Kershaw Leek Carbon Fiber Knife Review

Kershaw Leek Carbon Fiber
Kershaw Leek Carbon Fiber

Kershaw Knife Company was founded in 1974. There is really nothing else like a Kershaw knife. They have award winning technologies and use advanced materials, so when you are carrying a Kershaw knife, you are carrying a lifetime companion.

When they founded their company, they had a founding mission: to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This is one of the reasons that they use their award winning technologies and the appropriate, high quality materials. Kershaw is also dedicated to intensive craftsmanship, which guarantees that the high quality materials are put together in a good way and stay together.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. Something unique about Kershaw is that they have pioneered many of the technologies and advanced materials that are now the standard in the knife industry. Some of their finest innovative technological advances have been their SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism, knives that have interchangeable blades because of Kershaw’s Blade Trader technology, and one of their newest is the Composite Blade technology. This last technology is where they can actually use two different steels to give the knife the best of both worlds. For example, Kershaw can choose a steel that is known for having excellent edge retention and use it on the bottom portion of the blade, and then choose another steel that has been known for strength and use it on the spine of the blade. That way, you don’t have to compromise or give up either characteristic. This Composite Blade technology is truly groundbreaking.

Kershaw is actually a sub brand of Kai USA Ltd. Kai has now been Japan’s leading blade producer for over 100 years. Kai as a whole also has a commitment to innovation and uses an innovative approach for product development, research, production, marketing, and even distribution functions.

Kershaw has said, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back.” One of Kershaw’s newest releases is a new version of their famous Leek knife. This time, it is made with Carbon Fiber. So whether this is your first, or you are a returning customer, this new knife will be a great option for you.

 

The Blade:

The steel that Kershaw chose for this version of the Leek is CPM 154. This is a high end steel. The CPM stands for Crucible Particle Metallurgy. This Particle Metallurgy allows the steel to have finer carbide particles, which results in a slightly superior steel compared to just plain 154 CM steel. This superior version of the steel is easier to sharpen and has better results when polished. This superior steel is a little bit tougher and has better edge retention. For how tough this steel is, it is also relatively hard, because of the added Molybdenum. This steel has fantastic levels of corrosion resistance, which is surprising if you know your blade chemistry because it actually has less Chromium. When you have the correct equipment, this steel is pretty simple to sharpen, although it might take a couple of trial runs to get used to this particular style of steel.

 

The steel on this knife has been finished with a classic stonewash finish. A stonewash finish is when the steel is tumbled around with an abrasive material, usually small pebbles. After this process is completed, the steel is polished and smoothed over. The resulting look is a matte gray, with a textured look to it. Because the finish is an even, matte, the stonewash will help cut down on reflections and glares with the metal. The textured look of the finish also helps to conceal scratches and fingerprints, which allows you to go longer in between polishes. The stonewash finish on this Leek adds a rugged look while also cutting down on maintenance.

 

The steel on this Leek has been carved into a modified drop point shape. The drop point shape is the most versatile blade shape that you are going to be able to find. The shape is created by having the unsharpened edge slowly curve until it meets the sharpened edge at the point. This point is actually lowered, which gives you better control over the knife. The control aspect of the drop point blade shape is the reason why so many hunters or carvers love this shape. The hunters don’t have to worry about nicking the inner organs or damaging the meat while they are skinning their game. And carvers can go about doing their precision work without too much effort, because the knife is on their team. The difference between a drop point shape and this modified drop point shape is the point. On a regular drop point, the tip is relatively broad, which adds strength, but does not allow you to pierce or stab. The blade on this Leek is actually slimmer, which allows you to pierce, while also performing more intricate work. The only drawback to having this blade be the modified version of the drop point is that the tip is not going to have as much strength behind it and will be slightly weaker. One of the other reasons that a drop point is so versatile is that it sports a large belly with plenty of length for cutting or slicing. The ability to slice is one of the main features that you should be looking for on an everyday knife. So, the Leek is going to be a very comfortable everyday carry blade.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Leek is made out of black Carbon Fiber. Carbon fiber is a reinforced polymer, and is considered a generic term for a material that has thin strands of carbon that have been tightly woven together and then set in resin. This material is a crazy strong material that also happens to be very lightweight. Although it is such strong material, it is not indestructible in any way. In fact, because of how strong this material is, it ends up being extremely brittle. If you happen to drop a knife with this handle material, or knock it against something sharp or hard, it is likely to crack. This is because all of the carbon fibers are woven together in a single direction, so while the material is extremely strong going in that direction, it is not strong when the fibers are stressed in any other way. Unfortunately, because it is a labor intensive process to create this material, it ends up being fairly expensive. Because of the cost, carbon fiber is usually only found on high end knives. One unique characteristic about a carbon fiber handle is the look of it. Because of the way that the carbon is woven, and the ways that the light reflects off of the carbon strands, you can get a variety of patterns jut by weaving the carbon in a different way. On the Leek, Kershaw has woven the carbon fibers in a diagonal checkered pattern. The ergonomics on this handle are fantastic. Kershaw elongated the finger groove, which helps to give you more control over the knife and your cuts. The handle fits perfectly in your palm, providing you with comfort, even when you have been using the knife for long periods of time.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on the Leek is black to match the rest of the handle. Kershaw has pre-drilled holes in the handle, which allow you to reverse the pocket clip in four different directions. You can carry your knife tip up or tip down, and also on the left or right hand side. This helps to make the Leek ambidextrous friendly.

 

The Mechanism:

The Leek is a flipper knife. This mechanism works by having a protrusion form the blade, on the Leek, this protrusion is triangular. This triangle is part of the blade, but sticks out of the back of the handle when the knife is closed. When you want to deploy your blade, you push down on this protrusion which will then flip your blade into the open position. One of the biggest advantages in my opinion about the flipper mechanism is that it keeps your fingers and hands out of the way of the sharpened edge of the blade during the entire process, keeping your fingers safe. Another huge benefit to this mechanism is that you can actually open your knife with just one hand.

Since it is a Kershaw flipper, it features the SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism, which just helps you to flip your knife open quickly, efficiently, and safely.

This knife also features a Liner Lock. This mechanism locks the blade open during use. On one side of the knife’s steel liner, which is the steel plate where the handles scales are attached, moves into position behind the blade to securely lock it open. When you want to close your knife, you unlock this and manually push your blade back into the handle.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the leek is 3 inches long. When the Leek is opened, it is exactly 7 inches long, with a closed length of 4 inches. This is a light knife, weighing in at 2.3 ounces. This Leek has been made in the United States of America.

 

The Pros of the Kershaw Leek:

  • The steel is a high end steel with an excellent balance between strength and toughness.
  • The steel has fantastic levels of corrosion resistance, while maintaining an edge for long periods of time.
  • This steel is relatively easy to sharpen, when you have the correct equipment.
  • The stonewash finish adds a rugged look to the blade.
  • The stonewash finish helps to hide scratches and fingerprints, effectively cutting down on maintenance time.
  • The stonewash finish creates an even, matte look, so glares and reflections are cut down significantly.
  • The modified drop point shape gives you the control of the regular drop point, while offering a finer tip, so you do have stabbing capabilities.
  • The drop point shape provides you with a large belly, allowing for easy slicing, and making this knife a fantastic option for your everyday carry knife.
  • The carbon fiber handle is crazy strong and lightweight.
  • The pocket clip can be reversed in four different directions, giving you the most comfortable carry options.
  • The flipper mechanism allows you to open your knife one handedly, all while keeping your hand out of the way of the sharpened edge.
  • Sports the SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism.
  • Sports a Liner Lock.
  • Made in the USA.

 

The Cons of the Kershaw Leek:

  • The modified drop point shape has a finer tip, therefore, it has a weaker tip that is not going to be able to stand up to what a regular drop point would.
  • Carbon fiber is a very brittle material, prone to cracking or breaking when impacted with a sharp or hard object.
  • Carbon fiber is an expensive material.

 

Conclusion:

Kershaw is a well-known and trusted knife company. Since the beginning, they have been creating innovative and ground breaking new technology that has since become the standard in the knife world. Kershaw uses some of the highest quality materials to create the highest quality of knives. These are knives that will last a lifetime and will be able to last through all of your adventures.

