Kershaw Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife Review

Kershaw knives was founded in 1974 and has been making great knives ever since.

Kershaw and their fans know that there is hardly anything like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s how can they back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, it is completely possible to own your Kershaw for a lifetime.

They say, “The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

Kershaw’s founding mission was to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use.  This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. They say, “Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Today we will be discussing the Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. The steel has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC level.

The blade has been finished with a black-oxide BlackWash finish. This means that the blade starts out as a black oxide finish. This is a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. Then, the steel undergoes a black stonewash finish. A stonewash finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or stain finished blade. A black stonewash finish is a blade that has had an acid treatment that darkens the blade before it undergoes stonewashing. The acid oxidation enhances a blade’s rust resistance by placing a stable oxide barrier between the steel and the environment. A very positive benefit of a stonewashed blade is that they are lower maintenance and preserve the original look overtime, which means that it is going to require little maintenance.

The blade is basically a modified Wharncliffe. The blade does have a large and broad belly, which will help make slicing easier. This is also going to help make this a more versatile knife. The spine of the blade is almost straight until it curves broadly and sharply down to the tip. This creates a very broad tip that will give the knife plenty of strength. However, because the tip is so broad, the user is not going to be able to pierce or stab with this knife. Right where the blade begins and the handle ends, there is a row of thick jimping, which will help you have a more secure grip on the knife.

 

Kershaw Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife
Kershaw Les George Spline Flipper Assist Knife

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of steel. Steel is going to be a very durable material that is also very resistant to corrosion. However, it is not lightweight at all. In fact, it is one of the heaviest materials that you are going to come across. Plus, steel can be slippery, so the manufacturer has to incorporate ridges or grooves to provide the required friction. The overall benefits to a steel handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and very resistant to corrosion. The cons to this knife handle material is that it is going to be heavy and it can be slippery.

The handle has also been finished with a black-oxide BlackWash finish. This creates a very rugged and well-worn look to the blade. The BlackWash is darker than the regular stonewash, which does also help to hide scratches and especially helps to hide the smudges that are going to accumulate over time.

The handle is pretty simple. About halfway down the spine begins a row of jimping that extends to the butt of the knife. This jimping is wide, but not as wide as on the blade. It will help give a very secure grip on the knife, especially when you are cutting. There is a finger guard, but because of the flipper, the finger guard is enhanced. Then, there is a deep finger groove, which provides a comfortable grip if you have to use this knife for long periods of time. The spine and the belly both curve slightly toward the butt of the handle.

As an added bonus, there is a lanyard hole on the butt of the handle. Many people like to use the lanyard to hang out of their pockets so that they can remove their knives more quickly than if they were using the pocket clip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip on the Spline does contrast with the handle because it is black instead of stonewashed. It is kept in place by two black screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife. This is a deep carry pocket clip, which means it is going to sit lower inside of your pocket. This not only keeps your knife more secure, it also lets you more easily conceal the knife. The pocket clip on this knife also works to make this an ambidextrous knife by having the handle pre-drilled to allow for attachment as either a left or right handed carry. However, the handle has only been drilled as a tip-up carrying system.

 

The Mechanism:

             This is a spring assisted knife that uses Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism. Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe® assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original. SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling knives. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

To assist you in opening this knife, Kershaw has equipped it with a flipper. This is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper is ambidextrous by design, because it is on both sides of the knife. It also adds some key safety elements to the knife because once the knife is opened, the flipper acts as an additional finger guard. The biggest safety feature about this knife is that when the user is opening the knife, it keeps the fingers out of the path of the blade. This helps the user prevent any accidental slicing of their fingers. This is also very different than the thumb stud, which is known for making people accidentally slice themselves.

The knife is also equipped with a frame lock. Kershaw explains the frame lock by saying, “In a frame lock knife, the knife handle—its “frame”—consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.”

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.9 inches long with a handle that measures in at 3.9 inches long. The overall length of the Spline measures in at 6.8 inches long when it is opened. This knife weighs in at 4.4 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

             When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “WHAT’S A SPLINE, ANYWAY? A spline is a numeric function that can define a curve. And Kershaw’s Spline, designed by Les George, is a knife with plenty of curves.

The first curve you’ll notice is the heavy curve of the blade spine. Essentially, the blade is a modified Wharncliffe version of Les’ Mini Harpy, but slimmed down all over to make it a lightweight carry. Les added a top swedge to thin the blade and lowered the tip to enhance its cutting power. The Spline offers a great all-around edge profile with exceptional push-cutting capability.

8Cr13MoV blade steel ensures the Spline’s blade takes and holds its edge, while Kershaw’s BlackWash finish gives it a matte finish and helps hide use scratches—because you are going to use it.

The Spline’s handle is steel, also finished in BlackWash, with curves that fit into your palm and give your index finger a secure curve to lock into while you work. The all-steel handles mean that the Spline also gives you a strong frame lock.

For quick and easy one-handed opening, just pull back on the flipper and the Spline opens with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening. The pocket clip is left/right reversible and there’s a handy lanyard hole.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Tickfaw Knife Review

Kershaw Tickfaw
Kershaw Tickfaw

Kershaw knows that there is nothing like one of their knives. From their award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing.

So what does the real thing mean? It means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get a ton of bang for your buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. They say, “Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.”

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. They say, “Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions.

Today we will be talking about the Kershaw Tickfaw.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 3Cr13 steel. This steel has been hardened to a 54-56 HRC. This steel is a value-priced high-chromium stainless steel.

The steel on this knife has been bead blasted. Using abrasive, glass or ceramic beads, the finish is made by blasting the materials at a high pressure against the metal, resulting in an even grey finish. The blasting creates an increased surface area and micro-abrasions make the steel more prone to rust and corrosion. A blasted blade, even from stainless steel, can rust overnight if left in a very humid environment.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a drop point blade shape. The drop point blade shape is a great all-purpose blade shape that can stand up to almost anything. A drop point is one of the most popular blade shapes that is on the market today because of how versatile it is. The shape is formed by having the back edge of the knife run straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. This tip is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, which is very similar to it, but it is much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to holdup to heavy use that makes drop point blades a good option on tactical and survival knives. Because the tip is easily controllable, a drop point knife allows you to perform fine detail and tip work. Plus, drop points have a very large belly that helps to make them very versatile and great at slicing. The bigger the belly, the easier it is to slice something with your knife. Drop point blades are a great option for everyday carry knives, because they are tough enough to take on the unexpected and the belly is big enough to slice through your daily chores. Drop point blades do have one major disadvantage, which is its relatively broad tip. This makes the drop point blade less suitable for stabbing than the clip point would be, but you do need to keep in mind that the broad tip is where you get so much strength.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of glass filled nylon, or GFN. This is the same material as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon, or FRN, as well as the name brand Zytel. All of these materials are a thermoplastic material which is very strong, resistant to both bending and abrasion, and is almost indestructible. As an added bonus, this material is very cheap.

GFN is similar to materials such as Carbon Fiber and Micarta, but those other materials are brittle and GFN is not. This is because in GFN the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which makes it strong in all directions. With Carbon Fiber, G10, and Micarta, all the fibers are arranged in a single direction. This makes the other materials strong in that specific direction, but not in any other direction. Many people did not originally like GFN because they felt like it felt cheap, plastic-y, and even a little hollow. Plus, you are not going to get as much grip from GFN as you would from G10.

This is such a cheap material because it can be injection molded into any shape and textured in the production process, instead of manually adding in texture, like Micarta needs. These characteristics lead to a high manufacturing volume, which creates a low cost.

The overall benefits of a GFN handle is that it is going to be strong, tough, and inexpensive. And, because it is more plastic-y and not a natural material, it requires no maintenance. This is a great knife to have in the outdoors because you don’t have to worry about rusting and corroding of the handle. The overall cons of the GFN handle is that it does have a cheap plastic feel and it is going to provide less grip than some other materials could.

