the tip in a single, uninterrupted line. The knife does have a slight belly, although it is angled sharply. The blade starts in a straight line, to about one third of the way up the knife. At that point, it angles up toward the tip. You will be able to use this for some slicing, although not a ton. The tip is very fine and very sharp. Because of this, the Goken is going to be exceptional at piercing and stabbing.

The blade does sport a plain edge, which allows you to take on a wider variety of tasks and chores. The plain edge is also going to be easier to sharpen than a serrated edge, because you do not have to worry about the teeth on the knife.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of G10. This material is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made out of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, although it is slightly inferior to carbon fiber, yet you can get this material for a much smaller cost. Although this material is cheaper to produce than carbon fiber, it cannot be injection molded like FRN handles, so it does still have some cost behind it.

To create G10, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in a resin, then compresses them, and bakes them under pressure. The material that they end up with is very tough, very hard, very lightweight, and still very strong. Out of all the fiberglass resin laminates, G10 is considered the strongest. It is even stronger than Micarta, although it is going to be more brittle than Micarta.

Texture can easily be added to the handle, which is going to give you a solid grip. Tactical folders benefit from G10 highly because G10 is durable, lightweight, and non-porous. All of these characteristics help to keep the maintenance time down on this knife.

The handle on this knife is simple. It is mostly rectangular, with the spine stretching from the blade to the butt in an almost perfect line. There is a slight inward curve to better and more comfortably fit inside your palm. The butt is rounded and flared slightly, which does give you a more secure grip on the handle. The belly of the handle is the same as the spine, with a slight curve inward. Although the belly also sports a small finger groove that gives you a comfortable place to rest your fingers and also improve your grip. There are three diagonal grooves slashed across the face of the handle which add texture. You get the majority of your grip from the intense checkered pattern across the entire handle.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is held in place by a single black screw that matches the rest of the hardware, the handle, and the blade on the Goken. The pocket clip is a matte black rectangle. The handle has been drilled for either left or right hand carry, although it can only be attached for tip up carry. Because you can switch it for either right or left hand carry, this knife becomes fully ambidextrous. This is also a deep carry clip, which means that it is going to stay more securely in your pocket so you can move about comfortably without worrying about it slipping. The clip bends slightly at the bottom, which further secures it inside of your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual folding knife with a flipper to help you open the knife. The Goken has also been equipped with a locking liner mechanism and CRKT’s Field Strip technology.

Because this is a manual knife, it will be slightly easier to maintain than an automatic knife. It will also be legal in more states, cities, and areas, because it is not an automatic knife. The flipper on this knife is a rounded sharks fin shaped protrusion that is part of the blade, but does extend out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. To open a knife using a flipper, you manually pull back on this protrusion, which will flip the knife open and lock it into place. The flipper is ambidextrous by design and because it doesn’t extend off of the knife, you don’t have to worry about it getting in the way. One of the biggest benefits to the flipper is that it keeps your fingers out of the way of the path of the blade when you are opening and closing this knife. However, the flipper is a little bit trickier to get used to.

The locking liner is a locking mechanism for folding pocket knives. The locking liner is a folding knife with a side-spring lock that can be opened and closed with one hand without repositioning the knife in the hand. The lock is also self-adjusting for wear. The modern mechanism traces its lineage to the late 19th century, but in the late 1980s the design was improved by American knife maker Michael Walker. The locking liner’s side liner is split form the top toward the bottom, similar to a lock bar, that butts up against the tango of the blade to prevent the blade from closing.

When CRKT is explaining the Field Strip, they say, “The award-winning, breakthrough, “Field Strip” innovation, comes from the shop of legendary knife craftsman Ken Onion.

This no-tool take-apart technology allows for practical and efficient tool cleaning & maintenance in the field. To disassemble: start with the knife in the closed position, push the front release lever up away from the blade, then spin the release wheel on the rear of the handle away from the pivot shaft—once you feel the handle release, pull it up and away from the blade. The knife comes apart in three sections. Reassembly is as easy as reversing the procedure.” This is the ideal technology to have on your tactical knife.

CRKT Goken
CRKT Goken

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.693 inches long with a thickness of 0.136 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.854 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 8.563 inches long. The Goken weighs in at 4.2 ounces, which is an ideal weight for an everyday knife. This knife is not too heavy, but will still give the heft that people want in their knives.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT says about this knife, “Grace of a falcon, grit of a warrior. James Williams is one of the most revered martial artists in America. He brings that discipline and unrivaled know-how to this sleek tactical knife. To round out its powerful capability, it’s privy to Field Strip technology and won’t slow down even in the grittiest conditions. This is what happens when a master takes to making.”

The blade on this knife is made out of a very corrosion resistant steel, which means that maintenance will be a breeze. The steel is also easy to sharpen and you can get a fine edge on it with ease. The blade has been coated with an ultra-corrosion-resistant coating, so you don’t have to worry about your blade rusting when you are in the field. The coating also prolongs the life of the blade while cutting down on glares and reflections. The handle is made out of G10 which is tough, light, and very durable. The pocket clip is reversible, and the flipper helps to make this a fully ambidextrous knife. The Field Strip Technology is just a cherry on top of it all.

You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

CRKT M16-04KS Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, Inc. or CRKT is an American knife company established in 1994. This company is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon.

CRKT was founded in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these people were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. The company did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife was introduced. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan, was a success. Within the opening days of the show, the years’ worth of the product was sold out.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. These include the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges.

CRKT says, “From day one, we put innovation and integrity first. We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand.”

Today we will be talking about one of CRKT’s newest knives, the M16-04KS.

 

The Designer:

This knife was designed by Kit Carson who is from Vine Grove, Kentucky. CRKT says, “Kit retired as a ranking Master Sergeant and ultimately became a high profile member of the Knife Makers’ Guild. Kit designed the successful M16 knife series named one of the Top 10 Tactical Folders of the Decade by Blade Magazine. Inducted into the Cutlery Hall of Fame in 2012, Kit’s industry influence was felt far and wide. He even mentored such greats as Ken Onion. Kit passed in 2014. The Carson family requests that donations be made to the National Parkinson foundation at Parkinson.org.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 12C27 Sandvik steel. The company Sandvik says, “Sandvik 12C27 is Sandvik’s most well-rounded knife steel with excellent edge performance allowing razor sharpness, high hardness, exceptional toughness, and good corrosion resistance.” This steel has a hardness range of 54-61 HRC, high toughness, extreme sharpness, and good corrosion resistance. This steel is the perfect option for hunting knives, camping knives, high-end chef’s knives, and tactical knives. Since this CRKT knife is designed to be your regular everyday carry knife, just imagine the quality that this steel will bring to the blade. It stands up well to liquids, is durable, is tough, is strong, and maintains an edge well.