The Leek is one of Kershaw’s most popular knife designs. For this version of the Leek, Kershaw decided to upscale it. To create a higher quality design, they switched out the handle material and gave it what they call, “a handsome new suit of carbon fiber.” This new handle material is light weight, which in return cuts down on the weight of the whole knife. This makes it an extremely comfortable everyday carry knife. The combination of a high quality steel, a versatile blade shape, and an easy going blade finish creates a one of a kind blade. If you have loved the Leek in the past, you are going to want to purchase this brand new Leek.

Kershaw Leek Spring Assist Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the Kai Group, and is headquartered in Tualatin Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Kai Group. In 1997 the US production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kai USA Ltd. has three lines of products; Kershaw Knives brand of sporting and pocket knives, Shun Cutlery, which are handcrafted Japanese kitchen cutlery, and Zero Tolerance, which is a line of premium and professional knives.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grand and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

In 2002, Kershaw released a Steven Seagal model featuring stingray leather on the handle. IN 2004, Kershaw developed a multi-tool for the National Geographic Society with National Geographic filmmaker Bryan Harvey. Kershaw has also released models in collaboration with Jeep, Orange County Choppers, the American Professional Rodeo Association, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collector’s edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high quality materials, and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state of the art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

If this is your first Kershaw, you should prepare yourself, because even though it will last you a lifetime, you’re going to want a lot more Kershaw’s.

Today, we will be going over the Kershaw Leek. This version of the Leek is equipped with Carbon Fiber handle scales, a CPM 154 stonewashed blade, and is spring assisted. Get ready for it to rock your world.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM 154 stainless steel. This is a relatively hard steel which is considered an upgraded version of 440C through the addition of Molybdenum. This achieves superior edge holding compared to 440C while retaining similar excellent levels of corrosion resistance despite having less Chromium. IT has decent toughness good enough for most uses and holds an edge well. This steel is not too difficult to sharpen when you have the right equipment. This is a powder steel that has used Crucible Particle Metallurgy. The Particle Metallurgy process makes finer carbide particles resulting in a slightly superior steel that’s tougher and with better edge retention.

This blade has been finished with a stonewash finish. This finish is created by literally rolling the steel with pebbles. After the blade has been tumbled with the pebbles, it is removed, smoothed out, and polished. This creates a very rugged, well-worn look to your knife. There are a variety of benefits that come with it because the stonewash finish preserves the look of the blade overtime. The stonewash finish hides scratches and smudges, which takes maintenance time down significantly, especially when compared to other knife finishes.

This blade has been carved into a Wharncliffe style blade. The Wharncliffe blade is very similar to the sheepsfoot blade shape, but should not be confused with each other. The Wharncliffe is very much like a standard blade shape that has been turned upside down. This type of blade has a totally flat cutting edge and the spine of the blade drops gradually until the tip forms a point. There are a couple of stories as to how the name Wharncliffe came to be, with some people claiming that the pattern originated many years ago with some of the patterns used for Scandinavian Seax Knives and others claiming that it came from a British Lord who commissioned the knife to be made. There were several Lord Wharncliffe that the blade shape could have been named after, but the actual name Wharncliffe did not exist prior to 1822, which means it was named after that point in history. Regardless of history, the Wharncliffe is a very useful blade shape. It is fantastic for people who work in the office for opening boxes and envelopes, and definitely excels in box cutter type chores. This blade shape is not very good for preparing food and skinning as the lack of a belly makes it difficult of cutting soft tissue and using on a cutting board. As a general guideline to differentiate a Sheepsfoot and a Wharncliffe is that a Sheepsfoot blade has an abruptly curving spine at the tip of the knife, creative very little point. The Wharncliffe has a more gradually tapering spine creating a pointier tip, and is consequently more fragile.

The Kershaw Leek sports a plain edge. The plain edge is better than the serrated when the application involves push cuts. Also, the plain edge is superior when extreme control accuracy, and clean cuts are necessary, regardless of whether or not the job is push cuts or slices. The plain edges will also give you much cleaner cuts, which are excellent for your everyday tasks.

Kershaw Leek Spring Assist Knife
Kershaw Leek Spring Assist Knife

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Carbon fiber and features stainless steel liners. Carbon fiber is a generic term for any material that is made by weaving together strands of carbon which are then set into a resin. As such, the material is going to be as good as it’s made. Kershaw makes great carbon fiber, so this shouldn’t be a worry for you. Carbon fiber is going to be very lightweight and completely resistant to rust and corrosion because it is a nonmetallic material. This material is also going to be stronger than a stainless steel. Unfortunately, this material does have the tendency to be rather brittle, and because the strands of carbon are woven in a single direction the material is rather brittle. This means that if it gets hit with a hard or sharp object, it will probably crack. This material is also on the more expensive side of the spectrum. Because the fibers are woven together, the weave reflects light in different ways. You can achieve some nice looking results in the handle. In this Kershaw knife, the handle looks as if a basket was woven together. Carbon Fiber handles are strong, lightweight, and eye-catching. Unfortunately, do the labor intensive process, it is not cheap.

The handle features stainless steel liners. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but it is pretty heavy. This weight is perfect for giving your knife a little bit of extra heft to get the tougher tasks done. Stainless steel is very durable as well, which makes it the perfect option for a knife liner.

This is a pretty simple handle shape. There is a shallow, elongated finger guard on the bottom of the handle. The spine of the handle has a slight curve to it to give you a more comfortable grip when you are working with this knife.

The butt of the handle is rounded and there is a lanyard hole carved into it. Many people who have an EDC like the convenience of having a knife with them everywhere they go, however, they don’t always love using the pocket clip. Some people feel like the pocket clip tears up their pockets on their pants, and others are more worried about the clip giving away that they are carrying a knife with them. If you attach a lanyard to your knife, you can easily hide your knife deeper in your pocket, the clip won’t give you away, and you still have it on hand so that you have access to it at all times. Plus, when you are using the pocket clip, it will take you a little longer to pull your knife out than if you were using a lanyard instead.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a reversible pocket clip, but you can only attach it on the traditional side of the handle. The pocket clip shapes mimic the shape of the handle. This pocket clip and the two screws that attach it to the knife are black, just like the rest of the hardware.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a spring assisted knife. These knives differ from automatic knives in that you use your hand to partially open the blade rather than a button or lever. Anything with a button on the handle is considered an automatic switchblade and is subject to stricter regulations. The mechanisms inside the knife is what makes a spring assisted knife a spring assisted knife and not an automatic knife. Despite the difference in the mechanism, the overall deployment of a spring assist knife is very similar to that of an automatic knife. There are many different variations on the mechanism that makes a spring assist knife work. But, they will have a spring or tension bar that is designed to spring open the blade into locked positon. What makes them different from an automatic knife is that there is resistance after the blade is closed that will keep it closed until the resistance is overcome. Once the resistance is overcome, the spring engages and does the rest of the work opening the knife for you. But, because they have a different opening mechanism a spring assisted knife is not subjected to the same strict laws as an automatic knife.

This Kershaw knife features two opening mechanisms—it has the flipper and the thumb stud. The thumb stud acts similarly to the nail nick—you grasp the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open. The flipper is a shark’s fin shape that protrudes from the handle. You pull back on this protrusion and it flips the blade open. Many people like the flipper because it is naturally ambidextrous and it keeps your fingers out of the way during the entire opening process—keeping your phalanges safe.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long, with the handle measuring in at 4 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 7 inches long. Because of the lightweight handle material, this knife weighs in at a measly 2.2 ounces. This knife was made in the United States of America.

 

The Conclusion:

The Kershaw Leek series has remained as one of Kershaw’s most popular spring assist knives thanks in part to its ultra-slim profile and versatile blade design. This liner lock designed model features Kershaw’s patented SpeedSafe™ system, which quickly deploys the blade via the ambidextrous spine flipper function or the built-in dual thumb stud feature. The Leek also includes a small slide safety located on lower-rear of the back handle scale to help keep the blade at bay until you are ready to use it. This model, the 1660CF, features a smooth carbon fiber handle, stainless steel liners, a Wharncliffe style blade in a stonewash finish and a reversible pocket clip designed for tip up or tip down carry on the traditional side of the handle. The maintenance on this knife will be light because of the stonewash finish that extends the look of the blade. The 154 stainless steel has great edge retention. The handle is durable, but still aesthetically pleasing. Pick up your Kershaw Leek with a carbon fiber handle today at BladeOps.

Kershaw Volt II Knife Review

There is really nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. Kershaw says, “The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.) The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for everyday carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”
They were founded in 1974 with a mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

They also have a serious commitment to innovation. Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Kershaw says, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”
Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions.