The handle on the Tickfaw is pretty simple. For texture, there are four sections of extra texture that are raised on the face of the handle. In between, are lowered, smoother diagonal cross sections. This texture should be adequate for all of your basic tasks. The spine of the handle angles towards the middle at a slow angle and then sharply angles towards the butt of the handle. This creates a ridge that you can grip onto as well as creating a more comfortable grip. The belly of the handle does have a finger guard that is enhanced by the flipper when the knife is opened. There is a slight finger groove that is very elongated and angled downward. This will give you a secure but still comfortable grip. The butt of the handle is an angle, rather than a curve. As a bonus, there is a lanyard hole on the butt of the handle. The lanyard hole allows you to keep the knife close to you at all times without it getting in the way.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which helps to make this knife completely ambidextrous. The pocket clip has been skeletonized to cut down on weight. The hardware along with the pocket clip is black, which matches the handle well.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife uses the Kershaw SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism. Kershaw says, “Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe® assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. Originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original.” SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling selling knives. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use.

The blade uses a flipper to assist the user in opening the knife. The flipper is a sharks’ fin shaped piece of metal that is part of the blade. The flipper works to enable fast and easy one-handed opening. The flipper is also ambidextrous, which is perfect for making this a more comfortable knife for anyone to use. One of the biggest advantages for a flipper is how safe it is—when the user is opening the knife, their fingers stay completely out of the path of the blade. This is opposite of a thumb stud, which puts your fingers directly in the path. To open a Kershaw SpeedSafe flipper knife, Hold the knife handle vertically in one hand. Place your index finger on the top of the flipper or thumb on the thumb stud. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper or push outwards on the thumb stud. SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily, and the blade locks into place. Keep fingers away from blade edge while closing.

The knife has also been equipped with a Liner Lock. The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle.


The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 2.25 inches long with a handle that measures in at 3.1 inches long. The overall length of this knife measures in at 5.3 inches when it is opened. This knife weighs in at 2.0 ounces, which is a good weight to have with you at all times. In fact, you are not even going to notice this knife in your pocket.

 

Conclusion:

Kershaw says, “Tickfaw is a small town in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana. The Tickfaw, endorsed by the Duck Commander Pro Staff, is a small knife that should be in your pocket.

With its two-inch blade, it’s the perfect choice for when you don’t need a big blade, just a nice, sharp one. The Tickfaw is easy to open thanks to SpeedSafe® assisted opening. Just pull back on the built-in flipper and the blade moves out of the handle quickly and easily. A locking liner locks the blade safely open when in use. The stainless-steel blade resists chipping and corrosion and is easy to resharpen, too.

Glass-filled nylon handles make this knife lightweight and sturdy, while dimensional grooves in the handle provide a non-slip grip. The pocket clip is reversible for left- or right-handed carry.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw LoneRock Folding Gut Hook Knife Review

There really is not much that compares to a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. Kershaw says, “That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”
Kershaw was founded in 1974 with the mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw is also a brand of Kai USA LTD. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Today we will be discussing the LoneRock Folding Gut Hook Knife.

Kershaw LoneRock Folding Gut Hook Knife
Kershaw LoneRock Folding Gut Hook Knife

The Blade:

This hunting knife has a blade that is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. 8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, Kershaw believes, offers their customers an excellent value. HRC: 57–59.

The knife is coated in a titanium carbo-nitride. Kershaw also uses titanium carbo-nitride to produce an attractive black or gray blade coating that increases the blade’s hardness, helps maintain the edge, and increases the overall lifetime of the blade. A coating can increase the overall lifetime of the blade because it creates a barrier between the steel and the environment. This increases the wear resistance as well as the corrosion resistance.

The blade has been carved into a drop point gut hook blade shape. It has a similar shape to a regular drop point shape. It features the large belly that is ideal for slicing. This is especially important for a hunting knife, because you need the large belly to be able to skin the game that you are dressing. The large belly also works to make the knife a little more versatile. Next, the knife still has a lowered tip, which gives the blade more control. This is also crucial for a hunting knife because the added control makes it easier to avoid nicking any of the internal organs. However, this blade shape differs from a drop point on the spine. Instead of the slow curve straight from the handle to the tip, it is broken up by a gut hook. This allows you to flip the knife around and cut a clean line through your game. Often times though, hunters don’t like to use this because then the point of their blade is directed at them. This is a great tool for beginner hunters. However, this gut hook is not completely useless. You can also use it for prying nails out of something, opening a bottle, or for cutting through thick materials such as a seatbelt.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of glass-filled nylon with a K-Texture grip. Glass filled nylon is more commonly referred to as GFN. This is the same material as Fiberglass Reinforced Nylon (FRN) and even the name brand Zytel. This material is a thermoplastic material that is strong, resistant to bending and abrasion, and overall just pretty much indestructible.

This material can be so durable because the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout the handle. While GFN is similar to other material such as G-10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta, it does not suffer from being brittle like the other materials. This is purely because of how the fibers are arranged. Because they are arranged haphazardly when it comes to GFN, the material is durable in all directions and won’t break apart when stressed in any direction. The other materials have their fibers arranged in a single direction, so while they are extremely strong in that one direction, they will begin to chip or break apart when they are stressed in any other direction.

This material can be so inexpensive because it is injection molded to shape it. This means that the manufacturer can create a high volume of handles in one go as well as texturing the handle in the production process. This helps keep the cost very low.

The overall benefits of a GFN handle is that it is going to be strong, tough, inexpensive, and require zero maintenance. This is especially beneficial in a hunting knife because it is guaranteed to get messy and it will be easy to clean. If you are on a long hunting trip, you won’t have to worry about your handle corroding if you cannot get it entirely clean. The overall cons to this material is that it does have a cheap plastic feel and it is going to offer less grip than G-10 would.

The handle on this is one of the more unique aspects of the knife. The shape is simple with a curve spine, a curved belly, and a slight finger groove for increased comfort and grip. However, there is a bright orange streak going through the middle of it as well as orange ends. The rest of the knife is heavily textured with small K’s to provide the texture you need when it comes to your hunting trip.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is part of Kershaw’s series of hunting knives—for the toughness, durability, and edge-holding capabilities that your next hunting trip demands.

This is a manual opening knife, which means that there is no mechanical assist, such as SpeedSafe, that is used to open the knife. It opens the old-school way. This does help with legal issues, because it won’t fall under the same strict laws that an automatic or a spring assist knife would. However, it is also not going to be as efficient to use. While this can be a drawback in a tactical scenario, this is a hunting knife, so it should not have any issues. In fact, this can make it even safer, because while you are on the hunt and running around, you won’t have to worry about it accidentally opening.

This knife has been equipped with a secure mid-lock. The mid-lock is one of the older of the popular blade-locking systems, yet the principle is the same as with the locking liner and frame lock systems. Once the knife is opened, a steel bar locks into place behind the blade and prevents the knife from closing until released by the knife user. In this case, that steel bar is positioned along the back of the knife and you can see the mechanism along the handle spine. This heavy steel bar is under spring pressure. When the knife is opened, the lock snaps into place in a notch cut into the back of the blade, behind the pivot. This blocks the blade open until the knife user releases the lock. To close a mid-lock, the user presses down on the lock release on the back of the handle. This lifts the steel bar out of the notch in the back of the blade, releasing the lock and enabling the user to fold the blade back into the handle. To ensure strength in our mid lock knives, Kershaw uses only high-quality steel with excellent toughness and wear resistance.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is made out of nylon. Nylon is a material that is commonly used in knife sheaths. They are often compared to leather sheaths, because they are both very commonly used in sheaths. Just like leather sheaths, nylon sheaths are very tough and very strong. However, they are resistant to rot and mildew. This is an advantage over leather because they are not as vulnerable to water. Plus, nylon sheaths are not easily scuffed or torn.

Of course, nylon sheaths do have their cons as well. Nylon sheaths are one of the more inexpensive sheaths, but this also means that they aren’t going to last as long as the other sheaths. The biggest disadvantage to a nylon sheath is that they do get stretched out over time. While the sheath will still technically fit at this point, the knife is not going to fit as securely inside. Since this is a pocket sheath, this disadvantage should not matter quite as much.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.75 inches long. When this knife is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 8.5 inches long. This knife weighs in at 5.5 ounces without the sheath.

 

Conclusion:

             When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “The Buck Commander® LoneRock Folding Hunter with Gut Hook, designed and built by Kershaw, is a compact tool designed to make every hunting trip better.

