Boker Magnum Passenger Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17t century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and “Boker USA” took control of the trademark until he German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility (Hermann Boker & Co) shutting down in 1983. IN 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA has four different lines of knives: The Boker Premium Collection, the Boker Tradition line, the Boker Plus line which focuses on innovation, and lastly, Magnum by Boker. It is this last line that we will be focusing on today. Magnum by Boker is made for its Price and Performance. When Boker describes this line they say, “The attractive brand from Boker with a great price-performance ration. The concept takes place in Solingen, design, construction, and finishing in overseas. Magnum offers a wide range of knives form all categories, from traditional pocket knives, to hunting knives and modern knives. Latest lock technologies and knife trends also for price-sensitive customers.” Because this line is form Boker, you know that you can rely on it, but because the Passenger is from Magnum, you won’t have to worry about spending a fortune to get a quality pocket knife. Today, we will be focusing on the Boker Magnum Passenger knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440B stainless steel. This steel is part of the 440 series of steels. It is a low cost stainless steel and is the second most rust resistant out of the 440 steels. But, the 400 series are some of the most rust resistant knives that you can find. 440B stainless steel is very similar to 440A but it does have a higher carbon content range, measuring in at .75%-.95%. 440B steel can be hardened to about RC 58 and has good corrosion resistance. It is also a tougher steel than the more commonly used 440C stainless steel. However, 440B steel is inferior to 440C when it comes to edge retention and edge sharpness. But, because it is easier to work with and less brittle, it makes it easier for the manufacturer to machine meaning that it is going to make for a cheaper blade steel. Overall, the 400 series of steel remains one of the most popular choices for knife makers because it is easy to sharpen and it is very resistant to corrosion.

The blade on the Passenger has been finished with a stonewash finish. Personally, the stonewash finish is one of my all-time favorite blade finishes. This is for a variety of reasons ranging from the way that it looks to how low maintenance it really is. The stonewash finish got its name because the steel literally is “washed” with stones. The steel is rolled around with a small abrasive material, which is usually pebbles, to give the steel the rugged and textured look. Once it has been rolled with the pebbles, it is removed and smoothed out. This finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is actually a wide variety of stonewashed finish because the look will vary depending on the shape of the stones used, what the steel looked like originally, and the tumbling motion that the steel will go through. The stonewash finish also hides fingerprints very well, so the blade will not need to be polished as often as blades with different finishes. The stonewash finish is low maintenance and works to preserve the original look overtime.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade style. The clip point and the drop point blades are both very similar and they are also some of the most popular blade styles used today. This is because they are such great all-purpose knives. However, there are some key differences, so not only will I explain what a clip point blade is like, I will go over the differences between the two styles. The shape of the clip point blade has the back, or unsharpened, edge runs straight form the handle and then stop about halfway up the knife. Then, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This “cut-out” area can be curved or straight, but on this particular knife, it is straight. This cut-out area is also referred to as the “clip”, which is where the shape got its name. Clip point knives look as if the part of the knife from the spine to the point has been clipped off. Because of this clipped of portion, the point is lowered, which provides more control when you are using the knife. Because the tip is controllable, sharper, and thinner at the spine, a clip point knife lends itself to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. One of the reasons that this blade shape is so versatile is because of the large belly area that makes it perfect for slicing.

The differences between a drop point and a clip point really just comes down to the tip. On the drop point, the tip is also lowered, but much broader. Because of this, a drop point is much stronger and can take on harder tasks, but you aren’t going to have stabbing capabilities with it. A clip point has a lowered tip, but because it is thinner and sharper, you have fantastic stabbing capabilities. On the other hand, the tip is narrow and weak; more prone to snapping off. This weakness is really the blades only disadvantage.

The blade on the Passenger is a plain edge. This makes the knife capable of taking on a very large variety of tasks. With the plain edge, you will be able to get a finer edge and it will be easier to sharpen than a serrated blade. However, you will also have to sharpen your blade more often than if it were a serrated edge.

 

The Handle:

Boker Magnum Passenger Knife
Boker Magnum Passenger Knife

The handle on this knife is made out of G-10 handle scales with stainless steel liners. G-10 is a very durable reinforced material that is made up of fiberglass soaked in resin, then highly compressed and baked. This process makes it impervious to liquid and physically stable under extreme temperature fluctuations. G-10 is most commonly black, but can come in different colors. On the Passenger, the G-10 does come in black. This material is typically very non-slip. Many knife lovers love to use G-10 because of a variety of reasons. For starters, G-10 is very shapeable which means that it is more comfortable and will feature grippable handle shapes. Secondly, it gives you very similar traction whether in wet or dry environments, and will give you a very solid grip in rough conditions. Another reason that G-10 is such a fantastic knife handle material is that you can get different texture finishes that allow for higher or lower grip handles, depending on the expected use conditions. Also, because of the lower weight of G-10, the Passenger is going to be a lighter knife and not weigh you down.

The handle has ribbing down the palm of the handle to give you phenomenal grip in any environment. There is a finger guard and a deep finger groove to give you a solid grip and keep your fingers safe. In the finger groove, there is jimping to give you an even more secure grip. The spine of the handle slopes down slowly, fitting perfectly in your hand, and giving you a comfortable grip for long periods of time.

The liners are made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but it is not particularly lightweight. Because the stainless steel is just used for the liners, it won’t weigh down the knife enough for it to be a hassle. And, because of the heftiness behind the stainless steel liners, your knife is going to be noticeably stronger and more durable than it would have been without.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional ide of the handle. The pocket clip is silver, with a satin finish and held in place by three small screws. The clip and the screws match the rest of the hardware on the Passenger knife.

 

The Mechanism:

The Boker Magnum Passenger knife features a flipper mechanism. Flipper knives offer another way to smoothly open both spring assisted and manual folding knives. The flipper is normally located on the spine of the knife as part of the blade. The blade is deployed by using the index finger to pull back on it. This not only keeps your hands at a safe distance from the blade but gives you an added finger guard once opened. The flipper in most cases will actually swing around and end up underneath the knife continuing to offer protection from accidental knife injuries. If you are concerned the safety of your thumb, a flipper will be more to your liking than a thumb stud. The flipper is a relative newcomer on the one-hand-opening scene, at least in terms of popularity. While studs and holes enlist a thumb to open the knife, a flipper employs an index finger, and the feature is naturally ambidextrous. Some people do argue that deploying a flipper reliably takes a bit of practice, and that is pretty true.

The blade is secured with a liner lock. Liner locks are one of the more common mechanisms that you are going to find on a folding knife. This knife was invented in the early 80s by knife-maker Michael Walker. The liner lock functions with one section of the liner angled inward toward the inside of the knife. Form this position, the liner is only able to go back to its old positon with manual force, therefore locking it in place. The tail of the liner lock, which is closest to the blade, is cut to engage the bottom of the blade under the pivot. If the user wants to disengage the lock, they must manually move the liner to the side, away from the blade bottom.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.4 inches long. The G-10 handle on the Passenger measures in at 4.6 inches. The overall length of the knife measures in at an even 8 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The Passenger is one of many new mid-year models released by Boker this summer. Each liner lock designed model features a stainless steel blade that is seamlessly deployed with the spine flipper function and a gentle flick of the wrist and the stonewashed finished nature of the blade is great for hiding wear marks from all the tasks you will be able to accomplish with this workhorse. The tough blade made of 440B is going to be able to take on those harder tasks while always keeping its sharp edge. The Boker Magnum line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide impressive quality and outstanding price-performance ratio. This model features black G-10 handles, stainless steel liners, a clip point style blade in a stonewash finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a powerful pocket knife that is designed for demanding work. Pick up your Passenger knife today at BladeOps.

Piranha Blue Mini-Guard Knife Review

Piranha Knives specialize in excellent automatic knives. All Piranha products are made in the United States of America and feature superb design and craftsmanship. They use modern technology and cutting edge materials to make a highly quality automatic knife. They have a wide variety of different models and every single one of them would be a great option for you. Also, Piranha Knife Company offers you a lifetime limited warranty—which is unusual in the industry and a true testament to their willingness to stand by their high quality knives.

Today, we will be going over their Blue Mini-Guard Automatic knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM-S30V steel. This is an American made powder steel that is produced by Crucible and developed specifically for knives and more specifically for the high end premium pocket knives and expensive kitchen cutlery. Crucible works alongside knife guru Chris Reeve to produce this excellent steel. S30V steel is a martensitic powder-made stainless steel. Martensitic is a specific type of stainless steel alloy. This premium steel is a great balance of the three qualities you want out of your knife steel: edge retention, hardness, and toughness. To create such a high quality steel, Crucible has added Vanadium into the steel, which is where the V in the name comes from. The introduction of vanadium carbides brings extreme hardness into the steel alloy matrix. When the steel first came out, it came with a premium price. But now that other companies are producing similar steels, the price has dropped. Now, you can get a high quality steel for a lower price. One of the only drawbacks to this type of steel is that it is hard to work with and sharpen. This does increase the cost slightly, because the manufacturers have to work with it, and if you are a beginner sharpener, I wouldn’t try to sharpen this steel. If you are looking for a more workable steel with the same qualities, S30V steel does have a better looking brother, S35VN steel, which has added Niobium to make it easier for the manufacturers to work with. At this day, S30V is a very common steel and it is one of my favorites.

The blade on the Blue Mini-Guard knife has been finished with a black coating. Coatings provide corrosion resistance, but they will scratch off eventually, and at that time, the blade will have to be re-coated. The coated finish reduces the reflections and glares while also reducing wear to the blade. Coatings can work to prolong the life of a blade by preventing corrosion or rust. Quality coatings do add cost to a knife, but they also provide you with more corrosion resistance, less reflection, and require less maintenance. This black finish is a matte finish.

