CRKT Crossbones Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company has been around since 1994. CRKT is an American company that is based in Oregon. CRKT is known for their unique designs, the selection of products that they offer, and the quality of those tools that they offer. CRKT has been driven by a purpose during these past two decades. This purpose is, “to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to market.” This purpose is what has lead them to have many collaborations with multiple of the best knife designers and knife makers in the world. Out of these collaborations have been born some of the most innovative and ground breaking technological advancements in the knife world. Some of these advancements include the IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System, the OutBurst assist opening mechanism, and the Automated Liner Safety system. These technological advancements are part of the reason that CRKT has some of the best knives for everyday carry, for tactical missions, for hunting and fishing, and even for survival scenarios.

CRKT believes that every single person should be able to afford a high quality knife or tool. So to help keep costs down, they use the newest and most efficient manufacturing machines to be able to produce these products efficiently. Another thing that CRKT believes in is integrity. This theme word is behind every single aspect of their company. They have chosen to use integrity in their business model, meaning that they build their products for reliability and durability. They also always deal with their customers with integrity. CRKT has said that, “standing behind our customers is as critical as standing behind our products.” This means that if you purchase a knife or tool from CRKT, you can be sure that you are getting a quality product that will last you years. You also know that you aren’t getting scammed and will be treated with the utmost respect when ordering your product. CRKT is a reliable company that has excellent products. And they have just released a brand new knife. They named it the Crossbones.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Crossbones is made out of AUS 8 steel. AUS 8 steel is a Japanese steel, but it is very similar to the 440B steel. AUS 8 is pretty resistant to rust and corrosion. It is also very tough; however, it does not hold an edge as well as some of the higher end steels would. But, on a positive note, AUS 8 steel is very easy to sharpen and can get a crazy sharp edge. AUS 8 is commonly known as a stainless steel, however, this term is misleading. Any steel will rust or stain if left in just the right, or should I say wrong, environments. AUS 8 is no different, it will rust and it will stain. And it will do both of these things easier and quicker higher than a higher end grade steel would. All in all, with AUS 8 steel, you get a great balance between toughness, strength, edge holding, and resistance to corrosion. Because it is a medium grade steel instead of a high end steel, you get almost the same qualities, but for a much cheaper cost. This is a bonus, because it keeps your knife quality and durable, but you don’t have to shell out a fortune to buy this knife.

The AUS 8 steel has been finished with a satin finish. The satin finish is one of the most common finishes that you will find on a knife today. This satin finish is pretty much right in the middle of the different common finishes; it is shiny, but it is not mirror or polished finish. I wouldn’t call it matte though. The satin finish helps to slightly cut down on reflections and glares, all while working to help reduce rusting and corrosion. The satin finish is a solid finish, but there is nothing extra special about it.

The AUS 8 steel has been carved into a trialing point shape. Some basics about the trailing point blade shape: instead of curving down at the point, like many of the common knife shapes, the tip, and back edge, actually curves upwards. The trailing point shape gets its name because the point “trails” higher than the average part of the blade. This is usually a very lightweight blade shape. There are a handful of benefits to a trailing blade shape. The first one is that it provides you with a very large belly, with plenty of cutting length. Because the Crossbones has a trailing point shape, it is excellent at slicing and skinning, thanks to the large belly. Another benefit is that the upwards curve creates a very fine, sharp tip. This crazy sharp point is perfect for doing detail work. This blade will help you with detail cutting tasks such as skinning game or fish. Another great benefit is that the high point is out of the way. There are a few disadvantages to the trailing point blade shape—because the point is so sharp and fine, it is pretty weak. The point on the Crossbones is prone to breaking, so this is not going to be the best knife for everyday tasks. This is definitely targeted towards the hunters and fishers of the world.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Crossbones is made out of T6-6061 aluminum. This is a durable material, that has a handful of benefits. For starters, many knife lovers crave a heftier feel to their handles because it provides a surety that your knife is going to be able to stand up to the tasks at hand. Something fantastic about aluminum is that it provides a hefty feel to your knife, but since it is a lightweight and low density material, it won’t actually weigh your knife down, like a stainless steel handle would, for example. Aluminum is also extremely resistant to corrosion, which helps cut down on maintenance time. However, there are also a handful of drawbacks to having your knife handle made out of aluminum. One is that aluminum is prone to scratches. CRKT has been around the block a few times, and knows this. So to combat the scratches, they finished the handle with three different finishes. They tumble the handle, then they bead blasted it, and then they finally anodized it. Let’s go over these finishes and what they do for the aluminum. The tumbled finish is when the aluminum has been tumbled around with an abrasive material. This finish helps to hide

CRKT Crossbones
CRKT Crossbones

scratches and also gives the aluminum a less reflective nature. The bead blast finish is when the manufacturer fires small glass or ceramic beads at the aluminum with high power. This produces an even grey finish to the metal. This finish also helps to recue reflections and glares; it actually provides an even, matte finish. However, because it creates micro abrasions in the aluminum, this makes your handle more prone to rusting or corroding. So the last finish that CRKT performed on this aluminum handle was a hard, gray anodization. Anodization provides a couple of benefits. For starters, it creates a barrier between the aluminum and the oxygen, so it cuts down on how easy your handle is with rusting or corrosion. The anodization process helps to add hardness and protection to the handle. And lastly, the anodization process adds a color to the handle. With the crossbones, this anodization process has created a sleek, gray color to the handle. The handle is actually two toned. The gray part is in the shape of an hourglass, while a silver part outlines the hourglass shape. The last drawback to having an aluminum handle is that aluminum is a very cold metal. It will feel like it is biting into your hand in cold environments.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on the Crossbones is a skeletonized pocket clip. This is a silver metal to match the blade and hardware. This pocket clip will help your knife to hide securely in your pocket, and help it to almost disappear.

 

The Mechanism:

The Crossbones is a low profile flipper with a locking liner. A flipper knife is a manual folding knife. A flipper knife works because there is a small part of the blade, usually that looks like a shark’s fin, that protrudes from the spine of the handle when the blade is closed. To open this knife, you push down on that protruding part with enough pressure to flip the blade open. Because of the locking liner, the blade will then lock into place, so you don’t have to worry about it shutting while you are in the middle of using it. When you want to close the Crossbones, you undo the liner lock and push the blade back into the handle. There are a handful of advantages to the flipper mechanism. The biggest one is that this mechanism will keep your fingers out of harm’s way, or the sharpened edge of the blade, during the whole process. There is really no way that you can cut yourself during this process. The flipper mechanism is quick, safe, and efficient.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Crossbones is 3.536 inches long with a thickness of 0.124 inches. The overall length of the knife is 8.063 inches long, with a closed length of 4.503 inches long. The Crossbones weighs in at 2.4 ounces.

 

The Designer:

The Crossbones was designed by Jeff Park. In 2005, Jeff stumbled across Ken Onion’s shop and basically never left. Over the past decade, he has made a serious impact on Ken and Jeff has definitely learned a few things along the way. Jeff Park has come to have the reputation of being a perfectionist, because he has been so detail oriented with all of his projects. He has a definite taste to his designs; most of his knives are simple, yet flawless, elegant, and almost breathtaking. Jeff follows the fundamental art rule of “form follows function”, and his knives show that he has a deep understanding of both form and function.

 

The Pros of the CRKT Crossbones:

  • The steel is strong enough, tough enough, stain resistant enough, and has enough edge retention to get the job done.
  • The steel is easy to sharpen and you can get a crazy sharp edge on it.
  • Because the steel isn’t quite a high end steel, this steel is going to be more inexpensive than many steel options, but will still give you the qualities that you desire.
  • The trailing point shape provides the user with enough belly to make slicing a breeze.
  • The trailing point is a lightweight blade shape, so your knife isn’t going to be extremely heavy.
  • The trailing point has a very fine, sharp tip that will allow you to do the most delicate work.
  • The aluminum is strong, durable, resistant to corrosion, and lightweight while providing you with a hefty feel.
  • The aluminum handle has been finished with three different styles of finishes, so you know that it will be extra durable, extra resistant to corrosion, extra resistant to scratches, yet still very lightweight.
  • The flipper mechanism keeps your hand safe, while being quick and efficient.

 

The Cons of the CRKT Crossbones:

  • AUS 8 is a good steel, but it does not excel at anything.
  • The trailing point has a delicate tip, so it is prone to snapping or breaking off.
  • The aluminum handle is going to be cold.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT is a reliable company that has produced hundreds of excellent, innovative, and ground breaking knives. The Crossbones is a combination of all of those characteristics. They started with a durable steel that is going to get the job done and carved it into a shape that will be perfect for you hunters and fishers out there. They complemented this blade with a durable handle that is resistant to corrosion. Because of these two great features, maintenance time will be cut down and you won’t have to worry about your knife rusting while you work near water and guts. The Crossbones is going to be one of the best hunting and fishing knives that you will ever work with.

CRKT 5311 Pilar Folder Knife Review

CRKT has been a reliable American company since 1994. Over the past two decades, they have developed a fantastic reputation based on their knife designs, the selection of knives that they offer, and the quality of those knives. CRKT puts innovations and integrity first, because they want to be known for building products that can inspire and endure. They have been working with integrity since the very beginning. This means that they build products that are can perform reliably whether you are using it for work, fishing and hunting, tactical, survival, or any other need. Working with integrity also means that CRKT will deal with their customers honestly, letting you know that they respect and cherish you. They also want to put innovations first, and to do that, they try to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to market. To achieve this purpose, CRKT has collaborated with many of the world’s best knife designers and the best knife makers. Out of these collaborations have been born some of the most innovative and ground breaking technological advancements that are in the knife community. Some of these innovations include the Automated Liner Safety System, the IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System, and the OutBurst Assist Opening Mechanism.

CRKT believes that everybody should be able to afford a high quality knife. To keep costs low, CRKT uses the most advanced manufacturing equipment to develop their knives efficiently, but still with fantastic quality. CRKT believes that these high quality knives should help build confidence in the users, guaranteeing that they are able complete the task at hand. CRKT believes that if a knife isn’t up to your standards, then that knife isn’t up to CRKT’s standards.