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Volt II.

Kershaw Volt II
Kershaw Volt II

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. It is commonly said that 8Cr13MoV steel is the equivalent of an AUS8A steel. This is mostly true. When it comes to an EDC, you aren’t going to be able to tell the difference between the two. But when it comes to your wallet, 8Cr13MoV steel is the way to go. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. This is a top-of-the-line Chinese steel that is going to offer a great value. The thing with this steel is that it is going to get the job done for a very low price, and what more could you ask for?

The knife has been coated with a black-oxide coating. The black oxide coating is created with a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades, mainly for appearance, although it also does add some corrosion resistance to the blade. The coating itself, although more for appearance, is going to prolong the life of the blade, purely because the blade is coated. Unfortunately, just like other coatings, if it does get scratched off, it will need to be re-coated to maintain the same benefits.

The blade on this knife is a classic drop point. The shape is formed by a slowly sloping spine that creates a lowered point which is going to lead to more control over your cuts. What really sets the drop point apart is the broad tip which means that you are going to be capable of taking on those tougher tasks. However, this broad tip does mean that you are not going to be as capable of piercing, which usually isn’t too big of an issue because of the strength that you get in exchange.

The blade does have 2-Step Serrations, which Kershaw describes by saying, “Serrations assist in cutting through particularly tough or fibrous material, such as rope or cord.” In essence, the Kershaw 2-step serration is a more aggressive style of serration. This is a combo edge, so only the bottom third is serrated. The upper two thirds are plain, so that you can get fine work done. On the top of the blade, there is a short row of jimping to provide you with more control.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of glass-filled nylon, or GFN. This is a nylon synthetic polymer that has been reinforced with glass threads for increased strength, stiffness, and dimensional stability combined with excellent wear resistance. One of the most unique parts about GFN is that the fibers are arranged completely haphazardly, which means that the handle is going to be strong in all directions instead of just one, like G10. This material is also going to be cheap because it can be injection molded which means that plenty can be produced at one time. One of the last major benefits is that there is zero maintenance. This is the perfect handle material for those people who want a great knife but don’t want to have to work with a finicky material.

The handle shape is pretty simple. The spine has a slight bulge toward the butt of the handle as it angles downward. This bulge is going to give a little bit of a more solid grip. There is the flipper that is going to work as a finger guar. Then there are four finger grooves on the belly, which will give a comfortable and secure grip. The first finger groove is the deepest and the shortest, with each one getting progressively more elongated and shallower. The first finger groove does sport some jimping to give you an even better ability to work with this Volt II.

The handle is solid black, which creates a very sleek look to it. The face of the handle has been aggressively textured with small diamonds to give you a great grip in almost any environment.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife contrasts with the black handle, being a sleek silver. The clip itself is unique, curving around the hardware on the back. The screws that keep it in place are black, which match the rest of the hardware on this knife. It has been slightly skeletonized, with four small holes carved out of the tip in a row, each getting progressively smaller the closer it gets to the tip of the clip. The clip is reversible, with pre-drilled holes in the handle which allow the user to change the tip position as well as the side on which the knife is carried. The Volt II allows the clip to be attached on the left side in tip-down position as well as on the right side in tip-up positon.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is an assisted opening knife that is equipped with a SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism, a flipper, and a liner lock.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. This flipper is a rounded rectangular and is much smaller than your typical flipper. One of the benefits about a flipper is that it is going to act as a finger guard when the knife is opened. Plus, when you are opening this knife, it will keep your fingers out of the blade’s path, which is not a benefit of a thumb stud.

The SpeedSafe mechanism is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling knives. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. Overall, the benefits of the SpeedSafe is that it is going to use a torsion bar to help move the handle out of the blade which will enable smooth and easy one-handed opening. Plus, this is not a switchblade, so it is not going to fall in the same strict category as automatic knives do.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long with a handle that measures in at 3.9 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 7.1 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.3 ounces, which is an ideal weight for a knife that you are going to keep with you at all times.

 

Conclusion:

             When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “High-voltage looks in basic black. You get the same versatile blade and handle style as the original Volt, but with a non-reflective black oxide blade coating, black handle scales, and black pocket clip. In fact, the only things that aren’t black on this new iteration of the Volt II are the wicked gleam of the Kershaw-sharp edge and the secure locking liner.

The Volt II opens one-handed and with an authoritative “twack” thanks to Kershaw’s SpeedSafe® assisted opening system. A simple pull back on the flipper and the Volt II opens smoothly and easily. We think you’ll appreciate the versatility of the Volt II’s slightly dropped point blade. This classic shape is just about perfect for any task you’ll want to ask it to do. Partial blade serration just extends the Volt II’s capabilities and makes it easy to whip through materials like cord, webbing, or rope.

For a secure grip and a solid, satisfying feel in the hand, the Volt II has finger contours on the handle, diamond-patterned, glass-filled nylon handles, and heavy jimping on the back of the blade. With its great look and versatility, the black Volt II is destined to become a permanent partner for your pocket. You may wonder how you ever did without it.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Flythrough Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to from his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin Hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

Kershaw was founded in1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collector’s edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Like earlier mentioned, Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in Tualatin, Oregon, they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for their customers.

Kershaw says, “if this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing the brand new Kershaw Flythrough.

Kershaw Flythrough
Kershaw Flythrough

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a Chinese produced steel that belongs to the Cr series. Compared to another steel, it is similar to AUS-8. At its low cost, it is a good cutter. Especially when the steel has undergone a suitable heat treatment, the steel can maintain the sharpness of the edge for long periods of time as well as having extremely high corrosion resistance. This steel hardens to a level of 56-59HRC steel. Because of this is a softer steel, knives made out of these steel will always keep sharpening well as well as being easy to sharpen. This steel has a good balance in regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. The biggest characteristic that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. It is extremely inexpensive but still has a good balance of all the best characteristics. That being said, you do get what you pay for, so this steel will not compare to the other super steels on the block.

The blade has been finished with a black-oxide coating. This is created when a chemical bath converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blade and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. The pros of a coating is that it is going to prolong the life of the blade because it does cut does on corrosion and wear. However, a coating can and will scratch off after long periods of time or heavy use. Once the coating does scratch off, you lose out on all the coating benefits.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is one of the most popular blade shapes that you are going to find in the cutlery industry. This is because the shape is tough and still all-purpose. The blade is formed by having the unsharpened edge of the knife run straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow, curving manner, which creates a lowered point. When a knife has a lowered point, the user is going to have more control when they are cutting. This is a great everyday carry knife, so having control over what you do is important. The lowered point is also a very broad point, which gives the knife shape its character strength. One of the reasons that this blade shape is so versatile and makes for a great everyday carry blade is the large belly area that is perfect for making slicing easy. The majority of tasks that you are going to be completing throughout your day are going to involve slicing, so the large belly is especially important to this knife. The drop point blade shape does have one significant drawback, which is that because of the broad point, this knife is not going to excel at piercing or stabbing.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of stainless steel and has the same black-oxide coating that the blade does.

Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion. Unfortunately, it is not a particularly lightweight material, in fact, it is going to be one of hte heavier knife handles that you are going to have. Plus, stainless steel handles can be slippery, so manufacturers have to put in the extra work to add etchings or ridges so that there is enough texture that you can have a secure hold on the knife. The overall advantages to having a stainless steel handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. However, it is also going to be heavy and it can be slippery.

The coating is going to give the same advantages to the handle that it gave to the blade, meaning the life is going to be prolonged.

The handle is one of the unique aspects of this knife, because there are more angles than curves which gives this knife a futuristic edgy look. There is a finger guard, but because of the flipper, which turns into extra finger guard, the finger guard is quite large on this knife. This just means that you won’t have to worry about cutting yourself if you do slip. There is also a very deep finger groove, which helps to make this straight handle comfortable to hold. The spine and the bottom of the handle are completely straight, both angling towards the butt, which is tapered. The butt is also flat. To add texture, the middle of this knife handle comes outwards in a straight line down the middle of the handle. This creates enough texture that you do not have to worry about your grip when it comes to this knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a reversible deep-carry pocket clip.

The clip is reversible in the sense that you can attach it to either side of the handle, making this knife a fantastic option for left or right handed people alike. However, the clip can only be attached to carry the knife tip-up.