This knife is a classic stiletto style design. The stiletto style of blade is a dagger with a long slender blade and needle-like point, which has been designed as a primarily as a stabbing weapon. The stiletto’s blade narrow cross-section and acuminated tip reduces friction upon entry, allowing the blade to penetrate deeply. Over time, the term stiletto has been sued as a general descriptive term for a variety of knife blades exhibiting a narrow blade with minimal cutting surfaces and a needle-like point. The stiletto was first developed in Italy, dating back to the late 15th century, and is thought to be a development of the rondel dagger, which is a needle pointed weapon with a narrow blade designed primarily for thrusting, although it does possess cutting edges. The blade shape was later adopted throughout Italy as the favored offensive thrusting knife of the medieval assassin. The stiletto was even preferred by assassins as it was silent, easily concealed inside a sleeve or jacket, and featured a blade capable of easily penetrating the heavy leather and clothing of the day. The stiletto remained a popular weapon of criminals or political assassins form the 16th through the end of the 1th century, especially in France, Corsica, and Italy. The stiletto later followed the first wave of Italian immigration to the city of New Orleans, Louisiana during the mid-19th century, where the knife became a popular weapon of gamblers, gang members, and assorted assassins. This style of knife was actually involved in so many stabbings that the city passed an ordinance in 1879 outlawing the sale of any stiletto within the city limits. During World War One, there became a new need for stabbing weapons, which is when the dagger and stiletto reappeared. During the Second World War, there was another resurgence of the stiletto in the form of combat knives. During the 1950s, large numbers of folding switchblades with locking blades were imported from Italy to the United States. These Italian switchblades were commonly referred to as stilettos, since most incorporated a long, slender blade tapering to a needle-like point. These stiletto switchblades were designed primarily as an offensive weapon, optimized for thrusting rather than cutting. This was unlike most of the US switchblade designs of the day because they had a locking device, which locked the blade in the open position.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a spear point style blade. The spear point is similar to the needle-point blade, because they are both good for piercing. But, the spear point is a little stronger and it does contain a very small belly that can be sued for slicing. This style of blade is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center lien of the blade’s long axis. A spear point knife is a great choice for the knife enthusiast who is looking for a good balance between piercing and slicing ability. It successfully combines the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade, while maintaining some of the belly that is used for slicing.

The blade on this knife does have a plain edge. The main difference between plain edge blades and serrated blades really comes down to how you use your blade. Plain edges excel at push cuts, which is where you push the edge against the thing that you are trying to cut. Some good examples of this style of cuts are when you are shaving or whittling. Plain edges are best when you need precision and accuracy. Plain edge blades excel at tasks such as carving, dressing an animal, or peeling an apple. The other nice advantage of plain edge blades is their versatility. The plain edge is going to give you cleaner cuts than a serrated edge. With a plain edge, you are going to be able to get a finer edge on your blade and it will be easier to sharpen because you don’t have to worry about the teeth. However, because it is a plain edge, you are going to have to sharpen your blade more often than if it were a serrated blade.

Piranha Blue Mini-Guard Knife
Piranha Blue Mini-Guard Knife

The Handle:

The handle is made out of T6-6061 anodized aluminum. Aluminum is a very low-density metal used in knife making, and it is extremely corrosion resistant. Since it is such a soft metal, it is primarily used in knife handles and hard anodized for aesthetics and wear resistance. A fun fact about aluminum is that it is the most abundant metal in the earth’s crust. The alloy of aluminum used is T6-6061, which means the type of aluminum is 6061, and it is T6 tempered. T6-6061 Aluminum has one of the highest yield and tensile strengths of all aluminum alloys. Because this aluminum is used extensively in aircraft, it is often referred to as “aircraft aluminum”. Aluminum alloy is much cheaper to machine and produce than Titanium, and is lighter, weaker, and less resistant to wear. For the most part, Aluminum is an inferior metal to Titanium aside from its lightness. Aluminum is a nonferrous metal. One of the benefits of having an aluminum handle is that it gives your knife as solid feel, without all the extra weight. Some of the drawbacks to your knife handle being made out of aluminum is that if you use your knife quite a bit during colder months, you will probably find the handle uncomfortable cold given its conductive properties. This material is also susceptible to scratches and dings. Lastly, unless it is property texturized, the handle can be fairly slippery. When it is properly texturized, an aluminum handle can provide a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use.

The handle on the Mini-Guard has been anodized. Anodizing is an electrochemical process that converts the metal surface into a decorative, durable, corrosion-resistant anodic oxide finish. Aluminum is ideal suited to anodizing. The anodic oxide structure originates from the aluminum substrate and is composed entirely of aluminum oxide. This aluminum oxide is not applied to the surface like paint or plating, but is fully integrated with the underlying aluminum substrate, so it cannot chip or peel. Anodized finish has made aluminum one of the most respected and widely used materials today. The handle on the Mini-Guard has been anodized a deep blue.

To provide you with a secure grip, there is ribbing all around the handle.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only. This pocket clip is made out of titanium and has been anodized black. This clip is kept in place by a large screw and is a deep carry pocket clip. Titanium offers you one of the best rust resistance of any metal.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife with a plunge lock. Automatic knives are also known as switchblades, which is a type of knife with a sliding blade contained in the handle which is opened automatically by a button. Automatic knives have strict laws surrounding them in most states and cities, so know your local laws before your purchase and carry this knife. You are responsible for knowing your laws and the consequences surrounding them.

A plunge lock is long wearing and mechanically robust. A spring pushes a hardened, taper cylinder into a slot in the tang preventing closing. When the blade is stowed, the rounded plunger head makes contact with another slot in the tang acting to hold the blade closed. The plunger’s double duty is an elegant solution, negating the need for a ball detent. The mechanism is housed in the nested bolster plates for strength and longevity.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Piranha Blue Mini-Guard measures in at 2.9 inches long with the handle measuring in at 3.7 inches long. The overall length of the knife measures in at 6.6 inches long. The knife weighs in at 1.8 ounces and is made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

Piranha knives have certainly made their mark in the automatic knives arena for their tight tolerances, consistent quality and competitive pricing. Thanks to their unique custom-like anodized handle colors and a multitude of knife models with their respective blade variations, Piranha can most certainly appeal to every knife user. All models feature all-stainless steel hardware in addition to a titanium pocket clip. The Mini-Guard stems for the same style as the Bodyguard series but in a smaller size. This knife showcases aircraft grade aluminum handle scales that have been chamfered, rounded and polished for a comfortable and ergonomic feel and offers a classic stiletto style design coupled with modern materials. This knife puts a contemporary spin on the classic stiletto and fires hard and fast. This model, the 7BTBLU, features a marbled blue handle and a single-edged spear point style blade in a black finish and the pocket clip is designed for tip up carry only.  This is a durable, solid knife that is going to make the perfect self-defense knife. The marbled blue handle is classy and sleek, which will never go out of style. Pick up your Blue Mini-Guard Automatic Knife with an S30V Black Blade today at BladeOps.

Bear OPS Manual Folder Knife (Zytel Handle) Knife Review

Bear and Son has a rich family tradition in knife making. They have a skilled and experienced work force capable of performing many of the extra hand operations that go into the making of their products. The Bear & Son factory is unique: it is full self-contained. While some companies only assemble parts brought form various suppliers and put their names on the product, Bear & Son does everything in-house from building their own blanking dies to heat treating, grinding and assembly, and hand finishing their products. It is these steps that ensure that Bear & Son Cutlery is of excellent quality and a real value for both the dealer and consumer.

This commitment to excellence has just improved due to rich family tradition in knife making craftsmanship not only by management, but also their experienced work force. Their customers and consumers can look for even more new and exciting products as a result. Their ongoing commitment is to make them in America and make them affordable. They want everyone to be able to afford what they are proud to make.

Bear OPS Knives is a new subsidiary of Bear & Son Cutlery. Because they take their obligation of duty to our country very seriously; their goal is to manufacture the best tactical knives available for those who serve. Bear OPS knives are made with Operational Precision for Superior Tactical Knives, or OPS, that can be relied on for any situation.

Bear OPS only uses USA manufactured parts, material, and a dedicated workforce. Bear OPS uses only premium 154CM and CPM S30V steel for their blades and use their own heat treat, waterjet, and CNC grinders to finish the blades. Bear OPS is designed and engineered by the experts in their R&D and their in-house tool makers. You will always be proud to carry a knife from Bear OPS.

Bear & Son Cutlery has already and will continue to manufacture the “best knives made in the USA” that will now include tactical and military knives made in the USA. Come pick up your favorite Bear OPS knife today at BladeOps.

Today we will be discussing the Bear OPS manual folder knife that features a Zytel handle.

 

Bear OPS Manual Folder Knife (Zytel Handle)
Bear OPS Manual Folder Knife (Zytel Handle)

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of CPM S30V steel. This steel is made by Crucible, which is a United States based company. This steel was designed specifically for knives, which means that you are going to get all of the best qualities for your knife out of this steel. It is often used for high-end premium pocket knives and expensive kitchen cutlery. S30V steel has excellent edge retention and resists rust effortlessly. Crucible added in vanadium carbides which work to bring extreme hardness into the steel alloy matrix. When you look at this steel dollar for dollar, it is regarded as one of the finest knife blade steels with the perfect balance of edge retention, hardness, and toughness, which is one of the hardest balances to get out of a blade steel. There is only one drawback to this steel: this steel does prove to be hard to work with, which does increase the overall cost of the steel. Also, the steel is going to be tricky to sharpen, because of how hard it is to work with.

The blade has been finished with a bead blasted finish. This finish is created when ceramic beads are blasted at the steel at a high pressure. This creates an even gray finish. A blasted finish also reduces reflection and glares due to its even matte surface. The blasting does create an increased surface area and micro abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. A blasted blade, even from stainless steel can rust if left in a wet or humid environment.

The blade has been carved into a clip point blade shape. The clip point blade shape is a great all-purpose blade as well as being one of the most popular blade shapes in us today. While the Bowie knife is the most common place you are going to find this blade shape, it is popular on almost any blade style and you will find it on many pocket knives and fixed blades alike. The shape is formed by having the back edge of the knife runs straight form the handle and then stop about halfway up the knife. At this point, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This area looks to be “cut-out” and is curved. This section is also referred to the clip, which is how the shape got its name. Clip point knives look as if this section have actually been clipped out. The point on this knife is lowered, which means that you are going to have more control when you are using this knife. And because the tip is controllable, sharper, and thinner at the spine, a clip point knife will be more equipped to stabbing. The clip point has less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal because of the shape. One of the reasons that this blades shape is so versatile is because the blade has a large belly that is ideal for slicing. There is really only one disadvantage to the clip point blade, because of the narrow tip this blade point does have a tendency to be weak and break pretty easily. The drop point and the clip point blades are often confused with each other, because they are the two most popular blade shapes on the market today. They are each versatile and great for a large variety of purposes. The biggest difference between the two is that the drop point does have more strength behind the point, however, because of how broad they are, you do lose out on most of your piercing abilities. The clip point has a finer point, so you cannot take on harder tasks, but you do have your piercing abilities. These are both great blade shapes, but you have to choose which of the advantages you want out of your knife.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of Zytel. Zytel is a type of Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon, which is a thermoplastic material which was introduced by American chemical company, DuPont. Zytel is very strong, very resistant to bending, resistant to abrasion, and is practically indestructible. All of these things, and it is even cheap.

