Kershaw 3-Piece Set Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some products coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they back each of their knives for the life of tis original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Kershaw was founded din 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw says, “if this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw 3-Piece Set, which includes a spring assisted knife, a multi-function tool, and a K-Tool.

Kershaw 3-Piece Set
Kershaw 3-Piece Set

The Spring Assisted Knife:

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 4Cr13MoV steel. This is a budget line of Japanese steel. The biggest advantage that this steel can boast is that it is inexpensive. On the other hand, you do get what you pay for, so while this knife will get the job done, it won’t do much else. It is not going to maintain an edge for very long, but it will be very easy to sharpen. This steel is also going to be more prone to rusting and corrosion, so Kershaw has coated the blade to combat that. This steel is going to be just enough of everything, tough enough, durable enough, corrosion resistant enough, but you will have to put in a good amount of maintenance time.

The blade has been coated with a black-oxide coating. To put this coating on, a chemical bath converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. Some of the biggest benefits of a coating is that it does add a layer in between the blade steel and the environment, which helps with the corrosion resistance. With this blade, the coating will add enough corrosion resistance to the steel to boost it to regular levels, although you will still want to be careful with any moisture around the steel. The coating is also a sleek, matte black, which cuts down on all glares and reflections, whilst adding an elegant look to the blade.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape, which is the most popular blade shape in the cutlery industry today. This is an all-purpose blade shape that can really stand up to almost anything. This blade shape is most commonly found on hunting knives, although it is commonly found on many other styles of knives, such as regular folding knives, and even Swiss army knives. To form the blade’s shape, the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point is what adds more control and strength to the tip. Because of the tip strength, drop point blades are a popular option on tactical and survival knives. The broad tip that adds all the strength to the blade is also the drop point blades only disadvantage. Because of how broad it is, you do lose out on most of the blade’s piercing capabilities. This blade shape is often compared to a clip point blade that also has a lowered tip, but has a finer tip designed for piercing. Because the tip on the drop point blade is lowered, it is much more easily controlled. This means that you are able to perform fine detail work with this blade. One of the other reasons that this is such an all-purpose knife is because of the large belly that it sports. The belly is the slicing edge, and the bigger the belly, the more capable you are with slicing tasks, which will probably be the main style of task that you will be performing.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this spring assisted knife is made out of stainless steel and also features a black-oxide coating. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but it is pretty heavy. Stainless steel handles are also known for being slippery, which means that the manufacturer will need to incorporate some form of ridges or etching. To help with the texture on this particular knife, Kershaw has added diagonal ridges across the face of the handle.

The advantages of having a stainless steel knife handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. But, it is a heavier material and it can be slippery.

Just like with the blade, the black oxide coating does increase the stainless steels corrosion resistance abilities. This makes the knife an all-black sleek look. Plus, because of the extra corrosion resistance, the maintenance for this handle is reduced.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is black, as is all the hardware on this knife. The clip can only be attached for tip up carry on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is held in place by two screws and has “Kershaw” stamped across the middle.

 

The Mechanisms:

This is a spring assisted knife that utilizes a flipper mechanism and locks with a frame lock.

An assisted opening knife, which is often referred to as a spring-assisted knife, is a knife that spring open only after the blade is slightly pushed open with force. This is not like a switchblade, because nothing holds down the assisted opening knife when it’s in the closed position. As the user begins opening up the blade with the flipper, which does have some resistance, the spring or torsion bar attaches the knife and propels it open where it locks into place.

A flipper is a shark’s fin shaped protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper is there to enable fast and easy one-handed opening as well as being fully ambidextrous. One of the other major advantages to a flipper is that it keeps your fingers out of the way during the entire opening process, which a thumb stud does not. This protects your fingers from accidentally getting sliced during the opening process.

To open this knife, hold the knife handle vertically in one hand and place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper, which will open the knife quickly and easily and lock the blade into place. Keep your fingers away from the blade edge when you are closing the knife.

This knife features a frame lock, which is when the knife handle, or its “frame”, consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.25 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7.75 inches long.

 

The Multi-Tool:

The multi tool measures in at an overall length of 4.0 inches long. This knife is made out of 3Cr13MoV steel, also with a black oxide coating. Just like the knife in this set, the steel is more of a bargain steel than anything else. The steel is going to be soft which isn’t as big of a deal with a multi-tool, like it is a big deal with a knife.

The black-oxide coating is ideal for this tool because it prolongs the life of it. This tool shouldn’t be encountering too many humid environments, so you shouldn’t have to worry about corrosion like you would the knife. However, if it does encounter a wet environment, make sure that you dry it off completely and oil it every once in a while, to avoid the rusting that would be bound to happen.

This multi-tool encompasses four different tools in one. The first is that it is a screwdriver, then a bottle opener, then a hex wrench, then a cord or seat belt cutter. The seat belt cutter is at the tip of the knife. This is a sharp piece of metal that will come in handy in any emergency situation. You will be able to slice a seat belt in a car wreck, or cut twine in an emergency situation. The screwdriver will be able to help you from day-to-day. The hex wrench has a couple of sizes that you can choose from, and again, this will be a good tool to have on you at all times, because it is small enough not to get in the way, but tough enough to work as a great tool. The bottle opener is on the bottom of this multi-tool, where a circular hole has been cut out of the tool.

This is the perfect tool to have with you at all times. While it only has four purposes, the four purposes that it does have are exceptional.

 

The K-Tool:

The K-tool is a tool that is completely unique to Kershaw. This tool is made out of 3Cr13 steel, which is a value priced high chromium stainless steel. Like the rest of the set, this stool has been coated in a black-oxide coating, which is perfect for prolonging the life of this tool. The tool has been carved into the Kershaw “K” shape.

This tool measures in at 2 inches long and functions as a bottle opener. This is the better tool to have on hand if you know that you won’t be needing a screwdriver, hex wrench, or cord cutter, but will be opening a lot of bottles.

 

Conclusion:

This limited edition Kershaw 3-Piece Set boasts a black oxide finished Spring assist knife as well as a multi-function tool and a K-tool. With this set, you can be prepared for almost any situation. Pick up this bargain set today at BladeOps.

 

 

Kershaw Fringe Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, that ranges from pocket knives to sporting knives to kitchen cutlery.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. The early manufacturing was mostly done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin Hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and plenty others.

Kershaw has a commitment to innovation and has actually pioneered many of the technologies that are now standard in the knife industry. They promise to keep on innovating, bring new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife using public.

Today we will be discussing the brand new Kershaw Fringe.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel has been known to be the equivalent of AUS8A—and it is true. To someone who just likes having a knife with them for their convenience and even to a knife enthusiast, it would be tricky to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13moV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. However, there are differences to the two formulas. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. Of course, when it comes to a Kershaw knife, you can expect the best quality. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edges, strength, and hardness. 8Cr13MoV is high quality Chinese steel and Kershaw knows that they can make it work for their customers. One of the biggest advantages to this steel is how inexpensive it is, which keeps the overall cost of the knife down considerably.

The blade has been finished with a titanium carbo-nitride coating. Kershaw uses this coating to produce an attractive dark grey blade coating. It also increases the blade’s hardness, helps maintain the edge, and increases the overall lifetime of the blade. The coating helps to make an already good steel even better.

The blade on this knife is a drop point blade style. This is one of the most popular blade shapes in the cutlery industry and for good reason: it is tough and versatile. The spine of the blade runs from the handle to the tip in a slow curving manner. Because it curves toward the tip, it creates a lowered tip, which gives the user more control and allows them to work on fine tip work. The tip on the drop point style is broad, which is where the bulk of the strength comes from. It is this strength that sets the drop point style apart from similar styles such as the clip point. The strength allows the user to take on almost any task without worrying about the tip snapping. This blade shape is very versatile because of the large belly that it boasts. The belly makes slicing easier which is vital in an everyday knife.