The blade has been finished with a black oxide finish, which is a conversion coating formed by a chemical reaction. When the steel is heated to around 285 degrees F, there is a reaction between the iron of the ferrous alloy and the hot oxide bath that actually produces a magnetite on the surface of the blade. Some of the advantages to coating your blade is that it cuts down on glares and reflections while increasing the lifespan of the knife. This is because there is now a barrier between the high quality steel and the environment. Every challenge in the environment hits the coating and cannot touch the blade. The drawback to having a coated blade is that the coating is going to scratch off after time.

CRKT M16-04KS
CRKT M16-04KS

The blade shape is a modified tanto style. While an original tanto blade is not designed to work as an everyday knife, this modified version is. The tanto blade shape was originally designed for armor piercing, but was popularized by Cold Steel. The shape is still similar in style to Japanese long and short swords. Just like the regular tanto blade shape, this one does have a high point with a flat grind, which gives you a crazy strong point. The strong tanto point has been designed for stabbing into hard materials; this is because the point does have a lot of metal near the tip. Because of the excess metal, it can absorb the impact from repeated piercing or hard piercing that would cause most other knives to break. On a normal tanto blade, the front edge will meet the back edge at an angle, rather than a curve, which means that there is no belly. On this modified tanto, the blade does have a slight belly that you can use for some slicing. However, it does still meet at more of an angle than the blades designed for a belly, so you do still have a very strong tip. While this modified tanto does have the typical strength, it does have a very slight belly for your day-to-day tasks.

Like all the best EDC knives, this one does have a plain blade. Because of this, you can get a finer edge that will be easier to sharpen. You are also better equipped to take on a wider variety of tasks, which is ideal for your EDC knife.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of 2Cr13 steel. This steel is incredibly strong and because of how non-porous it is; it reduces the onset of corrosion easily. This style of steel is particle-reinforced for added strength and resilience. This is a tough handle that is going to be able to take a beating. No matter what comes your way throughout your daily life, there is not concern that the handle is going to fall apart.

The handle is very unique. It is skeletonized by having four large circular cut outs in the handle. These holes keep the weight of the knife down; without them, this large knife would be much too heavy to be considered an everyday carry knife.

The spine of the handle is straight until the very end where it curves to form the butt of the handle. The belly of the handle has one bulge that is in the middle of the handle. This creates good ergonomics that fit your hand comfortably, even if you are using it for long periods of time. While there is no finger groove or guard, the flipper is going to protect your fingers and keep them safe from getting cut if you do slip.

The portion of the handle that meets the blade is completely rounded so that when the knife is closed it looks circular. The pivot joint is textured differently than the handle to contrast.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is also black, which makes this an all-black knife. The clip is just as unique as the handle, with three large circular cut outs, similar to the handle. This is a more arrow shaped clip, so it will attach a little more securely onto your pocket. The top of the clip is rounded, and kept in place by three black screws that round with the curve. The black screws match the rest of the hardware on this knife. Unfortunately, the clip is not a deep carry clip, so it is not going to be as secure in your pocket as it could be. However, that deduction is quickly made up because the clip is four-way reversible. You can attach this clip for either tip up or tip down carry and for either left or right handed carry. This helps to make the knife more fully ambidextrous.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual folding knife that is equipped with both a thumb stud and a flipper opening mechanism. The M16-04KS also has a frame locking mechanism.

Because it is a manual knife, you don’t have to worry about the strict laws that surround automatic knives. However, you do still need to know all of your local laws. BladeOps is not responsible for any consequences. The thumb stud is what it sounds like—a small barrel shaped stud that sits where a nail nick would. You use your thumb to push this knife open. The flipper is a skeletonized circular piece of the blade that is part of the blade. This section extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. You can use your finger to pull back on, or flip, this knife opened, where it will lock into place. Since the knife is equipped with both of these opening mechanisms, I will compare and contrast the two, but you can still play around with both to see which you would prefer to use. The stud allows you to comfortable open the knife with one hand. However, the stud will also put your hand very close to the blade. There have been plenty of stories about people cutting themselves while trying to open the blade. Be cautious while you get used to this opening mechanism. The flipper also allows you to open the knife with one hand, but it does keep your hand at a safe distance from the blade. Plus, once the knife is opened, the flipper acts as a finger guard.

The frame lock mechanism is very similar to a liner lock, except that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and the lock. The handle will have two sides is much thicker than the liner of most locks. Exactly like the liner lock, the frame lock is placed with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. To release the frame lock, you apply pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When the knife is open, the pressure on the lock will force it to snap across the blade, which will engage it at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness, so you will know that they are durable, reliable, and won’t fail you.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this CRKT knife measures in at 3.871 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.134 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 5.337 inches long. When this folding knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 9.313 inches long. The M16-04KS weighs in at 6.2 ounces. While this is a heavier knife, it is also a lot larger than your typical EDC knives. For the size of it, because of the skeletonized handle, this is actually a lighter knife.

 

Conclusion:

When describing this knife, CRKT says, “Homage: Paid. The M16 is the most popular series that CRKT has ever seen. We’re humbled to do right by the revered Kit Carson with this new iteration of a legendary tactically-inspire everyday carry folding knife. This one is more than just a fresh take on a classic. It’s a true tribute to one of the greats. The late Kit Carson designed this and many of his other groundbreaking knives in his shop in Vine Grove, Kentucky. Kit’s lasting legacy comes from his influence on the knife industry—he’s known for popularizing the flipper which is now a household component. Beyond that, he’s also remembered for his esteemed ranking as a Master Sergeant and his high-profile membership in the Cutlery hall of Fame. The M16-04KS keeps all we love of Kits original tactically-inspired everyday carry folding knife and adds a substantial tanto blade complete with a durable black oxide finish. With its hardy frame lock, it’s securely held in place in the midst of whatever job you put in front of it while the stainless steel handle bored with five holes keep clean and light. With the M16 reissue, we’re honoring a legend the best way we know how.”  The Sandvik steel is going to be tough, durable, and very resistant to corrosion, which does keep maintenance down. The handle is made out of stainless steel that is very corrosion resistant, which means that the entire knife is going to be low maintenance. You can pick up this brand new knife today at BladeOps and have your new go-to everyday carry knife.