In this material, the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout the material, which means that it will be strong in all directions. Zytel is very similar to G-10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, except that those materials have the fiberglass strands aligned in a single direction. That is why the other materials are brittle, but Zytel is almost indestructible.

Many people did not warm up to this material because they said it felt cheap and even hollow. Plus, Zytel does provide less grip than G-10 does.

This material is inexpensive because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and texturized in a multitude of ways in the production process. All of these characteristics leads to high volume manufacturing and a low cost.

The handle is simple and completely black. The spine of the handle curves to fit inside of your palm perfectly. The bottom of the handle has three curves and finger grooves that span the length of the handle. The first one is the deepest and least elongated. It gives you a comfortable place to rest your fingers. Lastly, there is a slight finger guard to protect your fingers from getting cut if you do slip.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual folding knife that sports a dual thumb stud and features a liner locking mechanism.

The thumb stud is one of the most common ways that a knife can be opened with just one hand. The thumb stud replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives. This mechanism is also very straightforward to use—you hold the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud, and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open. And because the stud does extend through the blade, which means that it is protruding on both sides, the knife is ambidextrous and can be opened with either hand. One of the only drawbacks is that because it does protrude from the blade, some people feel like it gets in the way of their tasks. The other drawback to a thumb stud is that when you are using this opening mechanism, it does put your fingers very close to the blade, you just have to be careful when you are getting used to the thumb studs.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade locking systems. The handle is made of two plates on either side of the blade. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade and prevents the blade form closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angels toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked positon. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner provides a secure and convenient way to make using this knife even safer.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2 7/8 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4 3/8 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.5 inches long. This knife was made in the United States of America.

 

The Pros of the Bear OPS Manual Folder Knife:

  • The S30V steel is strong and tough.
  • The steel maintains an edge for long periods of time.
  • The steel has the perfect balance between hardness, toughness, and edge retention.
  • The steel also has the ability to resist rust easily.
  • The bead blasted finish creates an even grey finish.
  • The clip point blade shape is all-purpose.
  • The clip point blade features a large belly.
  • The clip point blade excels at piercing.
  • This knife was made in the United States of America, so you can be proud to own, carry, and use it.
  • The Zytel handle is strong.
  • The Zytel handle is tough.
  • The Zytel handle requires zero maintenance.
  • Zytel is an inexpensive material, so it will keep the overall cost of the knife down.
  • The handle fits comfortably in your hand.
  • The thumb stud is ambidextrous.
  • The liner lock makes sure that you don’t need to worry about your blade closing in the middle of use.
  • The liner lock is a secure and convenient way to make using this knife even safer.

 

The Cons of the Bear OPS Manual Folder Knife:

  • The steel is hard to work with, which means that it will be hard to sharpen.
  • The bead blasted finish creates micro abrasions, which means that it can rust overnight if left in the worst environment—so keep up on maintenance.
  • The clip point blade is prone to breaking.
  • The Zytel handle does have a cheap plastic feel to it.
  • The Zytel handle is not going to provide as much grip as G-10 would.
  • Some people feel that the thumb stud gets in the way of things.

 

Conclusion:

The Bear OPS Bear OPS MC-110-B7-P Manual Folder Knife features a S30V modified clip point plain edge blade with a bead blast finish. The blade opens easily with the ambidextrous thumb stud.   Built by Bear OPS (a division of Bear and Son Cutlery) this knife features a black Zytel handle that is very comfortable in the hand. The knife opens smooth and locks tight into the open position with a liner lock. This knife is tough, durable, and you know that you can rely on this knife. Pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

Smith & Wesson Small SWAT Spring Assisted Knife Review

Horace Smith and Daniel Baird Wesson formed a partnership in 1852 to manufacture a firearm that could fire a fully self-contained cartridge. Form the beginning, Smith and Wesson firearms were noted for their innovative design, high quality production and reliability. The accomplishments of Smith and Wesson are numerous and its contributions to the history of firearms are vast. Smith and Wesson was an industry leader in 1852 when it was first founded and continues to lead the world today with innovations into the 21st century.

Smith and Wesson first started manufacturing knives in 1974. As a company, Smith and Wesson is heavily focused on the safety and security business, and knives were an obvious step form their core activities. Smith and Wesson knives used to be manufactured in house, although for a period of time Vermont Cutlery Co of West Rutland VT made knives for Smith and Wesson. Today, Taylor Cutlery makes and sells Smith and Wesson knives.

A lot of the Smith and Wesson knives made today are manufactured overseas and cater to the police and military. Smith and Wesson provides a lot of rescue, tactical, automatic and assisted open knives at affordable prices.

Smith and Wesson’s Military and Police knives are some of the more popular Smith and Wesson knives made today. These are large folding pocket knives outfitted with Multipurpose Assisted Generational Innovative Cutlery (MAGIC) technology, a proprietary technology developed by the engineers at Taylor Brands. These knives come in a variety of finishes including a flat black Teflon coating, urban camo, or a kind of desert finish.

Today we will be talking about the Smith and Wesson Small SWAT Spring Assisted Knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 4034 stainless steel. This steel is a very soft steel, which means that it will be easy to sharpen, although you will have to sharpen it pretty often because it does not keep its edge for long periods of time. Because this blade is made out of 4034, you can assume that this Smith and Wesson knife is made in China. This steel is not brittle. One of the biggest advantages of this blade steel is that it is very inexpensive. This means that you are getting a blade that can take on quite a bit for a low cost and a little bit of maintenance.

The blade has been finished with a bead blast finish. This finish is created by using abrasive ceramic beads. The beads are then blasted at the steel at a high pressure, which results in an even gray finish. A bead blasted finish reduces the reflections and glares due to its even matte surface. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. A blasted blade, even form stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in a very humid environment, so you will need to make sure that you keep your knife dry before you put it away.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade style. This is the most popular blade style that you can find in the market today, and for good reason: it is tough, durable, and all-purpose. The blade shape is formed by having the spine of the blade curve straight from the handle to the tip. The belly of the knife curves upwards to meet the point. The point of the drop point blade is lowered, which means that you will have more control over your cuts and slices. The lowered point is also extremely broad, which gives you the strength that drop point knives are known for. The strength of the point is also what makes this blade shape a great option for tactical or survival knives. One of the reasons that this blade is so versatile is because it has a large belly that is perfect for slicing. One of the most common tasks that you will be performing with this knife is slicing, so you will be perfectly prepared to take on almost any task with this knife. Drop points only have one major drawback: because of the broad tip, you do lose out on most of your tabbing or piercing capabilities. The drop point blade shape and the clip point blade shape are often confused with each other; the biggest difference is the tip. The clip point does have a fine and thin tip, you do have full piercing capabilities, but it is more prone to breaking. And while the drop point does not give you the piercing capabilities, you do need to remember that it has the famous drop point blade shape strength.

This knife features a plain edge, which is prepares you to take on a wider variety of tasks. The plain edge also gives you cleaner cuts and is easier to sharpen than a serrated blade would be.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of aluminum. Aluminum is a very durable material especially when used for knife handles. It is considered a low density metal, which means that it is lightweight, but still provides for a nice, hefty feel t the knife without weighing the knife down. Aluminum knife handles have extreme tensile strength. One of the drawbacks to an aluminum handle is that it has high conductive properties, so it will be cold to hold, especially if you are using it during the winter months.

The handle has textured inlays to give you the best grip that you can have. The aluminum parts of the handle are silver and the grip inserts are black. There is plenty of jimping that gives you the best grip possible while working with this knife.

The ergonomics of this knife create a very comfortable grip, even if you are holding it for long periods of time. The spine of the handle has a slight curve and the bottom of the handle has an elongated and shallow finger groove. The butt of the handle is flared out, which does give you more control over the knife.

Lastly, the butt of the handle does have a lanyard hole carved into it, which is ideal for keeping your knife on you at all times without it getting in the way. Plus, when you have your lanyard hanging out of your pocket, you are able to withdraw your knife more quickly.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is a deep carry pocket clip, which means that it will be easier to conceal in your pocket. Plus, the deep carry pocket clip will keep the knife more snugly and more securely in your pocket throughout the day. This means that no matter how much you move around; it will still stay secure. The pocket clip is stainless steel, and kept in place by two small screws that match the rest of the silver hardware on this knife. The pocket clip is a tip down pocket clip.

 

Smith & Wesson Small SWAT Spring Assisted Knife
Smith & Wesson Small SWAT Spring Assisted Knife

The Mechanism:

This knife is a spring assisted knife that uses Smith and Wesson’s MAGIC technology. This knife features both a thumb stud and a spine trigger and sports a liner locking mechanism.

The MAGIC (which stands for Multipurpose Assisted Generational Innovative Cutlery) works when you deploy the blade using the thumb stud or the flipper, which activates the spring and automatically flips your blade open. Because this is a spring assisted knife, you don’t have to worry about the strict automatic knife laws. But, because laws are always changing, always be sure to know your local knife laws.

A thumb stud is just about the most common one-hand-opening feature. A thumb stud essentially replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives. The principle is pretty straightforward—you hold the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open. Knives with a thumb stud usually incorporate a locking mechanism of some sort. One of the biggest drawbacks is that when you try to open this knife, your fingers do have to get pretty close to the blade. There have been plenty of cases where the user has cut their fingers when trying to open their knife with a thumb stud. Just be aware of what you are doing when you open this knife.

This Small SWAT knife enlists a liner locking mechanism. The liner lock is the most common to today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal plates on either side of the blade. Handle scales cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the back end of the blade and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked positon. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into he handle.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this Smith and Wesson knife measures in at 2.8 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 3 inches long. When the Small SWAT knife is opened, it measures in at 5.8 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2.3 ounces.

 

The Pros of the Small SWAT Knife:

  • The blade will be easy to sharpen.
  • The steel is very inexpensive, which keeps the cost of the knife down.
  • The blade has an even gray finish.
  • The knife is very lightweight, which will make it easy for you to have with you at all times.
  • The drop point blade has a strong point that is sharp and controllable.
  • The drop point blade has plenty of cutting edge, which is perfect for slicing.
  • The pocket clip is a deep carry clip, which allows you to more easily conceal your knife while also keeping it secure.
  • The MAGIC technology works quickly and efficiently.
  • The thumb stud is easy to use.
  • Because this knife is spring assisted, you don’t have to worry about the strict laws surrounding automatic knives, but it still opens quickly and efficiently.
  • The liner lock is secure and convenient.
  • The aluminum handle is strong and durable.
  • The aluminum handle is light, but still hefty enough to take on most tasks.
  • The aluminum handle is extremely resistant to corrosion.

