Kershaw Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assist Knife Review

Kershaw Knives designs and manufactures a wide range of knives, including pocket knives, sporting knives, and kitchen cutlery. Kershaw is a brand of Kai USA Ltd., a member of the KAI Group and is headquartered in Oregon.

Kershaw Knives was started in Portland, Oregon in 1974 when knife salesman Pete Kershaw left Gerber Legendary Blades to form is own cutlery company based on his own designs. Early manufacturing was primarily done in Japan. IN 1977, Kershaw became a wholly owned subsidiary of the KAI Group. In 1977 the U.S. production facility was opened in in Wilsonville, Oregon. Due to an expanding market, the facilities were moved to a large production site in 2003. Currently, Kai USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin Oregon with some goods coming from their Japanese and Chinese factories.

Kai USA Ltd. has three lines of products; Kershaw Knives which is a brand of sporting and pocket knives; Shun Cutlery, which is a handcrafted Japanese kitchen cutlery; and Zero Tolerance, which is a line of premium and professional knives.

Kershaw has collaborated with a number of custom knife makers over the years to produce ground-breaking knives. Collaborations include working with Hall of Fame Knife Maker Ken Onion on Kershaw’s SpeedSafe knives, Ernest Emerson, Grant and Gavin hawk, Frank Centofante, Rick Hinderer, RJ Martin, and more.

In 2002, Kershaw released a Steven Seagal model featuring stingray leather on the handle. In 2004 Kershaw developed a multi-tool for the National Geographic Society with National Geographic filmmaker Bryan Harvey. Kershaw has also released models in collaboration with Jeep, Orange Country Choppers, the American Professional Rodeo Association, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Some fun facts are that Steven Seagal and his Kershaw collaboration knife paper in the movie Driven to Kill. Kershaw Knives have appeared in numerous other television shows and movies including Lost and Supernatural. In the television show Person of Interest, the character John Reece is frequently seen using a Kershaw Blur.

Today we will be talking about a version of the Blur. This specific knife is Kershaw’s 1670CAMO Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assisted knife with a black Sandvik blade and an aluminum handle.

 

The Blade:

The blade on this version of Kershaw’s Blue is made out of Sandvik 14C28N Stainless Steel. This steel is a great option for knife blades, because the steel grade allows for the highest attainable hardness without the compromising of microstructure integrity. The steel is often used in high end knives as well as custom knives.  This steel makes re-sharpening a breeze. The steel also has a high resistance to micro chipping, rolling, or folding of the edge. The steel can be hardened to a 55-62HRC, which is a fantastic hardness for folding or pocket knives. Sandvik 14C28N also has a high corrosion resistance which leads to a particular appeal if you are going to be working in a wet or humid environment, such as in the kitchen or if you are hoping to use this knife in the outdoors.

The blade has been coated with a black Diamond Like Coating. A coating does have several purposes on a knife blade. For starters, the coating finish prevents corrosion because it puts a layer between the steel and the environment. A coating also eliminates a shiny surface, which is ideal with a tactical field blade. You do not want the reflections off of a blade to give your position away. The Diamond Like Coating, or DLC, is a type of PVD coating which stands for physical vapor deposition. The process is to deposit a hard, ceramic like layer onto the steel surface. This ceramic like layer is composed of the combination of various nitrides and carbides and is chemically bonded to the metal surface and is much harder than any tool steel could ever be. This type of coating is usually so hard that it will actually make the blade scratch resistant, plus, because they are also chemically inert, they do protect against rust. A DLC is pitch black, but that’s not why it is sought after: it is by far the hardest coating that can be put on a surface. It is so hard that when metal is cut with a DLC coated knife, the blade will get marked—by the metal that has been spread on the DLC coating. Plus, DLC has low friction, so it is supposed to make the cut easier. Unfortunately, this does add a significant cost to your knife blade.

The blade has been carved into a slightly recurved drop point style blade. The drop point blade shape is one of the most popular blade shapes that is in use today, probably owing to the fact that it is basically an all-purpose blade shape. The most common place that you are going to come across this blade shape is on a hunting knife, because the point on a drop point blade is easily controllable. Because the tip is lowered on a drop point blade, it is easily controlled, which does make it easier to avoid accidentally nicking internal organs and ruining the meat. But, a hunting knife is not the only place that you are going to come across this blade shape: it is also very popular on tactical and survival knives. This is because of the way the style is formed: the back edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. This lowered point provides more control and adds strength to the tip. And while the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is so much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use that makes the drop point blade such a popular shape for tactical and survival knives. This blade shape is also extremely versatile because it features a large belly area that is perfect for slicing, which is most likely going to be the majority of what you are doing with your knife. Really the drop point blade shape only has one disadvantage and that is its broad tip, because it does make it less able to pierce than the clip point. But, you do have to keep in mind that it is this broad tip that allows the drop point blade shape to have so much strength behind it. This drop point blade on the Camo Blur does have all of those regular benefits, but the shape is slightly different. When it comes to the tip and belly, there is a slight curve that you don’t normally get with a drop point blade.