They have recently released a brand new knife and they call it the Pilar.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Pilar is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese produced steel. There are a few different types of Cr steel in the series, but 8Cr is one of the most common. This steel’s biggest selling point is how inexpensive it is. While this is a benefit to many people, you have to keep in mind that the less you spend on a steel, the lower the quality you are going to get. 8Cr13MoV steel is similar to AUS 8 steel, it is a little bit lower on the quality scale though. It is not quite as hard as AUS 8 steel and it is more corrosion prone than AUS 8. This steel has poor edge retention abilities, however, it is extremely easy to sharpen. With this steel, the better the heat treatment it goes through, the better the steel is going to be able to perform.

The steel has been finished with a satin finish. This is one of the most common steel finishes. This is a pretty average finish. It really has no character, and while it does add a small amount of reflection and glare reduction, it doesn’t add enough to be super noticeable. This is not a matte finish, but it is also not a shiny finish. The satin finish also works to cut down rust and corrosion, but it doesn’t do this well enough to make a noticeable difference.

The 8Cr13MoV steel has been carved into a sheepsfoot blade. The history behind the name of the sheepsfoot blade shape is that this style of knife was originally used to trim the hooves on sheep. But throughout history, this blade shape has also been very popular of delicate work such as electrical work or even woodcarving. A sheepsfoot blade shape is not common, but it is also not uncommon. What I mean is that many people have heard of the sheepsfoot blade, but they aren’t totally sure what its advantages and disadvantages are. While many people have heard of this blade shape, fewer have actually used a knife with this blade shape. So what is the sheepsfoot blade shape? This is a blade that has a straight sharpened edge, with a rounded unsharpened edge. However, on the Pilar, the usual straight sharpened edge is actually rounded slightly. The two edges still meet with a “false point”. This is one of the major disadvantages of the sheepsfoot blade shape; it cannot stab. While this is a drawback, some career paths benefit from having no point. One of these careers is an emergency responder. They can use this blade to cut a seatbelt without having to worry about injuring the victim with a sharp point. This blade shape is also very popular with sailors, because they can cut the rigging without needing to worry about piercing the sails. Because the sharpened edge is relatively straight and long, it will give you one of the cleanest cuts you could receive, especially if you are cutting on a flat surface. The sheepsfoot blade shape excels most at cutting or slicing. Another big benefit to the sheepsfoot blade shape is that it is very controllable. This is because the unsharpened edge of the knife is curved, so you can hang on to that section of the blade while cutting, instead of needing to hold on to the handle.

On the blade, near the unsharpened edge, there is an oval hole cut out to allow you to manually deploy the knife. This blade is a plain edge, which allows you to get a sharper edge than if it was a serrated knife. The plain edge also allows sharpening to be easier than if you had a serrated edge.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Pilar is made out of stainless steel. This material provides exceptional durability to your handle. Stainless steel is also very resistant to corrosion. However, no steel, even stainless, will rust if left in a damp, wet, or humid environment. Just because it is a stainless steel metal, you still will need to maintain the handle. It will obviously benefit you with less maintenance time than a non stainless steel. Unfortunately, stainless steel is not a lightweight material and will add significant weight to the Pilar. Another drawback to the stainless steel handle is that stainless steel is known to be very slippery, giving you a not so solid grip on your knife. CRKT has finished the stainless steel handle with a bead blasted finish This finish is created by blasting small ceramic or glass beads at the material with high pressure. This will create an even, gray finish. The blasted finish also works to reduce reflection and glare because it does have a matte surface. This style of finish helps to hide scratches that the Pilar’s handle will accumulate over time. Unfortunately, these small beads do create micro abrasions in the surface, so the stainless steel is more prone to rusting and corrosion.

The handle also has an elongated finger groove that helps with precise cutting tasks.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The Pilar comes with a pocket clip. This clip is stainless steel to match the rest of the handle. It is kept in place by two small silver screws. The pocket clip has been stamped with “CRKT”. This pocket clip is only able to carry your knife right handedly, but you can reverse the clip and carry it tip up or down.

 

The Mechanism:

The Pilar is a manual folding knife that is deployed by a thumb slot or thumb hole. This is really exactly what it sounds like: there is a hole in the blade that allows your thumb to get a solid grip on your blade and then allows you to push the knife open. This mechanism is simply elegant while remaining easy to use. This knife also sports a Frame Lock keeping sure to lock your blade into place while it is open. This allows you to work with your knife, even with the tougher jobs, without having to worry about your blade giving and closing on you.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 2.402 inches long with a thickness of 0.145 inches. When the Pilar is opened, it measures in at 5.938 inches long, with a closed length of 3.530 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.2 ounces.

 

The Designer:

Jesper Voxnaes is the man behind the knife. He is a native of Denmark, so

CRKT Pilar Knife
CRKT Pilar Knife

when he needs to test a knife, all he has to do is venture out into his backyard. Because he lives in the fjords and forests of Denmark, he has a harsh environment that his knives need to be able to endure. He started designing knives because no one was making the kind of knives that he wanted. He learned how to perfect a knife only by trial and error. In 2013 he was given his IF Award for one of the Top European Designs. Jesper named this knife after Ernest Hemingway’s personal 38’ sailboat that he used for renegade surveillance on German U-boats during World war II.

 

The Pros of the CRKT Pilar:

  • The steel is extremely inexpensive, which keeps the cost of the knife down considerably.
  • The satin finish helps to slightly reduce glares and reflections while also working to cut down on rust and corrosion.
  • The steel on this blade is extremely easy to sharpen.
  • The sheepsfoot blade shape has no point, which is a benefit if you need to work in close quarters or slice without having to worry about piercing someone. This is great for people such as first responders.
  • Because the sharpened edge is so straight, your cuts will be the cleanest that you will ever find.
  • The sheepsfoot blade shape excels at cutting and slicing.
  • The sheepsfoot blade shape is very controllable because the user is able to grasp the unsharpened edge of the blade.
  • The stainless steel handle is durable and rust resistant.
  • The elongated finger groove gives you better control.
  • The bead blasted finish hides scratches.
  • The pocket clip can be carried either tip up or tip down.
  • The hole cut into the knife helps to manually deploy the knife quickly and efficiently.

 

The Cons of the CRKT Pilar:

  • The pocket clip has only been drilled to carry this knife right handedly, so it is not ambidextrous.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT is an extremely reliable company. They are reliable to their customers, treating them with honesty and integrity. An they are reliable in their products, they produce knives and tools that are designed to be able to perform even in the most stressful situations. They believe that every person should be able to afford a high quality knife or tool, so they build their knives efficiently to keep the costs down. They have produced countless innovative and ground breaking new knives and one of the newest of their knives is the Pilar.

To create an excellent knife CRKT started out with 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. This steel’s biggest benefit is that it keeps the knife’s price down significantly. This steel is going to be able to get the job done, but it really doesn’t excel in ways that a high quality steel would have. This steel has been ground into a sheepsfoot blade that will give you clean cuts while letting you cut worry free because there is really no point. In fact, the point is dubbed as a “false point”. The stainless steel handle is very resistant to rust and corrosion, which does keep maintenance down. However, the stainless steel handle does add quite a bit of weight behind the knife. This is a great knife with a complex backstory and you can get yours here.

CRKT Gusset Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT, was born in Oregon in 1994. This company was founded by Paul Gillespie and Rod Bremer.  This is an American company that is known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. This company did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show when the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife was introduced. This is a small folder that had been designed by Ed Halligan. Within the opening days of the show, the years’ worth of the product had sold out.

For over 20 years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. To achieve this desire, they operate on a simple principle: the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. They also collaborate with the best designers in the world. Some of these collaborators have been Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. CRKT also owns fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of these patents are the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff-Serrated edges.

CRKT has recently released a brand new knife called the Gusset and the Gusset Black with Triple Point Serrations. These two knives are the same design with a few minor differences.

 

The Blade:

The blades on both of these knives are made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese steel that comes from the Cr series of steels. The highest quality out of the Cr steel is the 9Cr, with 8Cr falling closely behind. This steel is usually compared to AUS 8 steel, however, the 8Cr steel is slightly inferior to AUS 8. One of its biggest features that it boasts is how inexpensive the steel is. This steel can get a very fine edge and hold onto its edge for long periods of time. And, as a bonus, this steel is extremely easy to sharpen because of how soft it is. This steel also has a very high level of corrosion resistant properties. This steel is well balanced between strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties.

One of the differences between these two steel types is the finish that the blade sports. One of the versions of the knife has a gray Titanium Nitride finish. This is one of the best coatings that can be applied to a steel. One of the main reasons that this finish is used is to provide the steel with a different color. And the other main reason that this finish is used is to increase the durability of the blade. The Titanium Nitride finish is known to be extremely scratch resistant as well as extremely peel resistant. One of the unique characteristics of this finish is that it is applied through a process of plasma deposition performed in a completely air-sealed vacuum. This is a benefit because in many coated finishes, the finish runs or is coated unevenly, which makes for an uneven and unsmooth blade and also makes the coating more likely to scratch, peel, or chip off.

On the other version of the Gusset, the finish on the blade is Black Oxide. This is finish is also known as blackening and it is a conversion coating for ferrous materials that is used to add mild corrosion resistance and an appealing black appearance.

The blades on these knives have been carved into a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is the most popular blade shape on the market today and it is a very versatile and all-purpose knife. To form the shape of this knife, the back or unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point works to provide you with more control over your cuts and slices while also adding strength to the tip. The drop point blade shape is often confused with the clip point, because they work to be able to perform similar tasks and are also both very versatile. The biggest difference between the two is the point. The clip point has a thinner point that gives you better stabbing capabilities, while also being much weaker and more prone to breaking. The drop point blade shape has more metal towards the tip, which makes for a broader tip, and thus, less sharp. So while you do lose out on most of your stabbing and piercing capabilities with a drop point, it is so much stronger. Because of the extra strength it can hold up to heavier use and because of both of those characteristics, the drop point blade shape is very popular on tactical and survival knives. The broad tip is both a major advantage, but also a drawback to this blade shape. And because the tip is so easily controllable, this blade shape is very popular on hunting knives. This is because the lowered, broad, and controllable point makes it easier to avoid accidently nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. One of the last reasons that this is such a versatile and all-purpose blade shape is because of the large belly area that the shape sports. This belly area provides plenty of length that makes the Gusset the perfect knife for your everyday tasks as well; many everyday tasks involve some form of slicing. Because the Gusset has a drop point blade it makes it the perfect option to take on all of your common tasks that are expected, but it also prepares you to take on the unexpected challenges and adventures that accompany your life.