This knife does have a plain edge, which allows you to take on a wider variety of tasks.

 

The Handle:

             The handle is made out of stainless steel that has been coated with the same titanium carbo-nitride. The front of the handle has a carbon fiber insert.

Stainless steel already has high durability, but the titanium carbo-nitride makes it even more durable. Stainless steel also has the benefit of having a high resistance to corrosion. Unfortunately, stainless steel is rather heavy and can be pretty slippery. Kershaw combats these two issues by having the back of the handle full stainless steel, but the front has a carbon fiber inlay, which is very low weight. The carbon fiber inlay is extremely textured to give you enough grip to not notice the slickness of the stainless steel like you normally would.

Carbon fiber is a material that has thin strands of carbon that have been tightly woven and then set in resin. This material is very strong, very lightweight, but unfortunately, it is expensive. While carbon fiber is very strong, it is not indestructible and does suffer from being brittle. This is because all of the carbon fibers have been woven together going in the same direction. In that specific direction, carbon fiber is going to be extremely strong. Once its stressed in any other direction, it will start to break apart or crack. The carbon fiber inlay looks to be woven like a traditional basket weave. Underneath the inlay, the stainless steel has been etched with arrow shapes to add additional texture and grip.

The handle of the Fringe is very curvy. There is a large finger groove that gives you a comfortable and safe place to rest your fingers and have a secure grip. In the finger groove, there is jimping, which secures your finger further from slipping. After the finger groove, there is a slow curve towards the butt. The spine of the handle has ergonomics that fit perfectly in your palm, even if it is for long periods of time. The butt of the handle is triangular.

To add a little more control, the portion of the blade near the handle has a short row of thick jimping to help you better control when doing fine detail work.

On the butt of the handle, there is a lanyard hole carved in. It is rectangular oval and will fit any lanyard.

 

 

The Pocket Clip:

The Kershaw Fringe
The Kershaw Fringe

The pocket clip on this knife is black, which is darker than the dark grey handle, so it does contrast with it a little bit. This is a deep carry pocket clip, which means that it will sit in your pocket deeper, helping to conceal the knife, while also keeping it very secure inside your pocket. Unfortunately, this is a single-positon pocket clip, which means that the pocket clip is in a fixed position on the knife handle. On the Fringe knife, it has been attached for left hand, tip-down carry. The clip is kept in place by two small, black screws, that match the rest of the hardware.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife, which is a type of folder that uses an internal mechanism to finish opening the blade once the user has partially opened it using the flipper. Because it is not fully automatic, it does not fall under the same strict laws that a fully automatic knife would.

The Kershaw Fringe uses a flipper to help with the opening of this knife. The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper on this Kershaw knife is triangular with a flat top. Some of the bigger benefits to having a flipper instead of a thumb stud is that the flipper is not going to get in the way because it does not extend out of the blade. Second, when the knife is opened, the flipper acts as a finger guard, adding an extra element of safety. Third, because of the very design of a flipper, it is an ambidextrous opening system. And fourth, when you are using the flipper to open this knife, it keeps your fingers out of the blades path—making it a very safe mechanism to use.

This knife is also equipped with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe Assisted Opening Mechanism. Kershaw was the first company to bring SpeedSafe assisted opening knives to market, which in turn, launched a revolution in opening systems. This system was originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion. Kershaw says, “SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper.” On the Fringe, that is going to be a pull back on the flipper. They go on to say, “The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion ar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into positon, ready for use.”

The Fringe is also equipped with a frame lock mechanism. In a frame lock, the knife handle, or its frame, consist of two plates on either side of the blade. To ensure the most secure lock up, one of these sides is going to be made out of metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against eh backend of the blade and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked positon. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.1 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 7 inches long. This is a lighter knife, because of the handle material, weighing in at a mere 3.5 ounces. This weight makes it an exceptional option for your everyday carry knife, because you will hardly be able to tell when it’s in your pocket.


Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “The new Kershaw Fringe is out of the mainstream and anything but boring. With its gray titanium carbo-nitride coating on both blade and handle, as well as an attention-getting carbon-fiber insert, the Fringe is already a very attractive EDC. But it’s the things you don’t see at first glance that make it even better.

To ensure a comfortable carry, Kershaw has thinned the back handle, making the Fringe lighter than you’d expect for an all-steel pocketknife. A deep-carry clip enables you to carry it securely in the pocket, yet access is easy when you need it. The blade is 8Cr13MoV, a top-quality steel, precision heat-treated by Kershaw to bring out its high-performance qualities. It takes and holds an edge well, then resharpens easily. The gray coating further protects the blade from corrosion and gives it a sophisticated look. The blade opens quickly and easily with SpeedSafe assisted opening and the flipper or built-in thumb stud.

The Fringe’s handle is titanium carbo-nitride coated in gray with a large carbon-fiber insert that catches the light—and catches the eye. The blade locks securely in place during use thanks to a sturdy frame lock. Black hardware completes the classy look.”

You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

Kershaw Brawler Pack (Brawler Knife & Flashlight) Review

There is really nothing like a Kershaw. From award winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. And the real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s why they can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for everything.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocket knife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always choosing appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. They introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in their Blade Traders. Recently, their Composite Blade Technology, which combines two steels into one blade, giving knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And they will keep on innovating, bring new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon, they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

They say, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to sow you—along with a wide selection of your favorites.”

For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.

Today we will be talking about the Kershaw Brawler Pack, which includes the Brawler knife and a flashlight.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a popular budget brand of knife steel, which is made in China. This steel is an average steel that will stand up to most everyday tasks. 8Cr13MoV steel is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. This steel has the ability to retain its edge and sharpness for a long period of time. The range of this steel hardness is 56-58HRC. Knives made of this steel keep sharpening well and at the same tie they are easy to sharpen, and have highly aggressive cuts on soft materials. However, its biggest selling point is that it is inexpensive, so it will not stand up to harder tasks as well as not comparing to some of the super steels.

The blade has been coated with a black oxide coating. This is a chemical bath converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance.

The blade has been carved into a tanto blade shape. The tanto blade shape is not an all-purpose blade style, it is designed to do one thing and one thing really well. This knife style was originally designed for armor piercing, the tanto blade was popularized by Cold Steel and is similar in style to Japanese long and short swords. The tanto knife has a high point with a flat grind, leading to an extremely strong point that is perfect for stabbing into hard materials. The thick point of the tanto blade contains a lot of metal near the tip, so it able to absorb the impact form repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to break. The front edge of the tanto knife meets the back edge at an angle, rather than a curve. As a result, the tanto blade does not have a belly, which is sacrificed in exchange for a stronger tip. It is because there is no belly that this knife will not make a good all-purpose blade. With this blade style, you will not be prepared for all situations, but you will be able to take on any hard materials.
This knife does have a plain edge.

Overall, the tanto is an ideal shape for these piercing tasks because there is plenty of metal to support the point, making it stronger than many other blade shapes. You’ll notice that the top of the Brawler’s blade has a grind, too. This is called a swedge it helps narrow the blade, adding to its piercing power. At the same time, the Brawler’s straight belly offers excellent cutting capacity, is perfect for bearing down on a task, and is easy to re-sharpen.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of glass-filled nylon, or GFN. This is a thermoplastic material that is notable both for the fact that it is relatively cheap and practically indestructible. It can also be molded into just about any shape and textured in any number of ways. All in all, GFN is an excellent handle material across the board but it, like G10, does not pack the same allure due to its resemblance in both appearance and feel to plastic. That being said, unless you are overall concerned with the look of your knife, this is an all-around superb handle material that requires essentially no maintenance whatsoever. The benefits of having a knife with this material is that it is strong, tough, requires zero maintenance, and is inexpensive. The cons to this knife handle material is that it does have a cheap plastic feel and does tend to give less grip than G-10.