 

CRKT Realtree Homefront Hunt Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT, was founded in 1994. From day one, they put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. This is an American knife company that is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. This company was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men were formerly employed by Kershaw Knives. However, the company did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife was introduce. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan was a success. Within the opening days of the show, the years’ worth of the product was sold out.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. These include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff-Serrated edges. The Outburst is the company’s proprietary mechanism for their assisted-opening knives. The Lock Back Safety mechanism, which is also invented by Ron Lake, is similar in function to the LAWKS mechanism. And Veff-Serrations were developed by Tom Veff, who is a sharpener and knife maker, and are exclusively licensed to CRKT for production.

To make sure that they give their customers Confidence in Hand, they collaborate with the best knife designers in the world, to give you some of the best knife innovations in the world.

Today we will be talking about the Realtree Homefront Hunt Flipper Knife with a satin blade.

CRKT Realtree Homefront Hunt Knife
CRKT Realtree Homefront Hunt Knife

The Blade:

The blade has been made out of 1.4116 Stainless Steel. This is the steel that is used in Swiss Army Knives and it is an excellent steel for beginner sharpeners. It is exceptionally corrosion resistant and very tough. This example is extreme, but some people even clean their knives with this type of steel in the dishwasher—I would not recommend this, but you get the point. This steel does not hold an edge well at all, but it is so easy to sharpen, you can get it back to razor levels in a few minutes. This is a German steel that is most commonly found on popular kitchen knives. This type of steel is typically hardened to 54-56HRC, and the bigger the blade, the softer the steel. This steel is quite stain resistant.

The blade has been finished with a satin blade finish. The satin finish is a semi-shiny finish with a luster falling between bead blasted and mirror polished which are matte and high gloss. This is the most popular finish on production knife blades, it shows fine buffing lines with two direction finishes that better display the bevels of a blade. This finish requires great hand skill to accomplish. This finish is less expensive than both the mirror and polished finishes. It does have decent corrosion resistance, but less so than polished or mirror finished knives. The finer the abrasive and the more even the lines; the cleaner the satin finish blade looks.

This blade has been carved into a drop point style blade. The drop point is a blade shape that is used on many knives, and is most commonly seen on hunting knives. This, along with the clip point blade shape, is one of the most popular blade shapes used on knives today. Both of these shapes are great all-purpose knives, but the drop point blade shape can stand up to more than a clip point can. To form the shape, the back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. Because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are popular on tactical and survival knives. These two blade shapes are very similar but vary when it comes to the points. The clip point has a sharper, finer, and thinner tip, so you do have stabbing capabilities; but the point is much weaker and prone to breaking. The drop point has a wider point, which means that you are going to be able to take on the heavier tasks, but you do lose out on your stabbing capabilities. This blade shape is one of its biggest advantages, but it is also one of its biggest disadvantages. The drop point is such a versatile blade shape because of the large belly area that it is perfect for slicing. It is this slicing capabilities that are going to come in handy in your most common tasks. When you are looking for a great EDC knife, you should be looking for a knife that is going to be able to slice well. And, when you are looking for a hunting knife, you definitely need to be searching for a knife that can slice, because dressing game require lots of slices.

Because this is a hunting knife, it has a plain edge. The plain edge is better than the serrated when the application involves push cuts. Also, the plain edge is superior when extreme control accuracy, and clean cuts are necessary, regardless of whether or not the job is push cuts or slices. The plain edge will work better for application s like shaving, skinning an apple, or skinning a deer. This is because those applications involve either push cuts or the need for extreme control. When you are looking for a hunting knife, you definitely need to be searching for a pain edge.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of GRN, or glass reinforced nylon. This is a high strength, abrasion, and impact resistant thermoplastic polyamide formulation of the family more commonly known as nylon, often with varying degrees of fiberglass added for extra stiffness. This material is also resistant to bending—it is practically indestructible. And, as a total bonus, it’s cheap. This material is so close to being indestructible because the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in it being strong in all directions. This material is very similar to G-10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, but with those materials the fibers are aligned in a single direction. This makes them brittle because when the fibers are stressed in a different direction, the material starts to break apart. With the haphazardly arranged fibers, it doesn’t matter which direction the material is stressed—it won’t break apart.

Many knife enthusiasts did not warm up to this material because they felt like it was cheap and almost hollow feeling. GRN also tends to provide you with a little less grip than G-10 would. This material is inexpensive to purchase because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. All of these characteristics lends well to high volume manufacturing and hence low cost. This material is strong, tough, requires zero maintenance, and it is inexpensive.

The GRN has been printed to blend in with the forest. IT is tan with branches and green splotches printed on the palm. On the spine of the handle, there is a row of thick jimping to give you extra grip. The GRN has a small chevrons carved into the handle so that you have a secure grip no matter what environment you are in. This texture will help you have a secure grip even when you are dressing your game and everything is bloody and messy.

There is also a small finger groove carved into handle to give your fingers a comfortable and secure place to rest while you are using this knife. All of the knives features have been designed so that you will have a secure grip on this knife even during the messiest of times.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The pocket clip is dark grey and skeletonized. The clip is kept in place by one small screw; the clip and the screw matching the rest of the hardware on the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a flipper knife that sports a liner locking mechanism. The flipper mechanism is a relative newcomer on the one hand opening scene—especially in popularity. While studs and holes enlist a thumb to open the knife, a flipper employs an index finger, and the feature is naturally ambidextrous. Some people have reported that deploying a flipper reliably takes a bit of practice, and that is probably true. An essential element of a great flipper is a high quality pivot mechanism.

The liner lock is easily the most popular knife lock found in folding knives. It was invented in the early 80s by knife-maker Michael walker and was quickly adopted by a number of mainstream knife makers. The liner lock functions with one section of the liner angled inward towards the inside of the knife. Form this position, the liner is only able to go back to its old position with manual force, therefore locking it in place. The tail of the liner lock, which is closest to the blade, is cut to engage the bottom of the blade under the pivot. If the user wants to disengage the lock, they must manually move the liner to the side, away from the blade bottom.

The Realtree Homefront knife is also equipped with CRKT’s field strip technology. This was designed by world-class knife maker, Ken Onion. The field strip technology lets you easily disassemble your knife whenever, wherever, and without tools. To do so you follow these steps: 1. with the knife in the closed positon, push the lever up. 2. Rotate the wheel clockwise until the handles separate. 3. The handles and the blade should separate easily. To reassemble you follow these steps: 1. Press and hold the pivot. 2. Rotate wheel counter clockwise until snug. 3. Push the lever down. The Field Strip Technology has won the Blade’s Show Most Innovative Design Award, Men’s Journal Gear of the Year Selection, and KnifeNews Dealer’s Choice Most Innovative New Knife award.