This is a deep carry clip, so you can easily conceal the blade in your pocket while also keeping the Flythrough more snug in your pocket. This means that if you are using this knife as an everyday carry knife, you don’t have to worry about the knife sliding out while you go about your daily business.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual knife that uses a flipper for assisting you. This knife is equipped with the KVT ball-bearing opening system as well as a frame lock.

The flipper is a small rectangular sharks-fin shaped piece of the blade that extends through the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper enables fast and easy one-handed opening. It is also completely ambidextrous. To open a manual knife that uses a flipper, you are going to hold the knife handle in one hand with the butt end resting firmly in the palm of your hand. Place your index finger on the highest point of the flipper. Push down strongly and quickly on the flipper. At this point, the blade is going to move out of the handle and lock into place because of the frame lock.

In a frame lock, the knife handle consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade and prevents the blade form closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

The Kershaw KVT ball-bearing system makes one-handed opening of this knife fast and easy—without the need for a mechanical assist. While SpeedSafe assisted opening uses a torsion bar to help move the knife blade out of the handle, KVT relies on a ring of “caged” ball bearings that surround the knife’s pivot. Caged just means the ball bearings are secured within a ring that surrounds the pivot. It keeps the ball bearings in place, while still allowing them to rotate freely. When the user pulls back on the built-in flipper, the blade rotates out of the handle as the ball bearings roll in place. KVT makes one-handed opening quick, easy, and smooth as butter. In knives with the KVT ball-bearing system, you will also notice the knife has additional “detent.” This is a design feature that helps hold the blade safely in the handle when the knife is closed. When opening the knife, you may notice a little ‘stickiness’ just as you pull back on the flipper and before the blade rolls out of the handle on the KVT ball bearings. Just a little extra pressure on the flipper overcomes the detent and the knife will open with ease.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 3.9 inches long. The overall length of the blade measures in at 6.9 inches long. It weighs in at 3.7 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this new knife of theirs, they say, “Designed by RJ Martin, the new Flythrough features his unique ‘See-Through Pivot.’ This oversized pivot is hollow in the center, letting you ‘see through’ it. What’s more, the Flythrough also has a handle cutout behind the pivot that lets you see the end of the blade tang when the blade is open. Both of these features add interest to this striking knife. The Flythrough’s drop-point blade has a sculpted top swedge and is made of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel with black-oxide coating for a monochrome look and additional corrosion protection. A concave thumb-ramp on the top of the blade provides a secure place to rest a thumb or forefinger for controlled cuts. The steel handle features sweeping, sculpted lines that add to the dynamic look of the Flythrough. Lockup is secure thanks to a sturdy frame lock and a reversible deep-carry pocket clip lets the Flythrough ride comfortably low in your pocket.” Come pick up this brand new Kershaw knife today at BladeOps.

Kershaw Camp 10 Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin Hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. They use appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw Knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw says, “if this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Camp 10.

Kershaw Camp 10
Kershaw Camp 10

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 65Mn steel. This is a readily-available Chinese steel that has been specifically designed to provide good wear resistance as well as high hardness. This steel has a medium-high carbon content which means that it is going to have a high degree of toughness and resilience. The steel also has manganese, which in addition to also improving the toughness and resilience, it also improves the hot-working characteristics of the steel. What does this mean? It means that it makes for a great steel for machetes such as the Camp 10.

The blade has been finished with a black powder-coat. There are a few very good reasons for having a coated blade, for starters, it increases the life expectancy of the blade. This is because it forms a barrier between the steel and the environment, so that the steel cannot rust or corrode as easily as it once could have. The coating will also cut down on all glares and reflections, which is key if you are trying to remain hidden. A machete such as this one implies that you are in stealth mode when you use it, so the coated finish was a good option. The coating also makes this knife sleek and can reduce the drag, making it easier to stab with this knife. The biggest drawback to a coated finish is that the coating is going to scratch off eventually. Whether that is caused because of time or heavy use, it will scratch off. At this point, you have to recoat the blade if you want the same benefits.

This is a large drop point blade, characterized by the slow slope from the handle to the lowered tip. This is a tough blade shape as well as a versatile one. The tip is lowered, which does add an element of control. With such a large knife, you are going to want all the control that you can get. The tip is also very broad, which adds strength to the blade. In the case of the Camp 10, it adds so much strength. You are going to want all of the strength you can get when it comes to a machete, because you are going to be taking on all sorts of the natural elements, which we all know are the toughest elements. The drop point blade also has a massive belly, which will allow you to slice with the knife. Because of the strength, size, and thickness of this knife, you will be able to slice through even the thickest of branches.

Like all good machetes, the blade is plain. This means that you will be able to sharpen it in the field if needed, because all you really will need is a couple good stones. The plain edge allows you to take on a wider variety of tasks, so you won’t be limited to just sawing through materials.

 

The Handle:

This is a full tang knife, so the handle is made out of 65Mn steel, but it does have a rubber over mold. The full tang makes the knife stronger and more durable. The full tang just means that the entire knife is made out of one piece of carved metal. There are no weak spots where the handle and the blade have been welded together. This means that the knife is less likely to break. When you are in the field or out on a mission, if the handle happens to break off or break down, you will still have the entire knife, just without the grip of the rubber over mold. With a full tang knife, you don’t have to worry about what material you are trying to cut through. Plus, you are going to use this knife for more than just cutting because of the strength, but we will get back to that in the mechanism section.

The rubber over mold is tan, which pairs perfectly with the black portions of the rest of the knife. The rubber over mold makes this knife more comfortable to hold, because it adds a little bit of width and softness. The over mold is also intensely checkered so that you don’t have to worry about your grip slipping when you are in the heat of things. When you are using a machete, chances are you are in a strange or extreme environment. The grip of the over mold ensures that no matter what your environment is, you will have a strong and secure grip on this huge knife.

The handle has two large finger guards on each side of the handle, to ensure that you don’t cut yourself. The spine of the handle bulges out slightly to give you a more comfortable grip. The belly of the handle also bulges out slightly to give you a comfortable grip so that you can hold on to this knife for long periods of time if needed.

In the butt of the handle, there has been a lanyard hole carved in. This is crucial because a lanyard will help secure tis knife against loss. If you need to field dress any animals, the lanyard will give you a little bit more safety during that task. You can also wrap the lanyard around the handle to give more texture no matter what you are trying to accomplish. Lastly, if you are worried about visibility or losing your knife, you can tie on a brightly colored lanyard, or a bright piece of flagging onto your lanyard.

 

The Mechanism:

The Camp 10 is a fixed blade, which has plenty of benefits. For starters, they are stronger than other knives and also bigger than other knives. You can find a fixed blade in almost any size, from small, to ginormous just like this one. All of them are going to have extremely strong blades. Next, fixed blades don’t break because there are no moving parts on a fixed lade to break. Fixed blades are also easier to maintain, because you do not have to worry about the hinge like with a folding knife. Plus, cleaning is very straightforward and very simple. All you have to do is wipe down the blade and handle and oil the blade occasionally. This makes it a great option if you are going to be in nature for long periods of time—nothing can get in the handle, rusting and breaking down the mechanisms. Then, the biggest advantage to this fixed blade is that it is a superior survival tool. Because of the strength and versatility, you can use this knife for a wide variety of tasks such as cutting, digging, splitting wood, using it as a first aid tool, using it to prepare food, using it as a hunting weapon, hammering, or even a prying tool. The thickness of this knife will come in especially handy when it comes to hammering and prying. All in all, though, you can’t really go wrong with the Camp 10.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this Kershaw knife is made out of Glass-Filled Nylon, or GFN. This is the same material as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon. They are both a thermoplastic material which is very strong, resistant to bending, resistant to abrasion, and is practically indestructible. Plus, it is super cheap to make and thus purchase. This is an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. All of these characteristics lend well to high volume manufacturing and hence the lower cost.

One of the reasons that it is so strong is because the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in it being strong in all directions. This is different than G-10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, which are all similar materials, but have the fiberglass strands aligned in a single direction. Some of the benefits are that it is strong, tough, inexpensive, and requires zero maintenance—perfect for this low maintenance machete. The cons of the knife are that it has a cheap plastic feel to it and it has less grip than G-10 does.

The sheath also includes a belt loop, making this knife very easy to always have on you and out of the way. The sheath is tan, which matches the handle, with black loops, which match the blade.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 10 inches long, with an overall length of 16 inches long. This knife weighs in at a hefty one pound and 2.3 ounces, which gives you the heft to take on virtually anything. When the knife is in the sheath, it weighs in at 1 pound and 8 ounces.