 

The Cons of the Small SWAT Knife:

  • The steel is soft, so it will lose its edge quickly.
  • A blade with a blasted finish can rust overnight if it is left in the wrong style of environment.
  • The drop point blade is not as sharp as the clip point.
  • The drop point blade is less suitable for piercing.
  • The pocket clip on this knife is also a tip down pocket clip.
  • The thumb stud puts your fingers near the blade, so you do have to be careful when you are using it.
  • The aluminum handle is cold to hold.
  • The aluminum handle can be a little bit slippery.
  • The aluminum handle is going to be susceptible to scratches and dings.

 

Conclusion:

The Smith & Wesson SWAT Spring Assist knife snaps out amazingly fast and locks up tight. Using the M.A.G.I.C. (Multipurpose Assisted Generation Innovative Cutlery) system, this knife opens as fast as an auto knife. Built with a Drop point plain edge blade with a satin finish and a T6061 aluminum handle with grip inserts, the SWAT is an amazing knife that is perfect for daily carry. The blade opens using either the thumb stud or you can press the spine trigger and snap the blade right out. The safety is built right on the side of the handle for easy access. Comes with a pocket clip. The SWAT series features three size knives; this model is the small. The knife boasts a strong liner lock and tip down pocket clip. Pick up this fantastic knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

Boker Plus Sulaco Knife Review

Boker traces its origin to the 17th century as a tool maker in Germany graduating to swords and blades by the 1800s. The company claims it was producing 2000 sabres a week by 1839 for use in various wars. By the 1860s the company had fractured with a branch of the family emigrating to North America and setting up plants in Canada, New York, and Mexico. The German and North American factories produced similar knives and used the “Tree Brand” trademark. This continued until World War II when the Solingen factory was destroyed and Boker USA took control of the trademark until the German factory was rebuilt in the 1950s. In the 1960s and 1970s the company changed hands several times, with the New York facility shutting down in 1983. In 1986, Boker reacquired the rights to the American brand and Boker USA was started in Denver, Colorado for US production.

Boker USA actually has four lines of knives that they produce. The first one is the Boker Premium Collection that focuses on high-quality, handmade sports, and collectible knives form the Boker manufacture in Solingen. The next line is the Boker Tradition—these are handmade hunting and leisure time knife from the Boker knife manufacture in Buenos Aires. Third is Magnum by Boker which focuses on Price and Performance—this line focuses on attractive sports and leisure time knife for the daily use and collectible swords. The last line is the Boker Plus line. This is the line of knives that produces the Sulaco knife. This line is in close cooperation with international acknowledged experts form military, police, and security to develop and test tactical knives for the professional user. Boker Plus knives are innovative in terms of function and design, as well as guaranteed for everyday use. Conception, design, and construction of these knives are carried out in Solingen, and production takes place in Europe, the USA, and Asia.

Today we are going to focus on the Boker Sulaco Titanium Folder knife with a stonewashed blade.

Boker Plus Sulaco Knife
Boker Plus Sulaco Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 440C stainless steel. 440C is a 400 series stainless steel and it is the highest carbon content from 400 stainless steel series. It is usually heat treated to reach hardness of 58-60 HRC. It is a bearing steel and is used to make knife blades. This is an upper mid-range steel that was once considered the high-end in US knife steels, 440C is a good all-around steel that has now been overshadowed by many of the newer super-steels on the block, although that does not take away from the qualities that it still possesses. This is a stainless steel that is most commonly found on mass-manufactured pocket knives and is so popular because it is a solid, affordable, all-around choice. This steel is reasonably tough and wear resistant, but it excels most at how stain resistant it is. This steel does hold an edge better than its 400-sereis counterpart 420HC but, you do lose some of its corrosion resistance. This steel can easily be sharpened. It does have the highest levels of carbon and chromium in 400 series of stainless steels. This steel does have good resistance to the atmosphere, fresh water, and mild acids. It has the best resistance in the hardened, tempered, and passivated condition. This steel allows for razor sharp edges.

To create this finish, the blade starts with a dark wash to give the blade an initial protective finish Then the blade is washed with stones, or literally rolled around with pebbles, which marks it, bringing out the underlying color of the steel. The finished stone wash gives the knife an interesting pattern, while still maintaining the protective properties of the dark wash. This finish helps hide wear and tear on the knife as the knife is used. One of the stonewash finishes biggest advantage is that it preserves the look of the blade overtime. The stonewash finish gives you a textured, rugged look. This blade finish helps to hide scratches and fingerprints, so you won’t have to polish your blade as often as you would with other blade finishes. Also, depending on the manufacturer, a stonewash finish can often look satin from a distance.

This blade has been carved into a spear point style blade. This style of blade is very similar to the needle-point style of blade, because of how good it is for piercing. But, the spear point does have a stronger tip and it does contain a small belly that can be used for slicing, unlike the needle point blade shape. The spear point shape is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center line of the blade’s long axis. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that line sup exactly with the equator of the bade. The spear point blade shape is a great choice if you are looking for a good balance between piercing and slicing ability. This blade shape combines the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade, while also maintaining some of the “belly” that is used for slicing. All in all, it is a great hybrid blade design that is extremely functional. With this blade, the point controllability is excellent and the point is extremely strong, so you can easily use this knife for detail and tip work. To help with overall controllability, the entire spine of the knife has thick, shallow jimping. This gives your fingers a little bit of grip to really have full control over your blade at all times and in all environments. This blade does sport a plain edged blade, which gives you the ability to use this knife in a wider variety of tasks. However, some people do love the serrated edge because they with a serrated edge you can saw through some of the tougher and thicker materials. On the other hand, serrated edges leave you with jagged cuts, while a plain edge will give you clean cuts and slices.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of titanium. Titanium is truly a phenomenal material for knife handles. For how light the material is, it is amazing how durable and tough it is. On the flip side, it is also the most expensive common metal used in knife handles. It offers an extremely high resistance to corrosion, it doesn’t conduct and retain cold as much as its counterparts, and it can be anodized just the same as aluminum. Surprisingly, titanium is actually less resistant to scratching than stainless steel, but the upside of lightness outweighs the downside.

Some of the pros of this material is that it is strong—titanium is ideal for high-end, high performance knives and gear because it is light and strong. Titanium has a very high tensile strength. The next advantage is that it is low weight—titanium has a very low density. This characteristic strength to weight ratio is absolutely crucial when making a decision on your everyday knife. Titanium is also very corrosion resistant—it is even resistant in saltwater environments; this trait is due to a continuous oxide outer layer when exposed to air. Unfortunately, with all of those pros, titanium will cost you a decent amount.

A rare characteristic of titanium is that it is one of those rare metals that has a warm feel to it, so it won’t make your hands suffer nearly as much in the winter time, especially when being compared to aluminum.

The handle on this Boker knife has a very deep finger groove with a shallower finger groove following it, to give you a very comfortable and safe grip. There is jimping on the spine of the knife as well as a small portion on the bottom of the handle. The handle is two-toned; with lighter grey in the middle and darker grey framing it. Across the palm of the handle, there is a lot of thick texturing to give you a very secure grip. And, as a bonus and a benefit to using this as your EDC of choice, there is a lanyard hole carved into the butt of this handle.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. This is a deep carry pocket clip in a stonewash finish. This clip is kept in place by two small silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on the Boker Sulaco.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a manual folding knife that uses dual-thumb lugs and a frame lock design. A thumb lug is just a large thumb stud. This is arguably the most common one-hand-opening feature, and you can find this opening system through most knife manufacturers. A thumb lug essentially replaces the nail nick found on more traditional knives. The principle is pretty straightforward—you grasp the folded knife, place the tip of your flexed thumb on the stud and extend your thumb to swing the blade through its arc until the blade is fully open. Because the thumb lugs extend through both sides of the blade, the knife becomes ambidextrous.

The locking mechanism that this knife is equipped with is a frame lock mechanism. You can think of a frame lock as a beefed up version of the liner lock. They are very similar to liner lock mechanisms, except instead of an internal spring bar moving into place, tis part of the handle itself. Frame lock knives tend to be stronger than liner locks, as the piece of metal that slips into place is more substantial than that in a liner. Because of their similarity to liner locks, closing a frame lock knife is virtually the same—you push down on the spring bar so it no longer blocks the butt of the blade, remove your thumb from the path, then fold the knife closed.

This type of locking system puts a large portion of metal against the blade, ensuring a strong lockup for piercing, cutting, slicing, and other heavy duty tasks. Frame locks are seen in lots of mid to upper range knives, typically rafted from titanium. Frame locks are known for their strength and thickness, but it is only with the correct construction that they operate at full capacity. In the angle of the blade bottom is not matched correctly with the lock, the lock may not travel the correct distance, damaging its effectiveness.

 

The Specs:

The blade on the Boker Sulaco measures in at 3.7 inches long with the handle measuring in at 4.8 inches. The overall length of the knife is 8.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 4.8 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

Ram Maramba, late owner/operator of Zero Knives, is a Texas-born knife maker who was remembered for his contemporary non-nonsense forms and eye-catching conceptions. Each frame lock designed model sports a milled handle that is not only aesthetically pleasing but promotes plenty of grip security. Couple that with the dual over-sized thumb lugs and this folder is ready to go right out of the gate. The Boker Plus line of knives are designed in cooperation with knife experts worldwide and provide innovative knife concepts for every task. This model features an all-titanium handle, a modified spear point style blade in a stonewash finish and the pocket clip is statically designed for tip up carry only on the traditional side of the handle. The titanium handle is strong and durable, so you can take on all of your heavy duty tasks that come your way throughout your day. The spear point blade style is the perfect balance between point strength and belly, which helps with versatility. The stonewash finish and 440C stainless steel help preserve the look of your knife, because both of them are low maintenance. Pick up your Boker Plus 01BO034 Sulaco Titanium Folder Knife with a stonewashed blade today at BladeOps.

 

Meyerco Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife Review

Meyerco is the original assisted opening mechanism knife company. Thanks to the creative mind of Blackie Collins and the legendary vision of Bill Meyer, they were able to produce and patent the first assisted opening knife. The first MEYERCO knife was called the Strut’N’Cut. It is this very same Strut’N’Cut that won the 1997 Blade Show’s “Most Innovative American Design” award. They have never stopped improving from their roots of function, design, and quality. Their mission is to continually improve their products and offer the market the best possible product at a fair price that they everyday user can afford. They will never stray from this and they back it up with their Forever Warranty and the best customer service department anyone could ask for.