 

The Handle:

The handle on this knife is made out of 6061-T6 aluminum with Trac-Tec inserts on both of the handle scales. The aluminum metal is commonly used in a knife handle and there a few really great reasons as to why it is such a common knife handle material. For starters, aluminum can be anodized into just about any color that you can think of, which always adds an aesthetically pleasing feature to the knife. Plus, the anodization process does add a touch of durability and hardness to the handle. Aluminum is also a very low-density metal, so while it is a very tough material, it is also lightweight and is not going to weigh you down. Unfortunately, aluminum does have a limited resistance to impact, which just means that it is going to be prone to dents and scratches. The most commonly used aluminum alloy is 6061, because it does have the highest tensile strength out of all the aluminum alloys. The aluminum on this version of the Blur has been finished with a unique foliage camo print.

A common problem on an aluminum handle is that there is not enough grip to allow the knife to be an outdoors or even a go-to knife. To combat that, Kershaw has added inserts of Trac-Tec to both of the handle scales. These inserts give you plenty of grip that will allow you to use this knife in almost any environment without having to worry about your grip on the handle.

To help with control when slicing, there is a small amount of jimping on the spine of the handle, with a larger portion of jimping that rests in the elongated finger groove. The butt of the handle does have a lanyard hole carved into it.

 

Kershaw Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assist Knife
Kershaw Foliage Camo Blur Spring Assist Knife

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clip is black, just like the blade and has been statically designed for tip up or tip down carry, but only on the traditional side of the handle. The clip is kept in place by two black screws that match the rest of the hardware on this knife.

 

The Mechanism:

The Foliage Camo Blur is a spring assisted knife that boasts Kershaw’s patented SpeedSafe system as well as a liner lock.

The speed safe assists the user to smoothly open this knife with a manual push on the blade’s thumb stud. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by “gravity;” it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the thumb stud to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. The blade opens smoothly and locks into position, ready for use. The SpeedSafe system was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fishermen, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job-site. The SpeedSafe mechanism is very safe. When the user overcome the resistance of the torsion bar, SpeedSafe assists in opening the knife. Once opened, the liner locking system will secure the blade in positon so that it does not close accidentally. When releasing the lock, the blade won’t snap shut due to resistance provide by the torsion bar. Since the torsion bar provides a bias towards the closed position, it will normally hold the blade securely closed.

The liner lock is one of the most commonly found form of lock on modern folding knives—for ease of use, ease of assembly, and cost, it’s hard to beat a liner lock. The basic design uses one of the blade’s liners, cut out and bent to create a spring effect, to engage the back of the blade tang when the blade is opened. The pros of a liner lock sit hat they are simple to use, inexpensive to make, and very familiar to most people. But, the user’s fingers are in the path of the blade when closing, and this locking system is not normally suited for heavy-duty use due to the thin nature of the liner.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this knife measures in at 3.75 inches long with a handle that measures in at 4.5 inches long. The overall length of the Blur when it is opened is 7.875 inches long. This knife weighs in at 3.9 ounces. This knife was made in the United States.

 

Conclusion:

The Kershaw Blur series has remained as one of Kershaw’s more popular spring assist knives thanks in part to its slightly recurved blade design which is ideal for multi-tasking and promotes excellent slicing and piercing capabilities. This liner lock designed model features Kershaw’s patented SpeedSafe™ system, which quickly deploys the blade via the built-in angled dual thumb stud feature. The Blur also includes Trac-Tec inserts in both handle scales which provides increased security while holding it as well as staying in a pocket. This model, the 1670CAMO, features an aluminum handle with a unique foliage camo finish, grip-promoting black Trac-Tec inserts, a slightly recurved drop point style blade in a DLC (Diamond Like Carbon) black finish, stainless steel liners and a pocket clip designed for tip up or tip down carry on the traditional side of the handle. Pick up your Kershaw 1670CAMO Foliage Camo Blur spring assisted knife today at BladeOps.