The Brawler’s handle is just as functional. The angled handle curves into the palm of the user’s hand. Jimping on the back of the blade offers additional traction. With the blade deployed, the flipper doubles as a finger guard and provides additional hand protection during knife sue.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a four position pocket clip, which means that you can carry this knife tip up or tip down as well as on the right or left handed side of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

The Brawler knife features a flipper along with a SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism. The locking mechanism is a liner lock.

This knife also features a flipper, which enables fast and easy one-handed opening, as well as being fully ambidextrous, which means that it works for left and right handed options. To open a Kershaw SpeedSafe flipper knife, you hold the knife handle vertically in one hand. Then place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper. SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily, and the blade locks into place. Remember to keep your fingers away from the blade edge while you are closing it.

This Brawler knife is equipped with the Kershaw SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism. Kershaw were the first to bring SpeedSafe assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original. The SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s pull back on the flipper. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife form being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. TO open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade smoothly and locks into positon, ready for use. The SpeedSafe was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fishermen, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job site. And no, a SpeedSafe knife is not a switchblade. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblade. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blade DO NOT deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead, the user must overcome the torsion bar’s resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this, SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade. However, due to the complexity and constantly changing nature of these laws and regulations, it is impossible for Kershaw and BladeOps to be aware of every restriction in every location. It is the responsibility of the buyer to investigate and comply with the laws and regulations that apply in his or her specific area.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal plates on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as aluminum, cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the back end of the blade and prevents the blade form closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked positon. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unlocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using a Kershaw folding knife even safer.

 

Kershaw Brawler Pack (Brawler Knife & Flashlight)
Kershaw Brawler Pack (Brawler Knife & Flashlight)

The Specs:

The blade measures in at 3 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.1 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at 7.1 inches long. The Brawler knife weighs in at 3.9 ounces.

 

The Flashlight:

The flashlight that comes in this Brawler pack is constructed of aluminum with a knurled black finish. This is an LED flashlight that is powered by AAA batteries. The flashlight comes with a lanyard and a pocket clip so that you can have it with you at all times.

 

Conclusion:

The Kershaw Brawler Pack is an excellent way to get two quality pieces for one low price. Featuring a Brawler knife for larger tasks and an LED flashlight, this package deal is an excellent value on two quality tools. The knife features stainless steel with black oxide finish, plain edge blade and textured grip handles. Also featuring assisted opening and a reversible pocket clip for discreet EDC options. Pick up one of the Kershaw Brawler Packs to cover all your bases today at BladeOps.

 

Kershaw Exclusive FDE Leek Spring Assist Knife Review

Kershaw Exclusive FDE Leek Spring Assist Knife
Kershaw Exclusive FDE Leek Spring Assist Knife

Kershaw knows that when you are carrying a Kershaw, you are carrying the real deal. They have award winning-technologies and advanced materials that show you that you have value and plenty of it. Kershaw says, “Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.)

The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for everyday carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation and even pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Kershaw says, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”
Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Exclusive FDE Leek Spring Assisted Knife at BladeOps.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of Sandvik 14C28N Stainless Steel. This steel is one of the newer developments in Sandvik’s range of knife steels. It has been created with an optimized chemistry that provides a top grade knife steel with a unique combination of excellent edge performance, high hardness, and good corrosion. This new steel gives the highest achievable hardness without affecting the microstructure of the steel. Because of this, the edge will stay sharp for long periods of time while also maintaining the high stability. This stability means that the blade won’t microchip, fold, or roll, which keeps the quality high while also making re-sharpening easy. This steel can be hardened to a 55-62 HRC, which is the ideal hardness for knives that are going to need super sharp edges while also maintaining good corrosion resistance such as heavy duty pocket knives (such as this one), hunting knives, fishing knives, or even chef’s knives. Sandvik is known for their high quality steels and this is their highest. With this steel, your knife is going to be able to achieve much more than the average pocket knife.

The blade has been finished with a black coating. The coating comes in handy because it prolongs the life of the blade. This is because there is a literal barrier in between the steel and the environment. The already high quality Sandvik steel is going to last longer than ever with this sleek lack finish on it. The wear and corrosion resistance of this knife are significantly increased with a good coating. The black coating also cuts down on glares and reflections which is ideal if you are using this knife in the field. On the flip side, once a coating gets scratched off, the steel is almost worse off than if it had never been coated. This is because it can then get rusted, but it also gets in the way of smooth slices. Unfortunately, most coatings are going to get scratched off over time.

The blade has been carved into a Wharncliffe style blade. The Wharncliffe style blade is often confused with the sheepsfoot blade. This is because they do have some similarities and neither of them are super popular. The Wharncliffe is more like a standard blade shape that has then been turned upside down. This blade shape is going to have a totally flat cutting edge, while the spine of the blade is going to curve gradually until the tip forms a point. While this blade shape is not super popular, it is super useful. It is a great shape for an EDC because it works great in opening boxes and other similar chores. That being said, this blade shape does not make a good chef’s knife shape because it does lack a bely which makes it hard cut through foods. This blade shape does have a very fine point, which can be dangerous if you are using the knife to pierce through materials, especially when it comes to harder materials. Like a clip point blade, the tip of the Wharncliffe is not going to stand up to too much and you will need to be relatively careful with it.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife has been made out of anodized 6061-T6 aluminum. Aluminum is a very low-density metal that is often used in knife making because of how corrosion resistant it. While it is a low-density metal, it does still give the user the heft that you want backing you up without actually weighing you down. The most common type of aluminum is an alloy called the 6062-T6 alloy, which means that the type of aluminum is 6061 and it has been T6 tempered. This alloy has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys.

Anodizing changes the microscopic texture of the surface of the aluminum so that a porous coating or film can be applied that will in turn accept a dye. Anodizing makes aluminum stronger and anodic films are much longer lasting than other surface colorations. Anodized aluminum knife handles are highly scratch resistant and fade resistant. The knife has been anodized a flat dark earth brown.

The knife has stainless steel handle liners which are going to give the knife more durability and resistance to corrosion. The stainless steel is not going to be a lightweight material for a knife, but because it is only the liners that are made out of it, it is just going to add the heft that you want from a knife and not be an annoying weight.

The handle is very simple. There are two portions of jimping right where the blade ends and the handle begins. These two sections are going to give you a little more control when you are cutting with this knife and a little bit better grip when you are holding this knife. The spine of the knife has a skinny neck before it bulges out which will fit nicely in your hand. The belly of the knife has an indent/groove right after the row of jimping that is going to give you a more comfortable place to rest your fingers while also keeping your fingers a little more protected. The belly also bulges out, which will lead to a comfortable grip—even for long periods of time. The butt of the handle does taper in and is rounded. As a bonus, this Exclusive Leek does have a lanyard hole carved into the butt.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is reversible for either tip up or tip down carry, although it can only be attached on the traditional side of the blade. This is useful because it helps the user carry it in the direction that they feel the safest. This is also a disadvantage because the user cannot carry this knife on the side that they feel most comfortable. The pocket clip is kept in place by two screws. All of the hardware on this knife is black, which matches the blade and contrasts with the anodization color of the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife that uses a thumb stud as well as Kershaw’s SpeedSafe opening mechanism.