Meyerco says, “Dedicated to every user we have, from those who serve to serve us, to everyone who puts their life in harm’s way to protect us and guarantee our way of life to those how use our products for day in and day out chores. All of us at Meyerco hope that the next time you are ready to make a decision on which cutlery product to purchase; you’ll look at one of our many knives we offer. We know you won’t be disappointed, and you’ll be back to purchase another of our great products once you see how we perform.”

This is a collaboration with Pinkerton Knives, who says, “My interest in knives started at a young age. My father always carried a knife with him and used it daily. He expected a lot from his knives and instilled that in me. As I got older, I became interested in handmade knives and started collecting them. That was when I met custom maker and designer, Darrel Ralph. After ordering some of his knives, I finally convinced him to let me come by his shop to pick them up. It seemed silly to pay for shipping when I lived about 30 minutes from him. Once I started doing that we became good friends. I never actually apprenticed with Darrel. I just kept asking questions and bugging him to make designs I liked. Eventually, I became tired of him saying ‘no’ and decided to make my own knives. Darrel gave me use of is shop if I needed it. I guess you would say Darrel was my mentor.” When talking about his experience and the way he chooses to design knives, he says, “I approach [sic] to designing knives developed during my 18 yr. career in the physical security field. During that time, I had the opportunity to train and work with Police, fire/EMT, military, the Secret Service and other agencies. What I learned showed me the potential of a knife beyond normal utility tasks. I learned how easy it was to conceal a very large knife and how much damage a very small knife good inflict. This is also when I started thinking that the knife’s handle should permit multiple, secure grips and the blade should follow by being effective in those different grips.”

Today we will be discussing the Meyerco Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife.

Meyerco Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife
Meyerco Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of AUS-6 stainless steel. AUS-6 is an entry level Japanese cutlery steel in the same class as 440A. AUS-6 is one grade higher than AUS-4 and one grade lower than AUS-8. This steel takes a very fine edge, though edge retention is not as good as steel such as 440C. Overall, this is a soft steel that’s generally low quality with relatively little carbon content but it resists corrosion reasonably well.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish. The satin finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with a fine abrasive. For reference, the finer the abrasive and the more even the lines, the cleaner that the satin finish will look. Another benefit of a satin finish is that it helps to resist corrosion slightly. A high quality finish takes great hand skill. In terms of luster, it falls in a pretty medium level—there are more matte finishes and there are more reflective finishes. Because of this, this is the most popular blade finish used in the cutlery industry today.

The blade has been carved into a needle-point or dagger point blade. This blade is well-named because the two sides of the blade run at an angle toward each other to meet at the tip in a very sharp point. This knife blade shape is most commonly found in daggers or fighting knives, because the tip is long and very sharp and can penetrate into softer targets easily. This blade shape is very popular among military and police personnel because of their ability to be easily concealed and easily withdrawn from their sheathes. There are also some drawbacks to this blade shape. For starters, the blade lacks a belly, so it is not going to be an all-purpose blade design. Also, the blade contains quickly-thickening edges, so it is not going to be good for slicing or slashing. Plus, this blade shape does have a very sharp and thin point, which means that it has a tendency to break when used on harder targets. This is not an all-purpose blade, but it makes an excellent self-defense weapon.

This blade has a plain edge, which means that it will be easier to stab with it. And, the plain edges do give cleaner cuts.

 

The Handle:

This knife is a full tang knife, which means that the blade and the handle are made out of the same piece of metal. Because the entire knife is made out of one piece of metal, there are no weak spots where the blade and the handle have been molded together, which means that this knife will be exceptionally durable. This is ideal for a self-defense knife, because in a moment where you are needing to defend yourself, you really don’t want to be dealing with a broken knife.

This means that the handle is a stainless steel handle. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but is not particularly lightweight. In addition, stainless steel handles can be pretty slippery, which means that something has to be added to the handle to give you proper texture.

This handle has been wrapped with cord to provide you with the best texture. This cord is a highly versatile multi-filament nylon cord that has so many uses, applications, and benefits. You can almost use this cord for as many purposes as you can duct tape. Not only does the cord add texture and color to the handle, it also has great survival benefits. This cord is strong, durable, lightweight, water and mildew resistant, and has inner strands that can be removed and used if you are in need of a smaller thread. By having this paracord with you at all times, you are not only prepared to take on almost any tactical issue, you are also prepared for almost any survival issue.

This is a small knife, which is perfect for concealing. However, it will be a little bit trickier to get a good grip on the knife, so along with the cord wrapped handle, there is a large hole cut out of the blade before the handle begins that you can stick your finger through and then punch with this knife. This enhances your self-defense ability. The butt of the handle is squared off.

The overall pros of the stainless steel handle are that it is strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. This is a quality handle material because of how strong and durable it is—perfect for self-defense. The cons of the stainless steel handle are that it is heavy and sometimes can be slippery—if the cord happens to come off.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade, which is ideal for a self-defense knife.

For starters, fixed blades are stronger because there are no moving parts that could break. Also, because it is a full tang fixed blade, it has extra strength, which is exactly hat you need from a self-defense knife.

Second, maintenance is much simpler, because all you have to do is wipe down the blade and handle and oil it occasionally.

Thirdly, the blade is less likely to break because the blade can be thicker than a typical folding knife.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath is made out of glass filled nylon, or GFN. This is a similar material to Zytel, which is a thermoplastic material. This material is practically indestructible because of how the nylon fibers are arranged: they are arranged haphazardly, which means that the material is strong in all directions, instead of being arranged in one direction which would make it brittle. Because of how the fibers are arranged, the material is also resisting to bending and abrasion.

Plus, this material is very cheap because it is injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a wide amount of ways in the production process.

However, many people did not love the material because it feels cheap and somewhat hollow. This material is also less grippy than many people desire—but with a sheath, you don’t have to worry much about the grip.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 1.25 inches long, and four inches overall. This knife weighs in at a mere 2.24 ounces, which means that you can have it with you at all times and not feel like you are being weighed down. You pretty much won’t even notice the weight of this knife around your neck, in your boot, or wherever you choose to put it.

 

The Pros of the Meyerco Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife:

  • The blade steel will take a very fine edge.
  • The satin finish is the most traditional finish.
  • The satin finish does help with corrosion resistance properties.
  • The satin finish will never go out of style.
  • The dagger point blade is perfect for self-defense.
  • The dagger point blade has a very sharp point, that is perfect for stabbing.
  • The knife is a full tang blade, which adds a high amount of durability to the blade.
  • Stainless steel is very strong for a knife handle.
  • Stainless steel is very durable for a knife handle.
  • Stainless steel is very corrosion resistant, which means that your maintenance time will be reduced greatly.
  • The handle is wrapped with a cord, which adds enough texture to give you an excellent grip.
  • The cord wrapped handle adds an element of survival to this knife, instead of just tactical.
  • This is a fixed blade, which is stronger and more durable than a typical folding knife.
  • Fixed blades are easier to maintain than a regular folding knife.
  • The sheath is practically indestructible.
  • The knife is light enough that you can have it with you at all times.

 

The Cons of the Meyerco Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife:

  • The blade steel is a lower grade steel, which is not as durable as many other steels.
  • The blade steel does not hold an edge as long as many other steels.
  • The dagger point blade style does have a weaker point, so you cannot pierce into harder materials.

 

Conclusion:

The Meyerco® Dirk Pinkerton Variable Broadhead Neck Knife is built to take on the very toughest chores you can throw at it. With the high quality, Blackie Collins designed rubber handles, you will be able to “hang on” much better no matter how messy the job is. Features ambidextrous cord-wrapped handle, stainless steel blade and glass filled nylon holster. Measures 4″ overall, with a 1-1/4″ blade. The blade steel that is chosen can take a very fine edge, which means that you can keep this blade very sharp at all times—perfect for your new self-defense knife. The cord also adds an element of survival, because the cord is the ultimate survival material. Limited forever warranty. Pick up your new neck knife today at BladeOps.

 

Duck Faux Stag Mini Stiletto Automatic Knife Review

Duck Faux Stag Mini Stiletto Automatic Knife
Duck Faux Stag Mini Stiletto Automatic Knife

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of stainless steel. For the most part, a blade is either made out of stainless steel or out of a high carbon steel. Because this automatic knife is made out of a stainless steel, we are going to focus on the pros and cons of having a stainless steel knife blade. For starters, stainless steel blades usually have at least a 12 percent chromium level, which works to accomplish two things for the blade: it makes the blade better able to resist wear and it makes the blade a lot more corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, stainless steel is going to be softer than a high carbon blade. Because it is softer, the blade is going to be easier to sharpen, but it is also going to lose its edge faster than a high carbon blade would. In terms of durability, stainless steel knife blades are usually tougher than high carbon steels. Often times, they are not harder than a high carbon blade. Also, stainless steel blades are not going to rust, chip, or even stain easily. There is a common misconception that because a stainless steel is never going to rust. This is an incorrect assumption; stainless steels just have a higher resistance to rusting. You will still need to make sure that this blade is dry after each use, and to fully maintain its quality, you will need to oil the blade every once in a while. In terms of appearance, stainless steel blades look good for a very long time. When being compared to a high carbon steel, stainless steels take less time to maintain and keep their look intact a little bit better.

The blade has been finished satin, which is the most popular blade finish in the cutlery industry today. This finish is also very traditional, because the luster levels are pretty close to being right in the middle. Because of this, you are able to find more reflective blades and less reflective blades, but you don’t have to worry about this classy knife ever going out of style. The finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with increasing levels of a fine abrasive. This finish is designed and used to show off the bevels of the blade as well as showcasing the fine lines in the steel. In terms of how the finish is created, the finer the abrasive that is used and the more even the lines are, the cleaner the finish is going to look. This finish also helps increase the corrosion resistance slightly.