The edges on the two versions of the Gusset do vary. The version of the knife that sports the gray Titanium Nitride coating has a plain edge. This is the more traditional edge that you can purchase. There are a handful of benefits to having a knife with a plain edge. For starters, a plain edge is much easier to sharpen and you can get a finer edge on it. Second, the plain edge is the perfect edge for your push cuts, which involve slicing, peeling and skinning.

The version of the knife that has the Black Oxide finish features a combo edge. This is when the half of the blade which is closest to the blade is serrated and the other have has a plain edge. This type of edge has a tendency to make the customer feel like they have the best of both worlds. They have the serrated portion of the knife which is ideal for cutting through the thicker materials such as rope and branches, because you can saw through them. But, they also have the plain edge for any common slices that they need to perform.

In the end, edge style is purely preferential because you can get a very sharp edge on a serrated edge and plain edges do have the capacity to cut through the thicker materials. It’s best to look at what you expect to do the most with your blade and make your choice based on that.

 

The Handle:

The handles on both versions of the knife are made out of stainless steel. This material provides exceptional durability as well as crazy resistance to corrosion. However, stainless steel is also not lightweight. To cut down on the weight that the stainless steel handle would add, CRKT has cut out different geometric shapes in the middle portion of the handle. This is an effective tactic to keep the Gusset more lightweight, while also giving the user a fresh, unique style. Stainless steel is also fairly slippery, but the geometric shapes help in that area as well. Stainless steel is a very strong material, so the Gusset is going to be able to take on those harder tasks.

The finish on the two versions are different though. The gray blade has a matching gray handle and the black blade has a matching black handle. Since these knives are both monochromatic, it gives you a sleek, almost futuristic feel to it.

To keep your grip as comfortable as possible, CRKT has carved out a shallow, elongated finger groove and has added a finger guard to protect your fingers. On the butt of the handle, there is a row of thick jimping to help provide you with a secure grip. And as an added bonus, the butt of the handle also features a lanyard hole.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on both versions of the knife match that particular versions color. The clip is skeletonized to go with the handle as well as cutting down on weight. The handle on the Gusset has only been drilled to attach the clip for tip down carry on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

The Gusset is a folding knife that features a flipper opening mechanism. The flipper is a small protrusion that comes out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. You pull back on this flipper and it puts enough pressure on the blade to flip it open and then lock it into place.

CRKT Gusset Knife
CRKT Gusset Knife

The Gusset features CRKT’s IKBS system. This system was designed by Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala. It uses lubed ball bearings that are set into the folding knife pivot. Because of this system, you can have a rapid blade deployment that is smooth and fast.

The Gusset also features a frame lock mechanism. This is a very similar mechanism to a liner lock except that a frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. The frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, engaging at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.568 inches long, with a blade thickness of 0.123 inches. The overall length of this knife is 8.125 inches long and it features a closed length of 4.581 inches. This knife weighs in at 4 ounces even.

 

The Designer:

The Gusset was designed by Ken Onion, who is known at CRKT as the real deal. He was the youngest ever inductee into the Blade Magazine Hall of Fame in 2008 and he is recognized as one of the most innovative and successful knife designers of all time. In 1996 he created the first commercially successful assisted opening mechanism and 20 years later he unveiled his award winning Field Strip Technology. He is the designer of the successful Eros folder series as well as the award winning Hi Jinx. It seems to me like Ken Onion is never at a loss for ideas.

 

Conclusion:

The Gusset is a flipper knife that was named after the gussets of a metal dune buggy that adds additional strength and helps to reduce the overall weight. These knives are made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel which resists rust and corrosion well while also maintaining a very fine edge for long periods of time. As an added bonus with the blade, the steel makes sharpening a breeze. There are two different finishes for you to choose from: dark grey TiNi or a Black Oxide finish. There are also two different blade edge styles to choose from, the dark grey blade having a plain edge and the black blade featuring a combo edge. The drop point blade shape on these knives make them perfect for taking on heavier duty tasks as well as getting you through your everyday tasks. The stainless steel handle and pocket clip are skeletonized to reduce the weight behind this knife. This knife is strong, durable, and resistant to rusting and corroding. Either versions of this knife will be the perfect addition to your knife collection and you can get them both at BladeOps.

CRKT Homefront Folder Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and tool, Inc., or CRKT, was established in 1994. From the very beginning of this company, CRKT has had a purpose driving them forward: they want to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to market. Because of this drive, they have had collaborations and partnerships with the world’s top designers and many custom knife makers. Born from these collaborations are products and knives that are aesthetically pleasing, superior over all other knives, and have innovative and ground breaking characteristics about them. CRKT produces knives for everyday carry, for tactical missions, for hunting and fishing, they even have a few for survival situations. CRKT knows that their products are being put to the test in your lives every single day, and these products are standing up to the task. To ensure that their products are up to the standards of their users, they make sure to use the most advanced equipment and production systems. CRKT also believes in integrity, and that’s how they do business. They build products that are going to be reliable no matter what the task is at hand. They believe that everyone should be able to afford to carry the highest quality knives and tools, so they build their products with efficiency.

CRKT has recently released a brand new knife. They’ve named it the Homefront, and it really is a game changer. The Homefront was designed by Ken Onion. Ken Onion is the youngest person to ever been inducted into the Blade Magazine Hall of Fame, he accomplished this in 2008. Ken is also recognized as one of the most successful knife designers of all time. Ken is also one of the most innovative knife designers of all time, and has continually designed and released key aspects of knives that keep getting better.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Homefront is made out of AUS-8 steel. This steel is a Japanese steel and is similar to the more common 440B steel. AUS-8 is a common stainless steel and it is a decent all around steel. This steel is hard enough to get the job done, it is tough enough to get the job done, and it has enough resistance to staining and rusting. However, it does not excel at any of these. AUS-8 is not a high end steel; it is more like an upper mid-range steel. AUS-8 holds an edge fairly well, but you are going to need to sharpen it more often than many other types of steel. So count your blessings that AUS-8 is a breeze to sharpen and can get crazy sharp. A big advantage to having an AUS-8 blade is that it is pretty inexpensive.

The AUS-8 steel has been finished with a satin finish. This is one of the most common and typical types of finishes for knife blades. This finish is less expensive than a mirror finish and a polish finish, but because of that, it is less shiny as well. This finish is created by sanding the blade in one direction with increasing degrees of a fine abrasive. This finish will show off the bevels of the blade, while also showing off the lines of the knife. This finish reduces glare and reflections. This finish has decent levels of corrosion resistance.

The AUS-8 steel has been carved into a modified drop point blade shape. I’m sure you’ve heard of a drop point blade shape and know the blade pretty well, but a modified drop point is not as popular. So what it is? This term is generally used when the knife has a shape that is pretty much a mix of a clip point and a drop point, but probably shouldn’t be classified as either. We’ll go over the advantages of both styles of blade shapes and what the advantages on the modified drop point shape are. The drop point is such a popular blade shape because of how versatile this blade shape is. It has a strong point that is easily controlled. This controllable tip gives you the ability to do precision work; hunters love the controllable tip because it allows them to skin an animal without piercing through the organs or ruining the meat. The tip is strong enough to endure heavy use and because of this, the drop point is a popular shape for tactical or survival knives. Another huge benefit of the drop point shape is that it has a large belly that allows easy slicing. The clip point blade shape is similar to the drop point in many ways. For starters, it also has a big belly and plenty of cutting edge, making slicing a breeze. The point is similar, but this is also where they differ. While the tip on a clip point is controllable, it is much sharper than the point on a drop point. However, because it is sharper, it is also weak, whereas the drop point has a very strong tip. Both shapes are great for all purpose knives. The modified drop point combines advantages from both of these blade shapes. Of course it features a large belly, so with the Homefront, you will easily be able to slice. But, it features a broader point than a clip point, so you get the strength behind the point, but you also get a sharper point than you would on a drop point shape. The modified drop point has combined all of the best characteristics, giving you one heck of a blade. The Homefront will be a great knife for your everyday needs, your survival needs, your tactical needs, and basically any other need that you can think of.

 

The Handle:

CRKT Homefront Knife
CRKT Homefront Knife

The handle on the Homefront is made out of aluminum. T6-6061 aluminum alloy to be exact; which just so happens to be the most common type of aluminum used along with one of the strongest alloys of aluminum out there. Aluminum is a very durable material for handles. Many knife carriers like to have weight and heftiness behind the knife, because it helps the user feel more in control and gives you a little extra durability. But, knife carriers also don’t want to feel weighed down, like they have a brick in their pocket. Aluminum truly gives you the best of both worlds; it feels hefty, but it is actually a very low density, lightweight material, so it is not going to weigh you down. Aluminum is a pretty slippery material, so to combat that, CRKT has added some heavy texture. This texture will provide the user with a solid, secure grip. CRKT has also added jimping down part of the length of the handle, giving you an even more secure grip. Aluminum is also prone to scratches, and to help combat that, CRKT has anodized the Homefront handle. The anodization process provides hardness and protection to the aluminum. It also can add color to the handle. The Homefront has been anodized gold. The last drawback to having an aluminum handle is that it is a cold material. If you work in a cold environment, this knife is going to feel very cold in your hand, it might even feel like it is biting into your skin. If you work or live in a cold environment, or somewhere that experiences pretty harsh winters, this knife is not going to be your best friend during those colder months.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip that has been included with this knife is a skeletonized pocket clip. It is a charcoal color.

 

The Mechanism:

The Homefront is a manual folding knife, with a spine flipper to help rapidly deploy the blade. So how exactly does a flipper work? The basics of it is that there is a part of the blade that extends through the spine of the knife when the knife is closed. On the Homefront, this flipper is a small circle with a hole in the middle of it, which is one of the most uniquely shaped flippers that I’ve seen. You push down on this flipper, which then puts pressure on the detent. When enough pressure overcomes the detent, the blade will flip up into the open position and lock into place. There a few benefits of a flipper mechanism, but one of the biggest is that it keeps your fingers safe and out of the way of the sharpened edge of the blade while opening your knife. Another big advantage to the flipper mechanism is that you can open the Homefront with only one hand. The flipper mechanism is safe, quick, and efficient; these three characteristics are probably everything that you are looking for in an opening mechanism.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Homefront is 3.5 inches long, with a thickness of 0.133 inches. The overall length of the knife is 8.313 inches long, with a closed length of 4.728 inches long. The Homefront weighs in at 4.8 ounces.