The blade is razor-sharp and holds its edge well. Buck Commander brown titanium coating protects the blade in outdoor conditions. An oversized choil and thumb grooves on either side of the handle enable you to choke up on the blade when necessary. Mid-spine jimping provides a good grip for fine control. A big belly and precise gut hook make skinning easier.

This manual folder opens using the large groove in the blade—so there’s no thumb stud to get in the way of your work. A sturdy mid-lock secures the blade. You’ll get an extra secure grip with Kershaw’s exclusive K-Texture™ grip. The K-Texture material is both textured and rubberized to provide a non-slip grip, making the Buck Commander LoneRock exceptionally easy to use. Includes nylon sheath.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Strobe Flipper Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocketknives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group, headquartered in Tualatin, Oregon, United States.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a larger production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

They had a founding mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a strong commitment to innovation. They pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today, we will be going over the Kershaw Strobe Flipper knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. The easiest steel to compare this steel to is AUS8A. For everyday use, it is going to be complicated to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” The steel on this knife has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC.

The blade on this knife has been finished with a stonewashed finish. A stonewashed finish is created by tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches, while also working to make a less reflective look than a brushed or satin finished blade. There are actually a wide variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and the type of finish the blade has before it enters the tumbler. A very major advantage of a stonewashed blade is that it is going to be low maintenance and keep its look through time.

The blade on this knife has been carved into a clip point blade shape. This is a popular blade shape in the cutlery industry. It is created by having the spine of the knife go from the handle to about halfway up the blade before it turns and continues to the point of the blade. This section looks as if it is clipped out, and is named the clip, which is where the name of the knife shape came from. The clip can be either curved or straight, but on the strobe, it is straight. The clip creates a lowered point, which gives the user plenty of control over their cuts. The blade shape also has a very large belly, which makes slicing a piece of cake. One of the disadvantages of a clip point blade shape is that because the tip is fine, sharp, and narrow, it does have a tendency to break off or chip, especially when being used on hard targets. However, because of those same characteristics, the clip point is going to excel at stabbing.

 

Kershaw Strobe Flipper Knife
Kershaw Strobe Flipper Knife

The Handle:

             The handle on this knife is made out of 410 steel with K-Texture grip overlays. Steel is going to provide durability to the handle and knife as well as being incredibly resistant to corrosion. Unfortunately, it is not lightweight and is often slippery. The slipperiness of the steel is combatted on this knife with the K-Texture, which is an exclusive texture and pattern used on the handle of certain Kershaw knives. K-Texture provides an extremely secure grip. The overall benefits of a steel handle is that it is going to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant. The overall cons of a steel handle is that it is going to be heavy and it can be slippery.

The handle on his knife is designed for a great grip. The spine curves slowly toward the butt of the handle. About 2/3rds of the way down, a row of extreme jimping starts. This jimping is going to provide the user with the ability to really have control when they are using this knife. The belly of the handle does have a finger guard that is enhanced significantly with the flipper when the knife is opened. There is a slight finger groove that also has jimping in it to give the user an even more secure grip. The belly of the knife bulges out before curving towards the butt of the handle. The handle is outlined in steel, because the K-Texture does take up the majority of the handle. The steel on this knife is satin while the K-Texture is black, which provides a very sleek looking contrast.


The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is a deep carry pocket clip that is reversible. The pocket clip is black, which matches the middle portion of the handle. The clip has been slightly skeletonized at the top, which will cut down on weight.

This is a deep carry clip, which means that it is going to fit as deep in your pocket as it can. This is nice because you can move about throughout your day without worrying about the knife falling out of it. This knife is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which helps to make the knife ambidextrous. That being said, it is not reversible for either tip up or tip down carry. This knife has only been drilled for tip up carry. Some people do not like tip up carry, because if the knife accidentally opens in their pocket and they reach in, it is likely that they would slice their hands. However, this is a manual knife, so that is not going to be an issue for the Kershaw Strobe.

 

The Mechanism:

This knife is a manual knife which means that there is no mechanical assist, such as SpeedSafe, used to open the folding knife. This knife is going to open the classic, old-school way. That being said, it is equipped with the KVT ball-bearing opening system. The Kershaw KVT ball-bearing system makes one-handed opening of your knife fast and easy—without the need for a mechanical assist. While SpeedSafe assisted opening uses a torsion bar to help move the knife blade out the handle, KVT relies on a ring of “caged” ball bearings that surround the knife’s pivot. (“Caged” means the ball bearings are secured within a ring that surrounds the pivot. It keeps the ball bearings in place, while allowing them to rotate freely.) When the user pulls back on the built-in flipper, the blade rotates out of the handle as the ball bearings roll in place. KVT makes one-handed opening quick, easy, and smooth as butter.

This knife is also equipped with a flipper, which is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the user can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. A flipper helps to enable fast and easy one-handed opening as well as being ambidextrous. To open a Kershaw manual knife that has a flipper, Hold the knife handle in one hand with the butt end resting firmly in the palm of your hand. Place your index finger on the highest point of the flipper. Push down strongly and quickly on the flipper. The blade will move out of the handle and lock into place. (If you have trouble moving the blade fully out of the handle, add a slight flip of the wrist.)

This knife also has been equipped with a frame lock. In a frame lock knife, the knife handle—its “frame”—consists of two plates of material on either side of the blade. To ensure a secure lock up, one or both of these plates is usually metal. When the knife is opened, the metal side of the frame, the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. To close a frame lock knife, the user pushes the frame to the side, unblocking the blade, and folds the blade back into the handle. Like locking liner knives, frame locks are manufactured so that the locking side of the frame is angled toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias toward the locked position. Both the blade tang and the lock bar are precisely angled so they fit together for a secure, reliable lockup. The thickness of the frame material blocking the blade open makes the frame lock extremely sturdy.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.3 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.25 inches long. The overall length of this knife measures in at 7.5 inches when it is opened. This knife weighs in at 4.6 ounces, which is a good weight for a knife that you can have with you at all times. This knife is not going to be too heavy to have with you, but it is going to give you the heft that will get you through your tasks.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is describing this knife, they say, “Knife users who love the look of Kershaw’s Diskin Hunter—but would love it even more in a manual folding knife—now have their wish.

The Strobe takes the sweeping lines of the Diskin Hunter and turns them into a smaller, folding pocketknife. The clip-point blade offers a deep belly and opens with a handy flipper.

Thanks to the Strobe’s KVT ball-bearing opening system, the blade opens smoothly and easily; just pull back on the flipper. A washer with caged ball bearings surrounds the pivot joint and the bearings rotate as the blade moves out of the handle to ensure quick, one-handed opening. A frame lock provides secure lockup.

The blade is heat treated to Kershaw’s demanding specifications to bring out the best qualities in the steel, then stonewashed. The slim handle is characteristic of a Diskin knife and fits the hand securely. K-Texture™ handle overlays in glass-filled nylon provide additional grip.

The pocket clip is reversible for left/right-handed carry. Even better? It’s a deep-carry pocket clip so that it rides comfortably down in the pocket.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Secret Agent Fixed Blade Knife Review

Kershaw knows that there is really nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard-earned buck. Even our inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. Kershaw says, “That’s why we can back each of our knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with our famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. (Although, occasionally, a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.) The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, fishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you’re ready for anything.”

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation and has pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Secret Agent.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” This blade steel has been hardened to a 57-59 HRC.

The blade on the Secret Agent has been finished with a black-oxide coating. Black oxide is a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw uses this coating on some blades and pocket clips, mainly for appearance, though it does add some corrosion resistance. Because it is a coating, it is going to work to prolong the life of the blade. This is because the coating creates a barrier in between the steel and the environment. This will increase the wear resistance of the blade as well as the corrosion resistance. It will also slightly help the blade cut a little more smoothly. The coating is also black, which creates a sleek look while also cutting down on glares and reflections which is crucial for someone in the field.