 

Kershaw Natrix 7007 Spring Assist Knife Review

Kershaw, and many knife enthusiasts, know that there is nothing like a Kershaw. From award-winning technologies and advanced materials to the solid sound of the blade lockup, when you’re carrying a Kershaw, you know you’re carrying the real thing. The real thing means value and plenty of it. With Kershaw, you get incredible ban for your hard-earned buck. Even their inexpensive models are impressive. In fact, everything about a Kershaw is solid, crafted, reliable. That’s why they can back each of their knives for the life of its original owner against any defects in materials and construction with their famous Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Kershaw was founded in 1974 to design and manufacture tools that knife users would be proud to own, carry, and use. This has meant that every Kershaw knife must be of the highest quality. Whether it’s a hardworking pocketknife, a hunting knife, or a special collectors’ edition, Kershaw always chooses appropriate, high-quality material and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Along with extremely tight tolerances and state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, this ensures that Kershaw knives provide a lifetime of performance.

Kershaw pioneered the use of many of the technologies and advanced materials that are today standard in the knife industry. Their SpeedSafe assisted opening knives were first-to-market. They introduced the concept of knives with interchangeable blade in their Blade Traders. Recently, their Composite Blade technology, which combines two steels into one blade, gives knife users the best of both worlds by enabling them to use steel known for edge retention on the edge and steel known for strength on the spine. And they will keep on innovating, bringing new and better technologies, and materials to today’s knife making industry and knife-using public.

Kershaw Knives is a brand of Kai USA Ltd, a member of the Kai Group. For over 100 years, Kai has been Japan’s premier blade producer. Kai takes an innovative approach to product development based on the close coordination of research and development, production, marketing, and distribution functions. While many of Kershaw’s quality products are made in their 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Tualatin, Oregon, they also draw on Kai’s resources to provide the very best for their customer.

Kershaw says, “If this is your first Kershaw, be prepared. You just may be back for more. If it’s not your first Kershaw, welcome back. We’ve got some cool new blades to show you—along with a wide selection of your favorites. For design, innovation, quality, and genuine pride of ownership, Kershaw is the one.”

Today we will be talking about the Kershaw Natrix spring assisted knife.

Kershaw Natrix 7007 Spring Assist Knife
Kershaw Natrix 7007 Spring Assist Knife

The Blade:

The blade on this knife is made out of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. This is a very popular budget brand of knife steel made in China. In terms of composition, the steel is very similar to the Japanese steel of AUS-8 grade. 8Cr13MoV steel at its low cost demonstrates very worthy characteristics of cutting. The range of the steel hardness is 56-59 HRC. Knives that are made out of this steel keep sharpening well and at the same they are easy to sharpen. This steel is well balanced with regard to strength, cutting, and anti-corrosion properties. This steel is good enough to get the job done, but it is no super steel. The biggest advantage that this steel boasts is well inexpensive it is.

The blade has been finished with a stonewash finish. With this type of finish, the steel has literally been rolled with pebbles and then smoothed out. This creates a darker, rugged, look. Many people like this type of finish because it hides scratches better than other finishes. The biggest advantage to this finish is that it preserves the look of the blade overtime. Stonewash also hides fingerprints pretty well, so the blade might not need to be polished as often as others with different finishes.

The drop point blade shape is the most popular blade shape in the cutlery industry today. This style of blade is versatile, tough, and can take on almost any task that you throw at it. To from this blade shape, the unsharpened edge of the knife runs straight from the handle to the tip of the knife in a slow curved manner, which creates a lowered point. It is this lowered point that provides more control and adds strength to the tip. While the tip on a drop point is not as sharp as the tip on a clip point, it is much stronger. It is because of this tip strength and the ability to hold up to heavy use, drop point blades have become popular on tactical and survival knives. This lowered point also adds an element of control to the blade, which is why this blade shape works really well for fine detail work. Another characteristic that makes it such a versatile blade shape is because of the large belly that it boasts. Bellies are what makes slicing easy, and the majority of your everyday tasks will include some form of slicing. Drop point blades really only have one disadvantage and that is the broad tip. This broad tip will limit your piercing abilities, but you need to remember that it is also what provides you with so much strength. So while it is a drawback, it is not the biggest drawback that a blade style could have.

 

The Handle:

The handle is made out of black G-10. G-10 is a grade of Garolite that is a laminate composite made of fiberglass. It has very similar properties to carbon fiber yet it can be had for almost a fraction of the cost, because it is slightly inferior. The manufacturer takes layers of fiberglass cloth and soaks them in resin, then compresses them and bakes them under pressure. The material that results from that process is very strong, tough, lightweight, and hard. Everyday folding knives benefit from G-10 because it is durable and lightweight, non-porous, and can be easily textured. Unfortunately, because of how hard it is, it is very brittle. If this handle is subjected to a hard or sharp impact, it will probably crack or break. One of the other disadvantages is that it does lack elegance—it is known to look and feel very plastic-y, lacking personality.