 

The Extras:

This knife features a very unique, innovative characteristic. This is the first of CRKT’s knives to feature what they all the “Field Strip”. This innovation was created by Ken Onion, a well-known knife craftsman. This innovation allows you to take apart your knife with no tools for practical and efficient cleaning and maintenance, even when you are in the field. To dissemble your knife, you 1. Start with the knife in the closed positon. 2. Push the front release level up away from the blade. 3. Spin the release wheel on the rear of the handle away from the pivot shaft, once you feel the handle release you pull it up and away from the blade. The Homefront will then come apart into three sections. To reassemble the knife, you do the same process, but in reverse.

 

Pros of the Homefront:

  • The steel is hard enough, tough enough, and corrosion resistant enough to get almost any job done.
  • The AUS-8 steel has been finished with a sleek satin finish.
  • The blade has been carved into a modified drop point blade shape, which gives you all of the best characteristics of both the drop point and clip point shape.
  • The aluminum handle is durable, strong, and resistant to corrosion.
  • The flipper mechanism is efficient, safe, and quick.
  • This knife features the Field Strip mechanism, which allows you to take apart your knife without any tools whenever you want, to easily clean and maintain your entire knife.

 

Conclusion:

The Homefront looks like your classic grandpa’s World War 2 folder, but it’s so much more than that. While it does rock an old timey look, I guarantee that everything about this knife is new and modern. For starters, the AUS-8 steel is carved into a modified drop point shape, truly giving you the best of both worlds. You get the strength behind the tip that the drop point shape offers, and you still get the sharpness behind the tip that the clip point shape offers. With this blade shape, there isn’t much that you aren’t going to be able to accomplish. The handle has been anodized gold, giving it a more classic look. But this aluminum handle is going to be able to endure more than you can imagine. To top the whole knife off, CRKT has added their new Field Strip technology. This is an innovative invention that allows you to take your knife apart, without tools, to clean and maintain in the field. There is nothing old timey about this new invention. This invention is all thanks to Ken Onion. The brand new Homefront is going to change the way that you think about knives.

CRKT 281KXP Hi Jinx Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool, or CRKT, has been around since 1994. This company is based in Oregon and is an American company that has made a reputation through their distinct design, the selection that they offer, and the quality of all of their products. Since the very beginning, CRKT has had a purpose that has driven them to accomplish what they have. This purpose is “to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to market.” Because of this purpose, CRKT has collaborated with a variety of the best knife designers and custom knife makers. These collaborations have resulted in products that are always visually stunning and technically superior. These collaborations have also resulted in some of the most innovative inventions in the knife world to date, including the IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot system, the Automated Line Safety System, and the OutBurst assist opening mechanism. CRKT uses the newest and most advanced manufacturing equipment and production systems to produce the knives efficiently and with excellence.

CRKT has a company motto of integrity. They build their products with integrity and deal with their customers with integrity. Because of this, they believe that if their knives and tools aren’t up to their customer’s standards, then their knives and tools aren’t up to their own standards. When you purchase a CRKT knife, you can be sure that you are getting a high quality product and that you are dealing with a company that truly cares about you and your experiences. CRKT has produced their products to be able to stand up to everyday use, tactical use, survival use, and hunting and fishing. One of their newest knives is called the Hi Jinx Z, and it is just as quality as the rest of their knives.

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 1.4116 SS steel. If you are like me, you have probably never actually heard of this steel, and if you have, you aren’t quite sure what sets it apart from the other steels. 1.4116 SS steel is similar to the 440A steel. This steel is pretty inexpensive, which helps to keep the cost of the overall knife down. This type of steel has great resistance to rust and corrosion. It can take a fine edge, however, it doesn’t hold this edge as well as other types of steel do. This type of steel is most commonly found on kitchen knives. 1.4116 SS steel is decent, it will get the job done, but it is not super high quality. Investing in a knife with a higher quality steel is going to give you better results in the end. But having a blade made out of this type of steel is a great knife to have as your backup knife.

The steel has been finished with a satin finish. This type of finish is one of the most common finishes that you are going to find on knives. It does help to reduce glare and reflections a little bit, but it is not matte by any means. The satin finish will also help reduce corrosion to an extent, but if that is what you are looking for in a finish, keep looking. The satin finish is mostly to give your knife a pleasing, clean, elegant look.

The 1.4116 SS steel is carved into a drop point blade shape. This is the most versatile blade shapes out there, and it is certainly one of my favorites. The shape is formed by the unsharpened edge slowly curving to meet the point in a lowered position. There are a variety of benefits from having the point lowered. The first one is that you will actually have more control over the tip. Most hunters search for knives with a drop point shape because it lets you skin your game without having to worry too much about nicking the organs or ruining the meat. Another big benefit to having a lowered point is that it creates a broader tip than you would find on a clip point. Because the tip is broader, it has more strength behind it, and it is more durable. This helps your knife stand up to heavier duty and harder tasks. Another reason why the drop point blade shape is so popular is because it sports a large belly. This large belly with plenty of cutting room is what makes the Hi Jinx Z such a great every day knife. One of the only drawbacks to having a drop point blade shape is that because the tip is broader than many other blade shapes, you are not going to be able to pierce or stab many things. In my mind, this is a small price to pay to get all of the other benefits about the drop point blade shape.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Hi Jinx Z is made out of glass reinforced nylon, or GRN for short. This material is made by arranging the nylon fibers haphazardly, instead of in a single direction, like G-10, Carbon Fiber, or Micarta. Because of them being arranged haphazardly, GRN has a high strength level, while also being very resistant to abrasion and bending. GRN has been considered to be basically indestructible. However, GRN does not have too much texture when it is in its pure form, so to give the user a solid grip on the Hi Jinx Z, CRKT has added some extreme texturing to the palm area of the handle. With this aggressive texturing, you will be able to hold on to your knife in almost any condition without having to worry too much about slipping.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The Hi Jinx Z comes with an attached pocket clip. It is half skeletonized and silver satin to match the blade of this knife.

 

The Mechanisms:

CRKT Hi Jinx
CRKT Hi Jinx

This knife is a folding knife with a locking liner. This knife sports the IKBS system. This was designed by Flavio Ikoma and Rick Lala. This system sets lubed all bearings into the folding knife pivot. Because of this, the knife can be rapidly deployed with a smooth and fast movement. This knife is a flipper knife. A flipper knife works by using a small fin shaped that protrudes from the spine of the knife when the knife is in the closed position. You push down on this fin and it flips the blade open. Then the locking liner safety clicks into place and your blade is locked in the open position. When you want to close the knife, you undo the liner lock and push the blade closed. There are a few benefits to having your knife be a flipper, one of them is that it always keeps your fingers out of the sharpened blade range. This means that you never have to worry about your fingers getting cut or pinched. It also allows you to open your knife quickly and efficiently.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.293 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.111 inches long. When this knife is open, it measures in at 8 inches long, with a closed length of 4.721 inches. The Hi Jinx Z weighs in at 4.9 ounces.

 

The Designer:

Ken Onion is the man behind the Hi Jinx Z. Ken is considered to be the most innovative and successful knife designers of all time. He was the youngest ever to be inducted into the Blade Magazine Hall of Fame. He was inducted in 2008. In 1996, Ken, created the first commercially successful assisted opening mechanism. He recently just introduced the Field Strip Technology. Ken seems to always have new, ground breaking ideas. These ideas have won him so many awards. You know that if Ken Onion helped to design your knife, it is going to be an innovative, quality knife.

 

Pros of the Hi Jinx Z:

  • The steel on this knife is a pretty inexpensive knife.
  • The steel has decent toughness and strength behind it.
  • This steel is very resistant to corrosion.
  • This steel can get a very fine edge.
  • The satin finish helps to reduce glare, reflections, wear, and corrosion.
  • The drop point blade shape has a large belly with plenty of cutting room.
  • The drop point blade shape is one of the most versatile blade shapes, perfect for everyday use, tactical, or survival needs.
  • Because the tip is lowered, you have more control over it, allowing you to accomplish detail work with the tip.
  • Because the tip is lowered, it is broader, and thus has more strength and durability behind the tip.
  • The GRN handle is basically indestructible, it has incredible durability.
  • The GRN handle is resistant to wear and bending.
  • The GRN handle has plenty of extreme texture to provide you with a secure grip.
  • The knife comes with a pocket clip.
  • This knife sports the IKBS ball Bearing Pivot System.
  • This is a flipper knife, so your fingers are going to be kept out of the way and always safe.
  • Ken Onion is one of the worlds most renowned knife designer, so you know that this knife is going to be quality and innovative.

 

Cons of the Hi Jinx Z:

  • Because it is a drop point shape, the point is broad and stabbing things will be harder.
  • The pocket clip is not a deep carry pocket clip, so your knife will not be as secure in your pocket.

 

Conclusion:

Columbia River Knife and Tool company produces some of the most unique and quality knives on the market. They believe that everyone should be able to afford a high quality knife. They make their products with the newest manufacturing equipment to produce their knives and efficiently as possible. Because they produce their products so efficiently, they can keep their prices a little bit lower. Over the past two decades, they have collaborated with a variety of the most well-known knife makers and designers. Out of these collaborations have been born some of the most innovative technology in the knife market to date.

To create yet another masterpiece, the Hi Jinx Z, CRKT started off with a good steel. This steel is able to take on the tasks that you need it to, but it really isn’t going to be able to perform anything extra. This steel has a satin finish and a plain edge. Because it is a plain edge, it will be easier to sharpen and will be used for a larger variety of tasks. To make this knife perfect for every day uses, they chose to grind the steel into a drop point shape. This shape is the most versatile out of any of the knife blade shapes because it is strong, durable, has a big belly, and a decent tip. To complement this blade, Ken Onion and CRKT designed the handle out of Glass Reinforced Nylon. This is one of the strongest materials of its kind, because of how the fibers are placed haphazardly instead of in a uniform direction. This helps the handle be less brittle and less resistant to wear and bending.