 

The Specs:

The length of the blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long, with the handle measuring in at 4.75 inches long. The overall length of the blade is 8.125 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.3 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

While the Homefront knife is not new to the CRKT line-up this year, alternate variations were introduced after the overnight sensation of one of the most innovative platforms to date. Designed by American knife maker Ken Onion, this flipper features breakthrough “Field Strip” technology that allows the user the capability of complete disassembly without the use of tools–all done in less than a minute. Each liner lock designed model features no-nonsense classic aesthetics but the functionality and utilitarian value is as modern as it gets. From the beginning, CRKT has been driven by a single purpose: to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to today’s market. This model, the K265CXP, features a unique Realtree™ finished GRN (Glass Reinforced Nylon) handle, stainless steel liners, a drop point style blade in a satin finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. Pick up your CRKT Realtree Homefront Hunt Flipper Knife today at BladeOps.

 

CRKT Raikiri Knife Review

CRKT® (Columbia River Knife and Tool®) was founded in 1994. They say, “From day one, we put innovation and integrity first. We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand®.”

This is an American knife company that is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. The company was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men were employed by Kershaw Knives formerly. They left Kershaw knives to pursue their own knife designs. Their company did not have a big start, and it wasn’t until three years after the founding that it took off. This was when they introduced the K.I.S.S folding knife, which was designed by Ed Halligan. The knife was such a success that within the opening days of the show the years’ worth of the product was sold out. They sold at 4-5 times original production numbers, which resulted in a tripling of production efforts.

CRKT is known for producing a wide range of fixed blades as well as folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT collaborates with some of the best designers in the world. They also own fifteen patents and patents pending.

When you get a CRKT knife, you know that you are getting a quality tool that is going to assist you in any of your needs. Today we will be talking about one of CRKT’s newest knives, their Raikiri.

 

The Designer:

This knife is designed by Drew Hara, who is from Seki, Japan. CRKT says, “Dew Hara is a product of his environment… literally. Makers in his hometown of Seki, Japan, are famous for designing and producing some of the best fine kitchen cutlery in the world. He also carries the world-famous Hara name; his father, Koji Hara, is one of the most respected designers alive. Dew’s work stands solidly on its own, though—his ability to infuse elements from the natural world is unparalleled, and he’s only just scratched the surface of what’s sure to be a long and productive career.”

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 1.4116 Stainless Steel. This is the steel that is often used in Swiss Army Knives. The steel is a great steel if you are a beginner sharpener, because it is a little bit softer. Surprisingly, the steel has high corrosion resistance levels and does tend to be extremely tough. Because of the softness of the steel, it is not going to hold an edge well. However, because it is easy to sharpen and soft, it is easy to get a razor sharp edge on, you’re just going to have to keep re-sharpening it.

The steel has been finished satin, which is one of the most common steel finishes in the cutlery industry to date. This finish is classic and pairs well with most handles, which is why it is used so often. It also does reduce glares, reflections, and some corrosion, so it is good in the field as well as prolonging the life of the blade. The satin finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive. The abrasive is usually a sandpaper, and as a key, the finer the sandpaper and the more even the lines, the cleaner the steel is going to look. The satin finish shows off the bevels of the blade as well as showcasing the fine lines of the steel. With the satin finish, you know that this knife is not going to go out of style. Plus, the blade does not steal the show from the unique handle.

The blade is also unique, with more angles than curves. The blade does not sport a belly, so it is not going to be good for slicing or using this knife as an everyday carry knife. The spine of the knife angles down towards the tip, which is not lowered. The blade shape is similar to the sheepsfoot blade, which has a completely straight edge with a spine that convexes down to meet the edge at the tip of the blade. The sheepsfoot blade doesn’t have an actual tip, while the Raikiri does have a slight tip. This knife will be really good for safety tasks, because it will be hard to stab someone. If needed though, you will be able to stab a little bit. Knives with similar shapes have often been known to be used on ships, because the seas get tumultuous and they can keep you a little bit safer.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of ADC12 Aluminum that has been cast into the unique shape and textures. Aluminum is a very durable material, especially when used for knife handles. This is a low density metal that provides a nice, hefty feel to the knife without actually weighing the knife down. This characteristic is a major advantage because you want to feel like you have the heft to take on the tasks without actually having the weight that gets in the way of having this knife on you.

When a knife is textured right, the user will have a secure grip that is also pretty comfortable even if you use it for extended periods of times. However, aluminum does have high conductive properties, which means that this knife is going to feel extremely cold if you are using it in the winter or colder environments.

The overall benefits to an aluminum handle is that it is going to be strong, lightweight, durable, and extremely resistant to corrosion. The disadvantages to this steel is that it is going to be cold to hold, it sometimes doesn’t give you the best grip, and aluminum is susceptible to scratches and dings.

The Raikiri’s handle is the most unique feature about the knife. Just like the blade, the handle sports more angles than curves. The spine of the knife angles upward at a slight angle until about 2/3 of the way across the knife. At this point, it angles down towards the butt, which is squared off. The belly of the handle is less of a belly and more of a straight line that slightly angles upwards to the butt. Instead of a finger groove, there is a small section of jimping that is going to give you a more secure grip, while the flipper steps in as the finger guard. The actual handle has been cast to have a few ridges and grooves that will give you the texture you need to feel secure while you are working in the field.

 

The Pocket Clip:

             The pocket clip on this knife is not reversible. The handle has only been drilled for attachment on the traditional side of the handle for tip down carry. The clip matches the blade, being silver, and contrasts with the grey handle. The clip is kept in place by two silver screws. The rest of the hardware on this knife is dark grey to match the handle. The clip is rectangular, although it does look as if it has been clipped, because it moves from the thicker rectangular to a much thinner clip.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that sports a locking liner as well as a CKRT Field Strip innovation.

Because it is a manual folding knife, you don’t have to worry about many strict laws that surround this knife. If this knife was an automatic, it wouldn’t be legal in all states, cities, or areas. Since this is a manual knife, it should be legal in any area that allows people to carry knives.

The Raikiri has been equipped with a flipper, which is a sharks’ fin shaped protrusion on the blade. It extends off the bottom of the blade and out of the handle when the knife is closed. The user uses their finger to pull back on this piece of metal, which will flip the knife open and lock it into place. Some of the benefits of the flipper is that by its very design, it is ambidextrous. The flipper also does not get in the way, because it comes off the blade instead of out of the blade, like a thumb stud would. And, once the knife is opened, the flipper acts as a finger guard for extra protection. One of the biggest advantages to a flipper is that it keeps your hands out of the path of the blade while you are opening this knife. This makes it a much safer opening mechanism to use than a thumb stud would be. Unfortunately, the flipper does take a couple of practice runs to really have the hang of it.