A spring assisted knife is a knife that is not fully manual and not fully automatic. You have to start opening the knife manually, but that will trigger the opening mechanism and it will finish opening on its own. This is handy because it does not fall under the strict knife laws of the automatic and it will be easier to open than a manual knife.

The thumb stud is a small barrel that sits on the blade right where the handle ends and the blade begins. The thumb stud on this knife is silver, which does stand out against the sleek black blade. This will help you see it no matter what the environment is. The thumb stud is easy to use and can be used with only one hand, which is a major advantage. The thumb stud is extremely simple to get the hang of, which does increase the safety of it. However, one of the biggest drawbacks to the thumb stud is that when you are opening the knife, it does put your fingers directly in the path of the blade. This had resulted in people getting cut on plenty of occasions. Keep this in mind when you are first getting used to opening the knife to avoid getting cut.

SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud. The SpeedSafe works through its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. SpeedSafe® was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fishermen, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job-site.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 7 inches long. This is a lighter weight knife, weighing in at a mere 2.4 ounces. This knife was made in the United States of America, so you can feel patriotic when you use it. You also know that you can trust this knife.

 

Conclusion:

This exclusive to BladeOps variation of the Leek features a FDE anodized handle! The Kershaw Leek series has remained as one of Kershaw’s most popular spring assist knives thanks in part to its ultra-slim profile and versatile blade design. This liner lock designed model features Kershaw’s patented SpeedSafe™ system, which quickly deploys the blade via the ambidextrous spine flipper function or the built-in dual thumb stud feature. The Leek also includes a small slide safety located on lower-rear of the back handle scale to help keep the blade at bay until you’re are ready to use it. This model features a flat dark earth anodized aluminum handle, stainless steel liners, a Wharncliffe style blade in a black finish and a reversible pocket clip designed for tip up or tip down carry on the traditional side of the handle. Come pick up this new knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Method Knife Review

Kershaw Knives design and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin Hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, among plenty of others.

Today we are going to be talking about the new Kershaw Method manual knife.

Kershaw Method
Kershaw Method

The Blade:

The blade on this Kershaw knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This steel is a budget brand of knife steel made in China. This steel is comparable to AUS-8 but does contain a slightly higher carbon content. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is how inexpensive it is; and with its low cost, you do get a lot out of it. However, when it comes to blade steel, you really do get what you pay for, so this steel is not going to stand up to the super steels that are on the block. This is a softer steel, but surprisingly, it holds an edge for long periods of item. And because it is a softer steel, it sharpens easily and you can get a very fine edge on it. One of the other benefits to this steel is that it has a high corrosion resistance. While this steel is not going to stand up as well as a super steel does, it is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. 8Cr13MoV steel has a hardness level of 56-59 HRC.

The blade has been finished with a black-oxide BlackWash finish. A stonewashed finish is created by tumbling the blade in an abrasive material, which is most commonly small pebbles. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A BlackWash is also known as an acid stonewash or even just a black stonewash. This special style of stonewashing is created when the blade has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. A very positive benefit of stonewashed blades is that they are low maintenance and preserve their original look overtime; the stonewashed finish hides the scratches and smudges that occur with use throughout a blades life. The BlackWash is one of the most rugged finishes that you can find.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. The clip point is one of the two most popular blade shapes, designed for piercing, but also making a great all-purpose knife. The shape is formed by having the back edge of the knife run straight from the handle before it stops about halfway up the knife. At this point, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This area is straight and looks as if it has been cut out of the blade. This cut out portion is referred to as the clip. On the Method, the clip is not as dramatic as you can find on other knives, but it still creates a lowered and sharp point. Because this tip is lowered, you are going to have more control over your slices, which means that you can use this knife to perform fine tip work. And because the tip is controllable, sharp, and thinner at the spine, a clip point is going to excel at stabbing. One of the characteristics that make the clip point design an all-purpose blade shape is the large belly that makes slicing a breeze. The clip point really only has one disadvantage, which is because of the narrow tip, the blade does have a tendency to break fairly easily wen used on harder materials or targets.

This knife does sport a plain edge, which helps to make the Method a great everyday knife.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this Kershaw knife is made out of Machined G10.

G-10 is a type of Garolite, which is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. G10 has very similar properties to carbon fiber, but because it is inferior to carbon fiber, it can be made for a much smaller cost. This helps to keep the overall cost of the knife down. To create this knife, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results is very tough, very hard, very lightweight, and very strong. G10 is even considered to be the toughest of all the fiberglass resin laminates and even stronger than Micarta.

This handle is going to be brittle because the fiberglass strands are all arranged in a single direction. While the material is going to be very strong in that direction, as soon as it is stressed in a different way, it is going to start to break apart or chip.

The benefits to a G10 handle are that it is tough, light, and durable. Some of the disadvantages to having a G10 handle is that it is going to be brittle and it does lack elegance and personality.

The handle has more angles than curves. There is a large finger groove which makes this a comfortable knife to hold, even if it is for long periods of time. There is a slight finger guard, but because of the flipper mechanism, it creates a very thick finger guard. This helps to make the Method a very safe knife to use. The spine of the handle is straight until halfway down towards the butt, where it angles down towards the butt.

This knife also features a lanyard hole that has been integrated into the butt. By attaching a lanyard onto this knife, you will be able to more easily pull this knife out of your pocket. When you are just using a pocket clip, because the clip is latched onto your pocket, it can be difficult to pull out. When you are using a lanyard with it, you can pull the knife out even more quickly. Some people feel as if the lanyard actually hinders their ability to withdraw the knife smoothly, so it really all just comes down to personal preference. And, if you would rather not use the clip because you are not right handed, you can solely rely on the lanyard in your other pocket.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on the Method is a single-position pocket clip. It can only be attached on the right side of the handle for tip up carry. The clip is black and kept in place by two black screws. These screws match the rest of the hardware on this knife. This clip will allow the knife to fit securely inside your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife that uses a flipper and the KVT ball-bearing opening system. This knife is also equipped with a liner lock and an inset liner lock. Because it is a fully manual opening knife, you don’t have to worry about any strict automatic knife laws.

The Kershaw KVT ball-bearing system makes one-handed opening of your knife fast and easy—without the need for a mechanical assist. The KVT relies on a ring of “caged” ball bearings that surround the knife’s pivot. Caged means the ball bearings are secured within a ring that surrounds the pivot. It keeps the ball bearings in place, while allowing them to rotate freely When the user pulls back on the built-in flipper, the blade rotates out of the handle as the ball bearings roll in place. KVT makes one-handed opening quick, easy, and smooth as butter.

The Inset Liner Lock is a Kershaw variation on the liner lock that enables us to provide the security of a locking liner in a knife that’s slimmer and lighter. It works because Kershaw insets a sturdy steel plate on the inside of the knife’s handle. It’s a partial liner that is riveted into place in a custom-machined cutout on the interior of the handle. This means Kershaw doesn’t need a complete steel liner on both sides of the handle, which in turn means the knife won’t be as heavy or thick as a fully lined knife. In setting the lock in this way enables Kershaw to make a knife with a slimmer profile that won’t weigh your pocket down, while still providing the strength and security of a locking liner.