The blade on this stiletto knife has been carved into a clip point style blade. The clip point, along with the drop point, is one of the two most popular blade shapes that can be found on the market. The clip point blade is similar to the drop point in terms of how versatile it is; this blade style is considered an all-purpose blade shape. The form of the knife is created by having the unsharpened edge of the knife run straight from the handle and then stop about halfway up the knife. At this point, it turns and continues to the point of the knife. This section starting when turns is known as the clip, which is where the blade shape got its name. The clip on this knife is curved and looks as if this portion from the spine to the point has actually been clipped away. Because of the clip, the point on this knife is lowered, which helps provide you with more control when you are using this knife. The clip point blade shape is also known to be exceptional at stabbing, and this is because the tip is controllable, sharp, and thinner at the spine. These characteristics lend well to quicker stabbing with less drag during insertion and faster withdrawal. The characteristic of this knife that makes it such a versatile knife is the large belly that it boasts. This belly allows you to slice with ease, which is the most common task that you will be performing throughout the day. The clip point blade shape really only has one disadvantage, and that is because the point on the clip point blade is narrow and sharp, it does have the tendency to be weak is prone to breaking or snapping off. This narrow tip is also the characteristic of the clip point blade style that separates it form the drop point blade style. While both of these popular blade shapes are all-purpose and feature a lowered point, the clip point has a narrow tip and the drop point has a broad tip. This means that while the droop point blade style does offer you more strength, it also takes away all of your stabbing capabilities. And on the other hand, while the clip point is able to stab and pierce with ease, it is prone to breaking.

The Duck Faux Stag Mini Stiletto does have a plain edge that equips you to take on a wider variety of tasks. The plain edge will also give you cleaner cuts and will be easier to sharpen than a serrated edge.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife has been made out of acrylic to look like faux stag horn. According to fibersource.com, an acrylic is a manufactured fiber in which the fiber forming substance is any long-chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85% by weight of acrylonitrile units. Acrylic fibers are produced form acrylonitrile, which is a petrochemical. The acrylonitrile is usually combine with small amounts of other chemicals to improve the ability of the resulting fiber to absorb dyes. Some of the positive characteristics of acrylic is that they repel water exceptionally well. An acrylic is also quick drying to move moisture from the surface of this handle. Plus, the color should not fade in the sunlight like some plastics might.

The liners and bolsters on this knife are made out of stainless steel. Stainless steel is a great material for the liners because they have excellent durability and high resistance to corrosion. One of the drawbacks to stainless steel is that it is a relatively heavy material. But since it is only the bolsters and liners that are made out of stainless steel, it won’t weigh your knife down, and instead, it will add just enough heft that you can feel confident in the weight backing you when you are performing your day to day tasks.

The handle is pretty rectangular, with the butt flaring out for added control over this knife. There are two finger guards that jut out from either side of the top of the handle, which protects your fingers from getting cut if you slip. The two finger guards also are a classic characteristic of the stiletto style knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on this knife is only designed for tip up carry on the traditional side of the handle. The pocket clip on this knife is super skinny and is kept in place by two silver screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. The pocket clip has been stonewashed, which gives it a very rugged, well-worn look. The look of the pocket clip goes perfectly with the faux stag handle. With the length of the pocket clip and the small size of the handle, this knife will be easily concealable in your pocket.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an automatic knife that features a push button opener and a plunge lock mechanism.

Because this is an automatic knife, it does fall under the strict set of laws that surround automatic knives in the United States of America. These strict laws state that automatic knives are not legal in all states, cities, or areas of the United States. You, as the user, are responsible for knowing your local laws. BladeOps does not take responsibility for any consequences on your part.

An automatic knife is a style of pocket knife that has its blade contained in the handle. The blade is opened automatically by a spring when a button on the handle is activated. The deploying button on this specific knife is silver and stonewashed finish.

The locking mechanism on this knife is a plunge lock, which is the same as a button lock. This style of locking mechanism is often found on automatic knives. This style of lock uses a spring-loaded plunger to hold the knife open. When you press the button, it lines up a notch in the plunger and allows the blade to pivot. Some of the benefits to the plunge lock is that it is incredibly strong and it doesn’t put your fingers in the blade’s path. Plus, this lock is fast and easy to use, as well as being reliable. Unfortunately, this style of locking mechanism is not ambidextrous.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 1.875 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 2.75 inches long. When this stiletto knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 4.625 inches long. This knife weighs in at a measly 1.8 ounces, so it will be easy to have with you at all times, without weighing you down in the slightest. This knife was made in China.

 

The Pros of the Duck Faux Stag Mini Stiletto:

  • The stainless steel blade is going to resist rust well.
  • The blade is going to be easy to sharpen.
  • The blade resists wear well.
  • Stainless steel blades are tougher than a high carbon blade.
  • The blade is not going to rust, chip, or stain easily.
  • The satin finish is the most traditional finish, so you know that this knife won’t go out of style.
  • The satin finish does increase the corrosion resistance slightly.
  • The clip point blade style is versatile and all purpose.
  • The clip point blade style has a thin, sharp tip that is perfect for stabbing.
  • The clip point blade style has a controllable tip.
  • The blade sports a large belly that is ideal for slicing.
  • Plain edge lets you take on a wider variety of tasks.
  • Small size and lightweight allows you to have this knife on you at all times.
  • The acrylic handle is durable and tough.
  • Stainless steel liners add enough weight to be confident in your knife, but not enough that it weighs the knife down.
  • Plunge lock is very strong, so you don’t have to worry about your knife closing when you are in the middle of using it.
  • The plunge lock means that your fingers never have to be in the path of the blade when you are opening it.

 

The Cons of the Duck Faux Stag Mini Stiletto:

  • The blade is a little bit softer, which means that you will need to sharpen this blade more often than some others.
  • The clip point blade style odes have a weak point because of how sharp and narrow it is.
  • The plunge lock is not ambidextrous and neither is the pocket clip, which means this knife is definitely not an ambidextrous friendly knife.
  • As an automatic knife, it is not going to be legal in all states, cities, or areas.

 

Conclusion:

The Duck Mini Stiletto automatic knives snap open with a push on the button. This model features stainless steel bolsters, solid steel liners and faux stag handle scales. The plain edge clip point blade is perfect for everyday chores which is why the mini automatic knife makes the perfect novelty gift. The stainless steel blade is corrosion resistant and tough, which means that maintenance time will be a breeze. The satin finish is a traditional finish that goes exceptionally with the faux stag horn handle. This knife comes with a pocket clip that is designed for tip-up carry only. Pick up this perfect everyday carry knife at BladeOps.

 

CRKT Mah Journeyer Knife Review

Columbia River Knife & Tool, Inc. or CRKT is an American knife company that was established in 1994 and is based in Tualatin, Oregon. CRKT was founded by Paul Gillespi and Rod Bremer. Both of these men were formerly employed by Kershaw Knives, but left to pursue their own company.

CRKT did not really take off until the 1997 Shot Show, which is when they introduced the K.I.S.S. (Keep It Super Simple) knife. This was a small folder that was designed by Ed Halligan and was a total success. Within the opening days of the show, the years’ worth of the product was sold out.

Unfortunately, the company did experience a large setback in October of 2000 when US Customs seized a shipment of 80,000 folding knives that were collectively worth more than $4.3 million. All 50 models seized had previously always passed every Customs test. The shipmen had cleared Customs on September 29, but on October 3rd an inspector decided that the knives acted like switchblades despite the fact that none of them fit within the definition set forth by the U.S. Switch Blade Knife Act of 1958. On October 17, a letter was co-singed by Oregon U.S. Congresswoman Darlene Hooley and Senator Gordon Smith that petitioned the head of Customs to aid CRKT. Because of their action there was a Federal inquiry of the US Customs actions that had to be answered within thirty days. On October 20, the company was once again allowed to move their product. However, this was not before they lost over $1 million in sales.

The company produces a wide range of fixed blades and folding knives, multi-tools, sharpeners, and carrying systems. CRKT has collaborated with custom knife makers such as Ken Onion, Harold Carson, Allen Elishewitz, Pat Crawford, Liong Mah, Steven James, and Greg Lightfoot.

CRKT owns fifteen patents and patents pending.

Today we will be discussing the CRKT Mah Journeyer knife.

CRKT Mah Journeyer Knife
CRKT Mah Journeyer Knife

 

The Designer:

When CRKT is talking about their knife designer Liong Mah, they say, “If we didn’t know any better, we’d think the English definition of Mah is practical. After all, it’s a useful sensibility Lion incorporates into all of his designs, like the new G.S.D., the ever popular Eat’N’Tool, and the 2015 Mah-chete. As a kid, where others doodled cartoons in their school notebooks he drew knife designs. Later, having learned CAD, he was able to bring these ideas to life by collaborating with many of the top designers in the industry.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife has been made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a popular budget brand of knife steel that is made in China. In terms of composition this steel can be easily compared to the Japanese AUS 8 steel. This steel is well balanced in regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. Many of its features make this steel a good option for urban knives that need an average-good performance. The steel hardens to a degree of 56-59HRC and with a quality heat treatment will retain the sharpness of the cutting edge for a long period of time. Knives that are made out of 8Cr13MoV steel will keep sharpening well and are very easy to sharpen. While this steel does do a good job in all aspects, you do get what you pay for and it won’t excel at any of its characteristics. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is how cheap it is. For its cost you do get a decent steel.

The blade has been finished with a black stonewash finish. A stonewash finish refers to rumbling the blade in an n abrasive material, which is usually small pebbles. The finish effortlessly hides scratches and smudges, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. A black stonewash is also known as an acid stonewash or an apocalyptic stonewash and is my personal favorite blade finish. This type of stonewash finish has a blade that has undergone an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes the stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. A very positive benefit of a stonewashed blade is that they are low maintenance and preserve the look of the blade overtime.

The blade on the Journeyer has been carved into a drop point blade shape. This is one of the most popular blade shapes that is used in the cutlery industry today. The drop point style is a tough all-purpose blade shape that can stand up to virtually anything. One of the most common laces that you are going to come across a drop point blade shape is on a hunting knife, although you are easily going to be able to find it on plenty of other knife styles. To form the shape, the back or unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight form the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and helps to add strength to the tip. This tip is crazy strong and because of its strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are a very popular option on tactical and survival knives. And because of the lowered point on a drop point, the tip is easily controllable, which is one of the biggest reasons it is a popular choice on hunting knives. It is this lowered point that makes it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs or ruining the meat. And, because of the large belly that this blade shape boasts, the blade shape becomes a perfect option for your EDC knife. One of the only disadvantages to the blade is that the blade is extremely broad and is almost incapable of piercing. This tip is what differs the drop pint from the clip point: the clip point blade tip is lowered, but it is finer, sharper, and thinner than the drop point. This fine tip lets you pierce, but it is prone to breaking because of how thin it is. The drop point has so much strength behind it because of the broad tip, but it does take away from your slicing capabilities. Personally, I prefer the benefits that the drop point blade features—because the strength really is undeniable.