 

The Conclusion:

Kershaw says, “The popular Kershaw Camp 10 machete has been widely praised for both value and durability. And while its original black-and-gray color scheme looks great in the filed or in the backyard, we thought we’d try this favorite in a new color, too. This new black-and-tan color scheme was inspired by a Camp 10 that was put to work and got all dusty in the process. Turns out, it looked pretty good doing it. The new ‘Camp Tan’ as the designer likes to call it, has all the features of the regular Camp 10, but with a tan handle and sheath. From clearing brush to making kindling, the Camp 10 Tan is the ideal outdoor and survival tool. Cut, slash, hack, split, scrape—just about any task you ask of it, the Camp 10 Tan can handle. The full-tang Camp 10 Tan is made of 65Mn carbon tool steel for toughness and wear resistance. A black powder coat protects the steel and makes maintenance easier. With its rubber over mold, the Camp 10’s handle is super-grippy and provides and extra-secure, contoured grip. The handle has a built-in hand guard and is drilled in both front and rear so you can attach a lanyard either place—or both—for carrying versatility. The new Camp 10 Tan comes with a matching tan molded sheath with handy lash points and nylon straps. It attaches to pack, belt, ATV trial box, or saddle bags with ease.” Pick up this brand new Kershaw machete today at BladeOps.

Kershaw Ember Assist Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocketknives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to from his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kai USA Ltd. has three lines of products; Kershaw knives brand of sporting and pocketknives; Shun Cutlery, handcrafted Japanese kitchen cutlery; and Zero Tolerance, a lien of premium and professional knives.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives. Working with Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin Hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and many more.

In 2002, Kershaw released a Steven Seagal model featuring stingray leather on the handle. In 2004 Kershaw developed a multi-tool for the National Geographic Society with national Geographic filmmaker Bryan Harvey. Kershaw has also released models in collaboration with Jeep, Orange County Choppers, the American Professional Rodeo Association, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

With Kershaw, you know that you are going to get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive and durable, because everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be product to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. From pocket knives, to hunting knives, to a special edition run, Kershaw has always chosen appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship.

Today, we will be discussing the Kershaw Ember Assist knife with a CarboNitride finished clip blade.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this Kershaw knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. This is a popular budget brand of knife steel that is made in china. Its composition is close to the Japanese steel AUS-8. When this steel has the correct heat treatment, it will retain the edge sharpness for a long time while also maintaining its good corrosion resistance levels. Knives made with this steel are easy to sharpen and keep sharpening well. Overall, this steel is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. However, the best characteristic that it boasts is how inexpensive it is. For the cost, you get a good steel. However, you do need to remember that you do get what you pay for, so when compared to some of the more premium steels, this blade is not going to measure up.

The blade has been coated with a titanium carbo-nitride coating. This is an abrasion resistant ceramic coating that is formed by adding a small amount of carbon to the TiN coating during the deposition process. The carbon makes the coating harder and gives it a lower friction coefficient. This coating does produce an attractive gray blade coating that increased the blades hardness, helps maintain the edge, and increases the overall lifetime of the blade.

The blade has been carved into a modified clip point blade shape. Clip points blades are one of the two most popular blade shapes that is in use today. The blade is formed by having the back edge of the knife run straight from the handle and then stop about halfway up the knife. It ten turns and continues to the point of the knife; this cut-out area is referred to as the clip and is curved. The clip was named because it looks like the knife got that specific portion of the blade clipped off, and the blade style was named because of this portion. Clip point blades are very versatile because of the large belly that it sports, which is ideal for slicing. This blade shape is really designed for piercing, because it does feature a thin, sharp point. While this thin sharp point does allow you to pierce effortlessly, it is also one of the only drawbacks to this blade style. Because it is thinner, it will have more of a tendency to break or snap. The clip point blade does not have the strength that a drop point blade boasts.

The spine of the blade has an ergonomic top groove for your index finger when you are making close cuts.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 410 stainless steel. This steel is a 12% chromium martensitic stainless steel and when heated it hardens to achieve optimum strength and edge retention. Because of these qualities, it is commonly used in manufacturing cutlery. This steel is proven to withstand the effects of environment conditions, water, mild chemicals, and the acids that you will find in food. This steel also exhibits good heat and oxidation resistance. Sandmeyer Steel says, “The everyday rigors placed on cutlery demand a material that exhibits excellent strength, lasting durability, and resistance to mildly corrosive environments. For this reason, 410 stainless steel has become a staple in the manufacturing of knives and flatware. It is also utilized in cutting applications in industrial food processing. The alloy’s chromium composition protects surfaces from the acidity of food and the corrosive properties of water, while the material’s high strength and hardness make it an ideal substance suitable for a variety of mechanical applications.”

The handle has been finished with the same titanium carbon-nitride coating, which means that the color of the handle and blade are exactly the same. This also means that the life time of the handle will be extended because of how well protected the steel of the handle is.

Kershaw Ember Assist Knife
Kershaw Ember Assist Knife

The handle has an elongated finger groove, which helps give you a comfortable grip on this knife. Right after that, there is an extremely shallow and slightly more elongated groove that gives your fingers a comfortable place to rest, even if you are using this knife for long periods of time throughout your day. Near the butt of the handle, opposite the spine, there is a row of jimping that allows you to have a better grip on this knife. This jimping is needed because the handle is smaller than your typical knife handle, since is this knife is such a compact knife. The angles and contours of the Ember’s handle give it an edgy, tactical look.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a three position clip, which means that the user may position the clip for tip-up or tip-own carry on one side and one-position carry on the other. The clip and the rest of the hardware on this knife is black, which contrasts nicely with the blade and the handle. The clip is a deep carry clip, which means that your knife will be easier to conceal. The only disadvantage that some people find with a deep carry clip is that it takes a fraction of a second longer to remove from your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife that is equipped with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism as well as a flipper. The Ember is also equipped with a frame lock mechanism.

Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. This was originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, most major knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none can match the popularity or proven durabily of Kershaw’s original. The heart of a SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into positon ready for use.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. On the Ember, the flipper is very triangular. When the knife is opened, the flipper actually acts as a finger guard, adding an extra element of safety to this Kershaw knife.

In a frame lock knife, the knife handle, or its frame, consists of two pates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade, or the tang, and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked positon. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this Kershaw knife measures in at 2 inches long, with a handle of 2.8 inches long. When the knife is opened, its overall length is 4.8 inches long. The Ember assist weighs in at 2.2 ounces. This is a smaller knife, which is perfect for your new favorite EDC—its big enough to take on almost anything and small enough that it isn’t going to be a hassle to have with you at all times.

 

Conclusion:

This stylish assist knife is big on looks and just the right size for a pocket, briefcase, backpack, or purse.
When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say: “Kershaw and Rick Hinderer have teamed up to bring you a smaller pocketknife with plenty of style, the Kershaw Ember.
The first thing you’ll notice, of course, is the Ember’s size. The blade is just two inches long and, when closed, the knife is a compact 2.8 inches. But the next thing you’ll notice is the Ember’s striking looks. Angles, contours, matte-grey coating, and black hardware give it a tactical look-and-feel that we think knife users will really warm up to.
For easy opening, the Ember features SpeedSafe® assisted opening and a handy, built-in flipper. The modified clip-point blade has an ergonomic top curve, which gives the user a convenient place to position an index finger when guiding the knife’s edge in a close-cutting situation. A sturdy frame lock secures the blade in position for safe use.
The blade is heat treated to Kershaw’s demanding specifications to bring out the very best qualities in the steel. Titanium carbo-nitride coating on both blade and handle give the Ember a matte grey finish. Black hardware, including the three-position pocket clip, enhances this little knife’s look.
Easy to carry in pocket, briefcase, or backpack, the new Ember from Kershaw and Rick Hinderer packs a lot of style into a small package.” The Ember is long on style and class. Once you get it in your pocket you’ll see why it just may become your favorite every day carry pocket knife. So come on over to BladeOps and pick up your new favorite EDC today.