The blade on this knife is a spear point blade shape. A spear point blade is similar to the needle point blade because it is good for piercing. The difference between the two shapes is that the point on the spear point is stronger and it does contain a small belly that can be used for slicing. The spear point is a symmetrically pointed blade with a point that is in line with the center of the blade’s length. Both edges of the knife rise and fall equally to create a point that lines up exactly with the equator of the blade. The spear point contrasts with the needle point because the needle point blade has a sharper but weaker point, while a spear point knife does have a strong point that is also sharp enough for piercing. One of the other advantages to a spear point knife is that they do contain a small belly that can be used for some slicing and cutting. However, if you were to compare the belly to that of a drop point or a clip point, the belly is much smaller. The spear point is known as a hybrid blade design because it has a good balance between piercing and slicing. It also has the sharp point of a dagger with the strength of a drop point blade, while still keeping some of the belly that can be used for slicing.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of a rubberized co-molded handle. This is a textured rubber layer providing extra grip. The rubberized co-molded handle is black, making this an all-black look. Not only does this give your knife a very sleek look, it is also going to completely eliminate reflections and glares. Like I earlier mentioned, this is crucial in the field when you don’t want your positon to be given away.

The handle has two large finger guards, which will protect your fingers if you accidentally slip. The handle sides are symmetrical. After the finger guards there is a slight indent on both sides. This indent will provide you with a comfortable and secure grip for long term use. After the indent the handle bulges out, which will also work to give you a more solid grip.

The butt of the handle does have a lanyard section, which is wide enough for a variety of lanyards. This is especially important because you can keep your knife close to you without having to worry about it getting in the way. Plus, if you happen to need a little extra texture, you can easily wrap the lanyard around the handle before completing the task. This will provide the needed texture to get you through your chore safely. The lanyard can also be used so that if you happen to drop your knife, you can easily find it contrasting against the background. Plus, wrapping the lanyard around your wrist for safety can help in case of slippage, so that you will not lose or drop your knife.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade, which means that there is not a mechanism. The knife does not fold close and is stored in a sheath for protection. Some people like to use a folding knife more because folding knives are more discrete and easier to conceal. Pocket knives can also be easily transported in your pocket. There is also a belief that a well-constructed folding knife blade is as tough as a fixed blade.

There are plenty of advantages to a fixed blade. For starters, they are strong and big. You can really find a fixed blade in whatever size that you want, but no matter which size you choose, they are going to be equally strong—especially the blade. Plus, fixed blades are not prone to breaking. This is because there are no moving parts on a fixed blade that can rust out or wear down with time. And, you don’t have to worry about a hinge or the insides being clean and dry for your knife to keep its quality. With this knife, all there is to it is what you see, which means there is really nothing to break. Plus, the blade can be longer and thicker because it does not have to fit inside of a handle, so the blade is not going to break either. Because of this, the knife is going to be easier to maintain overall. Like earlier mentioned, you don’t have to worry about the insides of the handle wearing down, because there are no insides of the handle. And cleaning is going to be incredibly straightforward. All you have to do is wipe down the blade and the handle and oil the blade occasionally and you are good to go.

One of the other major benefits to the Secret Agent being a fixed blade is that fixed blades are the superior tactical tool. This is because fixed blade knives can be brought into play faster than a folding knife during tactical situations. All you have to do is pull the knife out of your sheath and you are ready to go. With a folding knife, you would have to pull the knife out, open it, and then you could finally use it. With many tactical situations, every single second counts, so why waste seconds on opening a knife when you could purchase the Secret Agent instead?

Lastly, this knife can be used for a broader spectrum of things because of the durability.

 

The Sheath:

The sheath that comes with this knife is made out of molded dual-carry plastic. Plastic sheaths are some of the cheapest ones that you are going to find on the market. You do get what you pay for, so you shouldn’t be surprise that plastic sheaths are also the ones that are the cheapest quality. A plastic sheath is one of the more inhospitable home for your blade if it is going to be carried for an extended amount of time. This is because it locks in moisture which can cause rusting or corroding issues on your blade. The sheath that comes with the knife is MOLLE compatible, which is a major advantage.

 

Kershaw Secret Agent Fixed Blade Knife
Kershaw Secret Agent Fixed Blade Knife

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 4.4 inches long while the overall length of the knife measures in at 8.7 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.1 ounces without the sheath and 4.7 ounces with the sheath.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is explaining this knife, they say, “This boot knife’s mission is to offer both performance and value. The model number of our Secret Agent boot knife could be none other than 4007.

This updated version of the boot knife features a single-edged blade with a non-reflective black-oxide finish. The blade is heat treated to Kershaw’s demanding specifications to bring out the very best qualities in the steel. The black-oxide coating provides additional blade protection.

For a secure grip, the handle is glass-filled nylon with a textured rubber over mold. The Secret Agent has a dual-carry molded sheath with a clip for convenient belt carry and slots to add your own leg carry straps. For additional versatility, the knife comes with a lanyard hole.

Discreet and concealable for tactical use and personal protection, the Secret Agent is also viable for a variety of utility purposes.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps and have a new favorite tactical knife.

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Fatback Folding Knife Review

Kershaw Fatback Folding Knife
Kershaw Fatback Folding Knife

Kershaw is known for a lot of things—all of which have to do with how innovative and quality their knives are. They were founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. his has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Plus, they have a serious commitment to innovation. Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. They say, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in Kershaw’s 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Fatback folding knife.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” This steel is hardened to a 57-59 HRC.

The steel has been coated with a black-oxide coating. The black oxide coating is a chemical bath that converts the surface of the steel to magnetite. Kershaw sues this coating on some blades mainly for appearance, although it does add some corrosion resistance. Because this is a coating, it is going to prolong the life of the blade because it is a barrier in between the steel and the environment. That being said, because it is a coating, it is going to scratch off after time or even just after some heavy use. Once the coating has been scratched off, you aren’t going to get any of the good benefits that come with a coating. You win some, you lose some when it comes to the coating on a blade. Lastly, the coating is a deep black that cuts down on all glares and reflections, which is great if you are in the field.

The blade has been carved into a modified drop point shape that has some dagger blade shape inspiration. The drop point is an all-purpose blade shape that is also super tough. This is also one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today. The blade is formed by having the back edge of the knife run straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow, curving manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and also adds strength to the tips. Normally, drop points have a broad tip, but the Fatback has a finer point because of the dagger point inspiration that it does have. While a typical drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, this one is almost as sharp as a clip point, which means that you are going to be able to pierce much better. That begin said, because it is finer and sharper, it is not going to be as strong as a typical drop point would be. Lastly, a regular drop point has a very large belly, and while the Fatback does have a belly, it is not as large as your regular drop point blade.

This knife does have a plain edge, which is going to give you cleaner cuts. The plain edge is also going to be easier to sharpen, although it will need to be sharpened much more frequently. The plain edge also equips you to take on a wider variety of tasks than a serrated knife would.

 

The Handle:

             The handle on this knife is made out of Glass-Filled nylon, or GFN. This is a thermoplastic, synthetic material that is almost impossible to break. While GFN is similar in structure and characteristics to G-10, Micarta, and Carbon Fiber, it is much stronger and not prone to breaking. This is because in the other materials, all of the fibers are arranged in a single direction. This means that while the material is going to be strong in that direction, it is not going to be super strong in any other direction. This is where the brittleness comes in as well as the ability to bend the other materials. GFN has all of its fibers arranged haphazardly, which means that the handle is going to be strong in all directions instead of just one. This is why GFN is not brittle, and is resistant to bending and abrasion.

Plus, GFN is a cheaper material because it can be injection molded which means that the manufacturer can texturize the handles throughout the process and can produce a lot more all at once. This leads to a much cheaper material. That being said, some people do feel like it has a cheap plastic quality to it and it does not give as much texture as a G10 handle would.

To help with grip the belly of the handle has plenty of ridges. There is a large finger guard that is enhanced by the flipper which will create a safer grip on the knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is black, which matches the hardware, the handle, and the blade on this knife. It is kept in place by two small screws. This is a deep carry knife, which is a great option for you to keep your knife deep inside your pocket. It also helps you to conceal your knife better inside of your pocket if you don’t want anyone to know that you have one.

This is also a 4-position pocket clip, which means that the user may position the pocket clip for tip-up or tip-down carry as well as for left or right-handed carry. This is the ideal option when it comes to pocket clips because it allows the user to use this knife in the most comfortable position possible.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife that has been equipped with a flipper, a SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism, and a liner lock.