This knife does have a flipper opening mechanism, which helps to keep your fingers safe and out of the way when you are opening it. Because they used the IKBS Ball Bearing Pivot System, the flipper mechanism will work quicker, smoother, and more efficiently.

The Hi Jinx Z is a quality knife that is going to be able to accomplish your everyday tasks. Because of the level of steel, this knife is the perfect knife for your backup knife or if you don’t want to worry about banging up your knife. Because all of the materials are good, but not great, this is a very inexpensive option for your everyday knife choice.

When purchasing a new knife, you know that you can rely on CRKT for giving you a great knife. The Hi Jinx Z will be a great addition to your collection.

 

CRKT Copacetic Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool Company, or CRKT was born in Oregon in 1994. This is an American company that is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over 20 years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They collaborate with the best designers in the world and operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand.

This company was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. These two men were both formerly employed by Kershaw Knives. However, the company did not truly take off until 1997. They took one of their new knives, the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) to the Shot Show that year. This was a small folder that had been designed by Ed Halligan. Within the opening days of the show the years’ worth of the product had sold out.

CRKT produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and they have patents pending. Some of these patents are the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff Serrated Edges.

Over the past twenty years, CRKT has built a reputation of being reliable, durable, and long lasting. You know that when you purchase a CRKT knife, you are purchasing a lifelong adventure partner and a blade that will be able to get the job done, no matter what the job is. CRKT has recently released a brand new knife and they call it the Copacetic.

 

The Designer:

Larry Hanks is the man behind this knife. He was practically born a woodworker but had plenty of other talents. He designed jewelry and foundry work and then culminated in a decorated career as a tattoo artist. After all of that, he met Ken Onion. Larry’s knife engravings were so skilled that Ken Onion enlisted his talents shortly after they met, and now they’ve been working together for over twenty years. It wasn’t until four short years ago that Larry took on his own projects. The progression was natural, and there’s no doubt around here that his knife making career will soon eclipse his tattooing career.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Copacetic is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This type of steel belongs in a series of Chinese steel. In the series, 9Cr steel is the highest quality. However, 8Cr steel falls closely behind in quality. This steel is best compared to AUS 8 steel, however, AUS 8 is the better steel between the two. 8Cr steel is softer, less durable, and rusts easier than AUS 8 steel. The biggest advantage that the 8Cr steel boasts is how inexpensive the steel is. Because of this, it can drastically reduce the cost of the overall knife. And this is an average steel that is able to get the job done. Because of how soft the steel is, sharpening is a piece of cake. And you can get a very fine edge on this knife that lasts for a while. While this steel has a variety of benefits, but it does not excel at anything.

The steel has been coated in a black oxide finish. This is a blackening coating that is used to coat metals. This type of coating is used to add mild corrosion resistance, as well as for appearance, and to minimize light reflection. However, because it is a coating finish, it will eventually scratch off. This finish helps to add a sleek essence to the all-black knife.

The steel has been carved into a clip point shape. This is a great all-purpose blade shape and is one of the most popular shapes on the market. This blade shape is commonly found on Bowie knives, but it is also popular on many pocket knives and fixed blade knives. To form this blade shape, the back of the knife runs straight from the handle and then stops about halfway up the knife. At this point, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. The spot where it turns and continues on to the point looks as if to be cut or clipped out. This is where the blade shape gets its name from. The clipped out portion can be either straight or curved, but on the Copacetic, it is straight. This type of blade shape has a lowered point, which makes it similar to the drop point blade shape. This lowered point provides more control when you are using this knife. And because the tip is controllable, sharp and thinner at the spine, a clip point knife lends itself to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. However, the tip is also the spot that makes the clip point and the drop point blade shape different. While the drop point has a broad tip, the clip point has a thin and sharp point. This is a disadvantage, because it is more prone to breaking or snapping when you are doing the harder tasks. However, it is an advantage because you do have stabbing capabilities. One of the last reasons that makes this blade shape so versatile and so popular is that it features a large belly area that is perfect for slicing. This large belly provides you with plenty of length that will help you have plenty of room for slicing. This is one of the key characteristics that you should be looking for in an everyday knife, because the majority of your everyday tasks include some form of slicing. The clip point blade shape is the perfect blade shape to be prepared for any situations, whether they are the expected or the unexpected.

On the unsharpened edge of the blade, near the handle, there is some deep, chunky jimping. The edge of the blade is a plain edge. This is when the edge is one continuous sharp edge. This type of edge is the most traditional type of edge. The plain edge serves a wider range of uses compared to other types of edges. One of the biggest benefits of a plain edge knife is that it is much easier to sharpen than a serrated edge. Some people worry that their plain edged blade is not going to be able to cut through the stronger or thicker materials, but when your edge is sharp enough, it can manage these tasks.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Polypropylene with Glass Fiber; Thermoplastic Elastomer. This material is lightweight as well as being more chemical and heat resistant than many of the other handle materials. And, because of the glass reinforcement, there is plenty of texture to provide you with a secure grip. The Thermoplastic Elastomers is a class of copolymers or a physical mix of polymers, which are usually a plastic and a rubber. This consist of materials with both thermoplastic and elastomeric properties. Thermoplastic elastomers show advantages typical of both rubbery materials and plastic materials. These two materials will provide you with a very secure grip in almost any environment.

There is a deep, rounded finger groove carved into the handle to make this a more comfortable handle to hold for long periods of time. Plus, CRKT has added a finger guard to protect your fingers from slipping and getting cut.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is black to match the rest of the knife. This is a deep carry pocket clip that is kept in place by two small screws. The handle has only been drilled to carry tip down on the traditional side of the handle. All of the hardware on this knife is also black to blend in with the all black knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening folding knife that sports a flipper mechanism to assist you in opening the Copacetic. The flipper mechanism is a shark’s fin shaped protrusion that juts out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. To deploy your knife, you push down on the flipper protrusion and it puts enough pressure on the blade to flip the knife open. It is also the section of the knife that turns into the finger guard when the knife is opened. Once, the blade has flipped open, the blade locks into place because of the locking liner that this knife sports.

The liner lock is a locking mechanism that many folding knives sport. This is the most popular knife lock that is found on folding knives. It was invented in the early 80’s by knife maker Michael Walker and was quickly adopted by a number of mainstream knife makers. The liner lock functions with one section of the liner angled inward toward the inside of the knife. Form this position, the liner is only able to go back to its old position with manual force, therefore locking it in place. The tail of the liner lock, which is closest to the blade, is cut to engage the bottom of the blade under the pivot. If the user wants to disengage the lock, they must manually move the liner to the side, away from the blade bottom. The liner lock was a great advancement in knife lock technology and assisted in the evolution of the tactical knife and the one handed knife.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.054 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.115 inches. When the knife is opened, the length is measure din at 7.625 inches long. When the blade is closed, it measures in at 4.551 inches long. This knife weighs 4.7 ounces.

 

Pros of the Copacetic:

  • The steel chosen for the blade is very inexpensive.
  • The steel is very easy to sharpen, because of the softness that it is.
  • The steel can hold a very fine edge for long periods of time.
  • The clip point blade shape is very versatile.
  • The clip point blade shape features a large belly that offers you plenty of length for slicing.
  • The clip point blade shape has a fine, thin edge that provides you with great stabbing capabilities.
  • The clip point blade shape has a lowered point which gives the user more control over their cuts.
  • Because it is a plain edge, this blade is extremely easy to sharpen.
  • The handle is lightweight and extremely durable.
  • This is a manual knife, so there are none of the pesky knife laws that surround a switchblade.
  • The flipper mechanism helps to efficiently deploy your blade.
  • Because of the liner lock mechanism, you won’t have to worry about the blade closing while you are using your knife.
  • The pocket clip is a deep carry pocket clip.

 

Cons of the Copacetic:

  • The steel that has been chosen for this knife is an average steel that does not excel at anything.
  • Because the finish on the blade is a coating, it will scratch off eventually.
  • The clip point has a very fine and thin edge that is prone to breaking or snapping when you are performing harder tasks.
  • Because this is a manual opening knife, it will be slower to deploy than a switchblade and much slower to bring into action than a fixed blade.
  • The pocket clip can only be attached to carry your knife tip up and can only be attached on the traditional side.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT has earned a reputation of being reliable, durable, and giving you long lasting knives. They deserve this reputation because their knives are game changers. To start off in the design of this new knife, they started with a steel that is easy to sharpen and will hold an edge for long periods of time. They matched it will a very durable handle that provides you with a secure, comfortable grip. The deep carry pocket clip is the cherry on top of this knife. This knife will change the way you think about everyday carry knives and you can pick yours up here at BladeOps.

CRKT Rakkasan Fixed Blade Knife Review

Columbia River Knife & Tool Company, or CRKT, was founded in 1994. This is an American company that is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over twenty years now, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. To do this, CRKT collaborates with the best designers in the world and operates on a simple principle: “that the greatest thing we can give our customers is Confidence in Hand”.

CRKT did not truly take off as a company until around 1997, at the Shot Show, when they introduced the K.I.S.S knife. During this shot show, the year’s supply of this knife sold out within only the opening days. Now, CRKT owns fifteen patents and even has some patents pending. Some of these patents are the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back safety mechanism, and Veff-Serrated edges.

CRKT has recently released a brand new knife and they called it eh Rakkasan.

 

The Designer:

Austin McGlaun is the designer behind this new knife. He is from Columbus, Georgia. Austin served in the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq and also as a street cop in Columbus, Georgia. Because of these two careers, he knows that a knife has to work as both a weapon and a tool. As part of the Forged by War program, he applied his skills as both a combat vet and a knife maker to develop the Clever Girl. Ne says that a knife is ugly but effective, it’s not ugly. It’s perfect.

 

The Blade:

The steel that this blade is made out of is made from SK5 Carbon Steel. This is the Japanese equivalent of American 1080. This steel is a high carbon steel that has a carbon level between 0.75% and 0.85%. Because of the high levels of carbon in this steel, the steel has increased abrasion resistance and also allows the steel to achieve an ideal balance of very good blade toughness with superior edge holding ability. This steel is commonly found on a variety of hand tools, because it has stood the test of time and use over many years in a handful of different countries. This steel is a hard steel that has the ability to make high quality blades. Because of the level of hardness, knives made out of this stele has the ability to cut through almost anything and is a very tough steel.