 

Kershaw Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assist Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group and is headquartered in Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form is own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. IN 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1977 the U.S. production facility was opened in in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a large production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kai USA Ltd. has three lines of products; Kershaw Knives which is a brand of sporting and pocket knives; Shun Cutlery, which is a handcrafted Japanese kitchen cutlery; and Zero Tolerance, which is a line of premium and professional knives.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

In 2002, Kershaw released a Steven Seagal model featuring stingray leather on the handle. In 2004 Kershaw developed a multi-tool for the National Geographic Society with National Geographic filmmaker Bryan Harvey. Kershaw has also released models in collaboration with Jeep, Orange Country Choppers, the American Professional Rodeo Association, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Some fun facts are that Steven Seagal and his Kershaw collaboration knife paper in the movie Driven to Kill. Kershaw Knives have appeared in numerous other television shows and movies including Lost and Supernatural. In the television show Person of Interest, the character John Reece is frequently seen using a Kershaw Blur.

Today we will be talking about a version of the Blur. This specific knife is Kershaw’s 1670CAMO Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assisted knife with a black Sandvik blade and an aluminum handle.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this version of Kershaw’s Blue is made out of Sandvik 14C28N Stainless Steel. This steel is a great option for knife blades, because the steel grade allows for the highest attainable hardness without the compromising of microstructure integrity. The steel is often used in high end knives as well as custom knives.  This steel makes re-sharpening a breeze. The steel also has a high resistance to micro chipping, rolling, or folding of the edge. The steel can be hardened to a 55-62HRC, which is a fantastic hardness for folding or pocket knives. Sandvik 14C28N also has a high corrosion resistance which leads to a particular appeal if you are going to be working in a wet or humid environment, such as in the kitchen or if you are hoping to use this knife in the outdoors.

The blade has been coated with a black Diamond Like Coating. A coating does have several purposes on a knife blade. For starters, the coating finish prevents corrosion because it puts a layer between the steel and the environment. A coating also eliminates a shiny surface, which is ideal with a tactical field blade. You do not want the reflections off of a blade to give your position away. The Diamond Like Coating, or DLC, is a type of PVD coating which stands for physical vapor deposition. The process is to deposit a hard, ceramic like layer onto the steel surface. This ceramic like layer is composed of the combination of various nitrides and carbides and is chemically bonded to the metal surface and is much harder than any tool steel could ever be. This type of coating is usually so hard that it will actually make the blade scratch resistant, plus, because they are also chemically inert, they do protect against rust. A DLC is pitch black, but that’s not why it is sought after: it is by far the hardest coating that can be put on a surface. It is so hard that when metal is cut with a DLC coated knife, the blade will get marked—by the metal that has been spread on the DLC coating. Plus, DLC has low friction, so it is supposed to make the cut easier. Unfortunately, this does add a significant cost to your knife blade.

The blade has been carved into a slightly recurved drop point style blade. The drop point blade shape is one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today, probably owing to the fact that it is basically an all-purpose blade shape. The most common place that you are going to come across this blade shape is on a hunting knife, because the point on a drop point blade is easily controllable. Because the tip is lowered on a drop point blade, it is easily controlled, which does make it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. But, a hunting knife is not the only place that you are going to come across this blade shape: it is also very popular on tactical and survival knives. This is because of the way the style is formed: the back edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and adds strength to the tip. And while the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is so much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use that makes the drop point blade such a popular shape for tactical and survival knives. This blade shape is also extremely versatile because it features a large belly area that is perfect for slicing, which is most likely going to be the majority of what you are doing with your knife. Really the drop point blade shape only has one disadvantage and that is its broad tip, because it does make it less able to pierce than the clip point. But, you do have to keep in mind that it is this broad tip that allows the drop point blade shape to have so much strength behind it. This drop point blade on the Camo Blur does have all of those regular benefits, but the shape is slightly different. When it comes to the tip and belly, there is a slight curve that you don’t normally get with a drop point blade.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 aluminum with Trac-Tec inserts on both of the handle scales. The aluminum metal is commonly used in a knife handle and there a few really great reasons as to why it is such a common knife handle material. For starters, aluminum can be anodized into just about any color that you can think of, which always adds an aesthetically pleasing feature to the knife. Plus, the anodization process does add a touch of durability and hardness to the handle. Aluminum is also a very low-density metal, so while it is a very tough material, it is also lightweight and is not going to weigh you down. Unfortunately, aluminum does have a limited resistance to impact, which just means that it is going to be prone to dents and scratches. The most commonly used aluminum alloy is 6061, because it does have the highest tensile strength out of all the aluminum alloys. The aluminum on this version of the Blur has been finished with a unique foliage camo print.

A common problem on an aluminum handle is that there is not enough grip to allow the knife to be an outdoors or even a go-to knife. To combat that, Kershaw has added inserts of Trac-Tec to both of the handle scales. These inserts give you plenty of grip that will allow you to use this knife in almost any environment without having to worry about your grip on the handle.

To help with control when slicing, there is a small amount of jimping on the spine of the handle, with a larger portion of jimping that rests in the elongated finger groove. The butt of the handle does have a lanyard hole carved into it.

 

Kershaw Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assist Knife
Kershaw Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assist Knife

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is black, just like the blade and has been statically designed for tip up or tip down carry, but only on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is kept in place by two black screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

The Foliage Camo Blur is a spring assisted knife that boasts Kershaw’s patented SpeedSafe system as well as a liner lock.

The speed safe assists the user to smoothly open this knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. The SpeedSafe system was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fishermen, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job-site. The SpeedSafe mechanism is very safe. When the user overcome the resistance of the torsion bar, SpeedSafe assists in opening the knife. Once opened, the liner locking system will secure the blade in positon so that it does not close accidentally. When releasing the lock, the blade won’t snap shut due to resistance provide by the torsion bar. Since the torsion bar provides a bias towards the closed position, it will normally hold the blade securely closed.

The liner lock is one of the most commonly found form of lock on modern folding knives—for ease of use, ease of assembly, and cost, it’s hard to beat a liner lock. The basic design uses one of the blade’s liners, cut out and bent to create a spring effect, to engage the back of the blade tang when the blade is opened. The pros of a liner lock sit hat they are simple to use, inexpensive to make, and very familiar to most people. But, the user’s fingers are in the path of the blade when closing, and this locking system is not normally suited for heavy-duty use due to the thin nature of the liner.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.75 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of the Blur when it is opened is 7.875 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.9 ounces. This knife was made in the United States.

 

Conclusion:

The Kershaw Blur series has remained as one of Kershaw’s more popular spring assist knives thanks in part to its slightly recurved blade design which is ideal for multi-tasking and promotes excellent slicing and piercing capabilities. This liner lock designed model features Kershaw’s patented SpeedSafe™ system, which quickly deploys the blade via the built-in angled dual thumb stud feature. The Blur also includes Trac-Tec inserts in both handle scales which provides increased security while holding it as well as staying in a pocket. This model, the 1670CAMO, features an aluminum handle with a unique foliage camo finish, grip-promoting black Trac-Tec inserts, a slightly recurved drop point style blade in a DLC (Diamond Like Carbon) black finish, stainless steel liners and a pocket clip designed for tip up or tip down carry on the traditional side of the handle. Pick up your Kershaw 1670CAMO Foliage Camo Blur spring assisted knife today at BladeOps.

 

Kershaw Barstow Knife Review

There is truly nothing like a Kershaw. From award winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know that you are carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why Kershaw can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime.

The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame nay cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collector’s edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state of the art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw has a commitment to innovation and has pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first to market. They introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in their Blade traders. Recently, their Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And they will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA, Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon. They also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

They have said, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back.”

Today, we are going to be discussing the Kershaw Barstow which is model 3960 through Kershaw.

 

The Blade:

The blade on the Kershaw Barstow is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This formula of steel is a Chinese series of steels. In the series of steel, 9Cr is the highest quality, with the 8Cr formula falling shortly behind. If you were going to compare this steel to another steel type, it would most closely match AUS 8 steel. However, 8Cr steel is the lesser steel between the two. 8Cr is a softer steel, so it is extremely easy to sharpen. It can be repeatedly sharpened without the quality of the steel wearing out. One of the major benefits about 8Cr steel is that it does keep its fine edge for long periods of time, so you can go longer between sharpening’s. While this steel is capable of taking on a wide variety of tasks, it still is an average steel, so keep that in mind while you have this blade take things on. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is. You get plenty of bang for your buck with this steel.