The Raikiri has also been equipped with a thumb hole, which is very similar to the nail nick. It rests in the same positon that a nail nick would, but it is fully skeletonized. The thumb hole was really made popular by Spyderco, but has evolved since their introduction. Just like the flipper, the hole is ambidextrous by its design and does not get in the way when the knife is opened. This opening mechanism is going to be easy and simple to use.

The locking liner is easily the most popular knife lock found in folding knives. This style of locking mechanism was invented in the early 80s by knife maker Michael Walker. Soon after it’s invention, it began to be used in a number of all the biggest knife designs. This mechanism works with one section of the liner angled inward toward the inside of the knife. Form this position, the liner is only able to go back to its old position with manual force, which locks it into place. The tail of the liner, which is the section that is closest to the blade, is cut to engage the bottom of the blade under the pivot. If the user wants to disengage the lock, they have to manually move the liner to the side, away from the blade bottom.

The CRKT Field Strip is an award-winning breakthrough. This innovation comes from the shop of legendary knife craftsman Ken Onion. This is a no-tool take apart technology that allows for practical and efficient tool cleaning and maintenance in the field. To disassemble: start with the knife in the close positon, push the front release lever up away from the blade, then spin the release wheel on the rear of the handle away from the pivot shaft—once you feel the handle release, pull it up and away from the blade. The knife will come apart in three sections. Reassembly is as easy as reversing the procedure.

 

CRKT Raikiri
CRKT Raikiri

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.759 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.134 inches. The handle on the Raikiri measures in at 5.112 inches long. The overall length of this knife measures in at 8.938 inches long. The Raikiri weighs in at 5 ounces, which is a heftier knife, but for such a large knife, it does tend to be lightweight. This knife is not going to be too heavy to use as an everyday carry knife.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT is describing this knife, they say, “When you want a sword but need an EDC. The Raikiri™ everyday carry folding knife has a serious namesake in the world of modern Japanese lore…the legendary sword is said to have sliced a bolt of lightning in two. Even if that particular need doesn’t arise, the carefully designed curves, shapely lines, and innovative Field Strip technology will make each job conquered feel just a bit more heroic.” The steel is tough and can get a razor sharp finish. The finish on the steel is classic and will never go out of style. The handle is tough, durable, corrosion resistant and provides you with a secure grip. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

CRKT SiWi Knife Review

“CRKT (Columbia River Knife and Tool) was founded in 1994. From day one, we put innovation and integrity first.” Says CRKT. “We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand.”

CRKT is an American knife company that is currently based in Tualatin, Oregon. This company was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both individuals were formerly employed with Kershaw Knives. The company did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife was introduced. The small folder, designed by Ed Halligan was a success. Within the opening days of the show the years’ worth of the product was sold out.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. These include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

Today we will be discussing the brand new CRKT SiWi.

 

The Designer:

Darrin William Sirois is the designer behind this knife. CRKT says, “Coming from a Special Ops background, Darrin doesn’t design knives that just work in theory. They need work in action too. And he knows the missing element to any great blade: human input. That’s why you’ll often find him hounding his Special Operations teammates and asking them what they like and don’t like about their knives. Now as part of the Forged by War program, he’s fine tuning until his knife making mission is complete. Along the way, he’s earning nods from award shows and fellow soldiers all around the world.”

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of SK5 Carbon Steel. This is one of the highest quality steels for a knife blade. It is the Japanese equivalent to American 1080. This is a hard steel that makes it create high quality blades and tools. Sk5 carbon steel gives a knife the ability to cut through practically anything. It produces a mixture of carbon rich martensitic with a few undissolved carbides. The extra carbide will increase the abrasion resistance and lets the steel attain an ideal balance of good blade toughness. This steel also gives excellent edge binding ability. A knife with a Sk5 carbon steel is going to be one of the best knives that money will get you.

The blade has been finished with a black powder coating. The coating is going to work to prolong the life of the blade because it puts a barrier between the high carbon steel and the environment. This makes it a little more durable, a lot more corrosion resistant, and a little more tough. The only drawback to having a coated blade is that the coating can and will scratch off over long periods of time or heavy use. Once the coating has scratched off, the only way to retain the same benefits would be to recoat the blade. Some of the benefits of the coating on the SiWi is that it cuts down on glares and reflections while also creating a very sleek finish.

The knife has been carved into a thick drop point blade shape. The drop point blade is the most popular blade shape in the cutlery industry because of how tough and versatile it is. It makes a great option for everyday carry knives to tactical or survival knives. The spine of the blade starts at the handle and curves towards the point in a slow slope. This creates a lowered point which is going to give the user more control over their cuts and slices while also allowing them to perform fine detail work with this knife. While the point is sharp, it is not as sharp as a clip point knife. This is because the point is very broad, which gives the knife the characteristic strength. Lastly, the drop point blade shape has a very large belly that makes slicing a breeze. The only drawback to the drop point knife is that because of the broad point, you do lose out on some of your piercing and stabbing capabilities. You need to remember that instead of being able to pierce exceptionally, you have unmatched strength in this knife.

This knife does have a plain edge. The plain edge is the more popular option between the three common edges: plain, serrated, and combo. The plain edge is going to be easier to sharpen because you don’t have to worry bout any of the teeth. It is also going to be easier to get a finer edge because of the same reason. However, plain edges do lose their sharpness quicker than the other two options do. The biggest advantage to a plain edge is that it equips you to take on the widest variety of tasks, especially when it comes to anything that requires a push cut.

 

The Handle:

G10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made out of fiberglass. This material is extremely similar to carbon fiber, except that it is a little bit inferior. To create this material, the manufacturer is going to take layers of fiberglass cloth. The manufacturer will then soak them in resin, then compress them, and lastly bake them under pressure. This process creates a material that is very tough, very hard, very lightweight, and very strong. Out of all the fiberglass resin laminates, G10 is considered to be the strongest. Tactical knives and fixed blades benefit from the qualities of G10 because it is a durable material that is lightweight while also being non-porous. The non-porous part is one of the biggest advantages, because it is not going to absorb any liquids that you do work with. This means that maintenance is going to be a breeze, because all you have to do is wipe down the handle. The pros to a G10 handle is that it is going to be tough, light, and durable. However, it is also going to be brittle and some people complain that it lacks the elegance they want out of a knife.