The flipper is a protrusion on the back of the blade that the sur can pull back on, or flip, in order to move the blade easily out of the handle. The flipper enables a fast and easy one-handed opening as well as being ambidextrous, which makes this knife the most comfortable and the easiest to use for its users. To open this knife, Hold the knife handle vertically in one hand. Place your index finger on the top of the flipper or thumb on the thumb stud. Gently apply downward pressure on the flipper or push outwards on the thumb stud. SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily, and the blade locks into place. Keep fingers away from blade edge while closing.

The SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud or pull back on the flipper. SpeedSafe is built into many of Kershaw’s best-selling knives. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. SpeedSafe® was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fishermen, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job-site.

The liner lock is the most common of today’s blade-locking systems. In knives with locking liners, the handle consists of two metal (usually steel or titanium) plates (the “liner”) on either side of the blade. Handle scales, which can be made from a variety of materials, such as G10, aluminum, plastic, or natural materials like wood or bone cover the plates. When the knife is opened, one side of the knife’s liner, often called the lock bar, butts up against the backend of the blade (the tang) and prevents the blade from closing. The lock bar is manufactured so that it angles toward the interior of the knife, creating a bias for the locked position. To close the knife, the knife user applies manual force to move the lock bar to the side so that the blade is unblocked and can be folded back into the handle. The liner lock provides a secure and convenient way to make using a Kershaw folding knife even safer.


The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.5 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.25 inches long. When the Fatback is opened, it measures in at 7.75 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.6 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about this knife, they say, “No, the Fatback does not have a fat back. In fact, it has a rather slim handle. But to ensure you always have an extra secure grip, it does have some extra fat texturing on its glass-filled nylon handle. Actually, we call it the Fatback because it’s one very tasty knife. Like bacon.

The handsome blade is a modified drop-point with a dagger-like shape. The 8Cr13MoV blade steel, with Kershaw’s precision heat treatment, provides long-lasting edge retention, as well as strength and hardness. Black-oxide coating offers an additional measure of blade protection and non-reflectivity.

The Fatback opens with Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening for smooth, one-handed opening. The pivot is oversized and decorative. The handle is drilled to support our four-position pocket clip—so you can carry tip-up/down, left/right, whatever your preferred carry position. And finally, the Fatback’s deep-carry pocket clip lets the knife ride securely and comfortably low in the pocket.” You can pick up this knife today at BladeOps.

 

 

 

 

 

Kershaw Buck Commander Green Antelope Hunter II Knife and Zip It Combo Pack Review

When it comes to quality knives, you know that you can rely on Kershaw. This is because they have award-winning technologies and advanced materials as well as solid sounding blade lockups. You know that when you have a Kershaw in hand, it is not going to let you down.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation and has pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are now the standard in the knife industry. Kershaw says, “Our SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. We introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in our Blade Traders. Recently, our Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling us to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And we will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.”

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in Kershaw’s 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon (just south of Portland), they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for the customer.

Today we will be discussing the Kershaw Buck Commander Green Antelope Hunting knife as well as the Zip It.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this hunting knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. You may have heard that 8Cr13MoV stainless is basically the equivalent of AUS8A. And it’s true. For everyday use, even a serious “knife knut” would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a well-made 8Cr13MoV blade and a well-made AUS8A blade. Nevertheless, there are slight differences in the steel formula. While most other components are relatively equal, 8Cr13MoV has slightly more carbon for hardness and wear resistance and slightly less nickel. The key to blade performance for both of these steels is manufacturing quality. That’s where Kershaw’s expertise comes in. Kershaw precision heat-treats 8Cr13MoV steel to bring out its best high-performance characteristics: the ability to take and hold an edge, strength, and hardness. Kershaw says, “8Cr13MoV is top-of-the-line Chinese steel and, we believe, offers our customers an excellent value.” This steel has been hardened to a HRC level of 57–59.

The blade has been finished with a satin finish. This finish is created by repeatedly sanding the blade in one direction with an increasing level of a fine abrasive. The fine abrasive that is most often used is a sandpaper. The satin finish is used to show off the bevels of the blade, while also showcasing the liens of the knife and reducing its reflective glare. As a key, the finer the abrasive and the more even the lines; the cleaner the satin finish blade is going to look. While the satin finish is going to look classy on this knife, it is a lower quality knife, so it is not going to give you the cleanest satin finish that you have ever found. The satin finish is one of the most common and most traditional blade finishes that you are going to find on the market. This is a perfect blade finish for a classy hunting knife such as this one.

The blade has been carved into a drop point blade shape, which is the perfect blade shape for a hunting knife. This is an all-purpose knife that can stand up to almost anything. The shape of the knife is formed by having the back edge of the knife run straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. It is also because the point on a drop point blade is easily controlled that makes it such a popular shape on a hunting knife. This helps you avoid accidentally nicking internal organs or ruining the meat. Drop point blades also sport a very large belly, which makes slicing a breeze. This large belly is going to help you skin your game with ease. The drop point blade does have one major disadvantage: because of its broad tip it is going to be less suitable for piercing than the clip point blade shape would be. You do need to remember that it is that same broad tip that gives the drop point blades their characteristic strength.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of a molded co-polymer which is a rubber like plastic. This is not the highest quality handle material that you are going to come across, because the rubber is going to break down after a while. That being said, it is going to offer you much more texture than any other material is going to offer you. This comes in handy with a hunting knife because you know that the job is going to get messy and you are going to want a material that can get wet without losing its grip. This material is also not going to corrode, which is a benefit that many hunters can enjoy. Lastly, the material is easy to maintain and clean because it is not going to absorb any of the fluids that it comes in contact with.

The handle is built for a secure grip. The spine has a slow slope towards the butt of the handle. The belly features a very large finger guard in case of slippage. Then there are four deep finger grooves to provide a secure and comfortable grip on this knife. Down the length of the handle are thin grooves to provide the needed texture.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a fixed blade knife. Many people like having a folding knife because it is more discrete, easier to conceal, and easier to have with you at all times. However, there are so many big benefits to having a fixed blade knife. For starts, they are going to be bigger and stronger than a folding knife is. You can really find a fixed blade in any size, but you know that no matter which size it is, it is going to be incredibly strong. The 3.6-inch blade is large enough to get your hunting job done on most average hunting tasks.

Because they don’t have to fit inside of a handle, the blade is going to be bigger and longer. This means that you are going to be able to perform easier with this knife than you would of a smaller blade. This also means that the knife is not going to break. The blade can be thicker than it would be on a folding knife, which helps protect it against snapping if you are ever using it a little tougher.

Fixed blades are also less likely to break because there are no moving parts on a fixed blade. This means that there is no spring that can wear down or rust, no hinge that needs oiling, and no inner pieces that might break down over time. This characteristic also helps make the knife easier to maintain. The knife is going to be easier to clean because you don’t have to really get into the knife to clean it. All you have to do is wipe down the blade and handle and oil the blade occasionally.

Also, fixed blades are going to make for a superior survival tool. This means that if you are ever on a hunting trip, you will be able to use this knife for more than just hunting. Some of the tasks that you can perform are prying, digging, splitting wood, cutting things, using it as a first aid tool, using it to prepare food, as well as using the butt of the knife to hammer. Although, the butt on this knife is not going to be the best butt you’ve ever come across.

Overall, when it comes to a hunting knife, your best bet is going to be a fixed blade. It will allow you to take on more tasks and will be able to perform duties other than just hunting.

 

The Sheath:

             This knife comes with a leather sheath for storage and carrying. Leather is one of the more traditional materials that is still used to make a knife sheath. Many people view a leather sheath as rugged, tough, and strong. This material is not going to break like plastic is known to do and if the stitches happen to come loose, it is an easy fix. Not only is leather a quality material, it also looks and feels good. The older your leather sheath gets, the better it is going to look (when you properly care for it.) Also, once a leather sheath is broken in, it is going to provide a custom fit for your knife. One of the biggest advantages for a leather sheath for a hunting knife is that leather is going to be completely silent. You will be able to pull the knife out and put it back in without making a sound. This is one of the more unique characteristics that is mostly found in only leather.