The steel has been finished with a black powder coating. This coating is applied as a free flowing, dry powder. Because it is applied as a poser coating, it can actually produce thicker coatings than a conventional liquid coating. Plus, it doesn’t run, so there will be no thicker or uneven sections. This coating is usually applied electrostatically and is then cured under heat to allow it to flow and form a layer or a skin on the blade. It creates a harder finish than a traditional paint would. This type of coating helps to resist scratches that the blade would have accumulated over time.

The steel has been carved into a clip point blade shape. To form the shape of this blade, the back, or the unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight form the handle and stops about hallway up the knife. Then, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This area looks to be “cut-out” or “clipped out”, which is where the blade shape gets its name. Clip point knives look as if the part of the knife from the spine to the point has literally been clipped out. This clipped out area can be curved or straight, but on this specific knife, it is curved. This blade shape is one of the most popular blade shapes on the market and makes for a fantastic all-purpose blade. The most common place that you are going to find this blade shape is on a bowie knife, but it is also a popular blade shape on many pocket knives and fixed blade knives. Because the point on this blade shape is lowered, the user will have more control over all of their cuts and slices. And, because the tip is so controllable, and because it is sharp and thinner at the spine, a clip point knife lends itself to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. While clip point and drop point blade shapes get confused often because they are similar and both very useful, the biggest difference in the two is that the clip point has a sharper and thinner tip than the broad tip of the drop point blade shape. While that is a big benefit in a lot of situations, the tip is also going to be more prone to breaking or snapping during heavier use. One of the other reasons that a clip point blade shape is so versatile is because it sports such a large belly. This belly provides you with enough length to make slicing a breeze. This blade shape will prepare you for all of the expected situations that you might come across, and still prepare you for all of the unexpected ones that you come across.

The edge on this blade is a plain edge. In general, a plain edge is better than the serrated when the application involves push cuts. Plus, the plain edge is superior when extreme control, accuracy, and clean cuts are necessary. The plain edge is best for applications like shaving, skinning, or peeling. A serrated edge is best for thicker and tougher materials, however, when a plain edge is sharp enough, it can manage cutting the thicker or tougher materials. The last benefit of a plain edge is that it is much easier to sharpen than a serrated edge. With a plain edge, you can sharpen your blade with a  file or extra coarse stone.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Rakkasan is made out of G10. G10 is a laminate composite that is made out of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, except that it can be made for almost a fraction of the cost. To make the G10, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The resulting material is crazy tough, very hard, extremely lightweight, and still strong. G10 is actually considered the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta. To add texture to the handle, the manufacturer will add checkering or other patterns to the handle. On this knife, the texture that they have added is a very small checkered pattern. This handle material is very popular on tactical folders and fixed blade because it is so durable and also very lightweight, yet still nonporous. Even though this material is cheaper to produce than carbon fiber, it still has to be cut and machined into shape which is not as economical as the injection molding process that is used in FRN handles. The G10 handle on this knife is black.

There three shallow grooves carved across the spine of the handle as well as three more shallow grooves on the bottom of the handle. This is to help provide you with a secure grip in even the toughest of situations. CRKT has also added a finger guard to help protect your finger from slipping and slicing yourself. The hardware on this handle is silver.

 

The Mechanism:

CRKT Rakkasan
CRKT Rakkasan

This is a fixed blade knife. While many people love folding knives for a variety of reasons, such as them being more discrete or easy to conceal, fixed blades have so many benefits to them. For starters, fixed blades are bigger, which tends to make them stronger. Secondly, fixed blades are much harder to break than a folding knife. On a folding knife, there are a variety of moving parts that can rust, get dirty, or break. Because fixed blades have none of these small moving parts, there is nothing that can break. And, because you don’t have to worry about all of the small mechanisms, you can take on harder tasks without having to worry about breaking your knife. Thirdly, fixed blades are easier knives to maintain. This advantage also has to do with the lack of small and moving parts. Really all you have to do with a fixed blade is a quick wipe down and sometimes oil the blade. This ease significantly cuts down on the maintenance time that you have to schedule to maintain the high quality of your knife. Fourthly, you can bring a fixed blade into play quicker than you would be able to with a folding knife. With a fixed blade, you have to unsheathe it and that is it. It’s a one step process. With a folding knife, you have to pull it out and then deploy it before you can use it. Lastly, a fixed blade is a superior survival tool. A fixed blade offers you more versatility for tasks than a folding knife would. With a fixed knife, you can cut, dig, split wood, prepare food, use it as a hunting weapon, hammer, and even pry. This is because of the larger size and extra strength that you receive with a fixed blade.

 

The Sheath:
The sheath that comes with this knife is a black Kydex sheath. This is a more modern sheath material, made out of thermoplastic. This was originally used to make holsters. The biggest advantage to Kydex is how durable it is. This sheath can survive in a variety of different environments, including being submerged in salt water. However, there are a variety of disadvantages to having a sheath made out of Kydex. It does not have much personality, in fact, it seems to look like a hard lump of plastic that lacks character. But, some people do like the dark color because it blends in well in stealth or hunting. One of the other drawbacks to having a Kydex sheath is that it is very loud when you are drawing out your knife or putting it back in. There’s a noisy click when doing either of those tasks. The last drawback to having a Kydex sheath is that with repeated drawing and putting back of your knife, the Kydex sheath will dull its edge.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Rakkasan is 4.894 inches long, with a thickness of 0.147 inches. The overall length of this knife is 10.438 inches long. This knife weighs in at 9.2 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

CRKT started their company with a single purpose: to bring useful technological advancements and entirely new product concepts to today’s market. To achieve that purpose, they have been collaborating with some of the most well-known, most advanced, and most popular knife designers and makers in the world.

The Rakkasan is one of many new models that CRKT has released this year and this specific one is one of several knives that are part of their Forged by War series of knives. This knife was designed by war veteran Austin McGlaun and the Japanese translation of “umbrella for falling” after the World War II Paratroopers from the 187th regiment. Each of these models sports a rugged and textured handle design complete with finger groove cutouts for a secure grip as well as a full bellied blade to handle a plethora of tactical and utility scenarios.

To start the design of this knife, they chose to use SK5 high carbon stainless steel. This steel is finished with a powder coating. The powder coating helps to increase the hardness of the steel and helps to reduce scratches and other abrasives that the blade would accumulate over time. The steel has been carved into a clip point blade shape. This is one of the most popular and versatile blade shapes because of its thin, lowered tip and its large belly. The handle is a black G10 handle that is lightweight, durable, and very strong. This fixed blade comes with a Kydex sheath. The Rakkasan would be the perfect edition to your knife collection–go ahead and get yours here.

 

 

CRKT Noma Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool Company was founded in Oregon in 1994. This is an American company that is known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over twenty years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. CRKT also operates on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To accomplish this, they collaborate with the best knife designers and makers in the world. Some of these collaborations have been with Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. Out of these collaborations have been born some of the most innovative inventions in the knife community. CRKT now owns fifteen patents and patents pending, some of their more well-known patents are the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer are the men behind the company. And while their company is excelling right now, it wasn’t always that way. CRKT did not truly take off until the 1997 Shot Show. This was the year and place that they introduced the K.I.S.S (Keep It Super Simple) knife. This is a small folder hat was designed by Ed Halligan and it was a raging success. Within the opening days of the Shot Show, CRKT had sold out the years’ worth of products. Now, CRKT produces a wide range of fixed blades, folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

CRKT has recently just released two brand new knives and they call them the Noma and the Noma Compact.

 

The Designer:

The man behind this burly knife is Jesper Voxnaes. He is from Loegstrup, Denmark and because of this, when he needs to test a design, he only has to step into his own backyard. The harsh elements and conditions of the fjords and forests in his native Denmark do the rest. When he was starting out, no one was making the kind of knives he wanted to design so he learned by trial and error. Apparently his efforts paid off given his IF Award in 2013 for one of the Top European Designs. Now he creates and uses knives like the Amicus as he sails, camps, and drives off road, which just so happens to be more often than not.

 

The Blades:

The blades on these knives are made out 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel formula comes from a Chinese series of steel. Out of this series, the 9Cr steel is the top quality, but 8Cr steel does fall shortly behind it. If you are looking for a comparison with a similar steel, I would say AUS 8 steel. However, AUS 8 steel is the slightly superior steel. 8Cr steel is a stainless steel, so it will resist rusting and corroding to an extent. However, it is an average grade steel, so there are higher quality stainless steels on the market. The hardness of this steel is an HRC 58-60. This steel is a breeze to sharpen and you can give the blade a very sharp edge. The edge on this blade will also last for long periods of time. The biggest advantage that 8Cr13MoV steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. This steel can take on the majority of jobs that you throw at it and you get it for a very inexpensive cost. However, keep in mind that it is considered an average grade steel and it won’t excel at anything.

The finish on these two knives is a satin finish. This finish is created by sanding the steel in one direction with an increasing level of abrasive material, which is usually a sandpaper. The main purpose of this finish is to showcase the lines of the steel.  This finish will provide you with an extremely traditional look. The satin finish is a medium finish, meaning that there are definitely finishes that are more reflective than it, such as the mirror finish, but there are also finishes that are much more matte than this finish, such as a stonewash or coated finish.

The steel on both of these knives have been carved into a drop point blade shape. This is one of the most popular blade shapes and for good reason: this is a great all-purpose blade shape that is extremely versatile. To form the shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. The lowered tip is broad, and that is what provides the user with such great strength. The clip point blade shape is often confused with the drop point blade shape, but it is the point strength that is a difference between the two. The clip point blade shape has a much thinner, finer, and sharper tip. While this tip does allow you to have stabbing capabilities, it does create a much weaker tip, which results in it being prone to snapping or breaking when performing some of those heavier duty tasks. One of the only drawbacks to the drop point blade shape is that it is broader, so you can’t really stab or pierce with it. However, because of the strength behind the tip and because it can hold up to heavy use, drop point blade shapes are popular on tactical and survival knives. The lowered tip also makes this blade more easily controllable, which makes them very popular on hunting knives. The lowered, controllable point makes it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. Another reason that this blade shape is so versatile is because it features a large belly area that provides plenty of length for slicing. When you choose to own a knife with a drop point blade, you will be preparing yourself for almost any situation that you encounter, whether it is the expected or unexpected situations.