The handle is definitely one of the most unique aspects of this knife. The G10 has been textured with little bumps that give plenty of grip to use this knife in a variety of environments. However, there are also finger indents spanning the entire length of the handle—both near the belly and on the spine. These indents are going to give you even more texture and a more comfortable and secure grip on this knife, because one of the indents is going to be an indent hat you want to use.

To give your finger a comfortable place to rest, there is a massive finger groove right when the handle starts. In fact, it is so close to the blade, that part of the blade’s metal has been sued to carve out this finger groove. There is also a finger guard to protect your fingers form getting hurt.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade, which has plenty of advantages. One of the first advantages is that they are strong and big. And because of the size, the blade is going to be extremely strong, and not prone to breaking. That leads to the next advantage, which is that they are not prone to breaking. This is partly because of the size and thickness, but it is also due to the fact that there are no moving parts on a fixed blade. And because they don’t have any moving or inner parts, they are also easier to maintain. This makes cleaning very straightforward—all you have to do is wipe the blade and handle down and make sure that the blade is dry before putting the sheath on. You should also oil the blade occasionally to help the coating remain strong and intact. Next, the blade is usually longer, which allows you to take on more tasks. The blade is usually longer because it does not have to fit inside of a handle. Fixed blades are also better in a tactical situation. This is because a fixed blade can be brought into play more quickly than a folding knife. All you have to do is pull the knife out of the sheath and you are ready to go. If you were using a folding knife, you would have to pull the knife out, flip it open, and then you would be ready to use it. The last advantage is that it is going to be a better tool overall. This is because of all the characteristics, but it allows you to not only cut, but dig, split wood, use it as a first aid tool, use it in food preparation, and even use it to hammer.

 

The Sheath:

             The sheath that this knife comes with is made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN, which is the same material as FRN. This is a thermoplastic material that is very strong. It is also resistant to bending and abrasion, which makes it almost indestructible. As a total bonus, it is an inexpensive material. This is an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. These characteristics allow you the manufacturer to high volume manufacture which gives you a low cost.

This is such a strong material because the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in the material being strong in all directions. This is opposed to G10, carbo fiber, and Micarta, which have the strands aligned in a single direction. This means that it can be stressed in almost any direction without breaking apart.


The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.341 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.200 inches. The overall length of this knife measures in at 7.438 inches long and weighs in at 5.6 ounces.

CRKT SiWi
CRKT SiWi

 

Conclusion:

CRKT says, “Built by a hero, refined by an expert. Retired Sergeant Major, Darrin Sirois channeled experience from 25 years of active duty into the creation of his original design. The knife world loved it. Then, renowned expert, Chris Williams made several small suggestions. The revisions boosted the SiWi™ compact tactical fixed blade into a league all its own. This is collaboration at its finest.

If there’s one thing that Darrin Sirois has learned from his time overseas, it’s that if a tool can’t endure some of the most extreme conditions imaginable, it’s not worth having on hand. So when he was in his Fayetteville, North Carolina shop, designing the knife that was to later become the SiWi™, his mission was singular: make it last. Then Chris Williams stepped in. He’s a master of aesthetic, and with several small tweaks, together they elevated the SiWi™ to a design force to be reckoned with and gave it a name that reflects the collaborative process. Match made.
This mission-ready fixed blade is a compact powerhouse. Though that sounds like a paradox, the proof is in the incredibly stout modified drop point SK5 carbon steel blade. Finished with a non-reflective and highly resistant black-powder coat, it’s built to last, a quality that’s equally as evident in its unique G10 handles. The handles match the 3.3” blade in its compact-yet-stout capacity with texture for a strong grip even in the grittiest conditions. The subtle jimping on the back spine finishes the look and feel. Finally, the glass-reinforced nylon sheath stands up to its counterpoint when it comes to utility with many different carry options.
When two great minds converge to create a knife, you know it’s going to be good…the SiWi™ far exceeds expectation.”

You can pick up this brand new knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

CRKT Mah Journeyer Knife Review

Columbia River Knife & Tool, Inc. or CRKT is an American knife company that was established in 1994 and is based in Tualatin, Oregon. CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men were formerly employed by Kershaw Knives, but left to pursue their own company.

CRKT did not really take off until the 1997 Shot Show, which is when they introduced the K.I.S.S. (Keep It Super Simple) knife. This was a small folder that was designed by Ed Halligan and was a total success. Within the opening days of the show, the years’ worth of the product was sold out.

Unfortunately, the company did experience a large setback in October of 2000 when US Customs seized a shipment of 80,000 folding knives that were collectively worth more than $4.3 million. All 50 models seized had previously always passed every Customs test. The shipmen had cleared Customs on September 29, but on October 3rd an inspector decided that the knives acted like switchblades despite the fact that none of them fit within the definition set forth by the U.S. Switch Blade Knife Act of 1958. On October 17, a letter was co-singed by Oregon U.S. Congresswoman Darlene Hooley and Senator Gordon Smith that petitioned the head of Customs to aid CRKT. Because of their action there was a Federal inquiry of the US Customs actions that had to be answered within thirty days. On October 20, the company was once again allowed to move their product. However, this was not before they lost over $1 million in sales.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, and Greg Lightfoot.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending.

Today we will be discussing the CRKT Mah Journeyer knife.

CRKT Mah Journeyer Knife
CRKT Mah Journeyer Knife

 

The Designer:

When CRKT is talking about their knife designer Liong Mah, they say, “If we didn’t know any better, we’d think the English definition of Mah is practical. After all, it’s a useful sensibility Lion incorporates into all of his designs, like the new G.S.D., the ever popular Eat’N’Tool, and the 2015 Mah-chete. As a kid, where others doodled cartoons in their school notebooks he drew knife designs. Later, having learned CAD, he was able to bring these ideas to life by collaborating with many of the top designers in the industry.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife has been made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a popular budget brand of knife steel that is made in China. In terms of composition this steel can be easily compared to the Japanese AUS 8 steel. This steel is well balanced in regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. Many of its features make this steel a good option for urban knives that need an average-good performance. The steel hardens to a degree of 56-59HRC and with a quality heat treatment will retain the sharpness of the cutting edge for a long period of time. Knives that are made out of 8Cr13MoV steel will keep sharpening well and are very easy to sharpen. While this steel does do a good job in all aspects, you do get what you pay for and it won’t excel at any of its characteristics. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is how cheap it is. For its cost you do get a decent steel.

The blade has been finished with a black stonewash finish. A stonewash finish refers to rumbling the blade in an n abrasive material, which is usually small pebbles. The finish effortlessly hides scratches and smudges, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A black stonewash is also known as an acid stonewash or an apocalyptic stonewash and is my personal favorite blade finish. This type of stonewash finish has a blade that has undergone an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes the stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. A very positive benefit of a stonewashed blade is that they are low maintenance and preserve the look of the blade overtime.