The Barstow blade has a black-oxide BlackWash finish, which is a style of stonewash finish. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is a wide variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion and the type of finish the blade has before it enters the tumbler. An “acid stonewashed” or “BlackWash” finish is a blade that has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The aid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. A very positive benefit of a stonewashed blade is that they are low maintenance and preserve their original look overtime; the stonewashed finish hides the scratches that can occur with use over time.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a spear point blade style. A spear point blade is similar to the needle point blade in that they are both good for piercing. However, its point is stronger and it contains a small belly that can be used for slicing.  A spear point is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center line of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. In contrast to the needle point blade, which has a very sharp but weak point, a spear point knife has a strong point that is also sharp enough for piercing. The lowered point is easily controllable and is useful or fine tip work. Spear point blades contain a small belly which can be used for some cutting and slicing applications. However, the belly is relatively small when compared to drop point and clip point knives. This style of blade is the perfect choice for a knife lover who is looking for a good balance between piercing and slicing ability. It has the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade, while also maintaining some of the belly that is used for slicing. This blade shape is considered a hybrid blade shape that has plenty of function.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Glass Filled Nylon, or GFN. This is a nylon based plastic that is reinforced with Glass Fiber and injection molded of ruse in knife handles. GFN handles are one of the cheapest and toughest handle materials to produce in large scale production knives. Even though GFN is perceived as a cheaper material, which it is, it makes for a very tough knife handle material and can take some serious abuse. It is quite a bit more flexible than G10 and other Resin Laminates, so it does not have the rigidity associated with them, however it makes up for this in its impact toughness. And, as a guideline, the higher the glass content, the more rigid the nylon. Additionally, nearly any texture can be created on the surface of this handle because it is injection molded, which makes it an extremely versatile material to work with.

The GFN on the Barstow handle is black. In the center of the handle is a series of grooves in an arrow pattern and intense texturing to provide you with a secure grip in almost any situation. The handle is all angles, instead of the traditional curves, with a flared butt.

The liners in the handle of the Barstow are made out of stainless steel, that also have a non-reflective Blackwash to provide an equally stout liner lock to secure the blade open during use.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The handle has been pre-drilled with holes in the handle to enable the user to change either the tip positon or the side on which the knife carries.

Kershaw Barstow
Kershaw Barstow

The Mechanism:

The Barstow sports a SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism. Kershaw Knives has long been known for innovation. They were the first to adopt the use of many of the advanced steels, high tech materials, and superior coatings that are now used industry wide. They were the first to introduce groundbreaking new technologies that have revolutionized the industry. One of these innovations is the SpeedSafe mechanism. Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe assisted knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. This was originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, and the knives with this mechanism flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original.

The SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual pull back on the flipper. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity”, it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

SpeedSafe was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fisherman, and those who require the one hand opening function on the job site.

SpeedSafe is a very safe mechanism. When the user overcomes the resistance of the torsion bar, SpeedSafe assists in opening the knife. Once opened, a locking system secures the blade in positon so that it does not close accidentally. When releasing the lock, the blade won’t snap shut due to resistance provided by the torsion bar. Since the torsion bar provides a bias towards the closed positon, it will normally hold the blade securely closed.

The Barstow also sports the flipper mechanism. This is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the blade.

This knife also features a liner lock. This mechanism characteristic component is a side spring bar that is located on the same side as sharp edge of the blade, “lining” the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When fully opened, that tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, keeping it firmly in place and preventing it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you place to use your thumb to push the spring “down” so that it clears contact form the butt of the blade.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Barstow is 3 inches long. The overall length of the knife is 7 inches long with a closed positon of 4 inches. This knife weighs in at 3.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Kershaw describes this knife, “The Barstow is a little wicked and a lot of value. It’s a folding dagger and everything about this slim, sleek blade is simple, direct, and ready. The straight spear-point blade, sharpened on a single side, is made of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel with Kershaw’s BlackWash coating for a non-reflective, “already-broken-in” look. The coating not only helps protect the blade, but also hides use scratches. The handle has glass-filled nylon scales with heavy arrow-patterned texturing to enhance grip. A stout steel liner, also with non-reflective BlackWash, provides an equally stout liner lock to secure the blade open during use. Even better, the Barstow opens quickly and easily with SpeedSafe assisted opening and the built-in flipper. All the hardware is black—with the notable exception of the Barstow’s tube spacers, which are anodized in blue for a touch of subtle color and eye-catching interest. For convenient and discreet carry, the deep-carry pocket clip enables the knife to ride low in the pocket and is left/right reversible.” This will change the way that you view everyday carry knives.

 

 

Kershaw Bareknuckle Knife Review

Kershaw knows that there is nothing like a Kershaw. From the award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. So what does the real thing mean? It means that your knife is going to be full of value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you are going to get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. Everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provides a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw has a commitment to innovation. They pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel know for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine.” Kershaw promises to keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.

Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kia has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing and distribution functions.

Today we will be discussing one of Kershaw’s newest knives, their Bareknuckle.

Kershaw Bareknuckle Knife
Kershaw Bareknuckle Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 14C28N steel. This steel allows for the highest attainable hardness without destroying the micro-structure integrity. This steel is often found on high end knives as well as custom knives. This steel allows for easy re-sharpening, although the steel has such high edge retention that you won’t have to sharpen this knife too often. The steel is also near resistant to micro chipping, rolling, or folding on the edge. This steel can be hardened to a 55-62 HRC and is extremely corrosion resistant, which does cut down on maintenance time.

The blade has been stonewash finished. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A very large benefit to the stonewashed blade is that it is going to be low maintenance while also preserving the original look overtime, because it can hide the scratches and smudges that are going to occur with time and use.

The blade is a modified drop point. The drop point blade is going to give this knife the strength and versatility that you crave out of a knife. The point on a drop point is lowered so that you have more control over you cuts and slices, allowing you to perform some fine detail work. The tip is also very broad, which is where the bulk of the strength comes from. The drop point blade style also features a very large belly which is ideal for slicing. The large belly makes this blade versatile and easy to use even for an everyday carry knife. The only drawback to the drop point blade shape is that because the tip is border, you do lose out on the bulk of your piercing capacities.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum. Aluminum is a very low-density metal that is often used in knife making. This material is very corrosion resistant as well, which cuts down on maintenance time considerably, because you don’t have to worry about rusting and corrosion. Most knives use a type of aluminum alloy called 6061-T6, which means the type of aluminum is 6061 and it has been T6 tempered. 6061-T6 Aluminum has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys. This type of aluminum alloy is often used in aircraft, so it is sometimes referred to as aircraft aluminum. This is often a selling point on knives with this handle material, but be aware that it is more of a gimmick than actual advantages. Aluminum alloy is cheaper to machine and produce than Titanium and is lighter, weaker, and less resistant to wear. For the most part, Aluminum is an inferior metal to Titanium aside from its lightness. However, when producing complex knives, such as the Kershaw Bareknuckle, aluminum is much cheaper to produce and the material costs less, which keeps the cost down considerably on this knife. Overall, aluminum is going to be strong, light, durable, and resistant to corrosion. However, it is also going to be colder to hold use to the high conductive abilities.

The handle on this knife has been anodized to a dark grey. Anodizing is a method of increasing the corrosion resistance of a metal part by forming a layer of oxide on its surface. The part that is being treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit. Anodizing increases resistance to corrosion and wear, while also giving the handle a sleek look. And because it actually changes the metal, instead of being painted onto the metal, the anodized color is not going to scratch off easily at all, like a coated finish would. While aluminum is normally very susceptible to scratches and dings, the anodized layer helps to decrease the likelihood of scratches occurring.

The handle has a deep finger groove that makes this knife comfortable to hold while also providing a more secure grip. There is a finger guard, but there is also a flipper that extends off the finger guard when the knife is opened and gives you a safer handle. After the finger groove, the belly of the blade has a slight curve until it meets the butt of the knife. The spine of the handle has an inward curve until about halfway up the handle, where it angles sharply towards the butt of the knife. The butt of the knife is triangular. Across the face of the handle are etchings and ridges to add enough texture that this knife is not going to slip out of your hand while you are using it.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The handle has only been drilled to attach the pocket clip tip up. However, it has been pre-drilled for reversible attachment on either the right or left side of the blade. This helps to make the knife more ambidextrous and allows you to attach the knife for the most comfortable attachment. This is not a deep carry clip, but it is arrow shaped, with the butt of the clip lifting up a little bit, to better clip onto your pocket. This allows for a more secure hold, so you don’t have to worry about it falling out. The clip is kept in place by two small screws, that match the rest of the hardware on the blade.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife features the KVT ball-bearing opening system, a flipper, and a sub frame lock.