The flipper is a small protrusion that comes out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper enables fast and easy one-handed opening as well as being ambidextrous in design. To open the knife, hold the knife handle I none hand with the butt end resting firmly in the palm of your hand. Place your index finger on the highest point of the flipper. Push down strongly and quickly on the flipper. The blade will move out of the handle and lock into place. If you are having troubling moving the blade fully out of the handle, add a slight flip of the wrist to assist you.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking lingers, the handle consists of two metal plates on either side of the blade. Handle scales cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against eh backend of the blade and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using this knife even safer.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.25 inches long. This Kershaw knife measures in at an overall length of 7.25 inches long. This is a super lightweight knife, weighing in at a measly 2.1 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this new knife, they say, “This smaller pocketknife from Kershaw and Jens Anso features a slim, 3-inch blade of 8Cr13MoV in our BlackWash finish. A top swedge adds to its eye appeal. The Method opens quickly, easily, and manually with our KVT ball-bearing system and a built-in flipper. The handle is black—of course. The G10 handle features an unusual machined pattern reminiscent of an architectural truss. It not only looks good, but also offers additional grip security. A custom back spacer features Jens’ large lanyard attachment for those of you who prefer a lanyard, and adds a touch of style even if you’re the lanyard-free type. An inset lock keeps the weight down on the Method while still providing solid blade-lockup security. A single position pocket clip (right, tip-up) enables the knife to sit securely inside your pocket. How do we accomplish all his style and value in a smaller knife? By using the Kershaw manufacturing ‘Method,’ of course.” Pick up this brand new knife today at BladeOps and have your new favorite go-to knife.

 

 

Kershaw Showtime Flipper Assisted Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocketknives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon, United States.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin Hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing Kershaw’s Showtime Flipper Assisted Knife.

Kershaw Showtime Flipper Assisted Knife
Kershaw Showtime Flipper Assisted Knife

The Designer:

This knife was designed by Todd Rexford. Todd says, “My fascination with knives began as a young boy attending numerous gun shows with my father. Every now and again I was able to pick out a knife for myself and soon my collection began to grow. As I got older, sport shooting, hunting, fishing, and automobiles consumed my life. I went to work in my father’s garage and continued on to college in order to obtain my engineering degree.

After college I continued to work in the garage until I moved out of state. It was then my fascination with knife-making began. Starting with simple machinery and hand files (plus lots of blood and sweat), I produced my first knife. From then on the addiction was set in stone. I strive to learn and improve the skills and designs I use on my knives with every piece that leaves the grinder. New materials and procedures are coming out every day and I take a lot of joy in learning everything possible about what works, and what does not when it comes to edged tools.”

 

The Blade

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” This steel has been hardened to an HRC 57–59.

The blade has been finished in two different ways. The first is a black oxide coating and the second is a satin finish. The satin finish is on the flats and the black oxide is on the rest of the blade. The two finishes combine to create a tuxedo-like look. The black oxide is created with a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. The satin finish is created when the manufacturer repeatedly sands the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine sandpaper. Kershaw says that their satin finish will “typically show a faint pattern of vertical lines across the blade. It is a shinier finish than bead-blasting and somewhat lighter in color.”

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point shape. This is the most popular blade shape on the market and for good reason: it is crazy versatile as well as being crazy tough. The spine of the blade reaches from the handle to the point in a slow curve. This curve creates a lowered, or dropped, point, which is where the knife shape got its name. The dropped point is also going to allow you to more easily control the knife, which is why it is a good option for detail work or clean cuts. The dropped point is also broad, which is where the classic strength comes from. The drop point blade shape is more capable of tougher tasks than the blade shapes similar to it, such as the clip point. The drop point also has a very large belly, which is going to make slicing an easy chore—perfect for an EDC. The only drawback to a drop point blade shape is that because of the broad tip, you do lose out on some of your piercing or stabbing capabilities.

The Handle:

The handle is made out of steel that has been coated with a black-oxide coating. The stainless steel is an alloy of iron and carbon; most steel also has additional elements alloyed in it to enhance specific characteristics. Stainless steels contain chromium to enable them to withstand rusting. Stainless steel is going to be incredibly durable as well as being highly resistant to corrosion. However, it is not going to be a lightweight handle material. Also, stainless steel handles can be slippery, which means that the manufacturer has to manually add in etchings, ridges, or grooves to give the user the appropriate levels of grip. The overall pros to a stainless steel knife is that it is strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. The overall cons are that it is going to be heavy and it might not offer you the best grip.

The handle is sleek, just like the rest of the knife. This knife looks like a James Bond outfit, so only the sleekest shape would do. The spine of the handle is straight, with only a slight angle towards the butt of the handle. The belly of the handle does have a large finger guard that is only enhanced by the flipper when the knife is opened. There are two elongated finger grooves on the belly. These will give you a more comfortable grip as well as giving you something to hold onto that will give you a more solid grip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which helps make this knife completely ambidextrous. However, it can only be attached for tip up carry, which is a drawback because that is the more dangerous of the two ways to carry a knife. This is a deep carry pocket clip, which means that the knife is going to stay more secure and snug in your pocket. The knife can also be more easily concealed. The knife is black, which blends in with the back handle scale. The pocket clip is kept in with black screws, although the bulk of the hardware is actually silver.


The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife that has been equipped with a flipper, the SpeedSafe opening mechanism, and a frame lock.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper enables fast and easy one-handed opening. It is also ambidextrous, which means that it is going to work for left and right handers. To open a knife with a flipper and the SpeedSafe mechanism, Hold the knife handle vertically in one hand. Place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper or push outwards on the thumb stud. SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily, and the blade locks into place. Keep fingers away from blade edge while closing.

The SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push pull back on the flipper. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. So how safe is the SpeedSafe? It is very safe. When the user overcomes the resistance of the torsion bar, SpeedSafe assists in opening the knife. Once opened, a locking system secures the blade in position so that it does not close accidentally. When releasing the lock, the blade won’t snap shut due to resistance provided by the torsion bar. Since the torsion bar provides a bias towards the closed position, it will normally hold the blade securely closed. New SpeedSafe users can ensure safe use of the technology by practicing to proficiency.

In a frame lock knife, the knife handle—its “frame”—consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lockbar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lockbar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3 inches long. The handle on this knife measures in at 4 inches even. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 6.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.7 ounces, which is a really good weight for an everyday carry knife such as this one.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “The Kershaw Showtime, designed by Todd Rexford, is not exactly a traditional “gentleman’s” knife. Which means that it could be exactly what the non-traditional gentleman is looking for.

With its 3-inch blade, the Showtime is a convenient size for pocket carry—whether you’re dressed up or down. The blade features a two-toned finish: black-oxide on the grinds and satin-polish on the flats. 8Cr13MoV stainless steel enables the Showtime’s blade to take and hold its edge.

The Showtime opens elegantly with the built-in flipper and our SpeedSafe assisted opening. And there’s no thumb stud to interrupt the clean, streamlined looks.

The handle is steel, black-oxide coated, and contoured for a solid grip. A frame lock ensures secure lock up. The decorative hex pivot enhances the Showtime’s showoff good looks. The pocket clip is reversible for left- or right-handed carry and because it’s also a deep-carry clip, carrying is always discreet.”

You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps and have a very sleek EDC.

 

Kershaw Agile Knife Review

Kai USA Ltd is the leading producer of premier blades in Japan and has been for over 100 years. They also produce houseware, razor blades, and a variety of other products in Japan. They have a commitment to innovation and make sure that they take an innovative approach to every aspect of their product development. That includes research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions.

Kershaw is a sub brand of Kai and just like Kai, they also have a commitment to innovation. Along with this commitment, they have pioneered many of the current technological standards in the knife industry. Kershaw developed an assisted opening mechanism that they called the Speed Safe, and this was the first assisted opening knives on the market. Later on, they introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in their Blade Traders. Lastly, they have recently introduced a Composite Blade technology, which enables them to combine two different types of steel into one blade. This gives the user the best of both worlds with their blade, because they can have a long lasting edge and a very strong spine. Kershaw vows to keep bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife using public.