The edge on these knives is a plain edge. Since the Noma and the Noma Compact have been designed for hunting, the plain edge is the perfect choice. Plain edges are more traditional and they excel at push cuts, skinning, peeling, and slicing. The plain edge will give your cuts a clean cut, keeping your meat at the highest quality.

 

The Handle:

The handles on the Noma’s have been made out of Glass Reinforced Fiber polyamide. This material is a thermoplastic which is super strong, resistant to bending and abrasion, and is practically indestructible. As an added bonus, it is super cheap. This is an inexpensive material to produce because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. These characteristics leads to high volume manufacturing and thus the low price. GRN is such a strong material because all of the nylon fibers have been arranged haphazardly throughout. This means that the handle can be stressed in any direction without breaking down because there are really no weak spots. With similar materials such as G 10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta the strands have been aligned in a single direction. This is why those materials are also so brittle: once you start to stress them in the opposing directions, they can easily break down and the handle will fall apart. And because those materials are so brittle, you have to be careful with what you do with them, because they can crack if subjected to hard hits on sharp or hard objects. GRN is not that way and has been designed to take a heavy beating. Many people did not warm up to this material because they thought that it felt cheap and almost hollow. Another complaint about GRN is that it is not quite as grippy as G 10 is. To add texture, CRKT has added dashes and circles into the palm portion of both of the handles. This will provide you with plenty of grip to hang on to your knife in the slipperiest of situations. Another thing that CRKT added to give you better control was a row of jimping on the spine of the knife. To keep your fingers comfortable for periods of long use, CRKT has added two elongated finger grooves to the bottom of the handle as well as a flared butt and a finger guard to keep your fingers safe from getting sliced.

On the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole carved into it. If you tie a lanyard onto your hunting knife, it will provide you with extra length, protect against loss, and even give you extra grip when you are performing those tougher and messier jobs. Attaching a lanyard onto your hunting knife is an excellent idea.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is skeletonized and kept in place by two small screws. This pocket clip is eligible for tip up or tip down carry, but the handle has only been carved to attach it on the traditional side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

CRKT Noma Knife
CRKT Noma Knife

This is a folding knife that uses a nail nick opening. The nail nick is exactly what it sounds like: a small indent on the blade that extends past the handle when the knife is closed. This nick gives you enough traction to then flip the knife open.

The Noma’s also sport a lock back safety mechanism. This mechanism is what you are going to find on many classic American folding knives. It is made of a spine on a spring. When the knife is opened, the spine locks into a notch on the back of the blade. To close the knife, push down on the exposed part of the spine to pop up the part of the spine in contact with the blade. This disengages the lock, which allows you to swing the blade to a closed positon. The benefits of a lock back include reliable strength and safety. The unlock button is also out of the way of your grip when using the knife, meaning you’re unlikely to accidentally disengage the lock and have it close on you. It also keeps your hands clear of the blades path when closing, minimizing the risk of cutting yourself. One of the disadvantages to this type of locking mechanism is that you have to use both hands to close a lock back so it can be inconvenient when you need to keep one hand on whatever you’re cutting. Although it’s possible to close a lock back with one hand, it isn’t easy.

 

The Specs of the Noma:

The blade on this knife is 3.317 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.110 inches. The overall length of the knife is 7.875 inches long with a closed length of 4.497 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.6 ounces.

 

The Specs of the Noma Compact:

The blade on this knife is 2.760 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.104 inches. The overall length of the knife is 6.563 inches long with a closed length of 3.757 inches long. The Noma Compact weighs in at 3.2 ounces.  You can find the Noma Compact here.

 

Conclusion:

“This backwoods field dresser doesn’t come with a butcher block. The Noma is a folding knife rooted in its Scandinavian hunting heritage and is the envy of butchers everywhere. Its big-belly blade design and ergonomic shape makes it a go-to if you’re going after wild game. Jesper Voxnaes of Loegstrup, Denmark channeled inspiration from his expansive Nordic backyard while designing the Noma™. The clean lines are notably Scandinavian but the blade shape and all-weather handle make it unmistakably a hunting knife. The blade itself is crafted with a deep belly design and features a satin finish. The lock back safety ensures your protection and locks into place after the blade is deployed with a subtle nail nick opening. Finally, the handle is made with glass-reinforced nylon for optimal grip and excellent durability. ‘Noma’ translates to fate in Old Norse, and you can bet that their hunting ancestors wouldn’t have left it up to anything but the Noma™ folding knife.” Pick yours up at BladeOps today.

CRKT Batum Knives Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company, or CRKT, was founded in Oregon in 1994 by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men were formerly employed by Kershaw Knives. This is an American company that is known for its distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over twenty years, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. They operate on a simple principle: that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To accomplish this principle, they have been collaborating with some of the best knife makers and designers in the world. Some of these designers are Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. Out of these collaborations have been born many groundbreaking and innovative inventions and mechanisms. Because of these, CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending. Some of these include the Outburst Assist Opening Mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and the Veff Serrated edges. The last patent that I just mentioned was designed by Tom Veff.

Looking at the company now, they are obviously succeeding and it seems as if they have always been that successful. That is not the case though. The company was founded in 1994 and it wasn’t until 1997 that it really took. That was the year that they introduced the K.I.S.S, Keep It Super Simple, knife at the 1997 Shot Show. This was a small folder that was designed by Ed Halligan and it was massively successful. Within the opening days of the show, the entire years’ worth of products had sold out. They now produce a wide range of fixed blades, folding knives, multi tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems.

They have recently released quite a few knives and one of them is the Batum, as well as the smaller version, the Batum Compact.

CRKT Batum Folder
CRKT Batum Folder

The Designer:

The man behind these two knives is Jesper Voxnaes. He is one of the lucky knife designers because he lives in Loegstrup, Denmark, so when he needs to test a design, he only has to step into his own backyard. The harsh elements and conditions of the fjords and forests in his native Denmark do the rest. When he was starting out, no one was making the kind of knives he wanted to design, so he learned by trial and error. Apparently his efforts paid off given his IF Award in 2013 for one of the Top European Designs. Now he creates and uses knives like the Amicus as he sails, camps, and drives off road, which just so happens to be more often than not.

 

The Blades:

Both of versions of the Batum have blades made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel has a hardness level of HRC 58-60. The steel is a Chinese steel that comes from the Cr series of steel. Out of the series the 9Cr steel is the best, with 8Cr steel falling shortly behind. I wouldn’t recommend purchasing a knife with a blade that uses any of the formulas less than 6Cr, because the blade would be much too soft. The best steel comparison for 8Cr is AUS 8 steel. However, between the two, 8Cr is the inferior steel. It is a stainless steel formula, so while it will resist rusting and corrosion to an extent, you will need to keep up on your maintenance to guarantee that the blades do not rust. This is a softer steel than most, so it will be a breeze to sharpen and you will be able to get a crazy fine edge on it. Surprisingly enough, this formula of steel does maintain an edge for long periods of time. The biggest advantage that 8Cr steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. But, keep in mind that you do get what you pay for, so while this blade will be able to take on the majority of tasks that you throw at it, it will not excel at anything in particular like some of the premium steels would.

Both versions of the knife also have a satin finish. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of abrasive, such as sandpaper. This works to showcase the lines of the steel and provides you with a very classic look. While a satin finish does minimize some glares and reflections, it is by no means a matte finish.

Both knives also feature a thick drop point style knife. The drop point blade shape is easily one of the most popular blade shapes that you can find and it has definitely earned that position. The back of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curve, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point is what gives you such great control over your cuts and slices. It is also one of the reasons that this blade shape is so popular on hunting knives. The lowered point also provides you with more strength than you would typically find on a blades point, which makes the drop point style a great option on tactical and survival knives. The drop point and the clip point blade shapes are often confused because they are both very popular and very versatile. The biggest difference between the two is definitely the point. While they both have a lowered point, the drop points tip is much broader, which does minimize your stabbing capabilities, but also provides you with crazy strength that is going to be able to take on those tougher tasks. The clip point’s tip is much thinner and sharper, so while you have full stabbing capabilities, the tip is much weaker than a drop point and is very prone to snapping and breaking when you are trying to complete those heavier duty tasks. Another reason that this is such a versatile blade shape, which also means that the two Batum’s are going to be so versatile, is because of the large belly that it rocks. The length that it provides makes slicing a breeze, which also means that the majority of your everyday tasks are going to be a breeze.

The knives feature plain edges, which do carry more advantages than a serrated or combo edge does. While you do sacrifice a little bit of sawing ability that is useful for getting through those tougher and thicker materials, the plain edge is easier to sharpen and easier to get a super sharp edge on. When your plain edge is sharp enough, it will also be able to get through those thicker materials, if only a little less efficiently than a serrated edge would be able to.  The plain edge is the more traditional edge and is perfect for push cuts, slicing, skinning, and peeling. The plain edge is not as niche as a serrated edge is, and because of that, it will be able to take on more of the common tasks that you expect to encounter.

 

The Handle:

The handles on these knives have been made out of two different materials, with the front handle scale being made out of G 10 and the back handle scale being made out of 2Cr13 stainless steel.

G 10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. It has very similar characteristics to carbon fiber, but it is slightly less quality, and you can get it for almost a fraction of the cost of carbon fiber. To make this materials, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material is crazy tough, very hard, still lightweight, and strong. One of the drawbacks to this handle material is that it does tend to be pretty brittle. To add texture and provide you with a secure grip, CRKT has added some intense checkering.

The stainless steel handle scale is going to be super durable and very resistant to rusting and corrosion, but it is heavy. Normally a handle made out of stainless steel would weigh the knife down, but because the Batum’s only have one handle scale out of stainless steel, you get all of the benefits without much of the drawbacks. This handle scale sports a stonewashed finish is gives you a very textured and well-worn look. The biggest benefit about a stonewash finish is that it preserves the look of the handle over time and it effectively hides any scratches and fingerprints that the handle will accumulate over time.