The blade on the Journeyer has been carved into a drop point blade shape. This is one of the most popular blade shapes that is used in the cutlery industry today. The drop point style is a tough all-purpose blade shape that can stand up to virtually anything. One of the most common laces that you are going to come across a drop point blade shape is on a hunting knife, although you are easily going to be able to find it on plenty of other knife styles. To form the shape, the back or unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and helps to add strength to the tip. This tip is crazy strong and because of its strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are a very popular option on tactical and survival knives. And because of the lowered point on a drop point, the tip is easily controllable, which is one of the biggest reasons it is a popular choice on hunting knives. It is this lowered point that makes it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs or ruining the meat. And, because of the large belly that this blade shape boasts, the blade shape becomes a perfect option for your EDC knife. One of the only disadvantages to the blade is that the blade is extremely broad and is almost incapable of piercing. This tip is what differs the drop pint from the clip point: the clip point blade tip is lowered, but it is finer, sharper, and thinner than the drop point. This fine tip lets you pierce, but it is prone to breaking because of how thin it is. The drop point has so much strength behind it because of the broad tip, but it does take away from your slicing capabilities. Personally, I prefer the benefits that the drop point blade features—because the strength really is undeniable.

The handle is a combination handle which means that two thirds of the blade is plain edged and the other third is a serrated edge. This means that you are going to get the best of both abilities. You are going to get the clean cuts when needed from the plain edge portion or you can saw through thicker materials with the serrated portion. One of the complaints about a combination blade is that the knife isn’t actually big enough to truly get the best of both world and instead you can fully utilize either edges. This is all personal preference.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this blade is made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN. This is the same material as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon or FRN. This is a thermoplastic material that is very strong, cheap, and resistant to bending, abrasion. This material is almost indestructible. While GRN is similar to Carbon Fiber, G-10, and Micarta, it doesn’t suffer from being brittle as much as those other materials. This is because in GRN, the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which guarantees that it is strong in all directions instead of being strong in only the direction that it is woven. However, many enthusiasts di not warm up to this material because they felt like it was cheap, somewhat hollow, and felt plastic-y. Plus, this handle material tends to be less “grippy” than G-10 is. This material is inexpensive because it is injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. This means that it can be manufactured in high volume with a low cost. The pros of this material is that it is strong, tough, needs zero maintenance, and very inexpensive.

The handle is mostly straight lines and angles instead of curves, although there is a very shallow finger groove. The butt of the handle is completely squared off. The handle has been extremely texturized so that you can have a secure grip on it in almost any environment. To assist with control when you are using this knife, there is a row of thicker jimping on the spine of the blade.


The Pocket Clip:

While the handle has only been drilled to attach the pocket clip tip up, it has been drilled to be reversible. This means that you can carry it left or right handed—choosing the side that is most comfortable and familiar to yourself. This stonewashed clip is deep carry, which means that it will stay extra secure in your pocket and you won’t have to be worried about it falling out as you go about your daily activities. In the middle of the clip, there has been a couple shapes carved out to add aesthetic and to keep down on the weight. While the clip does match the blade of this knife, it does not match the rest of the hardware which is all black.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that features a slip joint locking mechanism.

The blade sports a modified nail nick to assist you in opening the blade. Near the spine of the blade near the handle, there is an elongated oval etched into the blade. To open the knife, you get a grip with your thumb and use the traction to manually push the blade open until it locks into place.

The joint locking mechanism isn’t actually a true lock but is still a good option for this knife. Typically, slip joints require two hands to open and close safely. This locking mechanism is made up of a spring bar and a specially shaped blade. To open the knife, you pull on the blade to overcome the pressure form the spring, snapping the blade into place. To close it, make sure your fingers are out of the way of the sharp edge and push back down. One of the biggest advantages to this type of locking mechanism is that they are legal in almost every state and area. Plus, they are simple and easy to use. However, the draw back to this type of locking mechanism is that it technically isn’t a true locking mechanism, so I wouldn’t suggest that you try to use this knife for heavier duty tasks.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this CRKT knife measures in at 2.76 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.11 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 3.86 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 6.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The CRKT Mah Journeyer knife converts from a slip joint to a virtual fixed blade by simply pulling the pin tool from the back of the handle and placing it in the blade slot. This unique knife boasts a black stonewashed combo edge blade and a black glass reinforced nylon handle. The blade is extremely low maintenance because of the stainless steel and the black stonewash finish that helps to preserves the look of the blade over its lifetime. Built for everyday use, this classic slip joint delivers functionality and safety while slashing through daily cutting tasks. The T6 torque wrench pin tool that converts your knife to a fixed blade also can be used to adjust pivot tension on the blade. You can easily turn EDC into a virtual fixed knife simply by pulling out the pin tool in the back of the handle and placing it into the blade slot, so or you can adjust the tension on the opener. Tip up, right/left reversible deep carry pocket clip. Travel through life with the Journeyer. Pick up yours today at BladeOps.

 

CRKT M16-02KS Knife Review

CRKT, or Columbia River Knife and tool was founded in 1994. The company says, “From day one, we put innovation and integrity first. We made a commitment to build knives and tools that would inspire and endure. We collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand.”

CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men had previously worked for Kershaw Knives. This new company struggled to take off for the first four three years, but that all changed at the 1997 Shot Show. Ed Halligan had designed a small folder called the K.I.S.S or Keep It Super Simple. Within the opening days of the show, the entire years’ worth of the product was sold out. In fact, they sold at 4-5 times original production numbers resulting in a tripling of production efforts.

The company is known for producing a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Liong Mah, Greg Lightfoot, and even the Graham Brothers.

Through these collaborations as well as their own work, they have reached a point where they own fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of the more well-known patents include the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges.

Today we will be going over one of CRKT’s most recent knives, the M16-02KS.

 

The Designer:

Kit Carson is the man behind this knife. He is from Vine, Grove Kentucky. CRKT says, “Kit retired as a ranking Master Sergeant and ultimately became a high profile member of the Knifemakers’ Guild. Kit designed the successful M16 knife series named one of the Top 10 Tactical Folders of the Decade by Blade Magazine. Inducted into the Cutlery Hall of Fame in 2012, Kit’s industry influence was felt far and wide. Eh even mentored such greats as Ken Onion. Kit passed in 2014.” Kit is renowned as one of the best knife makers and designers in his time, so you can be sure that this knife will be quality and up-to-par.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 12C27 Sandvik steel. This is a martensitic stainless chromium steel that has been optimized for high quality professional knives. The steel has extremely high hardness, good corrosion resistance, and great wear resistance. Often times, you will find this steel on hunting and fishing knives as well as regular pocket knives and even tactical knives. This steel has the capability of being heated to an RC59 that will give you superior edge holding. This is a very clean steel, which means that it can be taken to a mirror polish. Sandvik says that continuous improvement for the last 45 years is what has taken this steel into the high performing steel grade that it is today.