Kershaw had a founding mission in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. To complete this founding mission, Kershaw knew that they had to build every Kershaw knife to meet the standards of the highest quality. From hunting knives to special collector’s knives, Kershaw has chosen appropriate, high quality materials and has remained dedicated to their intensive craftsmanship. Kershaw has extremely tight tolerances and state of the art manufacturing techniques, which combine to ensure your Kershaw knife with provide you with a lifetime of performance.

One of my favorite things that Kershaw has said is, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back.” That shows the confidence that Kershaw shows in their knives and supports a reputation that they have formed over the decades. One of their newest knives is called the Agile.

 

The Blade:

The steel used on the Agile is 8Cr13MoV. This steel belongs in the Cr series of steel and is a Chinese steel. The series has quite the collection of different formulas, with 9Cr being the strongest and most durable. The 8Cr steel falls closely behind the 9Cr and is most commonly compared to AUS 8 steel. However, between the two steels, AUS 8 is the superior one. 8Cr steel is an average steel that is going to get the job done and provide you with a great blade. However, you do get what you pay for, so the 8Cr steel won’t excel at anything. I would say that the favorite characteristic about 8Cr steel is how inexpensive it is, which drastically reduces the cost of the overall knife. This steel is relatively soft though, so while your edge won’t last as long as some other steel formulas, it will be incredibly easy to sharpen. Another benefit about this steel is that it is very resistant to rust and corrosion.

The finish on this knife is a stonewash finish. This is created by tumbling the steel around with an abrasive material, which is most commonly small pebbles. This is the part of the process where the finish gets its name. This process creates a very textured or rugged look. Then, the steel is removed and smoothed over, then polished. This type of finish reduces glares and reflections, while preserving the overall look of the blade overtime. The best feature that this finish type can boast is how easily it hides scratches and fingerprints that accumulate over time. The stonewash finish cuts down on maintenance time, while providing you with a manly look.

The Agile boasts a modified drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is created by having the unsharpened edge, or back, of the blade slowly curve down until it meets the sharpened edge, creating a lowered point. The lowered point is one of the drop points key characteristics and is also where it gets its name. The lowered point provides the user with ultimate control over their cuts, which is one of the reasons that this blade shape is so loved among hunters. The hunter does not have to worry about the blade piercing any of the organs or damaging the meat of their game that they are skinning. The lowered point also means that the point is broader than you would normally find. This provides you with extra strength behind the tip, so you won’t have to worry about the tip breaking or cracking during the heavier duty tasks that you put this knife against. However, the broad point of this blade shape is also one of its only drawbacks. Because the tip is so broad, it reduces your stabbing capabilities to almost nothing. While this is an advantage in most situations, there are a few situations where this will not be ideal. The drop point blade shape is one of the most versatile blade shapes that you are going to come across while blade shopping. One of the last reasons that it is such a versatile worker is because of its large belly. The large belly spans across the sharpened edge of the blade and provides you with plenty of length for slicing. The drop point blade shape is so loved among the knife communities because it prepares you to take on any of your daily tasks, while also arming you against the unexpected or emergency situations that you are bound to come across.

 

The Handle:

One of the unique features about this knife was that the blade effortlessly blends in with the handle. This is because the handle is also made out of a steel. There are a variety of benefits to having your knife handle be made out of steel, one of them is because the steel is very resistant to corrosion. The steel handle also provides the user with extreme durability. However, there are also a handful of disadvantages to having a steel handle. The first one is that the steel handle has the tendency to be pretty slippery. To combat this and provide you with a solid grip, Kershaw has etched in a bunch of ridges in the palm portion of your hand. This adds texture to the handle, while still ensuring that it is a comfortable handle to use. One of the other common disadvantages to having a steel handle is that it tends to be pretty heavy and will weigh the knife down.

To match the blade on the Agile, the steel handle has also been finished with a stonewash finish. This helps to provide you with a well-worn, rugged look. This handle is two toned though, with a Black Wash finish being the second tone.

One of the most unique features about this knife handle is that it includes three interchangeable back spacer tools. You can choose from a bottle opener, a flathead screwdriver, or a lanyard hole.  On the bottom of the handle, there has been a lanyard hole added. This lanyard hole juts out of the handle slightly, but won’t get in the way. There are a variety of benefits to tying a lanyard onto your knife, but one of best reasons is that it can help to secure your knife against loss. When there is a lanyard hanging off of your handle, you can easily attach your knife onto your belt, or onto a pack strap. This will keep your knife out of the way when you don’t want it, but provide you with easy access when you are ready to use your knife. The bottle opener and flathead screwdriver will also come in handy in a variety of situations.

The finger groove in this knife is more shallow than many of their other knives. However, Kershaw has added a finger guard to protect you from slipping and slicing your fingers or hands. Going towards the butt of the handle, there are two other finger grooves, which make this a very comfortable handle to hold. And the finger grooves will help provide you with a very secure grip in most environments.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is stonewashed to match the rest of the knife and is kept in place by two small screws. All of the hardware is gray or silver to blend in with the rest of the knife. This is a three position pocket clip. When you carry your knife with the tip up, the handle has been drilled to carry it either on the left or right hand side. This helps to make the Agile ambidextrous friendly. However, if you choose to carry your knife with the tip down, the handle has only been drilled to carry it left handedly.

Kershaw Agile
Kershaw Agile

The Mechanism:

The Agile has the Speed Safe assisted opening mechanism. The Speed Safe opening mechanism was first introduced to the knife community by Kershaw. Since the time that it was launched, it has won numerous industry awards along the way. This mechanism uses a torsion bar to help move the blade out of the handle. It also allows you to open the Agile smoothly, and with only one handed. While it runs as efficiently as a switchblade, it is not a switchblade and does not have the strict laws surrounding it that a switchblade would. This knife features a flipper which then becomes the finger guard, or a thumb stud. So you can choose which opening tool you prefer and are most comfortable with. The flipper is a small protrusion that you push down on to add enough pressure to flip the blade out of the handle. The thumb stud is a small piece jutting out of the blade that gives your thumb enough traction to be able to push the blade out of the handle.

This knife also features a Frame Lock. This is a portion of the handle, in the knife frame, that moves behind the blade to lock it into positon during use. This is a safety feature of the knife and will protect you and your hand from your blade shutting in the middle of use. This comes in handy the most when you are performing some of the heavier duty or harder tasks.

 

The Specs:

This knife was designed by Rick Hinderer. The blade on the Agile measures in at 2.75 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 6.25 inches long. When this knife is closed, it measures in at 3.5 inches long. Because of the steel handle, this is a slightly heavier knife and weighs in at 3.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The designer of this knife, Rick Hinderer is known for the practicality of all of his designs. This practicality is proven in the Agile when he takes the practicality to perfection. Rick Hinderer has added three interchangeable back spacers to the knife, each one sporting a different tool. You can choose between a bottle opener, a screwdriver tip, or a lanyard attachment. This provides you with the tools to get a large variety of chores done and you easily attach it will a single hex screw. The Agile even comes with a hex wrench to make the exchange easy and smooth. If you don’t prefer using any of the tools, the knife can easily be used without the back spacer. To create a durable and long lasting design, he started out with a stainless steel that takes and holds a sharp edge. Then, to make it long lasting, he added a stonewash finish to preserve the look of the blade overtime. The stainless steel handle is durable, stain and rust resistant, and provides you with a fantastic grip. The handle is two toned to add depth and character. For convenience, the Agile features a three position pocket clip and Kershaw’s Speed Safe assisted opening mechanism. This knife is a game changer.