Of course, leather also does have its disadvantages. Leather is not a waterproof material so if it gets wet often it can dry out the oils of the leather and crack. This cracking can also be caused by being exposed to extreme heat. You can prevent cracking if you oil your sheath from time to time. Just know that to get so many great benefits, you do have to take care of your sheath.

 

Kershaw Buck Commander Green Antelope Hunter II Knife and Zip It Combo Pack
Kershaw Buck Commander Green Antelope Hunter II Knife and Zip It Combo Pack

The Specs:

The knife has a blade that measures in at 3.6 inches long. The overall length of this hunting knife measures in at 8 inches even. This is one of Kershaw’s hunting knives, which means that it has been designed for the toughness, durability, and edge holding capabilities that your next hunting drip demands.

 

The Zip It:

             The Zip It gut hook is compact and lightweight. It is perfect or “unzipping” the skin without puncturing the gut sack. The Zip It handle is made out of steel with a non-slip insert. The blade on the Zip It measures in at .5 inches. The overall length of the Zip It hook is 3.75 inches long.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is discussing this knife, they say, “This fixed-blade knife is just the right size for field dressing most game and makes an especially excellent deer knife—which is why the Buck Commander® Buckmen chose it as one of their go-to tools. The quality steel is designed to hold an edge longer, providing extended use without re-sharpening—even under heavy field use. You’ll also like how the Antelope Hunter II fits your hand. The finger-contoured handle let’s your hand lock into place for a solid, yet extremely comfortable grip. The co-polymer handle is grippy enough to be secure, even when wet, yet cleans up easily. This set also includes the Zipit gut hook. Compact and lightweight, the Zipit makes it easy to “unzip” the skin without danger of puncturing the gut sack and ruining the meat. Includes nylon sheath for the knife.” You can pick up this combo pack today at BladeOps.

 

 

Kershaw PUB Knife Review

People of all walks alike believe that there is nothing like a Kershaw. When you are carrying a Kershaw knife, you are carrying the real deal. This means that everything from the solid sound of the blade lockup to the award winning technologies and advanced materials—all of it is going to be the highest quality.

No matter which model that you buy, you are getting the best bang for your buck. No matter which knife of Kershaw’s you are choosing to use, you are getting value and plenty of it. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. Because of their high quality knives, Kershaw backs each of their knives with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. This warranty backs each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction.  And yes, it is very possible to own a Kershaw knife for your lifetime. Kershaw knows that occasionally a Kershaw has been known to get accidentally left at a campsite, lost in the garage, or permanently borrowed by a friend.

No matter what situation you are choosing to face, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives, sporting knives, work knives, and tactical knives. These knives can take on tasks from destroying a cardboard box, to fishing or watersports, and then on to preparing you to take on truly nay task that a knife could be used for.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 with a mission to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. From hardworking pocket knives, to hunting knife and even a special collector’s edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high quality materials, and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state of the art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw also has a commitment to innovation. In fact, Kershaw has pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. From being the first to market with SpeedSafe assisted opening knives to the concept of knives that sport interchangeable blades, and lastly their Composite Blade technology, which truly gives knife users the best of both worlds. Kershaw is committed to keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA, Ltd. a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions.

If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. Kershaw has some cool new blades to show you—right along with a wide selection of your favorites. “For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Kershaw PUB
Kershaw PUB

The Blade:

The blade on the PUB has been made out of 8Cr13MoV steel. This is a popular budget brand of knife steel, which is made in China. In its composition this steel is close to the Japanese steel of AUS 8 grade. 8Cr13MoV steel at its low cost demonstrates very worthy characteristics of cutting. With the great heat treatment that Kershaw uses, the steel will retain its sharpness of the cutting edge and have a very good corrosion resistance for long periods of time. The range of hardness on this steel is 56-59HRC. Knives made out of this formula of steel will keep sharpening well and at the same time they are easy to sharpen, and have highly aggressive cuts on soft materials. This steel is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. Many features made this a suitable steel for production of non-expensive tourist and urban knives with good average performance. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is its inexpensive cost.

The blade has been finished with a stonewashed finish. With this type of finish, the steel is literally rolled with pebbles and then smoothed. Many people like this type of finish because it hides scratches better than other finishes. A stonewash finish also hides fingerprints pretty well, so the blade might not need to be polished as often as others with different finishes. The finish preserves the look of the blade easily overtime.

The blade is a modified sheepsfoot with a straight edge and clipped rather than rounded tip. In some cases, you want a knife that is perfect for slicing or cutting without worrying about controlling the point. You can easily avoid an accidental stabbing by using a sheepsfoot blade. The main purpose of a sheepsfoot blade is for cutting and slicing while minimizing the chances of anything accidentally being pierced by the point. The design of a sheepsfoot knife includes a straight edged blade and a dull back spine that goes straight down to meet the straight edge. The two blades meet at the tip to form a “false point”. The distinctive flat cutting edge is well suited to giving you a supremely clean cut, especially on flat cutting surfaces. Sheepsfoot knives are popular amount emergency responders who use them to cut seatbelts and other restraints without injuring the victim with a sharp point. They are also popular among sailors who use them to safely cut rigging without the danger of piercing the sails. The only disadvantage of a sheepsfoot blade is its lack of a sharp point which also happens to be one of its advantages.

This blade sports a plain edge, which is perfect for giving you clean cuts. The plain edge is the more traditional edge option that you have, especially when compared to a combo or serrated edge. The plain edge is the easiest edge to sharpen as well as getting a finer edge on it.

On the back of the blade, there is a row of thick jimping to help you have a secure grip and to give you better traction while you are using the Kershaw PUB.

 

The Handle:

There are a couple of different options for your PUB handle. The first option is a Carbon Fiber front handle scale with a steel back scale. Carbon fiber is a somewhat generic term referring to thin strands of carbon being tightly woven then set in resin. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer is wheat you get when you buy a knife marketed with a carbon fiber handle. The result is a tremendously strong yet lightweight material that is also rather expensive. While strong, it is far from indestructible and suffers from being brittle. This is because all of the fibers are arranged in a single direction so when they are stressed in that direction it is super strong. However, it starts to break apart when stressed in other directions. Because its brittle, it can crack I subjected to sharp impacts. Due to the way in which the carbon “weave” reflects light, you can achieve some nice looking results in a knife handle. Production of carbon fiber handles is a labor intensive process, though, so it tends to be found only on the higher end knives. The back handle scale on this knife is stainless steel, so it provides excellent durability and resistance to corrosion but is not particularly lightweight. The carbon fiber is black.

The other two options are made with an anodized aluminum front scale with a steel back. Aluminum is usually anodized for color, hardness, and protection. One of the options has been anodized blue and the other version has been anodized black. Aluminum is a very durable material for knife handles. It is a low density metal that provides for a nice, hefty feel to the knife without weighing the knife down. When properly texturized an aluminum handle can provide a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use. On the downside, if you use your knife quite a bit during colder winter months, you might find the handle uncomfortably cold given its conductive properties. Aluminum is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother titanium which tends to be found on the more premium knives.

The handle is a rectangular shape with a bottle opener on the butt of the handle. This handle also features a screwdriver tip, a pry bar, and a key chain attachment. The PUB is considered a multifunctional knife because of all these extra features.

 

The Mechanism:

This is a purely manual opening knife. There is no mechanical assist, such as SpeedSafe, used to open the folding knife. It opens the classic, old school way. Closed, you would never know that there was a handy blade inside—although you would definitely see the equally handy bottle opener. And if you were exceptionally sharp eyed, you might notice the slotted screwdriver tip right next to the bottle opener. To reveal the blade, just push down on what looks like the key ring attachment. You’ll see the blade move out of the compact handle. Keep pushing and the blade will swing all the way out, ready for use.

 

The Specs:

This is a miniature knife. The blade on the PUB measures in at 1.6 inches long. When the knife is opened, it measures in at 4.5 inches long. When the knife is closed, it measures in at 3.1 inches long. This knife weighs in at only 1.9 ounces.