The blade has been finished with a black oxide coating. Black oxide which is also known as blackening is a conversion coating for steels. This coating is applied to add a small amount of corrosion resistance as well as to reduce light reflection and to create a sleek look. One of the advantages of a black oxide coating over other types of coatings is that it does have minimal buildup. This steel is not the highest quality coating, so while it will do its job, it is also going to be prone to scratching off over time or with heavy use.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a tanto blade shape. The tanto style blade is not known for being versatile. In fact, it is known for being the exact opposite: it does one thing and it does that one thing better than any other blade shape. The tanto blade style excels at piercing through tough materials. This blade style was originally designed for armor piercing and the modern shape is still similar to Japanese swords. In the early 1980s, the modern tanto blade shape was made popular by Cold Steel. The shape of the tanto has a high point with a flat grind, which is where you get the extremely strong point for. The point is also pretty thick and does contain a lot of metal near the tip, which is what allows the blade to absorb the impact from repeated piercing that causes the other blade styles to snap. One of the other unique characteristics about the tanto blade shape is that it meets the spine of the knife at an angle, rather than your typical curve. Because of the harsh angle, you do get even more strength, but you also lose out on a belly. The lack of belly is what makes this blade shape not a good all-purpose blade shape. While this knife won’t allow you to take on any task that happens to come your way, it will always stand up to the challenge if you do come across a hard material that you need to pierce through. This blade shape helps to make the M16-02KS a great tactical knife.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of 2Cr13 steel. This steel has extreme strength that allows it to be used in things from regular pocket knives to heavy duty military knives. This steel is also very corrosion resistant and durable.

The handle has also been coated to extend the life of the knife. The handle gets the same benefits that the blade gets—it’s durable, more corrosion resistant, and more wear resistant. However, the same thing goes for the coating on the handle—as soon as it scratches off, you will begin to lose out on all of the benefits that you could have. Fortunately, the coating on the handle is harder to scratch off than the coating on the blade because the handle is not performing as heavy of tasks.

To keep the handle more lightweight, there have been four large circularly holes drilled into it. These holes not only cut down on the overall weight, but also add a little bit of texture—which is crucial when it comes to a stainless steel knife handle. Stainless steel handles to have the tendency to be slippery, but these holes will give you plenty of grip to hold onto the knife when you need it most.

The handle shape is pretty basic. The spine of the handle is straight until the butt of the handle where it curves down to form the butt. The belly of the handle bulges out significantly in the middle to fit better in your hand and create a more comfortable grip on the handle. There is a slight finger guard, but when the knife is opened, the flipper creates a big enough finger guard that you don’t have to worry about your fingers.

The CRKT M16-02KS
The CRKT M16-02KS

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket is a four-way reversible clip that matches the handle. The clip tapers towards the bottom before having the end bend upwards. While this is not a deep carry clip, the bend at the end helps the clip attach better to your pocket and keep it secure. The top of the clip is rounded, with three black screws keeping it in place. The black screws match the rest of the hardware on this knife, which means that the knife is a fully-black knife. Just like the handle, the clip has three round holes cut out. This is both for aesthetic and to keep the weight of the knife down.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is a manual folding knife that has been equipped with both a thumb stud as well as a flipper. This knife also has a frame lock to lock the blade securely into place when you are using it, and securely closed when you are not using it.

Because it is a manual knife, you don’t have to worry about the strict laws that surround automatic knives. This knife should be legal in most areas where pocket knives are legal, but like always, make sure that you know your local knife laws before purchasing.

The thumb stud is what it sounds like—a small stud in place of the more traditional nail nick. This will make for an easy and comfortable one-handed opening. The stud does extend out of both sides of the blade which makes it ambidextrous. One of the disadvantages is that some people do feel like the stud gets in the way because it does extend out of the blade. Another disadvantage is that when you are opening this knife, it puts your hand extremely close to the blade. If you choose to use the stud, be cautious while you first get used to using it.

The flipper is a rounded piece of metal that extends off the blade and out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The user deploys the blade by using the index finger to pull back on the flipper. The flipper also allows for one handed opening and in its very design, it is ambidextrous. One of the biggest benefits is that the flipper keeps your fingers at a safe distance while you are opening the knife, so it is safer to use. However, the flipper is also a little bit harder to get the hang of. The last benefit is that when the knife is opened, the flipper does act like an extended finger guard.

The frame lock is very similar to the liner lock except that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and the lock. The handle is usually cut from steel, like in this knife, so it is also thicker than most liner locks. Just like the liner lock the frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. To release the lock, apply pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When the knife is opened, the pressure on the lock will force it to cross the blade, engaging it at its furthers point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness, so you know you can rely on this lock to keep you safe while you are using the M16-02KS.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.057 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.117 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 4.299 inches long. The overall length of the M16-02KS knife measures in at 7.313 inches long. Weighing in at only 3.7 ounces, this is a very lightweight knife, that also has enough weight to back you up when it comes to tactical situations.

 

Conclusion:

When CRKT is talking about this knife, they say, “Homage: Paid. The M16® is the most popular series that CRKT has ever seen. We’re humbled to do right by the revered Kit Carson with this new iteration of a legendary tactically-inspired everyday carry folding knife. This one is more than just a fresh take on a classic. It’s a true tribute to one of the greats.

The late Kit Carson designed this and many of his other groundbreaking knives in his shop in Vine Grove, Kentucky. Kit’s lasting legacy comes from his influence on the knife industry—he’s known for popularizing the flipper which is now a household component. In addition, he’s also remembered for his esteemed ranking as a Master Sergeant and his high-profile membership in the Cutlery Hall of Fame. The M16®-02KS keeps all we love of Kit’s original tactically-inspired everyday carry folding knife and adds a Tanto blade complete with a durable black oxide finish. With its hardy frame lock, it’s securely held in place in the midst of whatever job you put in front of it while the stainless steel handle bored with four holes keeps clean and light.

With the M16® reissue, we’re honoring a legend the best way we know how.”

You can pick up this brand new CRKT knife today at BladeOps.