There is a finger groove to have a comfortable, secure grip on this knife. And in case that fails, there is a thick finger guard to protect your fingers from getting cut. The butt of the handle is slightly flared and this folder does sport a lanyard hole which has so many different benefits if you choose to use it.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on these knives are secured with two small silver screws that match the rest of the hardware. It is also stainless steel to match the back handle scale, which is where it rests. On the middle of the pocket clip, CRKT has stamped their logo. This pocket clip has only been designed for the traditional side of the handle, but it is eligible for a tip up or tip down carry option, which is a big benefit.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that uses a thumb slot for opening assistance. This is exactly what it sounds like: a carved out portion or slot that sits where the thumb stud would. When the knife is closed, the slot peeks out and you can easily get your thumb to push the blade open with this slot. One of the drawbacks to this style of mechanism is that your fingers and hands do have to be close to the blade at all times, which makes it easier to slip and cut yourself while opening the knife.

The Batum’s both sport a frame lock locking mechanism. This is similar to the liner lock, except that a frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. The frame lock is situated with the liner inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, engaging it at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness, so you will be able to take on those harder tasks with the Batum’s and not have to worry about the blade snapping closed during use.

 

The Specs for the Batum:

The blade on this knife is 3.158 inches long with blade thickness of 0.187 inches. The overall length of the knife is 7.875 inches long with a closed length of 4.772 inches long. This version of the knife weighs in at 6.9 ounces.

 

The Specs for the Batum Compact:

As the name implies, this is just a smaller version of the original Batum. The knife on this version is 2.452 inches long with a thickness of 0.147 inches. The overall length of this knife is 6.125 inches long with a closed length of 3.625 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

This beast of a folder sports impressive ergonomics paired with classic styling to ensure it is built for the long haul. This knife sports a frame lock that provides a convenient finger choil and finger groove for precise cutting. It also sports a thumb slot for manual blade deployment. This model features a G 10 front handle scale, a stainless steel back handle scale, a drop point style blade in a satin finish, and a pocket clip that is designed for traditional side but tip up or tip down carry. CRKT says, “The Batum™ Compact everyday carry folder is the knife equivalent of a 4×4. It’s the go-anywhere, do-anything backwoods go-to. A surprisingly capable blade pairs with an ergonomic handle to make a compact companion that won’t back down to any camp task—even if it’s twice its size.” Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

CRKT Amicus Compact Knife Review

Columbia River Knife and Tool company, or CRKT, was founded in Oregon in 1994. This is an American company that is known for distinction in design, selection, and quality. For over twenty years now, CRKT has put innovation and integrity first, making a commitment to build products that inspire and endure. CRKT believes that the greatest thing they can give their customers is Confidence in Hand. To do this, they collaborate with the best designers in the world, some of which are Ken Onion, Harold “Kit” Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, Greg Lightfoot, Michael Walker, Ron Lake, Tom Veff, Steve Ryan, and the Graham Brothers. They also own fifteen patents and patents pending, which include the Outburst assist opening mechanism, the Lock Back Safety mechanism, and Veff Serrated edges.

CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. In the past two decades, they have gained a serious reputation of long lasting, ground breaking knives. But, it wasn’t that way all the time. It wasn’t until 1997 at the Shot Show when they introduced the K.I.S.S, Keep It Super Simple, knife. This knife was designed by Ed Halligan and is a small folder. CRKT sold out of the entire years’ worth of product in the opening days.

CRKT has recently released a new knife to the Amicus series. This is the Amicus Compact.

 

CRKT 5441 Compact Amicus
CRKT 5441 Compact Amicus

The Designer:

The man behind this knife is Jesper Voxnaes. He is from Loegstrup, Denmark and when he needs to test a design, he only has to step into his own backyard. The harsh elements and conditions of the fjords and forests in his native Denmark do the rest. When he was starting out, no one was making the knife of knives he wanted to design so he learned by trial and error. Apparently his efforts paid off given his IF Award in 2013 for one of the Top European Designs. Now he creates and uses knives like the Amicus as he sails, camps, and drives off road.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8CR13MoV steel. This formula of steel is form a Chinese steel that has many different versions of the steel. The highest or best formula of the steel is the 9Cr formula, but 8Cr falls quickly behind. The best steel to compare this steel with is AUS 8 steel, however 8Cr is the inferior steel out of the two. 8Cr is a stainless steel, so it does resist rust fairly well, but you do have to make sure that you are keeping up on maintenance. This is a softer steel, so it is extremely easy to sharpen—many beginners can pull it off. And, you can get an extremely fine edge on 8Cr steel that does last quite a while. The biggest feature that this steel boasts is its low price. You get a steel that can stand up to most tasks for a very inexpensive cost. However, you do have to keep in mind that you do get what you pay for when it comes to steel, so while it will stand up to most tasks, this blade steel is not going to excel at anything.

The blade has been finished satin. This is one of the more traditional finishes. It is created by continuously sanding the steel in one direction with an increasing level of abrasive material—usually a sandpaper. The satin finish’s main purpose is to showcase the lines in the steel. In terms of how shiny this steel is, this is a fairly medium finish. It is not as shiny as a mirror finish, but it is more reflective than a matte finish. If you are looking for a very classic look, this finish is going to be your best bet.

The steel on the Amicus Compact has been carved into a tanto blade shape. This style of blade was originally designed for armor piercing because it was designed after the Japanese long and short swords. In the early 80s Cold Steel Americanized and popularized the tanto blade shape and now you can easily find a knife with this style of blade. This blade is for when you don’t want an all-purpose knife, but instead you want a knife that does one thing and does that one thing extremely well. This one thing is piercing through tough materials. The tanto style is formed with a high point and a flat grind, which leads to a crazy strong point that is perfect for stabbing into those hard materials. The tanto style also has a thick point which contains a lot of metal near the tip. Because of the extra metal, it can absorb the impact from repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to crack under the pressure. The front edge of the tanto knife meets the back edge of it at an angle, instead of the traditional curve. Because of this, the tanto has no belly, which is why you can’t use this for slicing or general utility purpose. But, by sacrificing the belly, your receive the extremely strong point. This style of knife is perfect for those unexpected moments while adventuring or even just going through your daily life.

The edge of this knife is a plain edge. This is the more traditional edge that you are going to find on knives and is tailored for excelling at push cuts. This means that the plain edge is going to be perfect for slicing, peeling, and skinning. As more benefits, the plain edge is the easier edge to sharpen because you don’t have to worry about all of the small teeth while sharpening. And, you can get your plain edge sharper than you could get a serrated or combo edge. Some people are worried that without the teeth of a serrated edge, they aren’t going to be able to saw through the harder and tougher materials. For the most part, you are going to want a serrated edge for those tougher materials, but if you get your edge sharp enough and with the benefits of the strong tanto shape, you will be able to get through those materials.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Amicus Compact is made out of stainless steel with G 10 scales covering one side of it. Stainless steel provides the user with durability that is out of the park as well as crazy resistance to corrosion. However, it is not lightweight and is going to weigh the knife down. It is also quite slippery. To combat both of these problems, CRKT used less stainless steel and added G 10 scales.

G 10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. This material has very similar properties to carbon fiber, but with the slight lag of qualities, you can get it for a much cheaper price. To create this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin. The manufacturer then compresses the layers of cloth and bakes them under pressure. The material that comes out is extremely tough, very hard, quite lightweight, and very strong. G 10 is even considered to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and stronger than Micarta. However, this is a brittle material because the fibers are all arranged in one direction, so when it is stressed in opposing directions, it will break down. One of the drawbacks that many knife users express is that the G 10 does not have much character and lacks elegance.

To provide you with exceptional grip, CRKT has added intense checkering as texture on the G 10 scale. There is also a row of shallow but thick jimping near the butt of the handle. The finger groove on this knife is shallow and elongated to provide you with a comfortable grip. There is also a finger guard to protect your fingers from getting sliced in the event of slipping.

As a cherry on top of the design of the handle, there is a lanyard hole on the butt, carved out of the stainless steel. One of the best reasons to keep a lanyard on your knife is that it makes it easier to attach to your belt or backpack strap, while keeping it out of the way when you aren’t using this knife, but giving you easy access when you do need your knife. The lanyard will also protect your knife from loss while you are out and about. I’ve come to realize that the preference for a lanyard is really a love-hate type of thing with people either loving it or see no point in it. Either way, it is always great to have the option.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a low carry clip that is made out of stainless steel. It is held in place by two small silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The pocket clip is attached on the back of the knife, or the stainless steel side of the two toned handle. In the middle of this pocket clip, CRKT has stamped their logo.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that uses a thumb slot blade deployment. This type of mechanism has been around since the 1980s and is exactly what it sounds like—a slot cut into the knife that gives you a spot to gain purchase on and flip the knife open. One of the first companies to use this style of mechanism was Spyderco, but most other knife companies have jumped on the train, and for good reason—it works excellently. Using it is basically like using a thumb stud and by its design, it is extremely ambidextrous. One of the advantages that the thumb stud does not offer is that the slot does not protrude from the blade and get in the way like the thumb stud sometimes does.

The Amicus Compact sports a frame lock locking mechanism. The frame lock is very similar to the liner lock is except that the frame lock uses the handle to form the frame and therefore the lock. The handle on knives with a frame lock is often cut forma steel that is much thicker than the liner of most locks. Just like the liner lock, the frame lock is situated with the liner set inward and the tip engaging the bottom of the blade. The frame lock is released by applying pressure to the frame to move it away from the blade. When it is opened, the pressure on the lock forces it to snap across the blade, which engages it at its furthest point. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Amicus Compact is 3.004 inches long with a thickness of 0.124 inches. The overall length of this knife is 7.313 inches long and it sports a closed length of 4.249 inches. This knife weighs in at 3.8 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Designer Jesper Voxnaes has done it again with a redesign of the popular CRKT Amicus folder knife–the Amicus Compact. The word “amicus” actually translates to “friend” or “comrade” which is fitting considering how this knife will deliver whenever you call upon it. From basic chores to demanding tasks, the 3″ tanto style blade is ideal for cutting and piercing and the G-10 front scale and stainless steel back scale provide a secure grip and quick and easy access. Just like its larger counterpart, the protruding back spacer provides jimping for multiple carry options and the lanyard hole make carry options almost limitless. The pock clip is designed for tip up or tip down carry. The Amicus Compact is the perfect size for when you want a knife with you that is going to be able to take on the majority of your daily task, but still preparing you for taking on those unexpected situations that tend to pop up in your everyday life. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.