Kershaw Cathode Knife Review

Kershaw Cathode
Kershaw Cathode

There really is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Kershaw says, “Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.) The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for everyday carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”
Kershaw was founded in 1974 with the mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Kershaw says, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Cathode which is an assisted opening knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 4Cr14 steel. This is a value priced steel that is incredibly stain resistant. It has been hardened to an HRC of 55-57. This is a Chinese steel that is known for being a budget steel. While it is going to get the job done, it is not going to do much more than that. It will be tough enough, barely. It will be strong enough, barely. It will maintain its edge, but not for long periods of time. The biggest advantage that this steel can give you is the low cost, which does keep the overall cost of the knife down.

The blade has been finished with a stonewashed finish. Kershaw creates this steel by tumbling the blade with ceramic “stones” that give the blade surface a desirable roughened or scuffed look. The look can be pronounced or subtle, but either way, it will preserve the original look of the blade through time. This is because this finish works to hide scratches, smudges, and fingerprints that accumulate overtime. The finish gives the knife a very rugged, well-worn look. For the Cathode, it gives the knife a very futuristic look.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a tanto blade shape. Something unique about the tanto blade shape is that it is not meant to be an all-purpose knife. This blade shape has been designed to do one thing and to do that one thing really well. The tanto blade shape has been designed to pierce through tough materials. This blade shape is similar in style to Japanese long and short swords, which were designed to pierce through armor. In the 1980s, Cold steel revamped the shape and popularized it. The blade shape is made up of a high point with a flat grind. These characteristics are going to lead to a very strong point that is going to excel at stabbing, especially hard materials. The blade does have a lot of excess metal near the tip, which makes it capable of absorbing the repeated impact from piercing through hard materials that would cause most other knives to break. Something else that is unique about this blade shape is that the front edge of the knife shape meets the spine at an angle, instead of the typical curve. This means that the blade is not going to have a belly, because you get the stronger tip instead. While this knife is not going to equip you for any task, it is going to equip you to take on any tough material that needs to be pierced through.


The Handle:

The handle is made out of stainless steel. An alloy of iron and carbon, most steel also has additional elements alloyed in it to enhance specific characteristics. Stainless steels contain chromium to enable them to withstand rusting. Stainless steel is going to provide the knife with high durability as well as being very resistant to corrosion. However, this material is not lightweight and is going to add significant weight to the handle. Because the knife is smaller, it should not be an out of control weight, but it definitely will have some heft to it. That being said, stainless steel does not come with much texture and the manufacturer will have to add in grooves or etchings to provide the knife with significant friction.

This is what the cathode excels at. The manufacturer has carved in plenty of geometric shapes, which provide plenty of texture. The handle has also been stonewashed, which matches the blade well. The handle has a spine that is straight for about 2/3 of the way until it angles down towards the butt. This angle is equipped with a row of jimping that will add even more grip. The belly of the handle has a large finger guard that is only enhanced by the flipper on it. The finger groove that follows is elongated and shallow, but does have a row of jimping to give an even better grip. The knife is more angels than curves, which match the geometric patterns on the handle. The butt is squared off. This knife does not have a lanyard hole.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is reversible for either left or right handed carry. This helps to make the knife fully ambidextrous and most comfortable for anyone who wants to use the knife. The clip can only be attached for tip up carry, which is the more dangerous way to carry the knife. This is because if the knife accidentally comes open in your pocket and you reach into it, you may get cut. The clip is black, which contrasts with the silver steel of the rest of the knife. The clip is kept in place with two screws which match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The clip is long and tapers towards the end.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife, which means that it is not fully automatic or fully manual. You have to begin to open this knife manually before the mechanism engages and it will finish opening automatically. This means that it will open almost as smoothly as the automatic knife, but it does not fall under the strict laws that the automatic knife would. The knife is equipped with a flipper, the Kershaw SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism, and a Frame Lock.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper enables fast and easy one-handed opening. The flipper also makes this knife ambidextrous, which means that it will work easily for either left or right handed people alike. The flipper is also very safe because when you are opening the knife, it keeps your fingers out of the path of the blade, unlike a thumb stud. That being said, it does take a little bit more time to get the hang of opening a knife with a flipper. The first few times, just take it slowly.

The SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism uses a torsion bar to help move the blade out of the handle. It also works to enable smooth and easy one-handed opening. And no, it does not fall under the definition of a switchblade. Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe® assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

In a frame lock knife, the knife handle—its “frame”—consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lockbar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lockbar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.25 inches long with a handle that measures in at 3.25 inches long. The overall length of this knife when it is opened measures in at 5.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at a mere 2.7 ounces which is very lightweight. However, this is a shorter knife, so the weight does make sense.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “In a battery, the cathode attracts the positive charge. One look at Kershaw’s new Cathode tanto and we predict you’ll have a very positive attraction indeed.

The Cathode isn’t ultra-fancy, just ultra-functional. The 2.25-inch tanto blade is great for slicing and piercing. A top grind adds a touch of style, while heavy jimping on the spine ensures a secure grip—especially when you need to choke up on the blade for detail work. The blade opens with a flipper and our SpeedSafe assisted opening, so one-handed opening is a breeze. And, since it’s a flipper knife, it’s perfect for left- or right-handed users.

The handle is stainless steel, cold-forged with a repeating pattern that’s not only looks good, but also enhances grip. The Cathode locks up securely during use thanks to the solid frame lock. Black hardware, including a backspacer with additional jimping and a reversible pocket clip, sets off the Cathode’s all-steel good looks.” So come on over to BladeOps and pick up the Kershaw Cathode today.

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Shuffle II Olive Tanto Folder Knife Review

Kershaw Shuffle II Olive Tanto Folder Knife
Kershaw Shuffle II Olive Tanto Folder Knife

There really is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Kershaw says, “Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.)

The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for everyday carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

Kershaw was founded in 1974 with a mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw has a commitment to innovation and has actually pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), we also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Shuffle II.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” This steel has been hardened to an HRC 57–59.

The blade has been finished with a black stonewash, or BlackWash finish. A stonewashed finish is created when the manufacturer tumbles the blade in an abrasive material, which is normally a ceramic pebble. The finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A BlackWash finish is a blade that has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. This will preserve the original look of the blade overtime.

This knife has thick tanto style blade. The tanto blade curves toward the point of the knife. The blade lacks a belly and instead has a straight edge that then angles up toward the point of the knife. Because of the lack of the belly, this does not make a great utility knife. And because there is a thick point, it can repeatedly pierce into hard materials and not break.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Glass-filled nylon, or GFN. This is a nylon synthetic polymer is reinforced with glass threads for increased strength, stiffness, and dimensional stability combined with excellent wear resistance. This material is almost unbreakable. This is because all of the fibers are arranged in a haphazard manner, which means that it is going to be strong in all directions. This is different from the other fiberglass based materials that have their fibers arranged in a single direction. The other materials (G10, Micarta, and Carbon Fiber), are incredibly strong in one direction but when they are stressed in other directions they begin to break apart or crack. This is the reason that the other materials suffer from being brittle but GFN does not.

GFN is also incredibly cheap because it can be injection molded and texturized in the manufacturing process. This means that the manufacturer can produce many handles at once which does keep the cost down significantly.

The handle is just as beefy as the blade. It has a spine that has a steep curve towards the butt of the handle. The belly of the handle has three finger grooves, the first two are deep and one is built into the blade. The third one is elongated and is more for comfort than a secure grip. The GFN on this handle is an olive green. The butt of the handle has a very wide lanyard hole, which will fit virtually any lanyard that you want it to. This lanyard hole is also where the screwdriver and bottle opener rest.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is black and slightly skeletonized to cut down on weight. It is reversible for either left or right handed carry. However, it can only be attached for tip down carry, which is the safer out of the two ways to carry a knife. The clip is kept in place by two small black screws which match the rest of the hardware on this knife.