The handle is a combination handle which means that two thirds of the blade is plain edged and the other third is a serrated edge. This means that you are going to get the best of both abilities. You are going to get the clean cuts when needed from the plain edge portion or you can saw through thicker materials with the serrated portion. One of the complaints about a combination blade is that the knife isn’t actually big enough to truly get the best of both world and instead you can fully utilize either edges. This is all personal preference.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this blade is made out of Glass Reinforced Nylon, or GRN. This is the same material as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon or FRN. This is a thermoplastic material that is very strong, cheap, and resistant to bending, abrasion. This material is almost indestructible. While GRN is similar to Carbon Fiber, G-10, and Micarta, it doesn’t suffer from being brittle as much as those other materials. This is because in GRN, the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which guarantees that it is strong in all directions instead of being strong in only the direction that it is woven. However, many enthusiasts di not warm up to this material because they felt like it was cheap, somewhat hollow, and felt plastic-y. Plus, this handle material tends to be less “grippy” than G-10 is. This material is inexpensive because it is injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. This means that it can be manufactured in high volume with a low cost. The pros of this material is that it is strong, tough, needs zero maintenance, and very inexpensive.

The handle is mostly straight lines and angles instead of curves, although there is a very shallow finger groove. The butt of the handle is completely squared off. The handle has been extremely texturized so that you can have a secure grip on it in almost any environment. To assist with control when you are using this knife, there is a row of thicker jimping on the spine of the blade.


The Pocket Clip:

While the handle has only been drilled to attach the pocket clip tip up, it has been drilled to be reversible. This means that you can carry it left or right handed—choosing the side that is most comfortable and familiar to yourself. This stonewashed clip is deep carry, which means that it will stay extra secure in your pocket and you won’t have to be worried about it falling out as you go about your daily activities. In the middle of the clip, there has been a couple shapes carved out to add aesthetic and to keep down on the weight. While the clip does match the blade of this knife, it does not match the rest of the hardware which is all black.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a folding knife that features a slip joint locking mechanism.

The blade sports a modified nail nick to assist you in opening the blade. Near the spine of the blade near the handle, there is an elongated oval etched into the blade. To open the knife, you get a grip with your thumb and use the traction to manually push the blade open until it locks into place.

The joint locking mechanism isn’t actually a true lock but is still a good option for this knife. Typically, slip joints require two hands to open and close safely. This locking mechanism is made up of a spring bar and a specially shaped blade. To open the knife, you pull on the blade to overcome the pressure form the spring, snapping the blade into place. To close it, make sure your fingers are out of the way of the sharp edge and push back down. One of the biggest advantages to this type of locking mechanism is that they are legal in almost every state and area. Plus, they are simple and easy to use. However, the draw back to this type of locking mechanism is that it technically isn’t a true locking mechanism, so I wouldn’t suggest that you try to use this knife for heavier duty tasks.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this CRKT knife measures in at 2.76 inches long with a blade thickness of 0.11 inches. The handle on this knife measures in at 3.86 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 6.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 2.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

The CRKT Mah Journeyer knife converts from a slip joint to a virtual fixed blade by simply pulling the pin tool from the back of the handle and placing it in the blade slot. This unique knife boasts a black stonewashed combo edge blade and a black glass reinforced nylon handle. The blade is extremely low maintenance because of the stainless steel and the black stonewash finish that helps to preserves the look of the blade over its lifetime. Built for everyday use, this classic slip joint delivers functionality and safety while slashing through daily cutting tasks. The T6 torque wrench pin tool that converts your knife to a fixed blade also can be used to adjust pivot tension on the blade. You can easily turn EDC into a virtual fixed knife simply by pulling out the pin tool in the back of the handle and placing it into the blade slot, so or you can adjust the tension on the opener. Tip up, right/left reversible deep carry pocket clip. Travel through life with the Journeyer. Pick up yours today at BladeOps.

 

Gen Pro Trainer Butterfly Knife (Practice) Black Handle Knife Review

 

Gen Pro Trainer Butterfly Knife (Practice) Black Handle
Gen Pro Trainer Butterfly Knife (Practice) Black Handle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blade:

This is a practice butterfly knife, which means that it sports dull edges. This blade has been made out of stainless steel. When it comes to the cutlery industry, there are really only two types of steels that a blade can be made out of, stainless steel or a high carbon steel. This can be confusing because stainless steel does contain carbon in its makeup. The biggest difference between stainless steel from regular or carbon steel is its chromium. Chromium is a metallic alloying element which has a silver color to it, resists rusting easily, and also resists corrosion easily. Because of this, stainless steel is known to standing up to rust and corrosion better than a carbon steel. However, stainless steel can still rust, so you just have to keep up on your maintenance, making sure that the steel is dry before you put the blade back into its handles. Of course, there are also disadvantages to a stainless steel. Stainless steel is less brittle than carbon steel, which means that it is more prone to deforming and also harder to sharpen. The upside to it not being brittle is that it is more chip resistant and will also retain and edge for longer period of time. In this knife, that actually doesn’t matter because there is not an edge that needs to stay sharp. When it comes to this knife, all you need to worry about is that this knife won’t chip but it may become a little disfigured. Stainless steels usually have at least 12% chromium. Stainless steel is technically tougher than a high carbon steel, but it is not going to be harder than a high carbon steel. Stainless steels also keep looking good for longer periods of time.

The blade on this knife has been finished with a satin finish. A satin finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive, which most commonly a sandpaper. As a key, the finer the sandpaper and the more even the lines, the cleaner the finish will look. This finish is designed to show off the fine lines of the steel. This is the most popular finish in the cutlery industry, probably because of how classic of a finish it is. In terms of luster, the satin finish falls right in the middle. You are going to find finishes that are more reflective than this finish and you are also going to find finishes that are less reflective than a satin finish. With this in mind, you don’t have to worry about this trainer ever going out of style. The satin finish effectively cuts down on glares and reflections while also cutting down on corrosion.

Like earlier mentioned, this is a trainer knife, which means the edges are dull. However, it is roughly in the shape of a dagger style blade. To cut down on weight, because stainless steels are heavy, there are thirteen holes cut out of the blade. This also helps with drag, so it is easier to learn how to manipulate.

 

The Handles:

The handles are made out of stainless steel, just like the blade. Stainless steel provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion, but it is not super lightweight. The durability factor is one of the most important factors when it comes to the steel and the blade. When you are first learning how to flip a butterfly knife, you are going to drop it and bang it around a lot. Without this durability level that you get from a stainless steel, the knife would not be able to last for as long as this knife is going to last. Also, stainless steel handles can be slippery, so manufacturers have to incorporate etchings or ridges to provide the required friction. In terms of this Gen Pro Trainer, there have been five holes cut down the length of each handle. These holes cut down on weight as well as give the knife better friction, so that you can have a solid grip on the handle. Another thing that helps with the user’s grip is that the handles are flared towards the butt. With a trainer, you need to have a very secure grip on your knife so that you can effectively learn how to manipulate a butterfly knife.

The handles on this trainer have been finished black. This adds a sleek look as well as increasing the corrosion resistance of the handles. Unfortunately, the black finish is going to scratch off eventually because it is not part of the stainless steel.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a trainer knife to learn how to use a butterfly knife, which means that it has been created just like a butterfly knife, except that it does not have a sharpened blade. Butterfly knives have a few different names, they have been called balisong knives, as well as a fan knife, and lastly a Batangas knife. The butterfly knife is a folding pocket knife, the difference between a butterfly knife and a regular pocket knife is that it has two handles that counter-rotate around the tang in a way that when closed, the blade is concealed within grooves in the handles.

The butterfly knife originated in the Philippines, so it was commonly used as a self-defense and pocket utility knife. Hollow-ground balisong were also used as straight razors before conventional razors were available in the Philippines. In the hands of a trained user, the knife blade can be brought to bear quickly using one hand. Manipulations, called flipping, are performed for art or amusement. Blunt versions of these knives, called trainers, are for sale to practice tricks without the risk of injury.

While a regular butterfly knife is now illegal in many countries, often under the same laws and for the same reasons that automatic knives are, trainers are usually legal anywhere. Of course, you should know your local knife laws.

There are two styles of construction when it comes to butterfly knives. There is sandwich or channel. This knife has been constructed sandwich style. Sandwich constructed balisong knives are assembled in layers that are generally pinned or screwed together. They allow the pivot pins to be adjusted more tightly without binding. When the knife is closed, the blade rests between the layers. This style of construction is the more popular style of construction, but it is also the weaker style of construction.

There are a few parts to a butterfly knife that are unique specifically to butterfly knives. The first piece is a bite handle, which is the handle that closes on the sharp edge of the blade. This handle will cut the user if they are holding it when the they go to close it. But because this is a trainer, you don’t have to worry about that. The bit handle is also the handle that has the latch on it. The other handle is known as the safe handle, which is the handle that closes on the non-sharpened edge of the blade.

The next piece that is specific to a butterfly knife is the latch. This is the standard locking system, which holds the knife closed. The latch is also what keeps it from opening up when the user doesn’t want it to. There are a few styles of latches. The first is the batangas, which is the latch that is attached to the bite handle. Another style of latch is a manila, which is when the latch is attached to the safe handle.

Along with the latch, there is a tach gate, which is a block inside the channel of the handles stopping the latch from impacting the blade.

The next few pieces that are specific to a butterfly knife is the tang pin, which is the pin meant to hold the blade away from the handle when closed to prevent dulling.

 

How to Flip:

To perform a basic flip there are a few steps. The first step is to hold the knife from the safe side, which is the side where the sharpened edge would not close. This step is not as important with a trainer, because there is no sharpened side, but once you move to a real butterfly knife, don’t forget about this step.

The second step is to flick your wrist back. Hold the knife directly out in front of you, pointing forward. Now flick your wrist back. The flick of your wrist should be similar to the reverse motion of casting a fishing line. When you flip your wrist back, the knife will open and the handle of the sharpened side with hit you between your thumb and your forefinger. At this point, you should keep your hand where it is.

The third step is to flip the knife back forward. This time, flick your wrist downward so that the knife closes again. The knife should be a similar positon to when you started now.

The fourth step is to open your thumb and flip the knife up again. The last time you flipped the knife up, the handle hit you on the thumb and forefinger. Flip the knife up in the exact same way, but open your thumb and move it to the side this time. This will allow the handle of the sharpened side to smack into the handle that you are holding, engaging the knife. Once you have flipped the knife up into place, close your thumb over both handles.

At this point, you will have performed a basic flip. Of course, this is just one type of the basic flip and you can get more complicated as you go further and become more adept at flipping.

 

The Specs:

When this trainer is closed, it measures in at 4 7/8 inches long. The overall length of this knife measures in at 8 7/8 inches long.