 

The Pros of the PUB:

  • Kershaw has earned their reputation of having quality, durable knives that you can rely on.
  • The blade is made out of 8Cr13MoV steel which is an easy steel to sharpen and continue re-sharpening over the years.
  • The blade has been finished with a stonewash finish, which easily hides scratches and fingerprints.
  • The 8Cr13MoV steel holds an edge for a long period of time.
  • The stainless steel has good corrosion and rust resistance.
  • The modified sheepsfoot blade shape makes it easy to avoid an accidental stabbing.
  • The flat bottom will provide you with an extremely clean cut.
  • The plain edge is easier to sharpen and easier to get a finer edge on it.
  • The carbon fiber handle is crazy strong.
  • The carbon fiber handle is extremely lightweight.
  • The aluminum handle is extremely durable and resistant to rust and corrosion.
  • Aluminum has a dense feel to it, to provide the strength behind the knife, while still being very lightweight.
  • The manual mechanism makes this a legal knife in any area.
  • Sports a bottle opener.
  • Sports a screwdriver tip.
  • Boasts a pry bar.
  • Features a key chain attachment.

 

The Cons of the PUB:

  • 8Cr13MoV steel is a softer steel.
  • The blade only has a false point, which means that you won’t be able to stab with it, when needed.
  • Carbon fiber is a brittle material.
  • Aluminum is a cold material.
  • The manual mechanism is going to be less swift than an automatic or spring assisted mechanism.

 

Conclusion:

The Pub is one of many new folding models released by Kershaw this year. Designed by acclaimed knife maker Dmitry Sinkevich, each model boasts a stainless steel blade that can be opened manually just by pulling down on the carabiner-like key ring attachment. When in the closed position, the tools of this knife are highlighted–including a bottle opener, screwdriver tip and pry bar. Every Pub is classified as a friction folder which by definition is a folding knife that does not use a lock or springs and uses the handle’s friction against the tang to stay open and the strong detent keeps everything at bay until needed. The handle features either a black aluminum front handle scale or a carbon fiber front handle scale, a stainless steel back handle scale, a modified sheepsfoot style blade in a stonewash finish and there is no included pocket clip option. This is the perfect multi functioning knife to have with you on at all times. The gadgets that are included with the PUB are sure to come in handy more than once.

 

Kershaw Dividend and Gray Dividend Knife Review

There is really nothing like a Kershaw. From award winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you are carrying Kershaw, you know that you are carrying the real deal. The real deal means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible bang for your hard earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty. And yes, people do own their Kershaw knives for a lifetime. The point is, you can always look to Kershaw for every day carrying knives that can tame any cardboard box and liberate any purchase from its plastic packaging, sporting knives that make hunting, finishing, watersports, and camping even better, work knives that won’t let you down, and tactical knives that ensure you are ready for anything.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state of the art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first to market. They introduced the concept of knives that had interchangeable blades in their Blade Traders. Recently, they released their Composite Blade Technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling them to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And they committed to keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA, Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 square foot facility in Tualatin, Oregon, they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for their customers.

Kershaw has said, “IF this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be talking about the Kershaw Dividend and the Gray Dividend.

 

Kershaw Gray Dividend
Kershaw Gray Dividend

 

The Blades:

The steel on both versions of this knife has been made out of 420HC steel. This is considered the king of the 420 steels, 420HC is similar to 420 steel but with increased levels of carbon. The “HC” in the name refers to the High Carbon, which makes the steel harder.

Kershaw Dividend
Kershaw Dividend

This steel is actually considered a lower mid-range steel but the more competent manufactures can really bring out the best in this affordable steel using quality heat treatments. The heat treatments results in better edge retention and resistance to corrosion. In fact, this is one of the most corrosion resistant steels out there, despite its low cost.

Both versions of the steel also feature a stonewash finish. A stonewashed finish refers to tumbling the blade in an abrasive material. This finish easily hides scratches while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is a wide variety of stonewashed finishes based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and they type of finish the blade has before it enters the tumbler. One of the biggest benefits of a stonewash blade is that they are extremely low maintenance and how they preserve the look of the blade overtime. The stonewash finish hides the scratches that can occur with use over time.

The steel on the Dividends have been carved into a drop point shape. The drop point shape is perfect if you are looking for a great all-purpose knife that can stand up to anything. A drop point is one of the most popular blade shapes in use today. The most recognizable knife that features a drop point is the hunting knife, although it is used on many other types of knives as well, including the larger blades in Swiss army knives. The back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, creating a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. Because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades are popular on tactical and survival knives. Because the point on a drop point blade is easily controllable, they are a popular choice on hunting knives. The lowered, controllable point makes it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. One of the other reasons that the drop point style blade is so versatile is because of the large belly area that they sport that is perfect for slicing. There are so many advantages to having a knife with the drop point style, but there is a drawback—its relatively broad tip, which makes it less suitable for piercing than the lip point. However, it is this broad tip that provides point strength that you are not going to find on clip point knives. By choosing a knife that features a drop point style blade, you are choosing a knife that is going to help you in any situation.

These knives both sport plain edges. The plain edge is definitely the more traditional style edge when being compared to a serrated or combo edge. The plain edge is more equipped to take on a wider variety of tasks. These tasks that it excels at include push cuts, slicing, skinning, and peeling. One of the disadvantages is that plain edges are not as well equipped to saw through the thicker materials. To get through the thicker or tougher materials, you are going to want the teeth that the serrated edge gives you.

 

The Handles:

The original version of the Dividend has a handle that is made out of glass filled nylon, or GFN. This is the same material as FRN. It is a thermoplastic material that is super strong, resistant to bending, abrasion, and is practically indestructible. And as a bonus, it is a cheap material. With the GFN, the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in it being strong in all directions as opposed to G 10, carbon fiber, and Micarta which have the fiberglass strands aligned in a single direction. Many knife enthusiasts did not warm up to this material because they felt like it was cheap and felt somewhat hollow. Another drawback is that it tends to be a little less “grippy” than G 10. GFN is inexpensive because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. All this lends well to high volume manufacturing and hence low cost.

The Gray Dividend is made out of aluminum. Aluminum is a very durable material for knife handles. It is a low density metal that provides for a nice, hefty feel to the knife without weighing the knife down. When the handle is properly texturized, an aluminum handle can provide a reasonably secure grip that is also comfortable and easy for extended use. On the downside, if you use your knife a lot during colder winter months, you might find the handle uncomfortably cold given its conductive properties. Aluminum is generally considered inferior to its stronger, yet more expensive brother Titanium which tends to be found on the more premium knives. The aluminum has been anodized for color, hardness, and protection. In this case, the anodization has given the handle a gray color. One of the other drawbacks is that aluminum is susceptible to scratches and dings.

There is an elongated finger groove to give you a comfortable grip while you are using this knife. There is a finger guard to protect your hand from slipping and getting cut. On the butt of the handle, there has been a lanyard hole carved in. The lanyard hole has a variety of benefits, one of the best being that it keeps your knife out of the way when you don’t need it, but gives you quick access when you do need to use your knife.

 

The Pocket Clip:

Both knives have deep carry pocket clips that are black. This pocket clip is kept in place by two small screws. All of the other hardware is black to match the pocket clip. These are four positon pocket clips. This means that you can attach it for left or right hand carry and you can keep your knife tip up or down.

 

The Mechanism:

These knives are assisted opening knives. They sport a flipper mechanism, a liner lock, and the SpeedSafe mechanism. The flipper is a shark’s fin shaped protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper actually employs an index finger, and the features in naturally ambidextrous. One of the benefits to using a flipper mechanism is that it keeps your fingers out of the way while you are opening your knife.

Line locks are one of the more common mechanism seen on folding knives. This mechanism’ characteristic component is a side spring located on the same side as the sharp edge of the blade, “lining” the inside of the handle. When the knife is closed, the spring bar is held under tension. When the knife is fully opened, that tension slips the bar inward to make contact with the butt of the blade, keeping it firmly in place and preventing it from closing. To disengage a liner lock, you have to sue your thumb to push the spring bar “down’ so that it clears contact form the butt of the blade. This lets you use your index finger to push the blade just enough so that it keeps the bar pushed down so you can remove your thumb from the blade path, then continue to safely close the knife.

The SpeedSafe Assisted Opening assists you to open your knife quickly and easily with a manual push on the thumb stud or pull back on the flipper.