The Mechanism:

This is a manual opening knife that has been equipped with a thumb stud and a liner lock.

Because it is a manual opening knife, there is not mechanical assist, such as the popular SpeedSafe, that can be used to open the knife. This knife just opens the classic, old school way. There are a few benefits to this as well as a few drawbacks. First of all, it is going to be easier to maintain because you do not have to worry about a spring like you would with a spring assisted or an automatic knife. This means that you do not have to be as nitpicky when you are cleaning this knife as you would with the other two styles of knives. Of course, to keep everything else in tip-top shape, you should be aware of keeping everything dry and clean. The next advantage is that because there is not mechanism, it is going to be legal in more states, cities, and areas than the other two styles of knives. Of course, you should still know your local knife laws before purchasing or carrying this knife. There are the disadvantages though. The biggest one is that it is not going to be as smooth as a spring assisted or automatic knife. This is because there isn’t a mechanism and you do have to open it completely by yourself. The next major disadvantage is that it is going to take longer to bring into play than the other styles of knives. This is because you have to do everything manually so you cannot click a button and have it open automatically.

The thumb stud is a small barrel that sits where the blade begins and the handle ends. This barrel is used as a way to get a solid grip on the knife that you are trying to open by using your thumb to push the knife open fully. The benefits to a thumb stud is that it is easy to use. It is also comfortable to use and can be used with only one hand. The disadvantages are that the thumb stud does protrude out of the blade, which can get in the way when you are trying to open the knife. The other disadvantage is that the thumb stud does put your fingers in the path of the blade when you are flipping open the knife, which can be dangerous.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lockbar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lockbar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lockbar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using this knife even safer.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.6 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 6.3 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3 ounces, which is lightweight for how large it is.

 

The Extras:

             This knife is also a bottle opener and a screwdriver.

 

Conclusion:

             When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “The Shuffle II offers a bigger blade and longer handle, but with the same multi-functional flexibility and value pricing that made the Kershaw Shuffle such a hit. And now it comes in outdoors-loving olive. The manual opening modified tanto blade is made of 8Cr13MoV, a quality stainless steel known for its ability to hold an edge, strength, and hardness. The heavily textured handle enhances grip, while still being comfortable to hold and use. A liner lock secures the Shuffle II’s blade open in use, but closes easily when its tasks are done. It also features the strong finger contours, handy bottle opener, screwdriver tip, and lanyard attachment that help define the Shuffle. As a utility knife, a work knife, or just a great multi-function pocketknife, the Shuffle II with its handsome olive handle is a perfect choice. It comes complete with a convenient reversible (left/right) pocket clip.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps and have a new favorite crazy tough knife.

 

 

Kershaw Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife Review

Kershaw knives was founded in 1974 and has been making great knives ever since.

Kershaw and their fans know that there is hardly anything like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s how can they back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, it is completely possible to own your Kershaw for a lifetime.

They say, “The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

Kershaw’s founding mission was to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use.  This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. They say, “Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Today we will be discussing the Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. The steel has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC level.

The blade has been finished with a black-oxide BlackWash finish. This means that the blade starts out as a black oxide finish. This is a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. Then, the steel undergoes a black stonewash finish. A stonewash finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or stain finished blade. A black stonewash finish is a blade that has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. A very positive benefit of a stonewashed blade is that they are lower maintenance and preserve the original look overtime, which means that it is going to require little maintenance.

The blade is basically a modified Wharncliffe. The blade does have a large and broad belly, which will help make slicing easier. This is also going to help make this a more versatile knife. The spine of the blade is almost straight until it curves broadly and sharply down to the tip. This creates a very broad tip that will give the knife plenty of strength. However, because the tip is so broad, the user is not going to be able to pierce or stab with this knife. Right where the blade begins and the handle ends, there is a row of thick jimping, which will help you have a more secure grip on the knife.

 

Kershaw Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife
Kershaw Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of steel. Steel is going to be a very durable material that is also very resistant to corrosion. However, it is not lightweight at all. In fact, it is one of the heaviest materials that you are going to come across. Plus, steel can be slippery, so the manufacturer has to incorporate ridges or grooves to provide the required friction. The overall benefits to a steel handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and very resistant to corrosion. The cons to this knife handle material is that it is going to be heavy and it can be slippery.

The handle has also been finished with a black-oxide BlackWash finish. This creates a very rugged and well-worn look to the blade. The BlackWash is darker than the regular stonewash, which does also help to hide scratches and especially helps to hide the smudges that are going to accumulate over time.

The handle is pretty simple. About halfway down the spine begins a row of jimping that extends to the butt of the knife. This jimping is wide, but not as wide as on the blade. It will help give a very secure grip on the knife, especially when you are cutting. There is a finger guard, but because of the flipper, the finger guard is enhanced. Then, there is a deep finger groove, which provides a comfortable grip if you have to use this knife for long periods of time. The spine and the belly both curve slightly toward the butt of the handle.

As an added bonus, there is a lanyard hole on the butt of the handle. Many people like to use the lanyard to hang out of their pockets so that they can remove their knives more quickly than if they were using the pocket clip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on the Spline does contrast with the handle because it is black instead of stonewashed. It is kept in place by two black screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. This is a deep carry pocket clip, which means it is going to sit lower inside of your pocket. This not only keeps your knife more secure, it also lets you more easily conceal the knife. The pocket clip on this knife also works to make this an ambidextrous knife by having the handle pre-drilled to allow for attachment as either a left or right handed carry. However, the handle has only been drilled as a tip-up carrying system.

 

The Mechanism:

             This is a spring assisted knife that uses Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism. Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe® assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original. SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling knives. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

To assist you in opening this knife, Kershaw has equipped it with a flipper. This is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper is ambidextrous by design, because it is on both sides of the knife. It also adds some key safety elements to the knife because once the knife is opened, the flipper acts as an additional finger guard. The biggest safety feature about this knife is that when the user is opening the knife, it keeps the fingers out of the path of the blade. This helps the user prevent any accidental slicing of their fingers. This is also very different than the thumb stud, which is known for making people accidentally slice themselves.

The knife is also equipped with a frame lock. Kershaw explains the frame lock by saying, “In a frame lock knife, the knife handle—its “frame”—consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.”

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.9 inches long with a handle that measures in at 3.9 inches long. The overall length of the Spline measures in at 6.8 inches long when it is opened. This knife weighs in at 4.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

             When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “WHAT’S A SPLINE, ANYWAY? A spline is a numeric function that can define a curve. And Kershaw’s Spline, designed by Les George, is a knife with plenty of curves.

The first curve you’ll notice is the heavy curve of the blade spine. Essentially, the blade is a modified Wharncliffe version of Les’ Mini Harpy, but slimmed down all over to make it a lightweight carry. Les added a top swedge to thin the blade and lowered the tip to enhance its cutting power. The Spline offers a great all-around edge profile with exceptional push-cutting capability.

8Cr13MoV blade steel ensures the Spline’s blade takes and holds its edge, while Kershaw’s BlackWash finish gives it a matte finish and helps hide use scratches—because you are going to use it.

The Spline’s handle is steel, also finished in BlackWash, with curves that fit into your palm and give your index finger a secure curve to lock into while you work. The all-steel handles mean that the Spline also gives you a strong frame lock.

For quick and easy one-handed opening, just pull back on the flipper and the Spline opens with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening. The pocket clip is left/right reversible and there’s a handy lanyard hole.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.