The Kershaw KVT ball-bearing system makes one-handed opening of your knife fast and easy—without the need for a mechanical assist. While SpeedSafe assisted opening uses a torsion bar to help move the knife blade out the handle, KVT relies on a ring of “caged” ball bearings that surround the knife’s pivot. (“Caged” means the ball bearings are secured within a ring that surrounds the pivot. It keeps the ball bearings in place, while allowing them to rotate freely.) When the user pulls back on the built-in flipper, the blade rotates out of the handle as the ball bearings roll in place. KVT makes one-handed opening quick, easy, and smooth as butter.

In knives with the KVT ball-bearing system, you will also notice that the knife has additional “detent.” This is a design feature that helps hold the blade safely in the handle when the knife is closed. When opening the knife, you may notice a little ‘stickiness’ just as you pull back on the flipper and before the blade rolls out of the handle on the KVT ball bearings. Just a little extra pressure on the flipper overcomes the detent and the knife opens with ease.

The flipper is a triangular piece of the blade that extends out of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper helps the user have fast and easy one-handed opening while also being ambidextrous in design. To open this knife, hold the knife handle in one hand with the butt end resting firmly in the palm of your hand. Place your index finger on the highest point of the flipper. Push down strongly and quickly on the flipper. The blade will move out of the handle and lock into place. (If you have trouble moving the blade fully out of the handle, add a slight flip of the wrist.)

The Kershaw Sub-Frame Lock is a variation on the traditional frame lock. In this case, a piece of the lighter weight frame, usually G10, glass-filled nylon, or aluminum, is machined out and a piece of steel is riveted into its place. This piece of steel acts just like a standard frame lock. It’s angled inward and biased toward the locked position. When the blade is open, it moves into position behind the blade tang, blocking it open. As with other frame locks, the user moves it to the side and out of the way in order to close the knife. The Sub-Frame Lock is Kershaw patented technology and enables us to make a knife with a slimmer profile, while still providing the strength and security of a frame lock. The Kershaw Sub-Frame Lock is covered under US Patent 9,120,234.

 

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.7 inches long. The overall length of this Kershaw knife measures in at 8.2 inches long. Weighing in at 3.4 ounces, this is an extremely lightweight blade—perfect for your everyday tasks. This knife is made in the United States of America, which means that the knife was made in their Tualatin, Oregon manufacturing facility by skilled Kershaw knife makers.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “If you already like the Kershaw Natrix, but would like it even more if it were built in the USA, your wish is granted. Like the other knives inspired by the original Zero Tolerance 0777, the new Bareknuckle, model 7777, is based on the style of our original award-winning design, but this one offers a slimmed down profile and upgraded materials. The blade is Sandvik 14C28N, a blade steel that was originally created through a Kershaw-Sandvik partnership to produce this high-performance steel. Increased nitrogen in the formula enables 14C28N to provide excellent corrosion resistance and the ability to be hardened to 58-60 Rockwell. Sandvik calls 14C28N the overall highest performing knife steel in the world that still maintains the productivity benefit of being fine-blankable. The Bareknuckle comes with handsome, anodized-aluminum handles in matte gray. And like our popular Knockout, the Bareknuckle features Kershaw’s patented Sub-Frame Lock to lighten in-pocket weight and to ensure safe blade lock up while in use. The blade opens manually with Kershaw’s KVT ball-bearing system and a flipper. For an additional touch of style, the blade rotates out of the handle on an oversized pivot. We complete the Bareknuckle with a reversible, deep-carry pocket clip for convenient carry on the left or right.” You can pick up this brand new knife today at BladeOps.

 

Kershaw Barge Multi-Tool Knife Review

There really is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. Kershaw says, “The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.)

The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

They were founded in 1974 with the mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

They also have a commitment to innovation. They say, “Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Barge, which is a multi-tool.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious knife enthusiast would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. 8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, Kershaw believes, offers their customers an excellent value. The steel has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC level.

The blade on this knife is stonewashed, which is created when the steel is placed in an abrasive material (usually pebbles) and tossed around. Once this step is completed, the steel is removed, smoothed out, and polished. This finish creates a very well-worn look to the blade, which also comes off as rugged. This finish works to easily hide the scratches on the blade as well as smudges, which means that it is a low maintenance finish. The stonewashed finish also works to prolong the original look of the knife overtime.

The blade has been carved into a modified Wharncliffe blade shape with a fairly straight edge. This is a perfect shape for a general utility knife. The back of the knife has jimping in two sections so that you can have a solid grip when you are trying to use this knife. The back angels sharply down towards the tip before stopping about a quarter of the ways away from the tip. At this point, it drops steeply down to meet the tip. The belly is not much of a bely at all, but rather a straight, flat line that curves up slightly at the end when it is about to meet the tip. This belly is miniscule when being compared to a drop point or a clip point, but will allow you to get the basics done when it comes to slicing. True to the Wharncliffe style, this blade has more of a false tip, which prevents accidental stabbings or injuries.

 

Kershaw Barge Multi-Tool Knife
Kershaw Barge Multi-Tool Knife

The Handle:

The handle has two different handle scales. The front one is made out of GFN and the back one is made out of stonewashed steel.

GFN is a thermoplastic material that is very strong, resistant to bending and abrasion, and is almost impossible to break. Plus, this is a cheap material. It is such a durable material because the fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout it, which means that it is going to be strong in all directions instead of just a single direction like G-10 or Carbon Fiber is. However, many knife lovers did not warm up to this material because they felt like it was hollow and felt cheap. It also offers less grip than G-10 does. This is an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. These characteristics lead well to high volume manufacturing, which is where the low price comes in.

The other handle scale is made out of steel which is incredibly durable as well as being very resistant to corrosion. Unfortunately, steel is not a lightweight material. This will add a little bit of heft to the knife, but because it is paired with GFN, it won’t weigh the knife down as much as a fully steel knife handle would. The overall benefits to a stainless steel handle is that it is strong, durable, and resistant to corrosion. The overall cons to a steel handle is that it is going to be heavy and it can be slippery. But because you have the other GFN handle scale, it shouldn’t be too heavy.

The handle on this knife is pretty simple. There are some angles in the front handle scale that offer good texture so that you can use this knife for a general utility knife. The spine of the handle curves slowly towards the butt. The belly of the handle is relatively straight. But does angle towards the blade on the knife, creating a thick finger guard. The butt of the knife (where the pry bar is) is also steel that has been stonewashed.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is not a deep carry clip, which is a drawback of this knife. That being said, it is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which helps to make this knife more ambidextrous. It can only be attached for tip down carry. Most people do prefer tip down carry because there is no danger of it accidentally opening in your pocket and then you reaching into your pocket and slicing yourself.

The pocket clip is black, which contrasts against the stonewashed handle scale. However, it does match the front handle scale as well as the hardware. The clip is tapered and is slightly skeletonized.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual knife, which means that there is no true mechanism such as SpeedSafe to open it. You are going to open this knife the old school way. That being said, it has been equipped with a thumb stud as well as a frame lock mechanism.

The thumb stud is one of the most common one-hand-opening features and is used by almost all knife manufacturers. The thumb stud essentially replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives. You hold the folded knife, place the tip of your thumb on the stud, and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open.

In a frame lock knife, the knife handle—its “frame”—consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.6 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.7 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.3 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.4 ounces.

The multi-function of this tool is that it has a pry bar on the butt of the knife. This means that you don’t have to do what most people are guilty of doing and using the blade of your knife as a pry. All you have to do is flip the knife over and there you go—a pry bar tool ready to go.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “You know you do it. And you know you shouldn’t. You should never use the blade of your knife—especially the blade of your folding knife—as a pry bar.

However, if you’re pry-prone anyway, we now have the right knife for you. The Barge features an integral pry bar that extends from the back spacer of the knife.  Now there’s no need to even think about wrenching on something with your blade. Finally, you’ve got the right tool for the job—an actual pry bar built into the back of the knife.

That said, the Barge’s other end is pretty handy, too. The shorter blade is a modified Wharncliffe with a fairly straight edge, which is a great shape for a general utility knife. That edge is extra handy for when you might need to bear down on something you’re cutting. The stonewashed finish hides scratches easily.

The handle has a textured glass-filled nylon front scale for grip and a stonewashed steel back with sturdy frame lock. The pocket clip is designed for tip-down carry and is left/right reversible. Next time you need to pry; you know what to do. Grab the Barge.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.