 

The Pros of the Gen Pro Trainer Butterfly Knife:

  • Stainless steel resists rust and corrosion easily.
  • Stainless steel also looks better than a high carbon steel for a longer period of time.
  • The blade won’t chip when you are learning about how to flip.
  • The satin finish is very traditional.
  • The satin finish cuts down on glares and reflections.
  • The satin finish cuts down on corrosion levels.
  • The skeletonized handles cut down on weight.
  • The holes and the flared handles provide good texture and grip.
  • Stainless steel is strong and durable.
  • The stainless steel handles are very resistant to corrosion resistant.
  • Because it is a dull blade, or a trainer, you can almost be sure that this knife will be legal in the United States. This is an advantage because not all butterfly knives are legal in all states or areas.
  • This knife is constructed just like an actual butterfly knife, including the size of this knife, so you can get down the flipping mechanism and not feel out of your league when you do move on to an actual butterfly knife.

 

The Cons of the Gen Pro Trainer Butterfly Knife:

  • The stainless steel may become disfigured.
  • The stainless steel handles are going to be heavy.
  • The stainless steel handles can be rather slippery.
  • The sandwich construction is the weaker of the two styles of construction.

 

Conclusion:

The Gen Pro Trainer butterfly knife features smooth action, a dull edge so you won’t cut yourself while practicing new tricks and is amazingly durable. This trainer balisong has a blade that cannot be sharpened. It has black finished stainless steel handles, and a stainless steel blade (dull). We took one of these and beat it against some steel pipes in an effort to see how strong and durable they are and they are incredibly durable. It is built with pin construction and should give you years of great practice. With this trainer, you can become a master flipper. Once you master the flipping even the most complicated flips, make sure to pick up an actual butterfly knife from BladeOps as well. Pick up this trainer butterfly knife today at BladeOps.

 

Microtech Custom Apex Fixed Blade Knife Review

Microtech began in 1994 in an apartment and then later continued in a storage shed in Vero Bach, Florida.

When the company was founded and throughout their history ever since, Microtech has been trying to accomplish one mission: to create the best knives possible. It has now been over two decades and they are headquartered in Western North Carolina. Microtech is still operating with that same mission with everything that they do. Their goal is to maintain the highest standards of quality possible.

Microtech utilizes exclusively American-Made manufacturing materials and labor. They say, “Every component we use is developed within the United States and more than 95% of all our components are manufactured in-house, by us directly. Because we use only the best quality materials, and to ensure our commitment to excellence, every Microtech knife is backed by our Lifetime Warranty.”

Every knife that they produce is sharpened by hand in their facility. The knives go through rigorous testing, research, and development to ensure that Microtech meets the impeccably close tolerances and extremely high standards of quality. They say, “We aim to continuously evolve and push the boundaries of expectation, delivering products that set the standard for precision cutlery. From all of us at the Microtech family, we thank each of our customers, as well as those who serve us and our country through the United States military, law enforcement and first responder services. Designed for exactly that reason, our Service Personnel Program aims to provide the best possible tools to those who rely on them the most.”

They know that it is because of their fans that makes it possible for Microtech to pursue their mission of creating the world’s best cutting tools and they want to thank you for that.

Today we will be discussing the Microtech Custom Apex fixed blade.

Microtech Custom Apex Fixed Blade
Microtech Custom Apex Fixed Blade

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of Elmax steel. This steel is produced by Bohler-Uddeholm and is a high chromium-vanadium-molybdenum-alloyed steel. Tis steel is going to have 1.7% carbon, 18% chromium, .3% manganese, 1% molybdenum, .8& silicon, and 3% vanadium. This combination of different materials gives the metal a high wear resistance, high compressive strength, superior corrosion resistance, and also the stability and ability to retain its size and form after taking abuse or taking on a harder task. High wear and high corrosion resistance is a hard combination to find on a steel, but this steel’s powder-metallurgy based production allows for its imperviousness to wear and corrosion. The steel is hardened to 57-59 HRC usually, although some companies do push that and harden it to around a 62 HRC. This steel does have good edge holding ability. Elmax steel is produced through a hardening and corrosion resistant mold using a powder-metallurgy process, which Bohler-Uddeholm is known for using in a variety of their stainless steels. This process involves blending fine powdered materials, pressing them into the desired shape, and then heating it to bond the material.

The blade has been finished with a DLC Apocalyptic Stonewash. This means that the blade has undergone two finishes. The first is a DLC, which stands for diamond-like carbon coating. This coating is a deep black, which does give the knife a sleek, discrete look. The biggest advantage of a DLC coating is that it is the hardest coating that can be put on a blade’s surface. DLC is also a low friction finish, so it does help the knife to make better and easier cuts. However, this is a very expensive finish, sometimes even doubling the overall cost of the knife when it has this coating. The second finish on this knife is the stonewash finish, which is creating when the steel is tumbled in an abrasive material. The stonewash finish helps to hide scratches and smudges. The blade on the Apex does have an Apocalyptic Stonewash, or a black stonewash, which is when the blade has undergone an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation helps to enhance the blade’s ability to resist rust because it places a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. With the black stonewash and the DLC, this blade is going to be extremely durable and low maintenance.

The blade shape itself is very unique. It does have a spear point, but it also sharpened on the upper half of the blade as well as the traditional cutting edge. This is an extremely broad spear point, with a large belly or cutting area. The spear point is most often compared to the needle-point blade because it is good at piercing. However, the spear point blade also sports a belly that can be used for slicing, while the needle-point is solely for piercing. The spear point blade shape is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center lien of the blade’s long axis. It is so good at piercing because both sides of the knife (belly and spine) rise and fall equally, which creates a very centered point. The spear point has a strong point that is also sharp enough for piercing. And because both sides of the blade are sharpened, it is going to be able to pierce even more efficiently. While the typical spear point blade does have a small belly, the spear point on the Apex has a very large belly that will be great for slicing through almost anything.

 

The Handle:

The handle on the Apex is made out of G10. G10 is a fiberglass based laminate. To create this material, the manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth that are soaked in resin before being compressed and baked. This process creates a material that is extremely hard and strong, while also being lightweight. This material is a great option for tactical, survival, and outdoors knives because it is rugged, can take a beating, is lightweight, and doesn’t require too much maintenance.

The G10 on this knife is black, which creates an all-black knife. This is sleek, but also cuts down on glares and reflections for when you are in the field and don’t want your position exposed. The hardware on this knife is bronzed, which does contrast nicely with the handle and give it some definition.

The spine of the handle curves inward first, which does give you a solid and comfortable grip. Following the first groove on the spine is a second, which goes until the butt of the handle. These grooves will help when you are using this knife for the heavier duty tasks. It will give you a comfortable grip, while also helping to provide you with a very secure grip. The belly of the handle is more unique. There is the finger guard, but it actually comes after a deep groove. The first groove and the finger guard are there to protect you from the wicked sharp and thick blade. There is a deep finger groove for you to really rest your finger in, giving you more spaces to really get a grip on this knife—which is what the handle is all about. After the finger groove, the knife curves inward until the butt of the handle. The G10 has also been textured, which will really give you a solid grip on the knife.

Each characteristic on the Apex’s handle is about giving you the most secure, comfortable, and safe grip on the knife. With such a large, thick, sharp blade, you are going to want all the safety features you can get on the handle.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade knife, which means that there is no mechanism or moving part on it. There is a debate going on about whether fixed blades or folding knives are better. While folding knives do have their benefits such as being more discreet and a little more convenient, fixed blades have plenty of benefits to compete.

For starters, they are crazy strong and big. You can find fixed blades in almost any size, but no matter which size you choose, it is going to be extremely strong. Their blades are also usually longer and thicker than that on a folding knife, because the blade does not have to fit inside of the knife’s handle. Because of this, you can get more done and you don’t have to worry about your blade snapping. Next, because fixed blades don’t have a mechanism or moving parts, you don’t have to worry about them breaking or wearing out. On a folding knife, you have to worry about the spring and the hinge. Fixed blades are also easier to maintain and clean. Lastly, fixed blades like this Apex are going to be the superior tactical tool as well as being the superior survival tool.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is a Kydex sheath with bronzed hardware as well as a Blade-Tech MOLLE-Lok. Kydex is a thermoplastic acrylic-polyvinyl chloride material that is most commonly used in creating holsters and sheaths. This is a modern material which means that it is going to have some advantages that only a modern material can have. Some of these are that it is has a Rockwell hardness rating of 90 which makes it almost scratch resistant. It is also waterproof and it is not going to stretch or shrink over time, so the knife is always going to have the same fit. Kydex sheaths are very durable and can remain unaffected when exposed to chemicals such as skin acids and other mild chemicals. Kydex is a great material for extreme environments and can even be submerged in salt water without having negative side effects. Overall, Kydex is mostly low maintenance. This is great for a tactical, survival, or outdoors knife, because you won’t have to worry about the sheath if you are ever out I the field for long periods of time.

Of course, the sheath is also going to have its disadvantages. One of the disadvantages that is complained about the most is how noisy it is. There is no way to pull your knife out of the Kydex sheath without making sound, which means that you aren’t going to be able to use this knife in a stealthy way. Also, because this material is not going to stretch or shrink over time, if the sheath doesn’t fit your knife exactly how you want it to, you are out of luck. Lastly, one of the biggest disadvantages is that you do risk dulling your blade’s edge when you keep pulling the knife out of the sheath and putting it back inside.

Overall, Kydex offers a very long-term, durable sheath. But it does come as is, so if you don’t like it when you first get it, you most likely aren’t going to like it later on.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 4.625 inches long with a blade thickness of a beasty 0.2 inches. The overall length of the Custom Apex measures in at a whopping 10 inches—big enough to get any job done. This is a heavier knife weighing in at 12.2 ounces. This Microtech knife was made in the United States of America.

 

Conclusion:

The Microtech Custom Apex fixed blade knife was designed by both Anthony Marfione and son Sean Marfione–the second collaboration between the two. This extremely wide-profiled Elmax blade features a spear point style so it’s actually sharpened on the upper half of the blade as well as the tradition cutting edge. The handle is comprised of a G-10 composite and is coupled with bronzed hardware for a truly custom look. The 3-D machined handle is expertly designed–offering appropriately placed finger guards and several choil locations for multiple grip options. Make no mistake about it–this knife is as comfortable as they come. The Custom Apex also includes a carbon fiber finished Kydex sheath, also complete with bronzed hardware, with Blade-Tech MOLLE-Lok attachment. You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.