 

The Specs:

The length of the blade is 3 inches long. The overall length of this knife is 7.25 inches long with a closed length of 4.25 inches long. The GFN version of the knife weighs in at 2.6 ounces. The anodized aluminum handle weighs in at 2.8 ounces. These knives are made in the United States of America by skilled Kershaw knife makers.

 

Conclusion:

The success of Kershaw’s made in the USA link series has yielded a Dividend. It’s a slimmer, sleeker pocket carry—proudly made in the USA in our Tualatin, Oregon factory, yet still built at a very affordable price. While the original Link is a larger and stouter knife, some of you prefer a slimmer blade. The Dividend is made for you. Not too big, not too small, the Kershaw Dividend is a just the right sized pocket knife. Its elegant drop point blade is a perfect 3 inches long and offers enough belly to be an efficient slicer. The knife is easy to open, even one handed, with SpeedSafe assisted opening and the flipper. The anodized aluminum handles in matte grey curves gently to fit the hand comfortably. A decorative molded back spacer and left/right reversible pocket clip make the Dividend both handsome and handy. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.

Kershaw Flitch Knife Review

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form his own cutlery company based on his own designs. This company was started with the vision to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan.

In 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing and distribution functions.   In 1997 the US production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a large production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin Oregon with some good coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker, Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives; Ernest Emerson; Grant and Gavin Hawk; Frank Centofante; Rick Hinderer; RJ Martin, and more.

With Kershaw, you get fantastic bang for your buck because even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, and reliable. That’s why they can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction. Because yes, people do own their Kershaw for a lifetime.

Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first to market. They introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blades in their Blade Traders. And recently, their Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling them to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And they have a commitment to keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies, and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife using public.

 

The Blade:

8Cr13MoV steel is what the blade on the Flitch is made out of. This steel is a popular budget brand of knife steel, which is made in China. In its formula, this steel is close to the Japanese steel AUS 8. Because the blade has been made out of this steel, it will keep sharpening well and will easy to sharpen. Plus, the Flitch will be able to have highly aggressive cuts n softer materials. This steel is well balanced in regards to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. In the Cr series of steel, 9Cr steel is the top end of the series and is really good. Next up is 8Cr, which is the more common formula that you are going to find. If the manufacturer gives this type of steel a good heat treatment, they will bring out all of the best qualities that this steel has. And lucky for us, because Kershaw has taken this steel thorough a heat treatment to bring out the best in this top value steel. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is its inexpensive cost. However, you do need to keep in mind that this is still considered an average grade steel. So while it will get most jobs done, this blade is not going to excel at anything.

This blade has a stonewashed finish. This finish is created by tumbling the steel around with small pebbles to create a textured look. After the steel has been tumbled around, it is removed, smoothed out, and polished. This style of finish gives you a very rugged, well-worn look. This style of finish easily hides scratches, while also providing a less reflective nature than a brushed or satin finished blade. There is actually wide variety of stonewashed finishes because the look is based upon the abrasive shape, tumbling motion, and the type of finish the blade started with. The biggest benefit to a stonewashed finish is that they are low maintenance and preserve their original look overtime. The stonewashed finish also easily ides the scratches and fingerprints that can occur with use over time.

The blade has been carved into a modified drop point style blade. A regular drop point blade shape has the back, or unsharpened, edge of the knife running straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. On this modified drop point blade shape, the back does not move towards the point in a slow curve. It starts off with an upward slant and has jimping on it to provide you with more control over your cuts. Then the blade does have a slow curve down for about a third of the blade. At this point, it almost resembles a clip point lade shape, because the curve meets an angel, which then slopes downward towards the tip. It is this lowered tip that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. And while the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. Because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy sue, drop point blades are a popular option on tactical and survival knives. And because the point is so easily controllable, a drop point style blade is also a popular choice on hunting knives. One of the other reasons that a drop point blade is so versatile is because it sports such a large belly area that makes slicing a breeze. The Flitch even has a bigger belly than you would normally find, so slices are not going to be easier than when you are attempting them with your Flitch. Because of the large belly, this knife makes for the perfect everyday carry option.

Because this is a great everyday knife, the Flitch sports a plain edge. This style of edge is the more traditional edge that you are going to find and it is more equipped to take on a wider variety of tasks. The plain edge is going to give you cleaner cuts while excelling at push cuts, slicing, skinning, and peeling. Some people worry that because the plain edge does not sport teeth, it is not going to be able to cut through thicker and tougher materials. While serrations definitely help to saw through the thicker and tougher materials, when your plain edged blade is sharp enough, it will be able to manage.

Kershaw Flitch
Kershaw Flitch

The Handle:

The handle has been made out of Glass Filled Nylon, or GFN. This material is basically the off brand of Zytel. GFN is a thermoplastic material which is super strong while being resistant to bending, abrasion, and it is practically indestructible. As a total bonus, it is a cheap material to purchase. This is an inexpensive material because it can be injection molded into any desired shape and textured in a multitude of ways in the production process. All this lends well to high volume manufacturing and hence low cost. This material is practically indestructible because the nylon fibers are arranged haphazardly throughout which results in it being strong in all directions. Similar materials such as G10, Carbon Fiber, and Micarta have their fiberglass strands aligned in a single direction. This means that when the strands are being stressed in the direction they go, the material is going to be extremely strong. But, when the strands are stressed in other directions, the material is going to start to breakdown. That is why those other materials are brittle. Because GFN’s fibers are arranged so haphazardly, it doesn’t matter which way the fibers are stressed, they aren’t going to break down. The Flitch has been designed to take a beating.

To give you a comfortable grip on the Flitch, even after periods of heavy use, there is a deep finger groove and then two more shallow finger grooves that follow suit. This gives your fingers a comfortable place to rest. To keep your fingers safe, there is a thick finger guard so that your fingers can’t slip and get cut. While the top of the handle is slightly curved, the butt of the handle is all angels.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The clip on this knife is a deep carry pocket clip. This means that it will be easier to conceal your knife snugly in your pocket. You also won’t have to worry about your knife falling out during all of your daily tasks. The knife has only been designed to be carried tip up, but the clip is reversible on the left and right sides, helping to make this knife more ambidextrous.

 

The Mechanism:

This is an assisted opening knife. It is Kershaw’s SpeedSafe assisted opening mechanism. Kershaw was the first to bring SpeedSafe assisted opening knives to market, launching a revolution in opening systems—and winning numerous industry awards along the way. This mechanism was originally designed by Hall of Fame knife maker, Ken Onion, and the knives with this mechanism flew off the shelves. Today, almost all knife companies offer some sort of assisted opening knife, but none matches the popularity or proven durability of the original. SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open any SpeedSafe knife with a manual pull back on the flipper. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. Closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by gravity, it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud or flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. And while it performs as smoothly as a switchblade, a SpeedSafe knife is not a switchblade. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblades. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blades do not deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead, the user must overcome the torsion bar’s resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade.

The Flitch features a flipper. To use a flipper, you hold the knife handle in one hand with the butt end resting firmly in the palm of your hand. You place your index finger on the highest point of the flipper. You push down strongly and quickly on the flipper and the blade will move out of the handle and lock into place.

The locking mechanism on this knife is a liner lock. This locks the blade open during use; one side of the knife’s steel “liner”, the steel plate to which the handle scales are attached, moves into position behind the blade to securely lock it open.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife is 3.25 inches long with an overall knife length of 7.75 inches and a closed length of 4.6 inches. The Flitch weighs in at 4.7 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

A bold blade and contoured grip could make the Flitch your new favorite EDC. With a modified drop point blade, top swedge, and strong finger contouring the Flitch offers a tactical look at a value price. The eye catching blade is made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel, which can take and hold a sharp edge, yet resharpens easily. Then Kershaw’s heat treatment brings out the best in this top value steel. The blade is stonewashed to help hid hard use scratches. The result is a very distinctive looking blade that performs well, too. The handle is glass filled nylon, textured, and chamfered for a solid, comfortable grip. Pair that with the deep finger grooves on the underside of the handle and the Flitch offers an exceptionally secure grip. A sturdy liner lock keeps the blade in place during use, then releases easily when you’re ready to EDC it. Pick yours up today at BladeOps.