The handle has an elongated finger groove, and the portion across on the spine of the handle, curves in ward as well. This will create a comfortable hold on the handle, even if you are using it for long periods of time. There is a finger guar, but when the knife is opened, the flipper turns into an extra-long finger guard to protect your fingers form getting sliced if you slip.

 

The Pocket Clip:

The pocket clips a deep carry clip, which means that it is going to stay more snug in your pocket—even if you are on the move for most of your day. The clip is only eligible for tip up carry, but it is reversible for either left or right handed carry, which makes this knife fully ambidextrous. Most of the hardware on this knife is black, but the pivot point is sliver.

 

The Mechanism:

The Natrix is a spring assisted knife. It features a flipper opening mechanism as well as Kershaw’s SpeedSafe Assisted Opening mechanism. This knife also boasts a sub-frame locking mechanism.

The flipper on this knife is a small and triangular protrusion that extends out of the spine of the handle when the knife is closed. The flipper helps to enable fast and easy one handed opening, while also making it ambidextrous. To open this knife, you hold the knife handle vertically in one hand and place your index finger on the top of the flipper. Then, you gently apply downward pressure on the flipper; the SpeedSafe opens the knife quickly and easily and the blade will easily lock into place. When you are closing this knife, keep your fingers away from the blade edge while closing.

The SpeedSafe was first brought to market by Kershaw. The SpeedSafe is a patented system that assists the user to smoothly open this knife with a pull back on the flipper. The heart of SpeedSafe is its torsion bar. When the knife is closed, the torsion bar helps prevent the knife from being opened by gravity; it creates a bias toward the closed position. To open the knife, the user applies manual pressure to the flipper to overcome the resistance of the torsion bar. This enables the torsion bar to move along a track in the handle and assist you to open the knife. And no, a SpeedSafe knife is not a switchblade. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblades. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blades DO NOT deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead the user must overcome the torsion bar’s resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this, SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade.

The Kershaw Sub-Frame Lock is a variation of the traditional frame lock. In this case, a piece of the lighter weight frame is machined out and a piece of steel is riveted into its place. This piece of steel acts just like a standard frame lock. It’s angled inward and biased toward the locked position. When the blade is open, it moves into position behind the blade tang, blocking it open. As with other frame locks, the user moves it to the side and out of the way in order to close the knife. The Sub-Frame Lock is Kershaw patented technology and enables us to make a knife with a slimmer profile, while still providing the strength and security of a frame lock.

The SpeedSafe was specifically designed for sporting, work, or everyday situations where one-handed opening is preferable and safer. It’s safe, efficient opening has made it a popular choice for hunters, fisherman, and those who require the one-hand opening function on the job site. The SpeedSafe mechanism is very safe, because once opened, a locking system that secures the blade in positon so that it does not close accidentally. New SpeedSafe users can ensure safe use of the technology by practicing to proficiency.

 

The Specs:

The blade on this Kershaw knife measures in at 3.25 inches long, with a handle that measures in at 4.25 inches long. When the Natrix is opened, it measures in at an overall length of 7.5 inches. This knife weighs in at 2.9 ounces.

 

Conclusion:

When Kershaw is talking about the Natrix, they say, “Where have I seen that profile before? That’s right. The new Kershaw Natrix is based on brother brand Zero Tolerance’s 0770, which itself was inspired by the award-winning ZT 0777. The design has—apparently—been the envy of certain other knife makers. And now we’re taking it back.

Kershaw’s new Natrix features a drop-point blade of 8Cr13MoV that offers solid performance with good edge-holding and easy resharpening. The stonewashed blade finish looks good and even helps hide use scratches. Accessed with the built-in flipper, SpeedSafe assisted opening makes it easy to open the Natrix one-handed so it’s always ready when you need it. The handle is lightweight G-10, 3D-machined and chamfered to fit comfortably in the hand. An oversized pivot provides an attention-grabbing detail on the front of the knife, while our patented Sub-Frame Lock secures the blade and provides a dramatic, contrasting line on the back. The Kershaw Sub-Frame Lock is covered under US Patent 9,120,234.

The Sub-Frame Lock design also enables us to lighten the weight of the Natrix, so that you get a big, useful blade in a knife that still weighs in at a mere 2.9 ounces. A decorative aluminum back spacer lightens the load even further and adds another embellishment. Finally, a custom-designed deep-carry pocket clip echoes the lines of a special recess machined into the handle to complete this good-looking knife.” Pick up this great everyday carry knife today at BladeOps.